Archive for March, 2009

Posted on March 31st, 2009 by by Mike

April 1, 2009

3-25-09

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Posted on March 24th, 2009 by by Mike

March 18, 2009

3-18-09

Publish at Scribd or explore others:
INSIDE BOE: SCHOOL BUDGET • SPRING GARDEN • DANCE EXCLUSIVE • DREAMZ VOLUME 2 | ISSUE 6 | MARCH 18, 2009 CONNECTING YOU T O V I N E L A N D . W E E K L Y. Visit us online www.grapevinenewspaper.com { ANDREA KORNBLUH / PHOTOS: DEBORAH A. EIN } Hazardous Waste Cleanup: Who Will Pay? In the case of Vineland Chemical, the EPA obtained $3.5 million from the Schwerdtle estate, a far cry from the $25 million already spent. I n the mid-1970s, around the time that Lois Gibbs of Love Canal, New York, discovered that her children’s school was built atop a toxic-waste dump, citizens in our own town were uncovering some ugly truths about Vineland Chemical Company (VCC). John Casadia, Sue Fenili, and Dorothy Lang suspected that Vineland Chemical, a company that produced pesticides and The cleanup has shifted west of Mill Road, and this phase is expected to continue until 2012. herbicides, was not disposing of its wastes properly. Casadia was concerned about the large number of dead Atlantic white cedar trees in the Blackwater Branch wetlands downstream of the Mill Road chemical plant. Fenili had recently formed a citizens’ group called “Kids Against Pollution” and was working as an activist to raise awareness about the dangers of chemical exposure. Each independently approached VCC’s owner, Arthur Schwerdtle, to inquire about the company’s practices. Each was turned away with unsatisfactory answers. After many letters and phone calls to the Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), an official investigation finally began. Arsenic salts, a byproduct of pesticide production, were found in open piles on Continued on page 10 Fluffy Friends s part of a science unit on the characteristics of living things, The Ellison School’s kindergartners opened their hearts to 12 little eggs…just about ready to hatch. For the first week, the children cared for the eggs by carefully turning them and adding water to the incubator that kept them warm and cozy. “The children watched as the eggs began to wiggle and then crack,” says Gerry Hudgins, kindergarten teacher. After a few days, the students bid their fluffy friends a fond farewell as they were transported a family farm. Kindergartner Anna Chung, in photo, bids her friend a fond farewell. I A It’s About 2.50% APY* Capital NOW Checking & Our “March Madness” 42” Flatscreen TV Drawing.             NEW BRANCH COMING SOON! Ask any employee, call 856.690.1234 or visit CapitalBankNJ.com for details. *Annual Percentage Yield (APY). Offer may be withdrawn at any time without previous notice. Interest rate may vary. Fees may reduce earnings. Rates guaranteed through June 30, 2009 No purchase or account opening required to enter drawing. Our Focus Is You. 175 S. Main Road, Vineland, NJ • 856.690.1234 Se Habla Español  CapitalBankNJ.com FREE { 2 } the grapevine | MARCH 18, 2009 Excellence since 1903 HARDSCAPING SEMINAR March 21, 2009 9am-11:30am RAIN OR SHINE Learn how to create and build your own elegant patio, walks, walls and more. Stimulus Sale 3 DAYS ONLY March 27th, 28th, 29th All Rich Lux Products $ 17.99 to $22.99 “We make it easy for you” Call and Pre-Register and you could win, a 10’x10’ area of patio paver. (Saturated Colors Extra) Reg. $35.99 to $45.79 433 S. Delsea Drive, Vineland www.recumminesinc.com 691-4040 67 CHESTNUT AVENUE VINELAND NJ 08360 Refreshments will be served Must be present to win. Drawing to be held 9/20/09. Cannot be combined with any other offer and subject to end without notice Sales Tax excluded. All discounts are off regular pricing. Cannot be combined with other offers. Only “Rich Lux” Products qualify for sale. UltraDeep & Safety colors are more: Valid at Vineland MAB only Expires on 3/29/09. 856-691-2481 COMING SO ON Make your reservations now for EASTER! Restaurant Pizzeria & Lounge DINNER BUFFET TUESDAY NIGHT ENJOY WITH DINNER FOR FOUR A Full Carafe of House Wine On Us! FOR A DINNER FOR TWO Enjoy A 1/2 Carafe of House Wine On Us! WEDNESDAY – DRINK SPECIALS $3/glass of Wine For Bar or Dining Room $2.50 Bottled Domestic / $3 Bottled Imports $2 Draft Beers • $3 Mixed Drinks • $5.50 Martinis Check Out Our Lunch Express Specials FOR RESERVATIONS OR TAKE-OUT CALL: 856-697-2900 OR 856-697-2902 Every Day! EVERYDAY SPECIALS (2) Large Cheese Pizzas – $16.49 | (3) Cheesesteaks – $12.99 | (3) Italian Subs – $12.99 1 LARGE 16” Cheese Pizza 2 (2) LARGE 16” Cheese Pizza w/(1) 2 Liter Soda 3 (2)Cheese Steaks 12” Roll 4 $8.49 Giorgio’s Exp: 4/30/09 GV Take-out only $16.49 Giorgio’s Exp: 4/30/09 GV Take-out only $7.99 Giorgio’s Exp: 4/30/09 GV Take-out only 16 x 16 Sicilian Cheese PIZZA $9.99 Giorgio’s Exp: 4/30/09 GV Take-out only 5 (2) Italian 6 12” SUBS (3) LARGE 16” Pizzas one topping each 7 LARGE 16” Pizza w/ two toppings 8 16 x 16 Famous Grandma’s Pizza Wings w/Blue Cheese Extra thin crust w/10 Piece $7.99 Giorgio’s Exp: 4/30/09 GV Take-out only $30.99 Giorgio’s Exp: 4/30/09 GV Take-out only $11.99 Giorgio’s Exp: 4/30/09 GV Take-out only $14.99 Giorgio’s Exp: 4/30/09 GV Take-out only 9 (2) Meatball 10 12” Roll Parmigiana Sandwiches LARGE 16” Pizzas w/French Fries Giorgio’s Exp: 4/30/09 GV Take-out only 11 (2) Chicken 12” Roll 12 LARGE 16” Pizza w/10 Piece Wings w/Blue Cheese WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Parmigiana Sandwiches $8.99 Giorgio’s Exp: 4/30/09 GV Take-out only $10.45 $9.99 Giorgio’s Exp: 4/30/09 GV Take-out only $12.99 Giorgio’s Exp: 4/30/09 GV Take-out only 13 (1) Famous Grandma’s Pizza Extra thin crust 14 LARGE 16” Cheese Pizza 15 w/Dinner Salad for 2 16 x 16 Sicilian Cheese PIZZA 16 (2) Cheese CALZONES $9.99 Giorgio’s Exp: 4/30/09 GV Take-out only $12.99 Giorgio’s Exp: 4/30/09 GV Take-out only $9.99 Giorgio’s Exp: 4/30/09 GV Take-out only Mozzarella & Ricotta the grapevine { 3 } $9.99 Giorgio’s Exp: 4/30/09 GV Take-out only 363 E. Wheat Road • Buena, NJ 08310 HOURS: Sun. thru Thurs. 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. • Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. I Editor’s Letter Signs of Spring Residential & Commercial Service & Installation Heating & Cooling Equipment Hot Water Heaters Water/Sewer Underground Piping Sewer Drain Cleaning On Friday we officially welcome springtime, though the signs of spring have already begun to present themselves around Vineland. As our “Recipe Corner” columnist Lisa Ann DiNunzio pointed out in her column two weeks ago, the first robins could be seen and heard chirping and swooping about in these parts before we turned the calendar to March. For the past two weeks, I’ve witnessed landscapers hard at work mulching and unearthing spring buds as piles of leaves are cleared away. The days are getting longer now that we turned our clocks ahead an hour two weeks ago. The dawn of spring coincides with the vernal equinox. On March 20 at 7:44 a.m., the sun will cross directly over the equator. On this date, day and night are about equal in length all over the world (equinox translates literally to “equal night”). As our planet revolves around the sun, the Northern Hemisphere, where we live, becomes tilted more toward the sun as winter turns to spring. That’s why the temperatures gradually rise, the days get longer and plants grow more vigorously over the course of the next few months. Another sure sign of spring is the appearance of dandelions on local produce market shelves, as pointed out by culinary writer Stephen Wilson in his column this week (see p. 14). Thankfully, they haven’t begun to appear in my yard yet. But even if you don’t see dandelions blooming amidst the grass here in Vineland, you’ll see plenty of them sprouting all over town in the form of lawn signs advertising the annual Dandelion & Beer Festival. The festival is being held on Saturday, March 28, from 6 to 11 p.m. at Merighi’s Savoy Inn. As the name implies, the event will once again highlight as a key ingredient in many different dishes, the much-maligned dandelion. And, also as the event’s moniker suggests, the event will once again feature a craft-brew component where attendees will get to sample numerous brews in their very own keepsake Pilsner glass. This year’s event will also feature cooking demonstrations so that you can replicate at home the delicacies you taste during the festival. The annual dandelion dinner pays homage to Vineland’s agricultural heritage and members of the city’s farming community will be recognized and honored during the evening. The Dandelion & Beer Festival is a feast for all senses that appeals to the ears (and dancing feet) as much as it appeals to the palate. The evening is headlined by southern New Jersey favorites, the Special K Band, a group that knows how to keep the crowd on their feet. Additional entertainment is provided by roving magician Bill Kerwood, and in a nod to Vineland’s Italian heritage, singer Tommy Serra. Tickets are $45.00 and can be purchased in advance. Call the Chamber at 856691-7400 or order online at www.vinelandchamber.org/events. { CONTENTS } 1 Hazardous Waste Cleanup Arsenic from a local Superfund site has leached into the soil, streambeds, and groundwater. A N D R E A KO R N B LU H 5 The School Budget The School Board gears up to approve the budget before presenting it to the voters. LEE BURKE 6 Ideas From Chicago National Main Street Conference generates ideas and entusiasm for Vineland’s program. TO D D N O O N Serving Vineland for over 100 years! 7 Men Who Knit They may not be such a rare breed, after all. DEBORAH A. EIN 691-1950 State Lic. # 12089 8 Community Calendar 12 Faces in the News 14 DINING: Springing To Life Gardens all over the region are beginning to do so, with a little help from the gardeners. ST E P H E N W I L S O N 17 18 20 21 Recipe Corner Pineapple pudding with a twist for holidays. L I SA D I N U N Z I O In Our Schools Entertainment A Third Weekly The Independent and its editors found fault with the town’s founder. V I N C E FA R I N AC C I O 22 Real Estate Transactions { STAFF } MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor LORI GOUDIE Art Director GAIL EPIFANIO Controller JACK EPIFANIO Advertising Executive { 4 } the grapevine | MARCH 18, 2009 SHERRY MUNYAN Advertising Executive MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher MARIE HALPIN-GALLO Advertising Executive TRACY BUSCHAM Graphic Designer MARIE TEDESCO Editorial Intern The Grapevine 3660 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361 PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816 EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2009. All rights reserved. I Civic Engagement { LEE BURKE } The School Budget What does a $196 million status-quo 2009-2010 school budget really mean? hile Vineland taxpayers may breathe a sigh of relief that there will be no school tax increase this year, the Board of Education has more work to do. Plans to apply for $80,000 in supplemental funding were announced at the March 11 meeting to restore more than 65 positions not included in the 2008-09 budget. Voters rejected a 2.5 cent tax increase last year, but City Council determined the increase was warranted and overruled the voters. School Board President Frank Giordano pointed out that the recent challenge to Abbott school districts funding was “put back in” by the State Supreme Court for just one fiscal year. Giordano has scheduled a special board meeting for 6:30 p.m. on March 17 to approve the proposed 2009-10 budget, which must be submitted the next day to W the Cumberland County Superintendent of Schools. A public hearing is set for April 1 at 7 p.m. at 649 Plum Street. Voters will decide their school district’s annual budget and select the citizens to represent their interests on the school board on Tuesday, April 21. The Grapevine will introduce the individual candidates in its April 15 issue. All VINELAND SCHOOL BOARD CANDIDATES Frank DiGiorgio Anthony Fanucci Gene Mercoli Robert Petronglo Patricia Phillips Paul Spinelli registered voters will receive a sample ballot listing the candidates for school board, the proposed budget, as well as the polling location and hours. Gov. Jon Corzine made good on his promise to increase school aid with about $1 billion in federal stimulus funding. However, the state must still deal with issues involving the under-funding of public employee pensions, the high cost of health benefits and gaps in revenue that might remain after the federal stimulus monies run out. The public should keep in mind the local board of education doesn’t run the school district; that is the job of the superintendent. Rather, the board sets the goals and direction of the district. According to the New Jersey School Boards Association, school board policies govern the district’s operations ranging from student discipline to personnel matters. The board annually evaluates the superintendent to ensure the schools are well run. It reviews and approves the proposed budget and negotiates labor contract with employee unions. The board serves as the liaison to the community to inform the public of the needs of the district, while conveying the public’s needs to the school administration. The annual budget reflects Vineland’s goals for its schools. It addresses academics, extracurricular activities and enrichment programs, special education, and support services such as busing, cafeteria and business operations. Vineland’s current superintendent, Charles “Chalky” Ottinger, has announced his plan to retire next year, along with six other senior professional staff. Vineland has had three superintendents and one interim in the last eight years. I Lee Burke regularly reports on civic meetings and organizations in an effort to keep Vinelanders informed and to get residents more involved in the processes of city government. The Top Banana DIV. OF ZUKERMAN FOODS Wholesale Outlet Wheat Road & Delsea Drive, Vineland • 641-0815 HOURS: Mon. – Thurs. 9-6:30; Friday 9-8; Sat. 9-6; Sun. 11-5 Sale Expires 3/25/09 Major Credit Cards Accepted EGGS & MILK LOW PRICE ALWAYS! FRESH CALIF. Ready to pick up. Easy shop by Phone or Fax 641-0813 ROMAINE .99¢ Each STRAWBERRIES FRESH – RED FLORIDA PARK FARM FROZEN CTN $1.99 MOMMA CARUSO DURAM CHICKEN DRUMS .79¢ LB. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | WHITE POTATOES 5 LB. BAG FRESH $1.99 IMPORTED PASTA ALL CUTS .99¢ LB. SWEET ITAL. SAUSAGE 5 LB. BOX $8.99 GINA?S SOUTHERN YAMS .59¢ LB. ONIONS SPANISH-RED-VIDALIA CABBAGE GREEN .29¢ LB. DUTCH LAN EXTRA LARGE Contact your Sprint Preferred Retailer: 533 N. East Avenue Vineland, NJ 08360 856.563.0330 2639 S. Main Road Vineland, NJ 08360 856.563.0110 622 E. Landis Avenue Vineland, NJ 08360 856.563.1771 .79¢ LB. LEMONS 4 for $1.00 GOLDEN PINEAPPLES $2.89 Each the grapevine { 5 } EGGS $1.29 DOZEN Communications SHOP SMART • SAVE SMART • EAT SMART I Downtown Vineland { TODD NOON, EXEC. DIR., VDID/MAIN STREET } Ideas from Chicago Now p gU Signinudents t New Sn All O ents Instrum Come our rec see renovaently store!t!ed Learning and networking come into play at the National Main Street Conference. he foot of snow that blanketed Vineland a couple of weeks ago did nothing to deter a VDID/Main Street Vineland delegation from making a journey to Chicago to the National Main Street Conference. I like to think of the annual National Main Street Conference as the ultimate battery recharger for each of us dedicated to the Main Street mission and vision. Each year those of us who attend come back reinvigorated, our minds more keen to new ideas—and we transmit this new enthusiasm to our other volunteers. As at the conference in Philadelphia last year, we can take pride in the size and dedication of Vineland’s representation. Our delegation of nine—which included Mayor Robert Romano, Councilwoman and VDID/Main Street Vineland Liaison Mayra Arroyo, six volunteers including the chairs of the Organization, Design, and Economic Restructuring Committees, and me—was, in fact, the largest from New Jersey this year. These conferences are valuable, because our delegation meets and networks with people representing the redevelopment efforts of cities and towns throughout the United States. We see what other Main Street districts are doing that we can do, and other districts can do likewise. We can see where we stand in relation to other communities. Each city and town follows the same Main Street program approach, and this common strategy to redevelopment makes learning and sharing easy. This year’s conference focused on technology as a means of helping in the revitalization effort. Representatives from VDID/Main Street Vineland’s delegation attended a wide variety of educational sessions that touched on such areas as website design, using social websites for promoting the downtown, ideas for promotional events, downtown safety, effective design elements in the downtown, investing in open space, helping merchants capitalize on the revitalization T HELP US CELEBRATE OUR 15 YEAR ANNIVERSARY WITH OUR OWN SPECIAL ECONOMIC STIMULUS PLAN! ONLY ONE TIME PER YEAR TO SAVE BIG $$$!!! effort, and much, much more. Several of theses topics are already under discussion in our four standing committees. I have mentioned in past columns some of the initiatives taking place. Other initiatives are under consideration. Our task now is to take what we learned at the conference, apply it our downtown, and continue our work with renewed vigor. Meanwhile, we have several subcommittees hard at work on events and proj- Our delegation networks with people representing the redevelopment efforts of cities and towns across the United States. ects—the Fresh and Specialty Foods Market, the Vineland Family Soap Box Derby, Thunder on the Avenue (which is returning to Landis Avenue this year), and, for the first time, a bridal show tentatively scheduled for the fall. We are even hard at work planning the annual Holiday Parade for Thanksgiving weekend. This is not to mention several other projects worked on by smaller groups from our committees. Just as a group of us got reenergized about revitalizing our downtown by going to the National Main Street Conference, you can get reenergized about our revitalization efforts by joining in and helping us. It can be as simple as picking a project or event that interests you and offering to volunteer your help. If you are unsure of where to start or how you can help, just get in touch with us. We can lead you in the right direction. I For more information on all VDID/Main Street Vineland events and activities, call our office at 794-8653 or visit our website— www.mainstreetvineland.org. FIFTH ANNUAL MAJOR CLEARANCE EVENT! Cash, credit card and 2008 Tax Refund Checks Accepted! Choose from hundreds of new and used Acoustic & Electric Guitars and Basses. Sale also applies to Drums, Percussion, Cymbals, Amps & PA Systems! Save on big names such as Marshall, ESP, Ibanez, Epiphone, Takamine, Pearl, Tama & more! { 6 } the grapevine | MARCH 18, 2009 While supplies last. Sale price based on the current manufacturer’s suggested retail price. Guitar cases not included with any guitar. The second item must be a different model than the first (not valid for two of the same guitar – etc). Sale valid for existing in-store inventory only. No special orders, layaways, or rain checks. We reserve the right to limit quantities. All Sales are FINAL! Sale for the public only. NO DEALERS PLEASE!! Exclusions: Rivera Amps, Keyboards, Music Books, DVD’s, Software, Digital Recorders and Drum Machines 606 E. Landis Ave., Vineland 856-692-2060 www.musiccentralonline.com I Gleanings { DEBORAH A. EIN, MANAGING EDITOR } Men Who Knit They’ve been popping up all over this week, on stage and in real life. ditorial intern Marie Tedesco asked me how I decide what to write about each week in this column. Good question, right? Maybe it’s not something readers wonder about as much as someone entering the field of publishing might. I explained to Marie that it often takes all week for my ideas to percolate, but usually by the weekend, I’ve narrowed it down to a couple of possibilities. Last week, for example, National Youth Art Month and the local exhibition of student artwork at Mennies School happened to coincide with my reading a CNN article about a bold Pakistani girl who wrote stories and poems that described how she felt about the Taliban’s repression of females and free speech. The report made me glad that in this country we have no inhibition of artistic expression, and I wanted to share that appreciation with readers of The Grapevine and E especially our youth. I’m hoping that parents urged their children to read the column. Another thing that clinched last week’s topic was when my own son brought home a letter informing us that his artwork, a selfportrait, had been selected for exhibition at our downtown coffeehouse in Hammonton. Which brings me to another topic for columns—my kids and the situations of parenthood, which I’m fairly certain many readers can relate to. (My kids, by the way, do not like it when I write about them, but would be more horrified if I wrote for a paper delivered to their friends’ houses.) I also told Marie that I have several unfinished columns. Some week, one of these may congeal into a column…or not. So in essence, Marie, it’s a confluence of events that causes an idea to win out for the week. The confluence of events this week has to do with a column I wrote a few issues back about a knitting group some of us in Hammonton started at the ever-popular coffeeshop/art gallery. Since then, I’ve noticed that Bogarts in Millville, on a Saturday last month (2 p.m. this Saturday, too!)—had “Chicks with Sticks” for “all levels of crocheting.” We have had so much fun with our knitting group so I’m glad to see there’s a group nearby for Vinelanders. But a couple of other events this past week makes me question that group’s title. Does it mean that men are not welcome? Is the group making the assumption that there are too few male knitters/crocheters out there? All I can say is that our group is glad we did not make that assumption. Bernie has been coming to our knitting group since the first gathering, and he has simply amazed us. I was previously content to knit simple scarves, but Bernie has raised the bar for all of us. From the first meeting when he pulled out a beautiful shawl he had knitted from a black/gold/silver ribbon “yarn” (that I purchased and wore to the Hometown Heroes Gala), he has been an inspiration. Having learned while he was a young man in college, Bernie now knits items for fundraisers and hospitals. Last Wednesday, he showed us some head warmers he knitted for preemies. So imagine my surprise when a knitter friend and I took our daughters on Friday night to the drama club’s performance of How To Succeed in Business Without Really Trying at Hammonton High School. None of us had seen the play performed ever before, so we were, well, in stitches when the actor portraying the president of the corporation pulled his knitting out of a desk drawer. Later, when the mail clerk finds out the big boss is a knitter, in order to get on the boss’ good side, claims he, too, is a knitter and that men who don’t knit must have a huge void in their lives. The president then proceeds to show off golf club covers he knitted using the popcorn stitch. Recently, Bernie joked with another knitter’s husband that a perk in being the odd man in the knitting circle is that he gets to be surrounded by the ladies. So I’m not so sure that the “Chicks with Sticks” title of Millville’s group would keep Bernie away. But that’s just Bernie! I The Stroke Center at Bacharach The only rehab hospital in NJ, PA or NY to receive all these honors: •Inpatient Rehabilitation – Hospital Stroke Specialty Program •Inpatient Rehabilitation for Adults WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | •Brain Injury Inpatient for Adults •Brain Injury Outpatient for Adults •Spinal Cord System of Care for Adults •Inpatient Rehabilitation for Children/Adolescents •Brain Injury Inpatient for Children/Adolescents •Brain Injury Outpatient for Children/Adolescents •Spinal Cord System of Care for Children/Adolescents the grapevine { 7 } Back to Life.™ I COMMUNITY CALENDER HAPPENINGS Birthdays Are Special Come & Play With Us! WEDNESDAYS IN LENT Bread and Broth. Lutheran Church of the Redeemer, 2384 E. Landis Ave. Meal at 6 p.m. followed by 7 p.m. service. 691-4278. SATURDAY, MARCH 21 Evening of Stand-Up Comedy. Moose Lodge, 187 W. Wheat Rd. Headliner comic is Chris Dubail, emcee is Matt Faison. Must be at least 21 to attend. Food and fun 6 p.m., comedy 7:30 p.m. $30 (proceeds benefit VHS Tennis Team). 692-2283. FRIDAY, MARCH 20 Homeschool Session. Parvin State park, 701 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove. Nature games, crafts, and activities to celebrate spring. Free and open to all homeschoolers. 1 p.m. SATURDAY, MARCH 21 THURSDAYS IN LENT Community Lenten Lunches. First Presbyterian Church, 800 East Landis Ave. Lunch and brief message by a clergy from the community. Noon-1 p.m. SATURDAY, MARCH 21 St. Joseph’s Day Celebration. The Parish of Saint Padre Pio at Church of Our Lady of Pompeii, 4680 Dante Ave. SicilianAmerican Club hosts. Proceeds to local charities. $35, age 6-12 $17.50. 697-2292. Rock Around the Clock. CCC gymnasium, Sherman Ave. and College Dr. The Cumberland County College Foundation hosts sock hop. Music by David Christopher Orchestra. 6 p.m. $100. 691-8600 ext. 392. FAN OF THE SOAPS? A “Nighttime CUSTOMIZED BIRTHDAY PARTIES with the Daytime Stars” bus trip and banquet is scheduled for March 28 at Rex Manor, in Brooklyn, NY. Proceeds will benefit the Gabriel Project, founded by Veterans Memorial sixth grade teacher Mark J. Melamed in 1990. The objective of this non-profit organization is to provide life-saving heart surgery to a child from an area where such surgery is not available. The organization also helps local children who need surgery and whose families cannot afford it. Those who attend “Nighttime with the Daytime Stars” will enjoy a buffet dinner, dancing, and a chance to meet and have their photo taken with their favorite soap opera star. Among those expected to attend are Bobbi Eakes (Crystal from All My Children; Bree Williamson (Jess/Tess) from One Life to Live; and Jeff Branson (Shayne Lewis) on Guiding Light. Tickets are $160 and include bus transportation, eight appetizer choices, eight entrees, and eight dessert choices. An open bar is part of the package. The bus will leave the parking lot on North Main Road opposite McDonald’s at 4 p.m. Approximate arrival time back in Vineland is 2 a.m. For tickets, contact Valerie Carbonara at 609-432-8542. 2 Private Rooms Cafe / Movie Area Leave The Details To Us — We Can Take Care of Everything So You Can Relax & Have Fun! during this week, including a relay race, a bingo day, basketball tournament, clean-up day, a visit to the Bay Atlantic Symphony and an essay contest. The public is invited to an open house on Tuesday, March 24, from 6-7 p.m. at the Carl Arthur Recreation Center, 300 W. Plum Street. Stuffing Parties Available Stuff Your Own Cuddly Friend WWW.TOWNPLAYALOT.COM 692-TOWN (8696) BABYSITTING SERVICE AVAILABLE 106 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland DISCOUNTED WORKSHOPS, special events and even yoga classes are on tap at The Artist Consortium (129 North High Street) in Millville’s Glasstown Arts District. For example there’s Dr. Sketchy’s Drawing Sessions every first Sunday from 2 to 5 p.m. Cost is just $10. There’s a Senior’s Drawing Workshop ($5), a Writer’s Group (free), Ostara Yoga Sessions, and more. Contact Jenny Klein at 447-0005 for details. BUCK THE BUCKLE-UP DOG is visiting the Animal Friends Foundation (AFF) at its April volunteer meeting at 7 p.m., Monday April 6, at the Millville Public Library (210 Buck Street) in Millville. Buck is sponsored by the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Department, Traffic Safety Program. His handler is Bill Garrison. Buck will present information on his five safety rules, including “Buckle your seatbelts!” He will also have handouts geared toward young people like his own coloring book and trading cards. All ages are invited to come out and visit with Buck and listen to what he has to teach us. AFF is an all-volunteer organization committed to finding solutions to the overpopulation of unwanted companion animals through education and financial support of existing low-cost spay-neuter programs. Call 503-5572 or visit www.animalfriendsfoundation.com. A FREE SEMINAR open to business owners or representatives from firms across the region will focus on compliance issues resulting from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, also known as the Stimulus Bill. More specifically, the discussion will concentrate on the sweeping changes in the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) and employers’ use of revised Form 941. The GlassWorks, located at the former administrative offices of glassmaker Wheaton Industries, will host the informational seminar on Tuesday, March 31, at 10 a.m. To reserve a spot, call 765-5607 or visit www.theglassworks.biz. The seminar is sponsored by Human Resources Consultant Andrea M. Jaworski, of Jaworski HR Advantage, LLC, Cumberland County-based Certified Public Accountants Preziosi, Nicholson and Associates, PA., and Payroll Source, LLC. Albert R. Maccani CPA/PFS CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT Celebrating 31 Years of Excellent Service! 1537 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland 856-691-3279 THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUB of Vineland will celebrate National Boys & Girls Club Week from March 22 to 28. The Club will hold a series of activities { 8 } the grapevine | MARCH 18, 2009 Do You Have Dangerous Trees? Call For Your Free Evaluation Good, Clean Work At Reasonable Prices Don’t Be Fooled. Call A Certified Aborist. For All Your Tree Care. Pruning • Tree Removals • Storm Damage Elevations • Shrubbery Trimming • Stump Grinding Owner Operated Local Business • Fully Insured Owner Working At All Jobs! FREE ESTI MATES www.forresttreesurgeon.com 10% Off Any Tree Service Forrest Tree Surgeon • 856-694-0922 Must present coupon at time of estimate. Not valid with other offers. Exp. 2/28/09 SATURDAY, MARCH 21 Lemondade/Bake Sale. Corner of High and Sassafras sts, Millville. Lakeside 8th graders will hold a fundraiser for Habitat for Humanity. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE VEIN SCREENING SATURDAY, MARCH 21 Defensive Driving Class. Training Center, 637 Bridgeton Ave., Bridgeton. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. $50. Class size limited. Register at 794-1941. SATURDAY, MARCH 21 Princess Party. SJH Fitness Connection, 1430 W. Sherman Ave. Morning and afternoon parties will entertain princesses ages 2-6. Parties 10-11:30 a.m. and 1-2:30 p.m. $25; proceeds benefit SJH Foundation. Reserve at 691-6551. Varicose Veins? Leg Swelling? Painful Legs? • Varicose veins can progressively worsen to leg swelling, permanent skin changes and pain • 30-minute treatments done in the office • Requires no down-time • Covered by insurance MONDAY, MARCH 23 Three Secrets to your Health Problems. Vineland Public Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave. Learn the causes of common health problems and non-drug solutions. 7-8 p.m. Reserve seat at 691-1313. TUESDAY, MARCH 24 City Council Meeting. Council Chambers of City Hall, Seventh and Wood sts. 7:30 p.m. Monday, March 23, 2-6pm 2950 College Drive, Suite 2B • Vineland, NJ 08360 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25 Community Health Fair. 513 Grape St. Free seminars, services, and screenings. Sponsored by Rock of Salvation Church and Vineland Health Dept. 6:30-8:30 p.m. 794-4261. Wednesday, March 25, 2-6pm 1000 White Horse Rd., Suite 703, Voorhees Friday, March 27, 2-6pm RFB Surgical Plus, 556 Egg Harbor Rd., Suite A, Sewell WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25 Cooking Demonstration. Bellview Winery, 150 Atlantic St, Landisville. Wine paired with three courses with Chef Joseph Messaglia of Mama Mia’s Ristorante in Seaville. 6 p.m., $47. Advance tickets required. 697-7172. Specializing in spider and varicose vein treatment Please Call for appointment SEND US YOUR EVENT NOTICES. We want to help you publicize your events. Send them to us at the address listed on page 4. 856-309-VEIN (8346) Charles L. Dietzek, D.O., FACOS Raymond S. Woitalik, M.D. FACS WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | www.VeinVascular.com Academy of Therapeutic Massage & Healing Arts Getting Divorced? Bonnie L. Laube, Esq. Greenblatt & Laube, PC Divorce, Separation, Custody, Child Support, Parenting Time, Alimony, Asset Distribution, Emancipation, Domestic Violence Certi?ed by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Civil Trial Attorney Economic Stimulus Plan Anyone enrolling now $500.00 off. Joining this March class. Books are included. Class starts March 23rd. Ask about a tour. Call now to enroll! 1881 S. DELSEA DR. VINELAND, NJ PLEASE CALL KATEY SCHELDER, CMTI the grapevine { 9 } (856) 297-9859 856-691-0424 • email: bll@greenblattlaube.com 200 North Eighth Street • PO Box 883 • Vineland, NJ 08362 WASTE CLEANUP Varicose • (Continued from cover) the 54-acre VCC property. Water that contacted the salts leached the arsenic into the Blackwater Branch, contaminating the stream as well as the floodplain soils. This stream joins the Maurice River and eventually flows into Union Lake. The arsenic also contaminated groundwater as cooling water stored in unlined lagoons percolated through the peat and sand and into the underlying Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer. Both the inorganic and organic forms of arsenic found at the VCC site are toxic to humans. The ingestion of large amounts of either form can cause death. Ingestion of inorganic arsenic increases risk of skin, liver, bladder, and lung cancer. Skin contact or the inhalation of airborne particles causes irritation to affected tissues. The EPA limit for arsenic in drinking water is 0.01 parts per million (ppm). In comparison, contamination hotspots along the Blackwater Branch contained sediments with as much as 4000 ppm. State officials stepped in and required Vineland Chemical to modify its production and wastewater treatment processes. In 1982, the waste piles were removed, some of the lagoons were lined, and a wastewater treatment system was installed. The system was unable to process that amount of water that left the site daily, so further remedies were pursued by the EPA. Meanwhile, VCC continued to operate until 1994. By 1989, a two-stage cleanup approach had been selected by the EPA. This approach focused on four distinct areas of site remediation: source control, management of migration, river area sediments, and Union Lake sediments. The “immediate action” stage began in 1992 with the removal of hazardous chemicals, the permanent closure of some outbuildings, and the installation of safety fencing. The second stage of the project began in 2000 and continues today. Last Wednesday, the agencies involved Veins? Reach Out To The Most Qualified Specialist Minimally Invasive Insurance covered and 30 min. Office Treatment Free Vein Screening Call to schedule an appointment • Featured on Charles L. Dietzek, D.O., FACOS Raymond S. Wojtalik, M.D., FACS Voorhees • Sewell • Vineland 856.309.VEIN (8346) Specializing in spider and varicose vein treatment 2950 College Dr., Suite 2B, Vineland • www.VeinVascular.com { 10 } the grapevine | MARCH 18, 2009 Walks, Patios, BBQ 1 5 % Off Hardscaping Herb & Joe Morgan Lighting/Landscaping Call for Free Estimate www.herbsshamrocklandscapingllc.com treatment facility at a rate of 2 million gallons per day. Effluent that meets the EPA cleanup standard of < 0.05 ppm is released back into the environment. According to Naman, the end date for the cleanup of contaminated groundwater is uncertain. “This [part of the project] may take 20 to 25 Much of the Superfund site is fenced to keep people more years,” Naman said. The out, but the arsenic salts are not as easily contained. total volume of arsenic-tainted groundwater is unclear. with the project spoke to members of Contaminated sediment in the Citizens United to Protect the Maurice Blackwater Branch system is the third River and Its Tributaries (CU) and memfocus of the project. A diversion channel bers of the public, about 60 people in all. was built in 2006 to redirect the stream Ron Naman, project manager for EPA and allow access to the original streambed Region II, gave an overview of the project. and adjacent floodplain. Here, too, soil Also on hand were representatives from washing is the preferred cleanup method. the Army Corps of Engineers and Sevenson The wetland’s peat soil, however, may have Environmental Services, the firm awarded contaminated soil up to four feet deep. the cleanup contract. The Blackwater Branch remediation east Naman said that the EPA’s first priority of Mill Road was completed in 2008. was to address the arsenic-contaminated Remediation west of Mill Road is expected soils near the chemical plant. Rather than to continue until 2012. Steve Allen, techniremove the 400,000 tons of contaminated cal consultant for Sevenson Environmental, soil, the EPA opted to build an on-site facil- explained that the goal is to restore the ity to “wash” the soil and return it directly floodplain to a cedar bog. Atlantic white to the site. This was feasible because the cedar seedlings, native shrubs, and grasses majority of the soil consisted of mediumhave been planted. But until groundwater grain sand; 95 percent of it could be cleaned pumping has ceased and the hydrology of and returned to the ecosystem. Contamthe area is restored, returning the area to its inated peat and fine-grain sand that could former ecological state is questionable. not be washed would be transported to a Once the Blackwater Branch phase is hazardous waste landfill in Michigan. complete, the EPA plan calls for a threeThe soil-washing facility was built in year “natural flushing period” to see if the 2003 and can process 52 to 71 tons of soil arsenic in the Maurice River can be per hour, allowing the cleanup of the reduced to acceptable levels. “Acceptable” chemical plant location to be completed in this case means reaching targets of 120 late last year. ppm in submerged sediments and 20 ppm The second priority of the EPA was to in exposed sediments. If these levels are prevent the arsenic-contaminated groundnot met, “active remediation of the water from migrating farther away from Maurice will be considered,” says the EPA the site. The affected water formed a website. Naman referred to this strategy as plume of contamination that was most con- a “wait and see approach.” centrated at its source and more dilute as it The project’s final focus is the cleanup flowed laterally underground. Thus, the of Union Lake. The EPA plan calls for a EPA, in 2000, built a 13-well extraction sys- lowering of the water level at the lake and tem that pumps groundwater through a the dredging of contaminated materials. Until the streambed remediation is complete, it remains to be seen where the arsenic-contaminated sediments will settle. The established beaches on the Maurice and along Union Lake are tested annually and so far, have been deemed safe for swimming. The arsenic that was carried downstream is more likely to be found in the deeper part of the lake, say EPA experts. However, hotspots of contamination are not marked. Considering the cost of the project so far—$25 million and climbing—and the present state of the nation’s economy, it helps to view the cleanup in an overall context. The VCC site is one of 1,255 abandoned hazardous waste sites currently on the EPA’s National Priority List. According to a report by The Center for Public Integrity, the law that taxed polluters and put money into the Superfund expired in 1995. Current cleanup efforts are supported by the general tax fund and the few dollars that the EPA manages to recover from polluters. Often pollution cannot be traced to a single person or company. In the case of Vineland Chemical, the EPA obtained $3.5 million from the Schwerdtle estate. The Recovery Act of 2009 includes $7.2 billion for EPA-administered projects and programs. The largest proportion of these funds, some $6 billion, will be used for community-based water quality and water infrastructure projects. A total of $600 million is earmarked for hazardous waste cleanup at priority sites. This amounts to less than a drop in the bucket. Those who attended the recent Citizens United meeting learned an important lesson: Environmental cleanup, around the country and right here in Vineland, is not guaranteed. There is not enough funding to go around. The EPA classifies the VCC site as “human exposure not under control.” It is our responsibility, like it or not, to do whatever we can to make sure that this remediation is a success. We—like John Casadia, Sue Fenili, and Dorothy Lang— must refuse to allow the mistakes of the past to plague the future. I DR. JOHN MAINIERO Affordable CHIROPRACTIC CARE $ 25.00 A VISIT NO INSURANCE NEEDED! NO REFERRAL NEEDED! WALK-INS WELCOME. AND WELLNESS CENTER 691-5900 1420 S. Lincoln Ave. • Vineland, NJ 08360 www.doctormainiero.com WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the grapevine { 11 } Environmental Enhancement Grants The Cumberland County Improvement Authority Is Accepting Applications For The 2010 Community Environmental Enhancement Grant Program. The program is open to all Cumberland County non-profit groups and organizations dedicated to preserving and improving the environment. Projects eligible to receive funding include: • Anti-litter Campaigns • Recycling Programs • Solid Waste Management • Air or Water Quality Enhancement • Watershed Preservation • Soil Management • Recreational Enhancement The application deadline is April 27, 2009. For more information or to schedule a pre-application meeting, please contact the Cumberland County Improvement Authority at 825-3700 or visit our Web site at www.ccia-net.com. Sportsmen Federation and Lake Aubrey Reclamation Project I Faces in the News Outstanding 4-H Members Recognized YMCA of Vineland Skateboard Park Animal Friends Gazebo at NJ Veterans Memorial Home Betty Moak, left, and Robert Sharp, Past President of the Bridgeton Exchange Club named Cassidy Wagner of Cedarville center and Chris Weir (not pictured) from Vineland as the 2008 Outstanding 4-H Members at the annual 4-H Recognition Program. In photo at top right, Freeholder Deputy Director Joseph Pepitone and former Freeholder and 4-H Department liaison Doug Rainear presented the 2008 4-H Member of the Year award to Jennifer Taylor of Millville. Taylor has been a 4-H member for the past nine years. She is a member of 4-H Teen Council and the Pony Pals 4-H Club. She represented New Jersey at the 2008 National 4-H Youth Congress held in Atlanta, Georgia and was selected as one of six youth from New Jersey to attend the National 4-H Conference next month. Vinelanders Samantha Mason, left, and Kelsey Burns were selected as the 2008 4-H Salute to Excellence award winners. Both are members of 4-H Teen Council and Hoof Beats 4-H Club. FREE WORKSHOP!!! Learn the Three Secrets to Tyler Talks Heart Health Jill Tyler, an Advanced Practice Nurse at South Jersey Cardiology in Millville, presented at the South Jersey Healthcare Women’s Health Institute’s annual Heart Health Conference at Centerton Country Club. More than 200 women attended. Tyler focused on what women need to know in order to reduce risk of heart disease. She also addressed signs and symptoms of a stroke and heart attack. Tyler has more than 20 years nursing experience, and has been certified by the American Nurses Credentialing Center and the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners as a Nurse Practitioner, in addition to Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) through the American Heart Association. Schiapelli Honored for Safety, Security South Jersey Healthcare has selected Charlie Schiapelli, director of Safety and Security, as the 2009 Director of the Year. Schiapelli joined SJH in 2004, after a distinguished 25-year career with the Vineland Police Department. He was nominated by numerous members of the Security team who describe him as a role model who exhibits professionalism and respect as he carries out his work. His leadership, fairness, honesty and compassion are admired throughout the health system. In 2008, Schiapelli initiated a Workplace Violence Committee to help ensure a safe environment for patients, visitors and staff. With patient safety and convenience in mind, he also took the lead in ensuring free valet parking Monday through Friday at the Regional Medical Center. YOUR HEALTH PROBLEMS Learn Natural Solutions to Get Your Health Back! If you suffer from Fatigue, Headaches, Hormone Imbalances, Digestive Trouble, Pain, Asthma, Arthritis, Sinus Problems/ Allergies, Weight Problems, and more, then this is for you! { 12 } the grapevine | MARCH 18, 2009 Monday, March 23 • 7:00-8:00 PM Vineland Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave. Workshop participants will: • gain understanding of the CAUSE of their health problems • learn non-drug solutions Presented by the Foundation For Welness Professionals Make your reservation today by calling (856) 691-1313 Use of the Vineland Public Library’s Meeting Room does not constitute Library endorsement. Seating is Limited to the First 20 Callers! WE WANT YOUR FACES! SEND US YOUR NEWS. We know that there’s more happening out there, and we want to help you publicize your events. Send them to us at the address listed on page 3. Yi Students Win Medals Ten students from Yi's Karate of Vineland participated in a Martial Arts Tournament in Egg Harbor Township, winning 21 medals (eight Gold, seven Silver, five Bronze, and one Sportmanship). Yi's Karate will compete at the 33rd Annual Garden State Championships later this month. Front row, from left: Hakim Abdus-Salaam, MaryAnn Grace, Rachel Davis, Sarah Mill, Paige Bailey. Back row: Zack Warren, RJ Vertolli, Master C. Vertolli, Joe Nvarro, Sam Llabres. Not Pictured: Josh Vertolli. Bennett, Middleton Rise to Top The YMCA of Vineland Seals traveled to Towson University to compete in the 36th Annual Towson YMCA Regional 8 & Under Championships. YMCA swim teams from New Jersey, Delaware and Maryland competed in this competition. Marc Bennett won the 8 year old boys 25 freestyle with a time of 14.68 and the 25 breaststroke with a time of 20.34. He also finished 2nd in the 25 butterfly with a personal best of time 15.89. Just beinning her swimming career, Caitlyn Middleton won the 6 & under girls 25 breaststroke and placed 3rd in both the 25 freestyle and butterfly. Marc joined Dominick Sheppard, Kyle Slusarczyk, and Jacob Alicea to finish 2nd in the boys 100 freestyle relay and the same relay team finished 9th in the 100 medley relay. Caitlyn joined teammates Cathryn Manning, Germaine Smart, and Sara Parks to finish 8th in the 100 freestyle relay and 13th in the 100 medley relay. Pictured are swimmers and coaches as they prepared for the meet. Irving Fryar Visits Landis School Students at Landis School were treated to a visit from former Philadelphia Eagle Irving Fryar on Thursday (March 12). Landis School’s 21st Century Community Learning Center’s after school program hosted the former wide receiver. Pastor Preston, CEO of The South Jersey Youth Alliance, sponsored Fryar’s visit to speak with the student body of Landis School on the subjects of character, motivation and making positive choices. RIGHT: Irving Fryar, who spoke to several groups of students throughout the day on Thursday, signs seventh-grader Matthew Sapsai’s shirt as Landis School principal Donald R. Kohaut observes. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the grapevine { 13 } I Culinary Adventures { STEPHEN WILSON / PHOTO: JILL MCCLENNEN } Springing to Life Getting the backyard garden ready for the season is a sure sign of spring. T he snow fell heavy last Monday, and we ended up with over a foot of the white stuff. Growing up in Florida, I never saw frozen precipitation when I was a kid. The saying that March comes in like a lion and leaves like a lamb certainly rang true on the first day of the month, and now that saying made sense to me. One thing about New Jersey that I love is the changing of the seasons. In Florida and in San Francisco, where Jill and I lived before we moved back to her home here, the seasons changed in much more subtle ways. Here in Vineland, the change is more noticeable and tangible, so I feel more connected to my environment and the natural cycles around me. During the course of the week that followed the snowfall, the snow turned to slush and the slush melted into the soil where it slowly saturated the Earth below our feet. This dampening prepared the soil for the spring seeds that would soon be sprouting to life and bringing us beautiful flowers and tasty edible plants. The previous week, I had gone to a meeting at the Carl Arthur building on Wood Street regarding the community garden that the Boys and Girls Club is constructing. There had been two speakers from the Master Gardeners Program there to talk about what kind of plants to put in a community garden and how to prepare the site. One of the questions was simple enough, what should people grow. The answer was equally simple—grow what you like to eat. By the time the weekend rolled around, I was ready to prepare my backyard garden ner of our little garden plot, I got on my knees and raked the thick layer of leaves from the ground. Underneath the brown, moist leaves was my oregano plant, which looked as though it had made it through the winter quite well. Low to the ground and hidden under an insulating layer of leaves, small bits of green were ready to explode in the next few weeks into a full-fledged, harvestable plant. Next to the oregano, a small rosemary plant showed signs of life. Elsewhere in the garden, large swaths of wild mint hid much like the oregano, protected from the cold by a thick layer of last year’s leaves. With my gardening tools, I set to work, plunging the shovel into the cool damp ground and turning over the for planting. Even so soon after the snowwinter cover crop of rye that I had planted fall, spring was in the air, and I particularly last fall. The soil was dark and damp, with enjoyed finding the edible hints that a new the occasional eggshell that remained from season was upon us. In the southeast corprevious years’ additions of homemade { 14 } the grapevine | MARCH 18, 2009 Eating Out compost. Unearthed plump earthworms reacted to their newfound liberation from the ground by quickly slithering back into the depths. I was pleased to see them, as worms are a sign of healthy soil. I stayed away from two patches of the garden—the asparagus bed and the rows of garlic that I had planted in the fall. We planted asparagus roots two years ago, garlic plants have looked remarkably better. Most are looking strong and healthy and I hope they turn out better than last year’s batch, which were on the small size. As I’ve come to realize, gardening is a lifelong learning experience with many failures and successes. After finishing my work in the garden that day, I saw another sign that spring is well on its way. I went to Santori’s at Main and Oak, my favorite produce market in Vineland, to do some shopping. In the back of the store, nestled between the leeks and spinach, were Jersey Fresh dandelion greens! I remembered these bitter greens from last year, and am excited to make a big dandelion salad this week. Later this month, on March 28, I’ll also be getting my fill of this bitter green at Merighi’s Savoy Inn when the Chamber of Commerce hosts the Dandelion and Beer Festival. If you’d like to attend, contact the folks at the Chamber at 691-7400. Maybe I’ll see you there. I Stephen Wilson along with his wife Jill McClennen owns The Sweet Life Bakery. You may contact him via e-mail at thesweetlifebakery@verizon.net. Vineland, 697-5500. Steaks, veal, chicken dishes. Meet friends at the bar, gather for dinner. Open daily for lunch and dinner. Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 205-0012. Home of the “Gutbuster” 21-oz. burger, as well as pizza, salads, wings, subs, and dinners. Casa Dori II, Brewster Rd. and Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 794-1888. Authentic Italian, lunch and dinner; catering available. Continental Room at the Ramada Inn, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 6963800. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Open to hotel guests and the public. Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call for lunch and dinner specials. Soft ice cream and cakes year-round. Mon.-Sat 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 696-1900. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Takeout, too. Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. Open 24 hours. Kids eat free Tues. and Sat. Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave., Vineland, 691-5511. Family time-honored recipes, fresh ingredients. Donkey’s Place, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland, 690-1777. One-of-a-kind cheesesteaks made on large, fresh poppyseed rolls. Dreamz Cafe, 2184 Union Lake Crossing, Millville, 765-5029. Panini, sandwiches, salads, soups. Also, gelato, Italian coffee, desserts, smoothies, and frappuccino. From fine dining to lunch spots to bakeries, the area has choices to satisfy any appetite. Call for hours. Amato’s Restaurant, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 692-5756. Veal, chicken, seafood, and pasta specialties for dinner. Open for lunch, too. Closed Sundays. Andrea Trattoria, 1833 Harding Hwy., Newfield, 697-8400. Chef/owner Andrea Covino serves up Italian specialties in an atmosphere of fine dining. Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave, Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food served tapas style, specialty martinis, catering, private parties. Extensive wine list. Live music every Friday 10 p.m.-1.a.m. Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-0909. This breakfast and lunch spot offers a menu of sandwiches named for colleges near and far. Bain's Deli, 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. Come in for breakfast, lunch, or dinner, or take it with you. Daily specials include coffee of the day. Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees, desserts, drink specials. Take-out, too. Happy Hour buffet Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. NFL flat-screen TVs. Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy., ...the long skinny green leaves seemed to have survived the winter intact and healthy. and one must wait two years before harvesting the tender pencil-thin spears, so in mere weeks, we’ll be eating tender, delicious spears fresh from our garden. The other patch that I avoided was where the green garlic tops were protruding from the ground. I planted three rows of them last fall, and the long skinny green leaves seemed to have survived the winter intact and healthy. Since the snow has melted and the temperature increased, the Continued on next page Family Restaurant & Pizzeria 3600 E. Landis Ave. (In Lincoln & Landis Shop Rite Center) 856-691-3099 Delivery!! March is Gourmet Lunches & Dinners Take Outs & Package Goods SERVING THE FOOD YOU LOVE IN A VERY DIFFERENT WAY. FREE LUNCH Month! NO NEED TO WAKE UP EARLY! Our Breakfast Menu Is Now Available All Day Long!! Milmay Tavern has It’s an intriguing steak sandwich served on an oversized poppyseed kaiser roll baked exclusively for Donkey’s Place. That’s right, a round roll. The meat is a block of thinly sliced ribeye steak grillcooked, but never chopped, covered with American cheese and topped with tender onions cooked until they are caramelized from our secret seasoning. It’s the loads of our signature onions that gives Donkey’s Steaks its personality. The red pepper relish is a tangy addition to the flavorful taste. 20 South 6th Street Vineland, NJ Pay to the bearer: WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | “food with flavor” Better Food Better Prices Tuckahoe Road & Millville-Mays Landing Road, Milmay N.J. Want the “Real Thing?” You no longer have to drive to Philly! Authentic Donkey’s Place expires 3/31/09 Chuck Boone Band Saturday, March 28 Limit one per customer – present this check to receive discount 10% Off Entire Order “Philly Cheesesteak” “Wit Wiz” or Without! Purchase one Lunch at regular price. Get a second of equal or less value FREE! Stomach Stimulus Check • Panzarotti • Chicken Cheeseteak • Salad (Grilled Chicken Salad) • Grilled Barbecue Chicken Deluxe • Tender BBQ Pork Sandwich • Fried Fish Platter, and Much More! the grapevine { 15 } (609)476-3611 Open 6 days 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Closed Monday Free o er excludes veal or seafood Lunch served from 11am-4pm Expires March 31, 2009 Dine—In Only 20 South 6th Street, Vineland, NJ (856) 690-1777 • Fax (856) 690-1677 • www.donkeyscheesesteak.com Continued from previous page Esposito's Maplewood III, 200 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks, seafood and pasta dishes at this Italian restaurant. Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. & Tuckahoe Rd., Vineland, 691-6080. Italian cuisine and dinner buffets to savor. Family-owned. Fresh Restaurant, 1405 Mays Landing Rd., Millville, 327-3435. Jumbo lump crabcakes, Black Angus burgers. Wed. is pasta night. Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli, 527 S. Brewster Rd., 697-3509. Name says it all. Daily specials, catering. Closed Sunday. General Custard’s Last Stand, 2578 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 696-2992. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Tues.-Sat. Gina's Ristorante, 110 N. High St., Millville, 825-4241. Italian cuisine, lunch and dinner, BYOB, nothing over $20. Giorgio’s Restaurant 363 E. Wheat Rd., Buena, 697-2900. Serving lunch and dinner. Italian cuisine, pizza. Sun.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Giovanni's Italian-American Deli. 1102 N. East Ave., Vineland, 692-0459. Pizza, Italian subs, all your lunch favorites. The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf Course, 4049 Italia Rd., Vineland, 691-5558. Open to public for lunch Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Jake’s. 611 Taylor Rd., Franklinville, 6945700. Italian-American, served lakeside. Lunch, dinner, happy hour, Sunday brunch. Joe's Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-8860. Barbecue and Kosher chickens, homemade sides, catering. Landicini's Family Restaurant & Pizzeria Landis and Lincoln aves., Vineland, 6913099. Italian cuisine, gourmet pizza, gourmet salads. Open for lunch and dinner. Larry's II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-9001. Bring the family. Sunday breakfast buffet, early-bird dinners. Library V Restaurant, 206 Rt. 54, Buena, 697-9696. Renowned for prime rib, steaks, seafood, salad bar. Closed Mon. and Tues. La Locanda Pizzeria & Ristorante, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 794-3332. Pasta, veal, chicken. Lunch and dinner. Closed Sunday. Lucia's Ristorante, 785 W. Sherman Ave., Vineland, 692-0300. Italian fine dining and regional cooking. Manny & Vics, 1687 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 696-3100. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Manny's Pizza, 426 N. High St., Millville, 327-5081. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 563-0030. Italian-American cuisine, seafood and veal. Open daily for lunch and dinner, Sunday breakfast buffet. Martino’s Trattoria & Pizzeria, 2614 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 692-4448. Dinners, brick oven pizza, risotto, polenta. Three meals daily. Merighi's Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. Banquet/ wedding facility as well as intimate restaurant. Nicky G. Fridays 9 p.m.–midnight. Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s Head rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet lunches and dinners in a casual setting. MVP Bar, 408 Wheat Rd, 697-9825. Full bar menu, live entertainment, drink specials. Neptune Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge, 1554 South Delsea Drive, Vineland, 6922800. American cuisine, array of cocktails. Next Oar, 127 N. High St., Millville, 2931360. Weekly menu, made-to-order dishes. Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek cuisine—lamb dishes and salads. Paperwaiter Restaurant & Pub, 1111 Village Dr., Millville, 825-4000. Special occasions. Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland, 6940500. Breakfast, lunch, dinner specials; convenient drive-thru, mini-meal specials. Pete’s Pizza, 20 W. Park Ave., Vineland, 205-9998. Pizza (including whole wheat), subs, wings. Open daily 11 a.m-10 p.m. Positano Ristorante, 419 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 696-0477. Veal, chicken, and seafood specials, BYOB. Richland House, 1303 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-5700. Eclectic dinners and casual lunch fare. Closed Mondays. Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville, 3278878. Authentic Vietnamese—noodle soups, curry, hotpot, Buddhist vegetarian. South Vineland Tavern, 2350 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-7888. Breakfast, lunch, dinner daily. Seafood and prime rib. Steakhouse at Centerton CC, 1136 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3325. Lunch and dinner. Steaks, reserve wines, upscale casual. Sweet Life Bakery, 601 East Landis Ave., Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood bakery. Homemade pastries, cakes, coffee. Vineland's neighborhood bakery, where everything is made from scratch and quality counts. { 16 } the grapevine | MARCH 18, 2009 a 6th street between Landis and Elmer in Downtown Vineland 856-692-5353 www.thesweetlifebakery.com The Sweet Life Bakery was recently named 'Best Muffins in South Jersey? by SJ Magazine Readers Poll I Recipe Corner Tony Sopranos, 107 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 405-0200. Pizza, Mexican Southwest fare, Atkins-friendly salads. Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs, chicken, fish, steaks. Always clams, eat in or take out. Venuto’s Old World Pizza, 2166 N. Second St., Millville, 327-4002. Pizzas, gourmet salads, appetizers. Villa Filomena, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena Vista, 697-7107. Dinner combos, grilled meats, fish. Lunch and dinner daily. Wheat Road Cold Cuts, 302 Wheat Rd., Vineland, 697-0320. Deli and catering. Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-8899. Dinners, grilled sandwiches, wings in eight flavors. Willmott’s Pizza. 12 S. Seventh St., Vineland, 696-1525. Hand-tossed pizzas, stromboli, breakfast pizza. Take-out or eat in. Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville, 3270909. Continental cuisine and spirits served in a casually upscale setting. Ye Olde Centerton Inn, 1136 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3201. American classics served in a Rockwell setting. { LISA ANN DiNUNZIO } Recipe Swap June Walko suggests decorating this pudding with holiday-themed edibles. G reetings! This week’s recipe is a perfect springtime treat. I have to be honest: I love almost anything to do with pineapple, and this was no exception, it was simply delicious. I also want to let everyone know who has shared a recipe so far, that I continually receive numerous e-mails and comments from other Grapevine readers, stating how much they are enjoying the family-favorite recipes shared by the contributors. So thank you,—your favorite recipes are fast become other families’ favorites! togethers. It’s simply refreshing and delicious, and you can decorate the top of the pudding right before serving with many different holiday or seasonal items. Candy spearmint leaves and candied cherries to make holly leaves for Christmas, gummy hearts for Valentine’s, marshmallow peeps or chocolate eggs for Easter and candy pumpkins for autumn are just some of the creative ways you can have fun decorating this pudding. So enjoy!” In a bowl add pineapple and pudding mix, stir well with a fork. Add the container of Cool Whip and mix with a rubber spatula. Refrigerate overnight and decorate pudding before serving. As always, Bon Appetit! I Lisa Ann is the author of Seasoned With Love, Treasured Recipes and Lisa Ann’s Seasoned With Love II. Send recipes for publication to lapd1991@aol.com or to The Grapevine, 3660 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361. Pineapple Pudding 1 (16 oz.) can Dole crushed pineapple, undrained 1 small box Jell-O instant vanilla pudding mix 1 (8 oz.) Lite Cool Whip, thawed The following recipe and story is shared by June Walko. She writes: “My sister Eunice shared this recipe with me many years ago, it’s served at most of our family holiday get- WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | 419 South Delsea Dr., Vineland • Take out Only • 12”PIZZA PIZZA PIZZA BUY 2 GET 1Plus Tax FREE $14.00 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK the grapevine { 17 } Private parties available on Sat. & Sun. Mon. to Thurs. 11 to 9 Fri. & Sat. 11 to 10 All Credit Cards Accepted 696-0477 I In Our Schools Cumberland Christian School Honor Roll Elementary School, 2nd Quarter HIGH HONORS Fourth grade: Jacob DuBois, Taylor Endres, John Bonanno, Olivia Fields, Faith Karkocha, Nathaniel Kreofsky, Cara Melchiorre, Julia Wiberg, Daniel Wright. Fifth grade:Tori Djakow, Richard Gardenhire, David Shepherd, Chyanne Smith, Katelyn Torrance, Alissa Weyman. HONORS Fourth grade: Erin Blizzard, John Bonanno, Tyler DuBois, Robert Giacoboni, Dustin Ott, Brandon Paulaitis, Timothy Peterson, Caroline Robbins. Fifth grade: William Gardner, Aden Herchelroth, Steven Mazzochi, Dayna Myers, Dylan Ott, Mallory Reichert, Cory Shropshire, Victoria Shuster, Jami Vohland, Daniel Yang. Students Hear Stories of Iraq Staff Sgt. Anthony Evans, a graduate of Vineland High School, and Staff Sgt. William Daisey spoke to Terry Kuhnreich’s history classes at VHS South. Both men are part of Delta Co 1-114. Front row, from left: Nicolina Barbagli, Dana Polo, Staff Sgt. Evans, David Cohen, Kimberly Jackson, Shirley Gusman, Hans Jones, Glenn Stultz and Mrs. Kuhnreich. Back row, from left: Jenn Miller, Liane Drastal, Kelsey Price, Oliver Gomez, Glenn Stultz, Staff Sgt. Daisy, Amanda Laboy, Amanda Colon, and Sophia Garrahan. Future Lawyers? The Vineland High School mock trial team was crowned Cumberland County champion after competing in the regional two-day county competitionl. Front row, from left: Sylvia Brown, Brigid Wallace, Brandon Tomasso, Jasmine Beatty, Corinne Boesz. Back row, from left: Charles Fiore, Melanie Schaffer, Yasenia Wagner, and John Howard. Not pictured: Paul Cohen, Sean Deloach, Sean Laurencio, Erika Suda, Maryann Wallace and Samantha Wallace. Middle School, 2nd Quarter HIGH HONORS Sixth grade: Jada Fields, Nicholas Kreofsky, Rachel Reese Seventh grade: Emily Austen, Matthew Crow, Joshua Ginchereau, Noreena Ogidan Eighth grade: Joshua Bonanno, Precious Bryant, Amber Davis, Joshua DuBois, Christopher Fitting, Brianna Paulus, Caitlyn Saul, Alexis Smith, Adam Watts. HONORS Sixth grade: Austin Hale, Anna King, Maeghan Parmer, Brenda Zeck, Jacob Bonanno, Brianna Lund, Abigail Milcarek, Cory Monteleone-Haught, Meredith Rehmann. Seventh grade: Joseph Chick, Nicole Crow, Allison Federico, Ryan Godfrey, Connor MacLeod, Courtney Saul, Sara Seabock, Seth Thompson, Austin Valentine. Eighth grade: Kara Gregor, Jared Gunn, Maria Hayes, Meredith Jones. Wallace Read-In Wallace Middle School held its First Annual African American "Read In" in conjunction with the 20th National African American Read In. Celebrating Black History through the written word and promoting literacy were the goals of the event. Students listened to volunteers read from books, short stories, folk tales, speeches, quotes and poetry. Volunteer readers included students, teachers, and community members, Dr. Emily Cannon, Mrs. Gwen MacCalla and Claudia Smith, Vice President of the Greater Vineland Chapter of the NAACP (pictured). { 18 } the grapevine | MARCH 18, 2009 Restaurant Profile Dreamz Cafe & Gelato n accountant for 19 years, Joann Constantine decided to open a cafe at Union Lake Crossing. It would be a place where she could prepare family recipes that had been cooked for her by her mother and grandmother. Gelato was another item she would offer. She had learned how to make the treat at the Aromi D’Italia Gelato Culinary Institute in Baltimore. Now several months later, Constantine is living her dream at Dreamz Cafe & Gelato, where the menu includes her signature panini sandwiches, wraps, salads, soups, coffees, teas, pastries, and more. “Everything is homemade and made to order,” Constantine says. “So that means it may take a little longer to get your food, but it will be worth it.” The 24 flavors of Italian gelato made daily on the premises are what makes some people frequent Dreamz. “Our slogan is ‘Come sample us’,” she states. “You can come in and try every flavor.” According to the Dreamz website, Italian gelato is comparable to premium A which has 250 calories and up with 20 grams of fat or more per 1/2 cup). The water-based gelato is vegan and preferred by the lactose intolerant; it has just 70 calories and 0 fat per 1/2 cup. So maybe you really can have your gelato and eat it, too. That’s good news for springtime! ice cream you would buy in a grocery store or purchase from ice cream shoppes. But Italian gelato is heavier and has an extremely intense taste. There are two forms of gelato— cream and water based. The creambased gelato has approximately 170 calories with 7 grams of fat per 1/2 cup (compared to premium ice cream, Dreamz Cafe & Gelato is located at Union Lake Crossing, 2184 N. Second St., Millville, 765-5029 or 765-5031. www.dreamzcafeandgelato.com Hours are Monday through Thursday 11 a.m to 8:30 p.m. in winter, until 9 p.m. in summer., as well as Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. year-round. Always closed on Sunday. JEWELRY Trade In Hours: Mon.-Sat. 11am–2am Sunday 8am–2am 3 Movies 4 Repair, Redesign or Scrap NOW SERVING BREAKFAST ON SUNDAYS! 2 Eggs Any Style w/Homefries & Coffee Get Credit For Movie Trades towards purchase of DVD’s Not Valid on any other offer. Sales titles limited to inventory in Stock. Exp. March 31st 856-696-3600 Corner, Main Rd. & Landis Ave., Vineland 1048 North Pearl St., Upper Deerfield A special courtesy will be applied to any purchase of in-stock merchandise when you mention this ad. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | 4 $2.99 Western Omelete w/Homefries & Coffee $5.95 Cream Chipped Beef with Coffee TRADE IN YOUR DVD’s SELL YOUR DVD’s Call or come in store for complete details $5.95 : sday Thur usic ve M y & Li es Che ackers r The C - 1 AM 9 PM Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. Daily $2 Beer Specials ive Gary Music & 9 PM The Kid 1 AM Choose from THOUSANDS of popular DVD and Blu-Ray Rentals. L Satu rday the grapevine { 19 } SUNDAY: All-U-Can-Eat Wings $7.95 Open 10am to 9pm Mon.-Thurs. 10am to 10pm Friday and Saturday 12noon to 9pm Sunday 408 Wheat Rd., Vineland (856) 697-9825 Visit www.doublefeatures.com for info on all of the latest new releases on DVD and Blu-Ray Disc and sign up for our free weekly emailed newsletter. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. I Entertainment Dance Exclusive CHOREOGRAPHERS TO WATCH, THIRD FRIDAY, WINE AND CHEESE, AND A CUMBERLAND PLAYERS PRODUCTION. FRIDAY, MARCH 20 Book Signing. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. Author Helen Patricia Jones signs copies of He Wants, She Wants. 6 p.m. FRIDAY, MARCH 20 Musicaly Inclined, The Towheads, Mark Forchic Trio, Organic Trio. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. Violin groups, Celtic music, jazz. 7 p.m., $6. FRIDAY, MARCH 20 Tom Moran/Adelante. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. Acoustic, 5 p.m./7 p.m. SUNDAY, MARCH 22 Cosy Sheridan & T.R. Ritchie. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. Enjoy a special concert event and fundraiser to support 4Epilepsy. 7 p.m., $20. For questions, adonoflio@yahoo.com. Photo: TR Ritchie. MARCH 20 AND 21 Nightlife at Villa Filomena. Villa Filomena Ristorante & Lounge, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena, 697-7107. Thurs.: Ladies Night, Fri.: Live music, Sat.: Italian Accordian. MARCH 20, 21, 26, 27, AND 28 Barefoot in the Park. SATURDAY, MARCH 21 Works in Dance 2. Cumberland County College, Guaracini Arts Center, Sherman Ave. and College Rd., Vineland. 8 p.m. Tickets are $10. Call box office at 692-8499. This year’s N.J. State Council on the Arts Choreographic Fellowship Awards went to a collection of unique and expressive professional New Jersey choreographers, including Heidi Cruz-Austin, John Evans, Donna Gentile, Dajhia Ingram, Samuel Pott, and Ramya Tirumalai. See them work together in an exclusive dance performance. The Little Theatre, 66 E. Sherman Ave, Vineland. A Neil Simon classic is staged by local actors. 8 p.m., plus 3/22 matinee at 2 p.m. Tickets $13. Senior citizens $6 at matinee performance. All seats reserved. Visit www.cumberland players.com for advance tickets, or call 6925626 and leave a message. SATURDAY, MARCH 21 Savoy Unplugged: Andy DiMacale. Merighi’s Savoy Inn Bistro, Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. 9 p.m.-midnight. No cover. SATURDAY, MARCH 21 Dan Wythoff, Bread & Butta, Carmen Costa, Shutters, Elisa Frederic. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. 6 p.m., $8. MARCH 18, 19, 20, 21, AND 24 Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Wed.: ’70s and ’80s Throwback Night (frozen drink specials) 8 p.m.-midnight, Thurs.: Karaoke with DJ Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.1 a.m. Fri.: Blue Moon Dance Party, $3 Blue Moon drafts, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Sat.: Latin Dance Party, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Tues.: Country Western Dance Party (beer and shot specials), 8 p.m.-midnight. Savoy Inn Bistro, E. Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. DJ Nicky G from 95.1 WAYV, music from ’60s, ’70s, ’80s and today. 9 p.m.-midnight. No cover. SUNDAY, MARCH 22 Poetry On High. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. Hosted by Rita Lyman, with featured poet and musician John Stirneman, 2-5 p.m. SATURDAY, MARCH 21 Steve Testa. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. 7 p.m. AT THE CASINOS Tickets: 1-800-736-1420; www.ticketmaster.com unless otherwise noted. HEADLINERS, COMEDY ACTS, AND MORE THURSDAY, MARCH 19 Wine & Cheese Event Feat: Ryan Carr, A’s Rage, Dustin Burrows. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. 7 p.m. { 20 } the grapevine | MARCH 18, 2009 9 p.m. (except during headliner engagements) 1-800-298-4200. BOARDWALK HALL MARCH 21 Divas 4 Divas. Pop Diva Kuh Ledesma, Divine Diva Zsa Zsa Padilla, Concert Queen Pops Fernandez, and Asia’s Songbird Regine Velasquez. 8 p.m. $68-$150. 609-348-7000. Comedy Stop at the Trop. Three comedians nightly. Sun.-Thurs., 9 p.m., $23; Fri., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $23; Sat., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $28. Order tickets by phone at the Comedy Stop Box Office: 1-877-FUNNY-AC or 609348-0920. Visit www.comedystop.com. HEADLINERS SATURDAY, MARCH 21 Loretta Lynn. Harrahs. 9 p.m. $55, $45, $35. MARCH 19, 20, AND 21 Anything Goes. Sacred Heart High's Performing Arts Dept. presents the Cole Porter classic. 7:30 p.m. each night, Sat. matinee 1 p.m. $15 reserved, $10 general admission. 691-4491 ext. 1110 or 1206. CONVENTION CENTER MARCH 21 AND 22 Atlantic City Beer Festival: Celebration of the Suds Noon-10 p.m. (two sessions) Saturday, 1-5 p.m. Sunday. $45 at the door, $35 per session in advance online, Group tickets available. www.celebrationofthesuds.com. George Thorogood. Showboat House of MARCH 19, 20, AND 21 Nightlife at Old Oar House. Old Oar House Brewery, 123 N. High St., Millville, 2931200. Thurs.: Open mic, 9 p.m. Fri.: Danny Eyer Band, 9 p.m., Sat: Kelly & Kozak, 9 p.m. Blues. 9 p.m. $42, $32. Yesterday: A Tribute to the Beatles. Tropicana. Liverpool Club Theater in North Tower. Wed.–Sun., 8:30 p.m., $25. COMEDY & MORE Comedy Club at Borgata. Borgata Music Box: three comedians daily, SATURDAY, MARCH 21 Trump Comedy Series Presents Josh Blue. Trump Plaza. 9 p.m., $25. FRIDAY, MARCH 20 Friday Night Flashback. Merighi’s Save Time & Money! fter Charles K. Landis’ Rural Vineland and The Weekly, the third newspaper to appear in Vineland was forged from the political conditions of the town and shaped by reaction to what was already being published. The Independent was conceived by a group of residents who felt they had been shortchanged in some way on the opportunity Landis promised to all those who moved here. As Frank D. Andrews explains in his series “History of Vineland Newspapers,” those who harbored resentment over their lack of success here were quick to point a finger, “blaming their failure upon the promoter of the enterprise.” Because The Weekly, in its early years, was apparently influenced by Landis, it was felt that an opposition newspaper was necessary. Andrews writes that those disenchanted by Vineland’s founder “formed a party whose leaders furnished the financial backing, in part, toward the establishment of The Vineland Independent…” The new publication debuted on March 2, 1867, one-and-a-half years after The Weekly first appeared. While The Independent’s title professed a neutral political stance, Andrews identifies its politics as a “less pronounced” version of The Weekly’s Republicanism. With William Taylor as proprietor and E. Hale as editor, The Independent was launched as a weekly publication, its opening editorial proclaiming it would support the side its editor deemed correct and basing its stance on the line, “Be just and fear not,” from William Shakespeare’s Henry VIII, according to Andrews. But, just like the Bard of Avon’s play, the authorship of which has recently been challenged, The Independent’s adherence to its principles to “be just” would soon be open to question. Unlike The Weekly, which existed 12 years under its original ownership, The Independent was immediately plagued with an abundance of management changes. Six months after the appearance of its first issue, Hale retired and Charles W. Blew became Taylor’s partner in the business a month later. In less than a year, Blew sold his interest in the newspaper to Taylor, who became sole proprietor and A editor for the next two years. On August 5, 1870, Taylor sold the operation to William H. Gill, Jr. and T. F. Mackenzie whose ownership lasted less than a year when Uri Carruth and William G. Smith purchased the newspaper. By August 2, 1871, Carruth had become the sole owner and editor and seemed to meet with the approval of the town’s “Independent Party.” As records indicate, the new editor mercilessly ridiculed Landis in the pages of his publication, seemingly unaware of the boundaries and limitations commonly accorded to good taste. On March 18, 1875, after Carruth had, according to a later New York Times account, “more than once made Mr. Landis’s domestic problems, which were many, the subject of a newspaper article,” a piece that examined the fragile mental condition of Landis’s wife appeared in The Independent. Upon reading the article the following day, Landis quickly marched to the newspaper offices and shot Carruth. The editor survived for seven months and, in the early months of 1876, Landis was tried, then acquitted for reasons of insanity. Meanwhile, the paper had been forced to change hands once again, the third time in only five years. Andrews reports that friends of Edwin A. Teall bought the publication in the spring of 1875 and then placed him in charge of the enterprise. Teall left before the end of the year, replaced by co-editors William J. Corbett and E.G. Blaisdell who were, in turn, replaced in May 1876 with Henry Wilbur and Myron H. Dodge who turned The Independent into a daily newspaper from October 14, 1876 until January 17, 1877. Wilbur consolidated his publication with The Weekly in 1880, creating The Weekly-Independent, which was purchased by W.V.L. Seigman in 1884. By 1890, the title reverted back to The Independent and it was sold to The Independent Publishing Company in 1893 when Daniel W. Davis took over as editor. With Davis’s retirement shortly afterwards, J.J. Streeter soon became proprietor and editor, and it wasn’t long before The Independent was transformed into a voice for the People’s Party, ending its allegiance to Vineland. I Protect Your Health & Home There is no better time than the present to rethink the products that you use in your home and on your body. We are assaulted by toxic chemicals, dangerous additives and poisons in our food, home products, and construction materials — day after day, every day. Is it any wonder why cancer is afflicting Americans at an alarming rate? You can start to do something about it by ridding yourself of the toxic products currently in your household that are — at this very moment — affecting you and your children. Create a healthier, safer place to live with our organic and natural product lines. Let us show you how to convert your household to a safer, non-toxic environment and help protect your health using less expensive, higher quality products. Your family is worth it. If you like the idea, give us a call for more info. Be sure to mention that you saw it in The Grapevine. Vineland’s Premier Car Wash Offers To You: EXPRESS WASH One editor of The Independent mercilessly ridiculed the town’s founder in the pages of the publication. • Traditional & Roth IRAs • Education Savings • Health Savings • Simplified Employee Pension Plan • Savings Incentive Match Plans for Employees *Substantial penalty for early withdrawal. **Consult your tax advisor. Member FDIC No Waiting for vacuum customers. Stay in your car!! Only $6.00 to get the salt off!! A Third Weekly Safe & Secure Individual Retirement Accounts • Save money for your retirement* • Reduce your taxable income now ** Don’t wait! Dial 1-800-690-3440 for more information or stop into a branch near you! 1-800-690-3440 • www.newfieldbank.com The solution is . . . Go Green! 877-460-1969 Full Service and Self-Service Car Wash 10% OFF WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Any Full-Service Wash { VINCE FARINACCIO } with this ad. Exp. 3/31/09 GV-UD 2611 S. Main Rd., Vineland Vo te d # 1 t” “B es t of B es 20 08 (Between Grant & Sherman) I Historical Vineland Gift Boo k Availables the grapevine { 21 } REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS The following transactions of $1,000 or more were filed with Cumberland County in the month of January 2009 (transactions may have occurred in an earlier month). Names listed may, in some cases, be those of buyers’ or sellers’ representatives. BRIDGETON 245 W Commerce St., Federal National Mortgage Assoc. to James L Gazzola on 1/20/09 for $116,000 688 N Pearl St., Sec. of Housing & Urban Development (by Atty.) to Genora Rosypal on 1/28/09 for $54,600 7 York St., Rebecca J Snyder to Willie Kitchen, Jr. on 1/29/09 for $93,500 COMMERCIAL TWP 2604 Maurice St., Forrest Gottshalk to Theodore M Borodynko on 1/21/09 for $20,000 0 North Ave., John R Bateman, II to Leah Obrien on 1/26/09 for $10,000 1801 &C Main St., Fed. Nat. Mort. Assoc. to Arminda E Ernst on 1/29/09 for $62,000 FAIRFIELD TWP 476 Back Neck Rd., Lori C Lynch (Atty.) to Mayra I Rosa on 1/13/09 for $77,000 1 Copin Dr., Michael Fabrikant (by Agent) to Steven G Jost on 1/14/09 for $30,000 HOPEWELL TWP 6 Beebe Run Rd., Aiko I Nakawatase (by Atty.) to Michael P Everly on 1/13/09 for $125,000 58 Lakeside Dr., Donald A Counsellor, Sr. to Jason R Cramer on 1/21/09 for $140,000 LAWRENCE TWP East Pern Ave., Lorna L Hurlston to Joseph A Gambale on 1/26/09 for $6,000 MILLVILLE 409 W McNeal St., City of Millville to Brandt & Madison Development Co. on 1/13/09 for $7,651 817 Pine St., Dorothy Esham to Michael Futrell on 1/13/09 for $98,000 616 SW Lakeshore Dr., Silvio Ciancarelli to Katherine Bailey on 1/13/09 for $199,900 218 E Main St., Anthony Renzi, Jr. to Anthony Renzi, III on 1/14/09 for $100,000 839 S 2nd St., Janet R Page to Bryan W Page on 1/16/09 for $55,000 614 & 620 Willow Rd., Diana J Day (Exec.) to Hattie E Ayres on 1/21/09 for $85,000 140 Cottage St., Hovnanian K At Millville II LLC to James Francis Hughes on 1/21/09 for $297,382 1112 Wheaton Ave., Thomas Hyson to Emmanuil Kerusenko on 1/22/09 for $35,000 802 N High St., John H Vanaman (Est. by Exec.) to Edward T Harvey on 1/26/09 for $42,000 4 Sterling Pl., Sec. of Housing & Urban Development (by Atty.) to Kimberly R Hall on 1/28/09 for $225,000 214 S 5th St., John D Mingin to Joseph Ervin on 1/29/09 for $50,000 209 211 213 215 D St., Misha LLC to DDI Properties LLC on 1/29/09 for $200,000 UPPER DEERFIELD 4 Lewis Dr., Takashi Dodohara (Grdn.) to Leonard J Godrey on 1/14/09 for $169,900 ADVERTISE IN The Grapevine and get incredible results. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. Beautiful Smiles, Made Affordable OUR SERVICES { 22 } the grapevine | MARCH 18, 2009 MILLVILLE FAMILY DENTAL Union Lake Crossing Shopping Center 2144 N. 2nd St., Millville NEW PATIENT WELCOMING PACKAGE $ 80( reg. $230.) Includes oral exam, full mouth series of x-rays, cleaning & polishing, oral cancer screening, periodontal (gums) evaluation. With coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Emergency Walk-Ins Welcome • Same-Day Denture Repair • • • • • • • • • • • Cleaning & X-Rays Porcelain Veneers Cosmetic Dentistry Periodontal Therapy (Gum Treatment) Full Mouth Reconstruction Implant Rehabilitation Root Canals (One Visit) Full & Partial Dentures Bleaching White Fillings Crowns & Bridges 856-825-2111 Open 7 Days a Week. Day & Evening Hours Proud Member Of The Allied Dental Practices Of NJ Personalized Dentistry SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO OUR SENIOR CITIZENS Se Habla Español E D W A R D P O L L E R , D D S • G L E N N P R A G E R , D D S • TO D D P R A G E R , D D S • D A N I E L D I C E S A R E , D M D REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 12 Old Deerfield Pk., Bernadette Cardwell to Charles I Corson on 1/20/09 for $140,000 8 Holly Ave., Marilee Joyce to Jules Pitsker on 1/22/09 for $166,900 39 Fern Rd., Mark A Petrunis to Frank Fradella on 1/28/09 for $50,000 110 Cornwell Dr., Joseph DeAngelis to Michael Jason Reed on 1/29/09 for $2,000 VINELAND 1132 W Arbor Ave., Barbara Cestaro to Juliana Atkinson on 1/13/09 for $168,000 1964 E Oak Rd., Gloria Lundberg to Carmela Trzeciak on 1/16/09 for $95,000 852 E Forest Grove Rd., Mattie F Battestella (Est. by CA, Adm.) to Andrey P Letushko on 1/20/09 for $120,000 923 New Pear St., MAB Investments LLC to Christopher Andrade on 1/21/09 for $117,000 1187 Bucks Run Ave., Fed. Nat. Mort. Assoc. to Keith Metzger on 1/21/09 for $232,900 900 S Spring Rd., RPJ Properties LLC to Clarence C Newton on 1/23/09 for $225,000 3020 Dante Ave., Cynthia D Smith to Davco Construction Inc. on 1/26/09 for $48,000 747 Embassy Terr., Fed. Nat. Mort. Assoc. to Maribel Montero on 1/26/09 for $128,500 31 Glenn Terr., Rea Richter (by Atty.) to Cloud M Volpe on 1/27/09 for $152,000 1238 & C W Landis Ave., Alice B Pantaleo (Exec.) to Capital Bank of New Jersey on 1/27/09 for $890,000 3709 Willow Dr., Simon Betty Trustee LLC to Paul Shinskie on 1/28/09 for $228,750 700 Wheat Rd., Nicholas Mainiero (Est. by Exec.) to Vineland City Of on 1/29/09 for $60,000 50 S Myrtle St., Morgan JP Chase Bank Trust (by Atty.) to Hector Acevedo on 1/29/09 for $80,000 314 W Wood St., Federal Nat. Mort. Assoc. to Chad E Hall on 1/29/09 for $90,000 5783 Independence Rd., Patricia A Stewart (Ind. Atty.) to Joan M Kelly on 1/29/09 for $200,000 2809 Rome Rd., Kristin R Niglio to Alex Hunter on 1/30/09 for $157,000 919 Longwood Dr., Patrick H Kimble to William Goertz on 1/30/09 for $190,000 www NEED REAL ESTATE? 856-696-CALL (2255) tom Homes ordable Cus Aff WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Join us for our Open House on Saturday March 21, 2009 - $500 OFF ANY HOUSE Refreshments • Tours • 3 Beautiful Models on Display FINANCING HELP AVAILABLE {Right Before Mainiero's Appliance on the Right} 11:00am to 3:00 pm the grapevine { 23 } 1846 S. Delsea Drive Vineland, NJ 08360 856-507-0432 Our Family of Doctors Bring your entire family to One Location. You will Benefit from a Team of Dental Professionals who can provide to you all Phases of Dentistry including a full time Orthodontics staff. Our Doctors and Specialists are Qualified, Knowledgeable and Caring. Our Friendly, Polite Staff is dedicated to making your time with us a unique, Pleasant Experience. Once you come to Quality Dental Care...You Are Family! ality Dental Care Qu Main Road • Vineland (Next to Acme & Blockbuster) Spring Special ? $2,995 ? Must present coupon. Exp. 3/31/09 Today’s Cosmetic & Family Dentistry Orthodontist License #5738 Full Braces Bridgeton (856) 691-0290 TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS www.quality-dentalcare.com (856) 451-8041 (Across from Walmart)

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March 11, 2009

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INSIDE RESTAURANT ROW • FACES IN THE NEWS • YOUTH ART MONTH • PANCAKES VOLUME 2 | ISSUE 5 | MARCH 11, 2009 CONNECTING YOU T O V I N E L A N D . W E E K L Y. Visit us online www.grapevinenewspaper.com { STORY AND PHOTOS: STEPHANIE FARRELL } One Book: The Glass Castle At least eight local book clubs read the bestseller, many of them in anticipation of the author’s visit to Cumberland County College. T he Guaracini Center was packed for the culminating event of Cumberland County College’s “One Book, One College” program. Best-selling author Jeannette Walls, whose memoir The Glass Castle was read in classes as well as in the community, captivated the audience. For more than half an hour, Walls told funny stories and shared insights with a personable and positive style—and without a single note card. She then opened the floor for questions and afterward graciously signed books and posed for photos for a line that snaked the length of the center’s hallway. “I’m just a woman with a story,” says Walls. “For a long time, my story was a source of shame.” Walls’ parents, despite being intelligent and talented, were inca- pable of caring for their children. Walls and her three siblings suffered through lack of food, heat and indoor plumbing. Her father was an alcoholic. Walls was able to go on to college, and she became successful writing about celebrities. “I thought that once my story was out, I’d lose all my friends, lose my job….” Yet Walls felt compelled to tell the truth, and The Glass Castle is the result. CCC freshman Sarah Singer says she absolutely loved the book. “I think I actually cried, which I don’t usually do. She had this life experience, horrible but…look how successful she is. She made the best of her circumstances. There’s something to be taken from that.” Art students at the college read the book and created alternative book covContinued on page 10 Student Jessica Mooney’s artistic take on the book. Top: James and Amber Parrish, husband and wife CCC students who read Walls’ book for class, are eager to have their books signed. “Home of the Original Penny Sale” 2009 Civic VP 4DR We Treat You Better…Period NDAP 9 HO 200IC 4 DR V IV 5,718 C $1 nd 670 tion a Destinliang charge…..$8,825 hand ……………..$1 88 MSRP.. …………….$16,3 TOTAL.. 1517 South Delsea Drive, Vineland + 1¢ LEASE FOR $229 36/MO. 856-692-1700 Se Habla Español SIGN & DRIVE • 0 DOWN BUY FOR $16,388.00 + 1¢ 4 door,4 cyl., power steering, Auto. Trans. power brakes, compact disc, mp3 Compatible, Power windows, Stock # 12588 36 mo. closed end lease, $229. 12 k Miles per year .15¢ coverage top $8244., LEVO $10,635. Tax, Tags, Registration and $97.00 Doc Fee extra. Select from over 300 Pieces to Create Your Own Masterpiece ustom Homes Affordable C At LaTorre Hardware A “Paint Your Own” Pottery Studio Sign up for Some Fun & Make an Easter Dish { 2 } the grapevine | MARCH 11, 2009 March 21st at 10am Call Carmie’s for Details 1607 S. Delsea Drive, Vineland, NJ 08360 Join us for our Open House on Saturday March 21, 2009 856-691-3637 Open Tuesday & Wednesday 10am – 6pm • Thursday 12 – 8pm Friday 12 Noon – 6pm • Saturday 10am – 4pm • Closed Sunday & Monday. – $500 OFF ANY HOUSE Refreshments • Tours • 3 Beautiful Models on Display FINANCING HELP AVAILABLE {Right Before Mainiero’s Appliance on the Right} 11:00am to 3:00 pm 1846 S. Delsea Drive Vineland, NJ 08360 www.carmiespotterypaintworks.com 856-507-0432 { CONTENTS } 1 One Book: The Glass Castle The author of the book, which has been locally embraced over the past year, visits the area. ST E P H A N I E FA R R E L L I Editor’s Letter One Step Forward, Two Back for Stem Cell Research What a difference a couple of years make. In November of 2007, New Jersey voters rejected a $450 million bond referendum to fund stem cell research. The defeat of the public question was a crushing blow for Governor Jon Corzine, who was a big advocate for the Garden State taking a much bigger and more proactive role in promoting stem cell research here. ThenPresident George Bush was staunchly opposed to embryonic stem cell research and vetoed a bill in June of 2007 that would have opened the gates to massive federal spending on such programs. Now in March of 2009, Corzine has a like-minded President in the White House with regard to the stem cell issue. On Monday, President Obama signed an order striking down his predecessor’s restrictions on embryonic stem cell research. Unfortunately for stem cell research proponents like Corzine, this step forward comes at a time when the economy is forcing cutbacks on the same programs Obama is trying to liberate. In February, the Governor had to cut $13 million from the 2009 state budget for stem-cell research. That cut came on the heels of an even bigger cut of $21 million the month before. But Corzine is hoping that President Obama’s willingness to commit federal funds to scientific research will mean millions more for New Jersey’s efforts to lure cutting-edge scientific companies to our state. Of course it will be months before any of those federal funds begin to flow, especially in the case of embryonic stem cell research, which carries with it a host of ethical considerations that must be sorted out before those spending decisions are made. I voted against the bond referendum in November of 2007 and was pleased that most of my fellow New Jersey voters did the same. It’s not that I don’t support stem cell research; I do. It’s just that I don’t feel that government funds (taxpayers dollars) should be diverted into areas of scientific research better left to private funding. Nor do I believe that political motivations should be behind the regulation of scientific research of any kind. Consider the examples of California and Missouri, as cited by Sigrid Fry-Revere, director of bioethics studies at the Cato Institute: “It’s better to allow private interests to fund the most promising research than to allow the party in power to make medical and scientific decisions for all,” said FryRevere in a recent article. He pointed out that California’s Proposition 71 authorized $3 billion in state funding to stem cell research. That was more than three years ago and not a penny has been spent yet. Lawsuits by those morally opposed to stem cell research have kept the state from issuing the bonds to raise the funding. “And these being bonds,” says Fry-Revere, “they’ll saddle California taxpayers with an additional $3 billion in interest payments over the next 30 years.” On the other end of the spectrum were Missouri voters who, in November of 2006, passed a constitutional amendment that protects the right to pursue all forms of stem cell research allowed under federal law — but not funding it. “This,” says Fry-Revere, “ensured that the state kept the door open for private laboratories like the Stowers Institute for Medical Research, which employs an international team of researchers and $2 billion in private endowments. For years, Stowers has been doing extraordinary research on adult stem cells, and the amendment will see to it that the progress continues as the lab expands into embryonic stem cell research in the future. And since it’s privately funded, there’ll be no bond issues, no debts, no interest to pay, and no taxpayer liability.” New Jersey should take their lead from Missouri, not California. We should refuse to stand in the way of stem cell research while also refusing to allow government to use our money to promote or hinder it. MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher 5 Vintage Buttons The making of pearl buttons was one of Vineland’s earlierst industries. V I N C E FA R I N AC C I O Residential & Commercial Service & Installation Heating & Cooling Equipment Hot Water Heaters Water/Sewer Underground Piping Sewer Drain Cleaning 6 What’s Cooking? The Restaurant Row initiative along Landis Avenue, that’s what. TO D D N O O N 7 Poetry in a War Zone National Youth Art Month reminds us of our ever-fragile freedoms. DEBORAH A. EIN Serving Vineland for over 100 years! 8 Community Calendar Faces in the News 12 16 DINING: Cake and Dinner, Too A cake delivery to Philadelphia offers a chance to hit the town. ST E P H E N W I L S O N 691-1950 State Lic. # 12089 19 Recipe Corner Two pancake recipes serve up a healthy way to start the day. L I SA D I N U N Z I O 20 21 Entertainment In Our Schools 18 REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS { STAFF } MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor LORI GOUDIE Art Director GAIL EPIFANIO Controller JACK EPIFANIO Advertising Executive SHERRY MUNYAN Advertising Executive MARIE HALPIN-GALLO Advertising Executive TRACY BUSCHAM Graphic Designer MARIE TEDESCO Editorial Intern WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | The Grapevine 3660 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361 PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816 EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2009. All rights reserved. the grapevine { 3 } { 4 } the grapevine | MARCH 11, 2009 JUNIPER VILLAGE OFFERS ASSISTED LIVING AND A SEPARATE SECURED COMMUNITY FOR INDIVIDUALS IN NEED OF DEMENTIA CARE A S S I S T E D L I V I N G A N D W E L L S P R I N G M E M O RY CA R E AT W I L L I A M S TOW N Nurturing the spirit of life 1640 South Black Horse Pike Williamstown, NJ 08094 www.junipercommunities.com SM 856.740.4444 I Historical Vineland { VINCE FARINACCIO } Vintage Buttons Vineland nurtured the business of pearl button manufacturing as one of its earliest enterprises. n the lawn, Hatchet Jack tried on one of the Warden’s linen suits, then a high-collared London shirt and Spanish leather vest with pearl buttons.” This passage is from novelist Rudolph Wurlitzer’s latest work, The Drop Edge of Yonder, a mystic Western peppered with iconic figures roaming a 19th century mythic frontier. But, if the characters and events of this narrative were real, it’s possible those pearl buttons glistening from Hatchet Jack’s leather vest could have come from Vineland, New Jersey. Shortly after its 1861 founding, Vineland nurtured the business of pearl button manufacturing as one of its earliest enterprises. While specialized buttons of gold and ivory had been around since the 14th century, pearl buttons were a relatively new and popular commodity of the 19th century, ini- “O tially produced in bulk in London, England and Vienna, Austria. According to the Chest of Books website, button manufacturing in the United States didn’t begin until 1826 when Samuel Williston started a modest business that soon led to the construction of a factory and world distribution. Pearl buttons, the Chest of Books site explains, “are made of pearl shells, or what is known as natural pearl, having a clear, pearly inside of various degrees of whiteness.” The site also observes that the craft of cutting, drilling and polishing a pearl button must be accomplished largely by hand. While machinery was added to this field of work, the industry hasn’t changed much. While the pearl button boom occurred in the 1880s and 1890s, Vineland was well ahead of most of the country. According to Elena J. Darling’s study of the subject in the Vineland Historical Magazine, the first men- tion of pearl button manufacturing in this area was in the July 4, 1868 edition of The Weekly, in which it was announced that a Philadelphian was about to establish a button factory that would employ 20 to 40 people. As it turns out, two men, Captain S.F. Hanson and a Mr. Bryant, established a factory on the northeast corner of Sixth and Quince streets by August 1 and began production of pearl buttons using shells from China, Panama and the Red Sea. Hanson and Bryant had hired as superintendent Newark, New Jersey resident David James, whose reputation was one of the best in the field of pearl button manufacturing. Within a year of working for Hanson and Bryant, James established his own business, and within two years, had the sole pearl button factory in Vineland from 1871 to 1872. In 1875, the business was placed in the hands of a relative while James opened yet another button factory in Landis Township. Darling reports that in March 1876, another pearl button manufacturer opened its doors, and shortly after, Nathaniel Eldridge Jenkins purchased the James business. In 1879, E.O. Mills & Company was established, led by Thomas Jones, an entrepreneur whose previous experience in the Philadelphia pearl button business guided the Vineland enterprise to what Darling reports as 1,200 gross of buttons weekly and a staff of 50 workers. Housed in the Gage machine shop at the Boulevard and Pear Street, the company was considered one of the biggest pearl button manufacturers in the United States. The Chest of Books website reports that the number of pearl button businesses in the country rose drastically from 17, as of April 1, 1891, to 95 by 1892. Unfortunately, as this nationwide competition increased and as the 20th century approached, changes in manufacturing as well as flooded markets led to a turning point for the last of the small pearl button businesses in Vineland. Some companies, like Peter Smith & Son, turned to specializing in jewelry that continued to require the precision of cutting by hand. Some, like Frank M. Lyons & Son, simply closed their doors. And others desperately sought larger companies for any work that could be outsourced. While Vineland had helped pioneer the pearl button industry, it was unable to successfully sustain its own manufacturing into the new century. I No wifi? No worries. At home or on the road, stay connected with a mobile broadband device from Sprint. Get it on the Now Network.™ Free > Rev A speeds > Sprint SmartView§ interface > MicroSD™ slot holds 32GB WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | $49.99 two-year price. Plus $50 mail-in rebate with new line activation with two-year agreement and a data plan. Connection Plans $ 59 99/mo. Req. 2-yr agreement. Other monthly charges apply. See below.** Contact your Sprint Preferred Retailer: 533 N. East Avenue Vineland, NJ 08360 856.563.0330 2639 S. Main Road Vineland, NJ 08360 856.563.0110 622 E. Landis Avenue Vineland, NJ 08360 856.563.1771 the grapevine { 5 } Communications **Monthly charges exclude taxes, Sprint Surcharges [incl. USF charge upof to 9.5% (varies quarterly), Administrative Charge (up to $1.99/line/mo.), Regulatory Charge ($0.20/line/mo.) & state/local fees by area]. Sprint Surcharges are not taxes or gov’t-required charges and are subject to change. Details: Sprint.com/taxesandfees. May require up to a $36 activation fee/line, credit approval & deposit. Up to $200 early termination fee/line applies. Mobile Broadband Card Offer: Offer ends 04/18/09. While Supplies last. Taxes and service features excluded. No cash back. Requires activation at the time of purchase. Mobile Broadband Card data plan required. Mail-in Rebate: Requires purchase by 04/18/09 & activation by 05/2/09. Line must be active 30 consecutive days. Allow 10 to 14 weeks for rebate. Connection Plan: Sprint reserves the right to limit throughput speeds or amount of data transferred; and to deny, terminate, modify, disconnect or suspend service if usage exceeds 300MB/month while off-network roaming. 1024 KB equal 1 MB. 1024 MB equal 1 GB. No plan discounts apply. Other Terms: Coverage not available everywhere. The Sprint Mobile Broadband Network reaches over 248 million people. Offers not available in all markets/retail locations or for i all phones/networks. Pricing, offer terms, fees & features may vary for existing customers not eligible for upgrade. Other rest rictions apply. See store or Sprint.com for details. 2009 Sprint. Sprint and the logo are trademarks of Sprint. Other marks are the property of their respective owners. I Downtown Vineland { TODD NOON, EXEC. DIR., VDID/MAIN STREET } What’s Cooking? The Restaurant Row initiative heats up with the first eatery opening on Landis Avenue later this year. estaurant Row is one of the programs the City has in place to attract businesses downtown and make it easier for such businesses to gain a foothold on Landis Avenue. It is also part of the mission to make the downtown a destination for food, entertainment, culture, and shopping. While the results of one of the City’s incentive programs, the Façade Improvement Program are already being seen up and down Landis Avenue, the Restaurant Row initiative is still in its preliminary stages. The end result, however, will be several fine eateries downtown and an indoor public market where a wide variety of foods can be purchased. To update you on the Restaurant Row initiative and make it more of a reality for you right now, I will give you a preview of one of the first eateries that will R open as a result of this program and introduce you to the owners. Obie Bermudez is dedicated to the revitalization of downtown Vineland. He is one of the newly appointed members of our Board of Directors. He and his wife Marilyn also love crêpes—very thin, delicious folded pancakes that originated in France and are filled with eggs, meat, or dessert topping. This inspired an interest in the CrêpeMaker franchise that led them to become the developer for that franchise in southern New Jersey. They will be opening a CrêpeMaker in the Cherry Hill Mall food court on March 21 and one is scheduled to open on the 600 block of Landis Avenue later this year. Negotiations are in progress for two more locations for the Atlantic and Cape May County areas. The Vineland location, which will be the Bermudez’s first free-standing CrêpeMaker store, will be the base for the catering division. The 2,300 squarefoot facility will also include a lounge. The incentives made possible by the Restaurant Row initiatives made it feasible for Obie and Marilyn to choose Vineland for a free-standing location. “With all of the projects going on downtown,” Obie Bermudez says, “like the renovation of the Landis Theatre, the Main Street façade program, and the Restaurant Row initiative, now is the right time to put it all together, and now seemed the right time to get involved from the beginning. I want to help set the standard for what’s to come.” However, his incentive runs deeper and he cites his roots from his parents’ arrival in Vineland in 1951. “I was born and raised in this town and I can tell you Vineland has something that a mall or any shopping center can never have and can never take away—history.” He cites, by example, the buildings with their unique architecture. “Landis Avenue was just waiting to be found again and, with the team that has been assembled here at the VDID and City Hall, we’re going to bring it back,” Obie continues. “Downtown Vineland will become an exciting family destination, attracting visitors and residents alike by embracing our history and culture, and by celebrating our unique and diverse heritage.” That is the spirit behind what we want to achieve downtown. Once this spirit takes root, it will blossom in other places. All it needs is something to nourish it. That is what the Restaurant Row initiative is all about. I hope that I was able to enlighten you about it. Perhaps, I even made you hungry for more. I For more information on all VDID/Main Street Vineland events and activities, call 794-8653 or visit www.mainstreet vineland.org. Choose from hundreds of new and used Acoustic & Electric Guitars and Basses. Sale also applies to Drums, Percussion, Cymbals, Amps & PA Systems! Save on big names such as Fender, Ibanez, Epiphone, Takamine, Pearl, Tama & more! Now signing up new students on all instruments! OUR OWN SPECIAL ECONOMIC STIMULUS PLAN! HELP US CELEBRATE OUR 15 YEAR ANNIVERSARY WITH ONLY ONE TIME PER YEAR TO SAVE BIG $$$!!! { 6 } the grapevine | MARCH 11, 2009 Come see our recentl renovated y store!! NUAL IF TH AN NCE EVENT! F L ARA nd JOR aCh,E redit card aAccepted! MA C s c s Check Refund 008 Tax 2 While supplies last. Sale price based on the current manufacturer’s suggested retail price. Guitar cases not included with any guitar. The second item must be a different model than the first (not valid for two of the same guitar – etc). Sale valid for existing in-store inventory only. No special orders, layaways, or rain checks. We reserve the right to limit quantities. All Sales are FINAL! Sale for the public only. NO DEALERS PLEASE!! Exclusions: Rivera Amps, Keyboards, Music Books, DVD’s, Software, Digital Recorders and Drum Machines 606 E. Landis Ave., Vineland • 856-692-2060 www.musiccentralonline.com I Gleanings { DEBORAH A. EIN, MANAGING EDITOR } Poetry in a War Zone National Youth Art Month celebrates the talents of our children…and freedom of expression. “T uba Sahaab looks nothing like a warrior. She is a slight girl of 11, living in a simple home in a suburb of Islamabad, Pakistan. But in Tuba’s case, looks are deceiving. “With her pen, Tuba is taking on the swords of the Taliban. She crafts poems telling of the pain and suffering of children just like her; girls banned from school, their books burned, as the hard-core Islamic militants spread their reign of terror across parts of Pakistan.” These are the words of Stanley Grant, reporting for CNN. His article continues; “A stanza of one of her poems reads: ‘Tiny drops of tears, their faces like angels, Washed with blood, they sleep forever with anger.’ Tuba is not afraid to express her views. Of the Taliban forcing young girls out of the classroom, she says: ‘This is very shocking to hear that girls can’t go to school, they are taking us back to the Stone Age.’ ” In good times and bad, art lifts our spirits. This is especially true of the burgeoning talents of the young. In this country, we are fortunate to be able to fearlessly encourage our children to express themselves through their art. This month in particular, we celebrate the artworks of our youth. Vineland Public Schools will again host the annual district-wide children’s art exhibit at Mennies Elementary School (361 East Grant Avenue), from March 11 through the end of the month. The exhibit is held in conjunction with the celebration of National Youth Art Month, and an opening reception is scheduled for March 13 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The exhibit is open to the public and children whose works are displayed are invited to attend with family and friends. All eight elementary schools in the district will be represented with work being displayed from kindergarten through grade five. Locally, National Youth Art Month coincides with “Music in our Schools Month,” so during the evening, there will be performances by Mennies’ School Fine Arts Club, the Petway School Chorus, and the Spanish chorus from Barse School. As in past years, the Woman’s Club of Vineland will present first-, second-, and third-place prizes to children in each school for outstanding artwork. “We welcome families to come and meet their child’s art teacher and to support the ever-increasing importance of the arts in our schools,” said Cherie Hackler, art teacher at Mennies School. “Those unable to attend the reception are welcome to stop by Mennies School throughout the month of March to view the artwork.” For more information, call Hackler at 794-7141 or e-mail her at chackler@vineland.org In addition to Hackler, Vineland’s elementary art teachers include Nancy Curley, Dane Barse School; Cynthia Doulis, Durand School; Beverly Hughes, Johnstone School; Lisa LaRosa, Petway School; Lisa Kaler-Ahma, D’Ippolito School; Kristin McMackin, Sabater School, and Kara Rehm, Winslow School. Congratulations and thanks to all these teachers who teach and encourage artistic endeavors. In addition to self-expression, art education develops self-esteem, appreciation of the work of others, cooperation, and critical thinking skills. We are blessed to be far from the world’s war zones, but our kids still have a lot to say and contribute. Tuba Sahaab’s home is less than two hours from where the Taliban have control. She loves writing poems and short stories (she has already published one book) and has created a cartoon character called Tomato Man. “I want to give peace to my nation,” she says, “I will fight for it.” I Men – Plan to Attend a free prostate cancer screening ( for men 40 years or older) Saturday, March 14 9 a.m. – Noon South Jersey Healthcare Frank & Edith Scarpa Cancer Pavilion 1505 West Sherman Avenue Vineland, NJ WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | PSA testing (a simple blood test) ~ Prostate exam and consultation by Christopher Lee, MD South Jersey Urology Consultants ~ Come and find out about the latest advances in prostate cancer treatments ~ If you plan to attend, please call to register: 856-575-4430. the grapevine { 7 } www.SJHealthcare.net/cancerservices.htm I COMMUNITY CALENDER HAPPENINGS EVERY WEDNESDAY IN LENT Bread and Broth. Lutheran Church of the Redeemer, 2384 E. Landis Ave. A Lenten meal at 6 p.m. followed by a 7 p.m. service. 691-4278. Lunch and brief message by a different clergy from the community each week. Noon-1 p.m. FRIDAY, MARCH 13 RNS Mobile Mammongraphy. Vineland Senior Center,. 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Women should call 1-800-246-2404 to make an appointment. Have insurance ID, if applicable, and name of physician. FRIDAY, MARCH 13 Benefit for Ron. North Italy Club, 414 Virano Ln. Friends of Ron Mejia are holding this benefit to help defray his cost for medical treatments. 7-11 p.m. $30 (includes a buffet, DJ and dancing, comedian (WIP’s Big Daddy Graham), silent auction, cash bar.. 692-4406 or 466-2664. FRIDAY, MARCH 13 South Jersey Homeschooler’s Support Group. Loyle Lanes Bowling Alley, Delsea Dr. Deanne Scalfo will take you through the supermarket jungle and show you how to find the good stuff (at the good prices)! She lets you in on the secrets the food companies don’t want you to know. Noon2 p.m. dscalfo@comcast.net. EVERY THURSDAY IN LENT Community Lenten Lunches. First Presbyterian Church, 800 East Landis Ave. THE EPICUREAN SOCIETY of Southern New Jersey presented its respected Restaurant of the Year award to Winfield’s Restaurant, located on High Street in Millville. Jeff Schwartz, President of The Epicurean Society made the presentation to owners Rick and Lois Abbott, and stated that Winfield’s stood out because of its excellence in food, service, and ambiance. The award is given by the Society to one outstanding restaurant, which is chosen from among the restaurants visited by the Society during their monthly dinner events. The Epicurean Society is a member of the American Culinary Federation, consisting of restaurant owners, chefs, purveyors and foodies from six counties in southern New Jersey. Call County Clerk Gloria Noto at 4534860 or Surrogate Douglas Rainear at 453-4800 for further information. COLLEGE STUDENTS may purchase a one-week YMCA membership while on break for $25. To qualify, students need to bring a valid college identification card to the front desk at the Y (1159 E. Landis Avenue). YMCA hours are 5:15 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Friday; Saturday, 5:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Sundays, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 691-0030. KIDDIE KORNER, a children’s store featuring new and used clothing will have its grand opening on Thursday, March 12, at 11 a.m. It is located at 504 E. Landis Avenue (near Army recruitment center). THE VINELAND PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL held its first Open House with about 50 local youngsters and their parents attending the event at 1155 East Landis Avenue, next to the YMCA. The bright-eyed children, ages 5 through 8, enjoyed refreshments and played with educational toys while their parents learned more about the school and completed enrollment forms. (Pictured is Neftali Ramos and Mom Erica Rosa doing just that.) Executive Director Ann Garcia and her husband, Tito, who serves as the facility consultant, answered questions and Albert R. Maccani CPA/PFS CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT THE COUNTY CLERK’S AND SURROGATE’S OFFICE will be open as follows for the month of March: Late Night – Offices open until 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 12. Mall Information Booth – Wednesday, March 18, from 10 .a.m until noon. Vineland/Millville Satellite Office Wednesday, March 25 Vineland 9 a.m. until 11:30 a.m. / Millville 1:30 p.m. until 4 p.m. Celebrating 31 Years of Excellent Service! 1537 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland 856-691-3279 explained some of the goals of the new school, which will open its doors this August to kindergarten, first and second grade students. School Curriculum Consultant Yvonne Cribbs offered a tour of the facility. Established by the Garcias and Cribbs. the school will provide the basics mandated by the State‘s Core Curriculum program, as well as drama as a way to encourage students to actively use their language skills and develop a lifelong interest in learning. The Vineland Public Charter School was one of six such initiatives approved last October by the New Jersey Department of Education. It is the first charter school to open its doors in Cumberland County. “If all goes well, we plan to add more grades in the years to come,” Garcia said. The charter school is funded by state and local taxes, which means there is no charge for students to attend. Transportation is provided for free by the Vineland School District. Classes are expected to begin on August 31 and run through June 29, 2010. The school day starts at 7:40 a.m. and ends at 4 p.m. To register a child or for further information, call 985-4782 or e-mail info@VinelandPublicCharterSchool.org. { 8 } the grapevine | MARCH 11, 2009 Do You Have Dangerous Trees? Call For Your Free Evaluation Good, Clean Work At Reasonable Prices Don’t Be Fooled. Call A Certified Aborist. For All Your Tree Care. Pruning • Tree Removals • Storm Damage Elevations • Shrubbery Trimming • Stump Grinding Owner Operated Local Business • Fully Insured Owner Working At All Jobs! FREE ESTI MATES www.forresttreesurgeon.com 10% Off Any Tree Service Forrest Tree Surgeon • 856-694-0922 Must present coupon at time of estimate. Not valid with other offers. Exp. 2/28/09 SATURDAY, MARCH 14 DTW Professional Wrestling. Landis Intermediate School, 61 W. Landis Ave. Former ECW, WWE Superstar Al Snow teams up with Tommy Golden to take on the team of Patch and JOJO. 7:30 p.m. $16, kids 6-12 $9. 563-0124. Varicose • SUNDAY, MARCH 15 Pasta Dinner Fundraiser. North Italy Club, Virano Ln. VHS softball team benefits. $10. 794-6800, ext. 2745. MARCH 15 THROUGH 17 Parish Mission & Healing Mass. The Parish of Saint Padre Pio at the Church of Our Lady of Pompeii, 4680 Dante Ave. Healing Mass and Anointing of the Sick, Sunday 3 p.m. Lenten dessert social to follow in Rosary Hall. Communal Lenten Penance Service, Monday, 7 p.m. Mass and healing service, Wednesday, 7 p.m. All invited to attend. 691-7526. Veins? Reach Out To The Most Qualified Specialist Minimally Invasive Insurance covered and SATURDAY, MARCH 21 Rock Around the Clock. CCC gymnasium, Sherman Ave. and College Dr. The Cumberland County College Foundation hosts an old-fashioned sock hop, 6 p.m. Music by David Christopher Orchestra, a jitterbug contest and more. $100 per person. 691-8600 ext. 392. SATURDAY, MARCH 21 Evening of Stand-Up Comedy. Moose Lodge, 187 W. Wheat Rd., Vineland. Headliner comic is Chris Dubail, emcee is Matt Faison. Must be at least 21 to attend. Food and fun 6 p.m., comedy 7:30 p.m. $30 (proceeds benefit VHS Tennis Team). 692-2283. 30 min. Office Treatment Free Vein Screening Call to schedule an appointment • Featured on Charles L. Dietzek, D.O., FACOS Raymond S. Wojtalik, M.D., FACS Voorhees • Sewell • Vineland TUESDAY, MARCH 24 City Council Meeting. Council Chambers of City Hall, Seventh and Wood sts. Open to the public. 7:30 p.m. 856.309.VEIN (8346) Specializing in spider and varicose vein treatment SEND US YOUR EVENT NOTICES. We want to help you publicize your events. Send them to us at the address listed on page 3. 2950 College Dr., Suite 2B, Vineland • www.VeinVascular.com WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Stripers, Drum Fish, Flounder, Blue Fish, Weakfish, Sharks, Tuna, Mahi-Mahi Anger Management Sportfishing the grapevine { 9 } For Pricing & Available Dates, Call Stephen at (856) 207-8128 e-mail: angermanagementfishing@comcast.net On the web at www.angermanagementfishing.com Fully insured and licensed charters ONE BOOK Weight-loss surgery is changing. Here’s how we changed one woman’s life. At 240 lbs., Nichole Newton suffered with joint pain, shortness of breath and the social awkwardness that comes from being overweight. To reclaim her once healthier, happier life, she chose weight-loss surgery at South Jersey Healthcare Regional Medical Center, a nationally-recognized Bariatric Surgery Center of Excellence. (Continued from cover) ers. Walls was impressed with the college’s discussions of the book as well as the student artwork. “It’s very humbling,” she said, and added that the artwork was “so amazing.” Singer said the book was required reading for freshmen. “We talked about it in English Comp. A lot of kids could relate.” On a trip to Wal-Mart, Singer noticed that the cashier, also a CCC student, had the book and they discussed it while she checked out. It’s just those kinds of conversations that Sharon Kewish, CCC English professor and chair of the program’s book selection committee, hopes happen all over campus and throughout the community. “The committee was pretty much unani”mous in choosing the book,” she says. We understood how directly our students would get involved in the book. The student reaction has been just amazing. In the classes I teach, the students have related to the main character, the issues of homelessness and extreme poverty.” Kewish says some of her students had been homeless themselves. “They were comfortable enough to talk about it.” For other students who had not experienced poverty, it makes an impression to hear about it from a fellow student. Her students also relate to Walls’ sense of survival. “Siblings taking care of siblings when parents are dysfunctional,” says Kewish. “Even when she’s going through it, there’s hope.” In addition to many classes reading and discussing the book, CCC hosted a well-attended panel discussion of faculty, students and community members in the fall. They also showed two movies with similar themes, Angela’s Ashes and The Pursuit of Happyness. These events were open to the community. “We want to be sharing with the Exceptional bariatric surgery care. Right here in South Jersey. The experienced SJH Bariatric Team put Nichole at ease and prepared her for every step of her successful weight-loss journey. Nearly two years later, and almost 120 lbs. lighter, activities that were once difficult or impossible are back in her life. She spends more time outdoors exercising, talking to neighbors and shopping, which is fun again! She’ll even take an occasional run up the Philly Art Museum steps. Why? Because she can! Our promise From our experienced physicians to our pre-op and follow-up group sessions, the SJH Bariatrics Team is dedicated to offering high quality weight-loss surgery and positive outcomes and experiences for every patient. { 10 } the grapevine | MARCH 11, 2009 For more information call: (856) 641-8263 • www.SJHealthcare.net Past CCC “One Book” Picks: 2004-05 James McBride’s The Color of Water 2005-06 David Guterson’s Snow Falling on Cedars 2006-07 Jodi Picoult’s My Sister’s Keeper 2007-08 Erin Gruwell’s Freedom Writer’s Diary community in an exchange of ideas,” says Kewish. “It’s a means of communicating with the community what we are doing in our classes. We want to have the community reading right along with us.” Kewish hears that eight book clubs are reading the book. One of those is Rose Diaz’s, which discussed The Glass Castle last month in anticipation of the author’s visit. Diaz says they talked about the resilience of children. “It was amazing how these children survived these parents,” notes Diaz. “Their basic human needs of shelter, food and clothing were consistently denied and yet three of them went on to be productive, functioning individuals. Could it be possible that even though they starved their little bodies the fact that they educated them, provided culture, and promoted self sufficiency was more essential to the development of the human spirit?” The Walls’ parents were nonconformists. “Granted there were issues of alcoholism and mental health,” Diaz continues, “but even so their personalities loved the chaos and refused to follow rules or fulfill expectations of any sort. Their fierce independence made them reject a normal life while always reaching for an impossibly grandiose future, i.e. the glass castle.” Diaz says she is impressed by the book’s nonjudgmental tone. “Her ability to accept her past and her parents as they are without rancor is truly awesome,” she says. “I think the author has captured the torn feelings a person experiences with members of their family that disappoint and wreak havoc.” Walls is not bitter. “I don’t consider myself a victim. My parents are who and what they are. I can accept them as flawed people, who did the best they could,” Walls says, who adds that what she truly regrets from her past is her father’s drinking. “We can take these things in our past that we’re not crazy about and have them work for us, turn them all to our advantage. I truly believe that everything in life is a blessing and a curse, it’s what you choose to make it.” She says that writing about her past was more than cathartic. “It has transformed the world for me. I was always a happy person, but I felt like a fraud. The world was filled with potential enemies,” she says. “I underestimated people, their goodness, kindness and compassion with a kid from the wrong side of the tracks. In the isolation of my shame, I didn’t realize that other people had their own stories. Now the world is filled with potential friends. Also, people like hearing about parents stranger than their own.” But writing about her past had excruciating moments. Her husband was reading her draft and asked her if her parents were not buying food, what did she eat? “My face started burning with shame. But he said, ‘you have to explain where you got food.’ It was very hard to be honest.” Walls had to write about digging through garbage. “Now that I’ve written it, it doesn’t haunt me anymore.” Walls recognizes that America is going through hard times, but having survived without the basics has helped her not take anything for granted. The Glass Castle has been optioned by Paramount and is currently with Brad Pitt’s production company. Walls’ next book, Broke Back Horses, is due out in October. She says it is being called a “true novel,” as it is based on her grandmother’s life, but told in first person and with gaps filled in with fiction. I WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the little shop BIG SALE 856-825-1194 HOURS Tue.- urs. 11-5 Fri. 11-6 • Sat. 11-4 60% OFF Melissa & Doug Toys % 75 OFF Winter & Selected Spring SALE ENDS 3-25/09 Large Selection of Christening Out ts & Gi s the grapevine { 11 } One Sale Item CLOTHING w/ this ad SIZES PREEMIE TO 4T 137 N. HIGH STREET, MILLVILLE NEW LOCATION Formerly Ricci’s Little Shop I Faces in the News Davila Promoted Battle of the Young Warrior The champions, from left: Hector Agosto, 3rd place Kata and Sparring; Diana Diaz, 2nd place Kata and Sparring, 4th place Weapons; Patrick Maxwell, 2nd place Weapons and Kata, 4th place Sparring. All the karate competitiors train at NJ State Black Belt Association in Vineland. Glenn Davila has been promoted to President of Performance Marketing (PM), a marketing and branding firm serving the Delaware Valley. Along with company founder Penny Rossi, Davila will provide support for all marketing and management functions including strategic planning, advertising, public relations, special events, market research, direct mail, signage and Internet marketing. Davila was part of the team that initially formed Performance Marketing. In 2000, Rossi spun off the company from Unitel Wireless Communications as an independent marketing firm. Since then, the company has worked with local and regional clients including South Jersey Healthcare and the SJH Foundation, Minotola National Bank, Stanker & Galetto, and the Greater Vineland Chamber of Commerce. VASA Partners with Youth Services The Vineland Administrators and Supervisors Association (VASA) recently formed a partnership with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Cumberland and Salem County and the Boys and Girls Club of Vineland, according to Dr. Thomas McCann, VASA president and Vineland High School South principal. VASA includes district supervisors of instruction, principals, executive principals, assistant principals, administrative assistants, and department directors and coordinators. “We’re thrilled,” said Donna Bennett, CEO for Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Cumberland and Salem Counties. “Since we mainly offer one-to-one mentoring services, I think VASA could be very helpful….” Said Chris Volker, Chief Professional Officer of the Boys and Girls Clubs: “We’re always excited when we can get more people involved in helping the children who really need assistance.” In the photo, from left: Bennett, Dr. McCann, and Volker. LSA Recognized At the annual reorganization meeting of the Statewide Insurance Fund, the Landis Sewerage Authority (LSA) received a Special Recognition Award for “maintaining an exemplary loss control program and employee safety program.” Pictured are Executive Director Dennis Palmer, Carol Ricci, Insurance Coordinator and Chairman Peter Galetto, Sr. with the award plaque received at the conference. Free Movie Rental @ Coupon Good for One Free* Overnight Movie Rental when you rent one at regular price. Hoag in Business 50 Years Martin K. Hoag, of Hoag-Parrish Financial Management, is celebrating 50 years in business. He started in 1959 as the sole proprietorship, selling New York Life Insurance out of his home. Hoag has served as President of the Vineland City Council (1968-1972); Chairman of the Board for Newcomb Hospital for three years and as a Board Member from 1980 to 1990. He also served on the Board of Directors of the United Jersey Bank from 1972 to 1989. Hoag is currently a member of Vineland Rotary and the Greater Vineland Chamber of Commerce. For the past 20 years, he has awarded scholarships to deserving Vineland High School seniors with financial needs. In 2000, Hoag joined forces with his son-in-law, Frank Parrish to form HoagParrish Financial Management. Raised on Staten Island New York, Hoag is a World War II veteran who served as an officer in General Patton’s Third Army in all five European Campaigns. Kudos to Edmeads The family and friends of Toya Edmeads would like to celebrate with her as she has attained some major successes in the past several years. Edmeads has carried a nursing license in the state of New Jersey for 29 years. She is also licensed in California. She has been attending Cumberland County College since 2004, majoring in Psychosocial Rehabilitation. In 2006, she made the Dean’s list and was inducted into Phi Theta Kappa (national honor society for two-year colleges), In 2008, she made the President’s list. She is presently employed with Bayada Nurses of Linwood and has been with them for five years. “We are immensely proud of her accomplishments and wish her the best as she continues on her journey through life. Keep up the good work!” Choose from THOUSANDS of popular DVD and Blu-Ray Rentals. *Free overnight movie rental when rented along with regular priced overnight movie rental. Regular additional day fees apply. One Free rental per coupon per customer per day. Expires 3/25/09 . { 12 } the grapevine | MARCH 11, 2009 Visit www.doublefeatures.com for info on all of the latest new releases on DVD and Blu-Ray Disc and sign up for our free weekly emailed newsletter. Artesi is Martial Arts Living Legend From left: Karate students and Goju Ryu Karate Masters Anthony Lingo and Marty Manuel congratulate their instructor, Grand Master 10th Degree Red Belt Joseph A. Artesi for being named a Martial Arts Living Legend. Artesi is the director of the NJ State Black Belt Association. WE WANT YOUR FACES! SEND US YOUR NEWS. We know that there’s more happening out there, and we Open 10am to 9pm Mon.-Thurs. 10am to 10pm Friday and Saturday 12noon to 9pm Sunday want to help you publicize your events. Send them to us at the address listed on page 3. Rieck Gets Green Flag Dan Rieck has been appointed as a Co-Chair of the New Jersey Motorsports Park (NJMP) Green Flag Committee (GFC). Rieck, along with the other CoChair Barry Taylor will continue to develop and expand the impact the GFC has on the local and racing communities. A former racecar driver and huge racing history buff, Rieck spent many race weekends at the old Vineland Speedway back in the 1950s and 60s Rieck replaces original GFC co-chair Hugh McElroy, who has transferred out of the area and is no longer able to participate in activities and events. The NJMP Green Flag Committee works to inform the general public of the features and benefits of NJMP and related Millville Airport tourism centers. In the photo: Rieck gets into a Lotus Formula junior single seater at the Vineland Speedway in 1964. FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Worldwide Convenience • Personal Attention Savings Home Equity Checking VISA Credit Cards Auto Loans VISA Check Cards Personal Loans Online Banking Plus Much More! “Serving Members for Over 70 Years” 37 West Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08360 856-696-0767 Also serving members at: 28A Cornwell Dr. Bridgeton, NJ 08302 856-453-9094 www.cumcofcu.org Ramada Honored by ARC The Ramada Inn of Vineland was honored for providing the American Red Cross with an outstanding facility to conduct community blood drives. Present at the award ceremony were Sherry Kejzman Soutiere, representing the Kejzman family, owners of the Ramada Inn; Carla Yates, and Guy Troiano, from the American Red Cross; and Vineland Rotarian Ron McMahon, Blood Drive Organizer for the Vineland Rotary Club. The ceremony took place during a Vineland Rotary Club Luncheon. The Vineland Rotary Club members have participated with the American Red Cross in donating blood for the past 11 years. During that time, Rotarians, their friends and family members have donated 1,000 units of blood holding four blood drives a year. In the photo, from left: Carla Yates, Sherry Kejzman Soutiere, Guy Troiano, and Ron McMahon. Vineland Rotary Club recently inducted Melissa Rhodes, owner of the Huntington Learning Center in Millville, into the Vineland Rotary Club. Club Member, Charles Loyle, inducted Melissa, and her sponsor, Melanie Druziako, left, presented her with a Rotary pin. Protect Your Health & Home There is no better time than the present to rethink the products that you use in your home and on your body. We are assaulted by toxic chemicals, dangerous additives and poisons in our food, home products, and construction materials — day after day, every day. Is it any wonder why cancer is afflicting Americans at an alarming rate? Bonnie Laube (center) receives the Vocational Service Award from current Rotary District Governor Ralph Owen (left) and incoming Rotary District Governor Sam Conte (right) at an award ceremony in Whippany, NJ. You can start to do something about it by ridding yourself of the toxic products currently in your household that are — at this very moment — affecting you and your children. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | The solution is . . . Go Green! D’Angelo Leads Seals The YMCA of Vineland swim team traveled to Ocean County YMCA for the 12&under New Jersey State Championship. Victoria D’Angelo finished 9th in the 9-10 girls 50 breaststroke 39.73 and 14th in the 100 breaststroke 1:27.76, swimming two personal best times. Other swimmers with personal best times at the meet include Melanie Milam, Kelsey DeMatte, and Alan Hsueh. Also, Joey Martino made two more National qualifying and personal best times in the 100 freestyle and 100 breaststroke. Vineland YMCA swimmers pictured include Alan Hsueh, Keith Harris, Melanie Milam, Kelsey DeMatte, and Victoria D’Angelo. Create a healthier, safer place to live with our organic and natural product lines. Let us show you how to convert your household to a safer, non-toxic environment and help protect your health using less expensive, higher quality products. Your family is worth it. the grapevine { 13 } If you like the idea, give us a call for more info. 877-460-1969 Be sure to mention that you saw it in The Grapevine. I Faces in the News St. Anthony Breaks Ground on First Phase of Expansion Saint Anthony Greek Orthodox Church held a groundbreaking ceremony last Friday for the first phrase of its three-phase expansion project. The first phase of the expansion at 430 West Wheat Road is the installation of an elevator, to include creation of a two-floor elevator shaft, topped off with a bell tower. The elevators are necessary for elderly and handicapped parishoners who have difficulty getting down the steep stairs to the social area below the church. Also part of the first phase expansion is an indoor waiting area with matching architectural design, with an anticipated completion date of April 2009. The second phase includes construction of a 12,000-square-foot multipurpose facility with expanded parking lot, and the third phase consists of an expansion of the existing church, which has served the Greek community in Vineland for 35 years. Pictured at the groundbreaking are, left to right: Marco Papadaniil (Parish Council), John Papadaniil (architect), Richard Milstead (Legal Council), James Gruccio (Legal Council), State Sen. Jeff Van Drew, Mayor Robert Romano, Fr. Nick Rafael, Nick Kaskabas (Parish Council President), Dr. Paul Mastoridis (Parish Council VP & Project Director), Jim Costas (Parish Council), Pan Kaskabas (building committee), Dan Kuhar (DRK Construction) and City Councilman Doug Albrecht (Parish Council Secretary). Garrett in Honor Band FREE WORKSHOP!!! Learn the Three Secrets to YOUR HEALTH PROBLEMS Learn Natural Solutions to Get Your Health Back! If you suffer from Fatigue, Headaches, Hormone Imbalances, Digestive Trouble, Pain, Asthma, Arthritis, Sinus Problems/ Allergies, Weight Problems, and more, then this is for you! Jenna Garrett, a Rossi Middle School sixth grader, has been selected to perform with the 2008/2009 All South Jersey Honor Band. Garrett was one 12 musicians accepted for 24 flute chairs in the Honor Band from a field of more than 60 candidates from throughout southern New Jersey, according to Kenneth Schultz, her music teacher (pictured with her here). { 14 } the grapevine | MARCH 11, 2009 Monday, March 23 • 7:00-8:00 PM Vineland Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave. Workshop participants will: • gain understanding of the CAUSE of their health problems • learn non-drug solutions Presented by the Foundation For Welness Professionals Make your reservation today by calling Internal Medicine Associates, P.A. 201 Laurel Heights Drive, Bridgeton, NJ 08302 • Phone: 856-455-4800 & Cumberland Medical Associates, P.A. 1206 West Sherman Ave., Bldg. 1, Vineland, NJ 08360 • Phone: 856-691-8444 (856) 691-1313 Use of the Vineland Public Library’s Meeting Room does not constitute Library endorsement. Seating is Limited to the First 20 Callers! proudly welcome General Surgeon, Cristina M. Nituica, M.D., specializing in breast surgery, to their sta?. As the premier female surgeon in the Cumberland County area, Dr. Nituica provides invaluable surgical services, especially to females in need of quality breast health care, within our communities. All major insurances accepted Quigley Wins T-Shirt Contest Notre Dame Regional School sixth grader Kelly Quigley has won the “Design a TShirt Contest” sponsored by Buena Boro Recycling and Clean Community Grants. some 40 other area students also entered the contest. In the photo, Boro of Buena Councilwoman Pat Andolaro and Bill Nimohay, Supervisor of Public Works, present Quigley with a T-Shirt sporting her design; her classmates and teachers were also given T-shirts. FREE VEIN SCREENING Varicose Veins? Leg Swelling? Painful Legs? • Varicose veins can progressively worsen to leg swelling, permanent skin changes and pain • 30-minute treatments done in the office • Requires no down-time • Covered by insurance Monday, March 23, 2-6pm 2950 College Drive, Suite 2B • Vineland, NJ 08360 Wednesday, March 25, 2-6pm Reyes Honored Bienvenida “Skipper” Reyes was awarded the 2008-09 Special Projects Recognition Award by the Gloucester County Special Services School District. She was selected to receive the award for her contributions to the Migrant Eductaion Program, which she has been a part of for the past 25 years. For the past 13 years, Reyes has worked as a summer school teacher, as well as providing instruction to the young adult migrant population in the evenings at the farm sites. In the photo: Reyes (with nametag) is surrounded by family, from left: a sister Professor Sofia Andrion from Panama, son Joshua, nephew Luis Andrion, daughter-inlaw Jacinda, daughter Joelle, and son Jared. Friday, March 27, 2-6pm RFB Surgical Plus, 556 Egg Harbor Rd., Suite A, Sewell 1000 White Horse Rd., Suite 703, Voorhees Specializing in spider and varicose vein treatment Please Call for appointment 856-309-VEIN (8346) Charles L. Dietzek, D.O., FACOS Raymond S. Woitalik, M.D. FACS WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | www.VeinVascular.com It’s It’s easy to get distracted by today’s o distracted y today’s r headlines… Frank Parrish & Martin Hoag You may You ma want to wait until “better times” to invest. e key to ay times” invest. time es long-ter i estment l long-term investment success has historically been to stay invested rm inv h hi rically b histori ll inv d i ested regardle regardless of what’s happening in the world market. Contact the ess what’s wo mark orld ket. investm professionals Hoag-Parris Financial Management investment professionals at Hoag-Parrish Financial Management ment sh for more information. more r Dial 85 Dial 856-691-1900 for a free consultation that carries absolutely 56-691-1900 tion carries no obligation. You can see us online at www.hoag-parrish.com. obligation. You g www w w.hoag-par rish.com. r Academy of Therapeutic Massage & Healing Arts ENROLL EARLY Receive a $300 Discount Next Class Starts March 16th Call NOW For A Tour & School Booklet 1881 S . DELS E A DR . V I NELAND, NJ ( 8 56) 692- 8111 the grapevine { 15 } Hoag-Parrish Hoag-Parrish Financial Ma Mangement Fi F nancial M ngement Securities offered through Royal Alliance Associates Inc., a registered broker-dealer. Member urities Royal Inc., , broker-dealer. FINRA/SIPC. Advisory Services FINRA/SIPC. Advisory Ser vices offered through Hoag-Parrish Financial Management, a registered NRA/SIPC Hoag-Parrish P Management, I Culinary Adventures { STEPHEN WILSON / PHOTOS: JILL MCCLENNEN } Cake and Dinner, Too A wedding cake delivery is a good enough excuse to dine out in Philly. thought that if we were going to drive all the way to Philly to deliver the cake, we might as well stay in the city for dinner and drinks. The cake was fairly large, and the base was a heavy black marble stand that the father of the bride had made specifically for this purpose. Jill and I decided to take the cake in two pieces, and prepared accordingly. After closing the bakery on Saturday evening, we cleaned up and before long were on our way to Philly. As we drove down Market Street in Philadelphia looking for the hotel, we realized it was on the opposite side of the street. We did a long, slow loop around City Hall, annoying several people behind us. We have a magnet on the back of the van that states “Caution: Wedding Cake on Board,” because we get tired of people honking at us when we go slowly around corners. I had called the concierge earlier and was instructed to pull up to the front entrance. Jill eased the van to the curb, and I tossed my keys to the doorman. We unloaded the cake onto a cart that we brought with us and began to wheel it into the hotel. We slowly made our way through the lobby, into the elevator, across the ballroom and to the display table. We were nervous every time someone walked by and made a snarky comment—it is NOT funny when you ask us if we’ve ever dropped a wedding cake. After about a half hour, we had set the cake up and it looked great. We left the hotel with about 30 minutes to spare before the guests would arrive. With the hard part done, it was time to eat. We parked the van in a parking garage nearby, and made our way onto Sansom Street. We were headed to Vintage, a wine L ast month, when The Sweet Life Bakery crew went to New York, we all stayed at the apartment of Lindsay’s sister and her fiancée. Last week, we made their wedding cake and transported it to Loews Philadelphia Hotel, where the wedding was to take place. We bar recommended to us by a customer of ours. He had told us the vibe was fun, the food good, and the wine selection excellent. We found Vintage right around the corner from El Vez (where I had gotten phenomenal guacamole a few months back). The dining area was long and dark, and the place was packed with hipsters. The music was loud but chill, and the whole place hummed from the conversations of several dozen people. We sat near the back of the dining room at a tall bistro table and perused the smallish menu for a few minutes. We ordered three dishes—fried calamari with a smoked tomato aioli, French onion soup, and a homemade veggie burger made with lentils, white beans, and root vegetables. Jill ordered a drink special, a champagne and lychee concoction, I got an Argentinean Malbec and Brittany asked our server what he recommended for a white wine. She settled on a Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand. All were excellent, especially Brittany’s wine. New Zealand is becoming well renowned for their Sav Blanc, and rightfully so. The food quickly arrived. The burger was wonderful, served with caramelized shallots and baby arugula on top, and golden skinny Beautiful Smiles, Made Affordable OUR SERVICES { 16 } the grapevine | MARCH 11, 2009 MILLVILLE FAMILY DENTAL Union Lake Crossing Shopping Center 2144 N. 2nd St., Millville NEW PATIENT WELCOMING PACKAGE $ 80( reg. $230.) Includes oral exam, full mouth series of x-rays, cleaning & polishing, oral cancer screening, periodontal (gums) evaluation. With coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Emergency Walk-Ins Welcome • Same-Day Denture Repair • • • • • • • • • • • Cleaning & X-Rays Porcelain Veneers Cosmetic Dentistry Periodontal Therapy (Gum Treatment) Full Mouth Reconstruction Implant Rehabilitation Root Canals (One Visit) Full & Partial Dentures Bleaching White Fillings Crowns & Bridges 856-825-2111 Open 7 Days a Week. Day & Evening Hours Proud Member Of The Allied Dental Practices Of NJ Personalized Dentistry SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO OUR SENIOR CITIZENS Se Habla Español E D W A R D P O L L E R , D D S • G L E N N P R A G E R , D D S • TO D D P R A G E R , D D S • D A N I E L D I C E S A R E , D M D Eating Out people milling about. It was interesting to see the difference in the crowd from one place to the next, even though Vintage and Fergie’s are right around the corner from each other. We left Fergie’s and made our way back to the garage, where we changed clothes in the van in a move that would have made Superman proud. We walked over to the Loews, where the reception was well under way. The cake had been cut and enjoyed by that point. We found the bride and groom and congratulated them on their future life together. We danced for a bit, and since the evening had long since turned into night, we decided to head home. It was a fast, fun trip into Philly. It’s nice to have a big city so close, and I’m glad we got to take advantage of it…if only for a few hours. I Stephen Wilson along with his wife Jill McClennen owns The Sweet Life Bakery. You may contact him via e-mail at thesweetlifebakery@verizon.net. Vineland, 697-5500. Steaks, veal, chicken dishes. Meet friends at the bar, gather for dinner. Open daily for lunch and dinner. Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 205-0012. Home of the “Gutbuster” 21-oz. burger, as well as pizza, salads, wings, subs, and dinners. Casa Dori II, Brewster Rd. and Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 794-1888. Authentic Italian, lunch and dinner; catering available. Continental Room at the Ramada Inn, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 6963800. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Open to hotel guests and the public. Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call for lunch and dinner specials. Soft ice cream and cakes year-round. Mon.-Sat 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 696-1900. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Takeout, too. Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. Open 24 hours. Kids eat free Tues. and Sat. Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave., Vineland, 691-5511. Family time-honored recipes, fresh ingredients. Donkey’s Place, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland, 690-1777. One-of-a-kind cheesesteaks made on large, fresh poppyseed rolls. Dreamz Cafe, 2184 Union Lake Crossing, Millville, 765-5029. Panini, sandwiches, salads, soups. Also, gelato, Italian coffee, desserts, smoothies, and frappuccino. From fine dining to lunch spots to bakeries, the area has choices to satisfy any appetite. Call for hours. Amato’s Restaurant, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 692-5756. Veal, chicken, seafood, and pasta specialties for dinner. Open for lunch, too. Closed Sundays. Andrea Trattoria, 1833 Harding Hwy., Newfield, 697-8400. Chef/owner Andrea Covino serves up Italian specialties in an atmosphere of fine dining. Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave, Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food served tapas style, specialty martinis, catering, private parties. Extensive wine list. Live music every Friday 10 p.m.-1.a.m. Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-0909. This breakfast and lunch spot offers a menu of sandwiches named for colleges near and far. Bain’s Deli, 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. Come in for breakfast, lunch, or dinner, or take it with you. Daily specials include coffee of the day. Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees, desserts, drink specials. Take-out, too. Happy Hour buffet Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. NFL flat-screen TVs. Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy., French fries on the side. The calamari was great—so hot, tender and crispy, it was hard not to eat them all myself. After relaxing for a few minutes, we left Vintage and walked over to Fergie’s, a little Irish pub on a side street. We had a pint, and people-watched for a while. The pub was very crowded and there were tons of Continued on next page It’s an intriguing steak sandwich served on an oversized poppyseed kaiser roll baked exclusively for Donkey’s Place. That’s right, a round roll. The meat is a block of thinly sliced ribeye steak grillcooked, but never chopped, covered with American cheese and topped with tender onions cooked until they are caramelized from our secret seasoning. It’s the loads of our signature onions that gives Donkey’s Steaks its personality. The red pepper relish is a tangy addition to the flavorful taste. 20 South 6th Street Vineland, NJ Pay to the bearer: WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Donkey’s Place expires 3/31/09 Limit one per customer – present this check to receive discount 10% Off Entire Order Stomach Stimulus Check • Panzarotti • Chicken Cheeseteak • Salad (Grilled Chicken Salad) • Grilled Barbecue Chicken Deluxe • Tender BBQ Pork Sandwich • Fried Fish Platter, and Much More! the grapevine { 17 } 20 South 6th Street, Vineland, NJ (856) 690-1777 • Fax (856) 690-1677 • www.donkeyscheesesteak.com Continued from previous page Esposito’s Maplewood III, 200 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks, seafood and pasta dishes at this Italian restaurant. Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. & Tuckahoe Rd., Vineland, 691-6080. Italian cuisine and dinner buffets to savor. Family-owned. Fresh Restaurant, 1405 Mays Landing Rd., Millville, 327-3435. Jumbo lump crabcakes, Black Angus burgers. Wed. is pasta night. Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli, 527 S. Brewster Rd.., 697-3509. Name says it all. Daily specials, catering. Closed Sunday. General Custard’s Last Stand, 2578 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 696-2992. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Tues.-Sat. Gina’s Ristorante, 110 N. High St., Millville, 825-4241. Italian cuisine, lunch and dinner, BYOB, nothing over $20. Giorgio’s Restaurant 363 E. Wheat Rd., Buena, 697-2900. Serving lunch and dinner. Italian cuisine, pizza. Sun.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Giovanni’s Italian-American Deli. 1102 N. East Ave., Vineland, 692-0459. Pizza, Italian subs, all your lunch favorites. The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf Course, 4049 Italia Rd., Vineland, 691-5558. Restaurant and lounge open to the public for lunch Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Jake’s. 611 Taylor Rd., Franklinville, 6945700. Italian-American, served lakeside. Lunch, dinner, happy hour, Sunday brunch. Joe’s Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-8860. Barbecue and Kosher chickens, homemade sides, catering. Landicini’s Family Restaurant & Pizzeria Landis and Lincoln aves., Vineland, 6913099. Italian cuisine, gourmet pizza, gourmet salads. Open for lunch and dinner. Larry’s II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-9001. Bring the family for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Sunday breakfast buffet and early-bird dinners. Library V Restaurant, 206 Rt. 54, Buena, 697-9696. Renowned for prime rib, steaks, seafood, salad bar. Closed Mon. and Tues. La Locanda Pizzeria & Ristorante, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 794-3332. Pasta, veal, chicken. Lunch and dinner. Closed Sunday. Lucia’s Ristorante, 785 W. Sherman Ave., Vineland, 692-0300. Italian fine dining and regional cooking. Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 563-0030. Italian-American cuisine, seafood and veal. Open daily for lunch and dinner, Sunday breakfast buffet. Martino’s Trattoria & Pizzeria, 2614 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 692-4448. Dinners, brick oven pizza, risotto, polenta. Open daily for all three meals. Merighi’s Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. Banquet/ wedding facility as well as intimate restaurant. Nicky G. Fridays 9 p.m.–midnight. Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s Head rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet lunches and dinners in a casual setting. Neptune Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge, 1554 South Delsea Drive, Vineland, 6922800. American cuisine, array of cocktails. Next Oar, 127 N. High St., Millville, 2931360. Weekly menu, made-to-order dishes. Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek cuisine—lamb dishes and salads. Paperwaiter Restaurant & Pub, 1111 Village Dr., Millville, 825-4000. A special place for all your special occasions. Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland, 6940500. Breakfast, lunch, dinner specials; convenient drive-thru, mini-meal specials. Pete’s Pizza, 20 W. Park Ave., Vineland, 205-9998. Pizza (including whole wheat), subs, wings. Open daily 11 a.m-10 p.m. Positano Ristorante, 419 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 696-0477. Veal, chicken, and seafood specials, BYOB. Richland House, 1303 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-5700. Eclectic dinners and casual lunch fare. Closed Mondays. Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville, 3278878. Authentic Vietnamese—noodle soups, curry, hotpot, Buddhist vegetarian. South Vineland Tavern, 2350 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-7888. Breakfast, lunch, dinner daily. Seafood and prime rib. Steakhouse at Centerton Country Club, 1136 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3325. Lunch and dinner. Steaks, reserve wines, upscale casual. Sweet Life Bakery, 601 East Landis Ave., Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood bakery. Homemade pastries, cakes, coffee. Tony Sopranos, 107 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 405-0200. Pizza, Mexican Southwest fare, Atkins-friendly salads. Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs, chicken, fish, steaks. Always clams, eat in or take out. Venuto’s Old World Pizza, 2166 N. Second St., Millville, 327-4002. Pizzas, gourmet salads, appetizers. Villa Filomena, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena Vista, 697-7107. Dinner combos, grilled meats, fish. Lunch and dinner daily. Wheat Road Cold Cuts, 302 Wheat Rd., Vineland, 697-0320. Deli and catering. Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-8899. Dinners, grilled sandwiches, wings in eight flavors. Willmott’s Pizza. 12 S. Seventh St., Vineland, 696-1525. Hand-tossed pizzas, stromboli, breakfast pizza. Take-out or eat in. Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville, 3270909. Continental cuisine and spirits served in a casually upscale setting. Ye Olde Centerton Inn, 1136 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3201. American classics served in a building right out of a Rockwell painting. { 18 } the grapevine | MARCH 11, 2009 I Recipe Corner { LISA ANN DiNUNZIO } Recipe Swap A healthy start to the day is fun and delicious with these favorite pancakes. Oatmeal Pancakes 3 cups buttermilk 1 3/4 cups old-fashioned oats 1 1/4 cups flour 2 tbs. sugar 1 tsp. baking powder 3/4 tsp. salt 1 tsp. baking soda 2 tbs. water 2 eggs, lightly beaten 2 tbs. butter, melted ay: Tuesd Mic Open ht Nig 8 PM Hours: Mon.-Sat. 11am–2am Sunday 8am–2am St. Patty’s Day Party! $2 Miller Lite Bottles; $2 Bud Lime Bottles; Knot non Dri Girls Specnk ial Shant Up Frida yN Shu ight Mon. $6.95 Miller Light Pitchers Tues. $6.95 Bud Light Pitchers Wed. $6.95 Bud & Bud Light Pitchers Thurs. $6.95 Coors Light Pitchers Fri. Sat. Sun. $2 Miller High Life Bottles; $2 Bud & Bud Light Bottles; G reetings! It’s important to start the day with a good healthy breakfast—it helps children focus better in school and adults to deal better with daily tasks. Whole grain cereal or toast, fruit, eggs and oatmeal are all good options. It’s best to stay away from sugary cereals and pastries; instead of helping you get a good jumpstart to the day, they will make you feel sluggish. Here are two healthy breakfast recipes for you to try. Marie Robinson writes: “I love making my family a healthy breakfast. Here is a pancake recipe that I’d like to share….” 2 tsp. sugar 1 tsp. baking soda ¼ tsp. salt Fluffy Buttermilk Pancakes 1 1/2 cups buttermilk 2 eggs 1 cup flour plus 2 tablespoons 2 tsp. wheat germ In a large bowl, beat buttermilk and eggs, then stir in the flour, wheat germ, sugar, baking soda and salt, just until blended (batter will be lumpy). Heat a heavy skillet or griddle over medium-high heat. Lightly grease with butter. Using about 3 tablespoons batter for each pancake, cook until bottom is golden brown and edges are dry. Turn and cook until second side is golden brown. Serve pancakes warm with maple syrup. You can also top with fresh berries, bananas, or chopped pecans. Anna Miller writes: “My husband and I share breakfast together every day. We both cook and take turns making our meals. Once a month, we have family and close friends over for brunch, this is one of the most requested recipes we serve.” In a bowl combine buttermilk and oats, cover and refrigerate overnight. Sift together flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Dissolve baking soda in 2 tablespoons of water. Add the other ingredients in the bowl along with the buttermilk and oats, stir until blended. Bake on a lightly greased hot griddle, until bubbles appear, then turn and lightly brown pancakes on second side. Serve with favorite topping. As always, Bon Appetit! I Lisa Ann is the author of Seasoned With Love, Treasured Recipes and Lisa Ann’s Seasoned With Love II. Send recipes for publication to lapd1991@aol.com or to The Grapevine, 3660 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361. $2 Coors Light Bottles; $6.95 Yuengling Pitchers $2 Yuengling Light Bottles; $6.95 Yuengling Pitchers $2 Corona & Corona Light Bottles; $7.50 Heineken Pitchers 10 % Off Serving Breakfast on Sundays, 8am–2pm All-U-Can-Eat Wings – Sunday, $7.95 Any Food Purchase Mention this ad to receive discount 408 Wheat Rd., Vineland (856) 697-9825 Vineland’s Serving Breakfast & Lunch Daily Dinner Wednesday-Saturday 3 Featuring Steaks, Seafood & Pasta 3 2 DON’T FORGET OUR SPECIAL 2 7 Wednesday Night 7 Pasta Night • Fight the recession and your • 3 financial depression with our 3 new Fresh For Less Menu!! 4 Dinner entrees from $8.95 to $13.95 4 Overstuffed Sandwiches • Black Angus Burgers 3 Chef Fred’s Jumbo Lump Crabcakes 3 FREDRIC BELFUS 5 5 Executive Chef/Owner neighborhood bakery, where everything is made from scratch and quality counts. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | a 6th street between Landis and Elmer in Downtown Vineland 856-692-5353 www.thesweetlifebakery.com The Sweet Life Bakery was recently named ‘Best Muffins in South Jersey? by SJ Magazine Readers Poll the grapevine { 19 } 1405 Mays Landing Rd., Millville, NJ 08332 Between Custard Corral & Old Vineland Tavern I Entertainment JAZZ AND ACOUSTIC, MEET THE ARTIST, STAND-UP, BATTLING BANDS, AND A SCHOOL PRODUCTION. Filomena Ristorante & Lounge, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena, 697-7107. Thurs.: Ladies Night, Fri.: Live music, Sat.: Italian Accordian. THROUGH APRIL 5 Bosco Art Exhibit. Cumberland County College, Guaracini Arts Center (Art Gallery), Sherman Ave. and College Rd., Vineland. Opening Reception March 11, 2-3:30 p.m. 691-8600 ext. 314. The exhibition features 28 works in oils, acrylics, watercolor and mixed media by Gus Bosco. Pictured is Bosco’s “Landscape.” “My work originates from an outward image,” states Bosco. “Once the work begins, the image that I have before me becomes an illusive struggle to bring to life…. I trust my intuitive process to finish it.” The award-winning painter and sculptor studied at the Fleisher Art Memorial as well as the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Prior to retiring, Bosco was an art technician at Camden County College and also taught painting, sculpture and drawing. His work appears in private and corporate collections nationally. SATURDAY, MARCH 14 Savoy Unplugged: Frank Caprarri. Merighi’s Savoy Inn Bistro, Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. 9 p.m.-midnight. No cover. SATURDAY, MARCH 14 Qatsi. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. Acoustic guitar. 7 p.m. SATURDAY, MARCH 14 Tony Mascara. Ramada Inn, Harry’s Lounge, 22 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 6963800. 6:30 p.m. SUNDAY, MARCH 15 Pre-Irish Festival Event. Bogart’s SATURDAY, MARCH 14 Horrible Horrible Creatures, Our Fair City (pictured), Is He Misery, Young Bloods, and Shadow Play. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. 6 p.m., $8. Photo: Bob Conboy Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. Music with SJ Songwriters Guild, 2-5 p.m. SUNDAY, MARCH 15 Book Signing. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 5631400. Also, The Status, The Right Coast, Barely Blind, So To Speak, and Just in Case. 6 p.m., $8. High St., Millville, 327-3714. Author Michelle Andrews signs copies of Child of Compromise: The McKenna Family Chronicles. 2-5 p.m. MARCH 11, 12, 13, 14, AND 17 Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Wed.: ’70s and ’80s Throwback Night (frozen drink specials) 8 p.m.-midnight, Thurs.: Karaoke with DJ Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.1 a.m. Fri.: Blue Moon Dance Party, $3 Blue Moon drafts, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Sat.: Latin Dance Party, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Tues.: Country Western Dance Party (beer and shot specials), 8 p.m.-midnight. FRIDAY, MARCH 13 Dancing with the Cumberland County Stars. Centerton Country Club, 1136 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3325. Four couples will compete to raise Scholarship Funds for CCTEC (Technical Education Center). 7-11 p.m. TUESDAY, MARCH 17 Tony Mascara. Ramada Inn, Harry’s Lounge, 22 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 6963800. 6:30 p.m. the Bay-Atlantic Symphony. 7-8:30 p.m., free. 451-1169. TUESDAY, MARCH 17 Music Lecture. Millville Public Library, 210 Buck St., Millville. Learn about the influences of classical music in jazz; lecture by Paul M. Somers, sponsored by MARCH 19, 20, AND 21 Anything Goes. Sacred Heart High’s Performing Arts Dept. presents the Cole Porter classic. 7:30 p.m. each night, Sat. matinee 1 p.m. $15 reserved, $10 general admission. 691-4491 ext. 1110 or 1206. THURSDAY, MARCH 12 Open Mic. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. 7 p.m. MARCH 13 AND 14 Nightlife at Villa Filomena. Villa MARCH 12, 13, AND 14 Nightlife at Old Oar House. Old Oar House Brewery, 123 N. High St., Millville, 2931200. Thurs.: Open mic, 9 p.m. Fri.: Ravioli Shanker, 9 p.m., Sat: TJ Fry Duo, 9 p.m. AT THE CASINOS Tickets: 1-800-736-1420; www.ticketmaster.com unless otherwise noted. Sinbad. Resorts. 8 p.m., $50. HEADLINERS, COMEDY ACTS, AND MORE Yesterday: A Tribute to the Beatles. Tropicana. Liverpool Club Theater in North Tower. Wed.–Sun., 8:30 p.m., $25. FRIDAY, MARCH 13 Difonzo Pop Experiment. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland. Also RC Static, Gennereo, and Forgotten Fall. 6 p.m. $10$12 (frontgatetickets.com). { 20 } the grapevine | MARCH 11, 2009 HEADLINERS FRIDAY, MARCH 13 Flogging Molly. Showboat House of Blues. 7 p.m. $32, $27. COMEDY & MORE Comedy Club at Borgata. Borgata Music Box: three comedians daily, 9 p.m. (except during headliner engagements) 1-800-298-4200. SATURDAY, MARCH 14 Trump Comedy Series Presents Ben Bailey. Trump Marina. 9 p.m., $25. MARCH 13, 14, AND 15 John Edward. Trump Plaza. Psychic medium. Friday 7 p.m., Saturday 2 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m. $175. FRIDAY, MARCH 13 Friday Night Flashback. Merighi’s Savoy Inn Bistro, Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. DJ Nicky G from 95.1 WAYV, music from ’60s, ’70s, ’80s and today. 9 p.m.-midnight. No cover. Daddy Yankee. Taj Mahal. 9 p.m., $75, $60 and $50. Comedy Stop at the Trop. Three FRIDAY, MARCH 13 Tom Moran/Punky O’Dell and the Love Dark. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. Acoustic, 5 p.m./7 p.m. MARCH 13 AND 14 Johnny Mathis with Gary Mule Deer. Tropicana. 9 p.m., $175. FRIDAY, MARCH 13 Ocean The Legend. Fuel House Coffee SATURDAY, MARCH 14 The Wailers. Taj Mahal. 8 p.m., $25. comedians nightly. Sun.-Thurs., 9 p.m., $23; Fri., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $23; Sat., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $28. Order tickets by phone at the Comedy Stop Box Office: 1-877-FUNNY-AC or 609-348-0920. Visit www.comedystop.com. BOARDWALK HALL MARCH 11 THROUGH 14 A-10 Men’s Basketball Championship. 609-348-7021. I In Our Schools Cumberland Christian High Honor Roll Highest Honors, 2nd Marking Period 9th Grade: Briana Horner, Rachel Nash, Kara Ott, Daniel Vandzura. 10th Grade: Rebecca Gardella, Jacob Havens, Jennifer Leonard, Kylie Ott. 11th Grade: Matthew Austen, Jessica Bradway, Sharmaine Ross. 12th Grade: Kimberly Koering, Jeffrey Sjogren, Richard Worley. 100 Days, 100 Bears The Ellison School’s first grade class celebrated the 100th day of school by making the smiles of 100 children, 100 times brighter. Earlier this year, the children were told the story of a young boy being helped by the Dream Foundation, an organization founded by Ellison parents, Mark and Gina Rudolph, to provide support to children and their families as they cope with devastating illnesses. “The children were so touched that they made cards and mailed them to him in the hospital,” says Rachel Engle, first grade teacher. “They also decided it would be fun to celebrate the 100th day of school by sending him 100 Teddy bears to share with his friends.” The students led a school-wide drive for brand new Teddy bears, and in they came. Carefully counted by the first graders, each Teddy bears was hugged before the students carefully packed up their fluffy friends and sent them on their way. Left behind is a 100-day lesson of love sure to last a lifetime. Honors, 2nd Marking Period 9th Grade: Eric Irizarry, John Johnson, Eric Sjogren. 10th Grade: Jessica Ciaurelli, Emily DenBleyker, Raychel DiMatteo, Angela Maccarelli, Emily May-hew, Brandon Paulus, Brandon Read, Alisa Yeon. 11th Grade: Hannah Andrews, William Fitting, Kevonna Hayes- Kennedy, Erica Nash, Leana Phillips, Taryn Riggs, Amaris Watson. 12th Grade: Sean Connors, Matthew Creamer, Ashley Haney, Richard Malatesta, Ashley Pinckney, Jessica Schaper, Hope Trifiletti, Kelly Varesio, Carey Walden, Paul Welch. Dr. Seuss Celebrated Students at Bishop Schad Regional school participated in a few special events to celebrate Dr. Seuss and Read Across America. Students made Dr. Seuss hats, enjoyed cooking and eating Green Eggs and Ham, and hosted guest readers. Pictured is first grader Carly Fanucci enjoying some Green Eggs and Ham. Mayoral Visit Mayor Robert Romano spoke to several classes of Vineland High’s School of Business and Leadership. He shared his personal and career history and then answered questions. The mayor also shared insights related to the duties and responsibilities of the mayor and city council members. Grandparent Society Mrs. Bialecki’s second grade class at Notre Dame won the penny collection contest for February sponsored by the Grandparent Society. The class gets to pick a dress-down day as their prize. The Notre Dame Grandparent Society is made up of grandparents, aunts and uncles, along with many friends of Notre Dame. Birthdays Are Special Come & Play With Us! WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | 2 Private Rooms Cafe / Movie Area Leave The Details To Us — We Can Take Care of Everything So You Can Relax & Have Fun! CUSTOMIZED BIRTHDAY PARTIES the grapevine { 21 } Stuffing Parties Available Stuff Your Own Cuddly Friend WWW.TOWNPLAYALOT.COM 692-TOWN (8696) BABYSITTING SERVICE AVAILABLE 106 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland Getting Divorced? Bonnie L. Laube, Esq. Greenblatt & Laube, PC Divorce, Separation, Custody, Child Support, Parenting Time, Alimony, Asset Distribution, Emancipation, Domestic Violence Certi?ed by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Civil Trial Attorney 856-691-0424 • email: bll@greenblattlaube.com 200 North Eighth Street • PO Box 883 • Vineland, NJ 08362 { 22 } the grapevine | MARCH 11, 2009 JEWELRY Repair, Redesign or Scrap 856-696-3600 Corner, Main Rd. & Landis Ave., Vineland 1048 North Pearl St., Upper Deerfield A special courtesy will be applied to any purchase of in-stock merchandise when you mention this ad. Full Service and Self-Service Car Wash 10% OFF Any Full-Service Wash with this ad. Exp. 3/31/09 GV-UD Save Time & Money! Vineland’s Premier Car Wash Offers To You: EXPRESS WASH No Waiting for vacuum customers. Stay in your car!! 2611 S. Main Rd., Vineland Vo te d # 1 t” “B es t of B es 20 08 Only $6.00 to get the salt off!! (Between Grant & Sherman) REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS The following transactions of $1,000 or more were filed with Cumberland County in the month of January 2009 (transactions may have occurred in an earlier month). Names listed may, in some cases, be those of buyers’ or sellers’ representatives. Gift Boo k Availables BRIDGETON 104 Harvard Ave., William G Guess (Est. by Exec.) to Oloruntobi A Olusa on 1/6/09 for $165,000 SE Ave & E Broad St., James Todd to TriCounty Community Action Agency Inc. on 1/7 /09 for $16,000 37 Twin Oaks Dr., Sherwood at Twin Oaks LLC to Verna S Hernon on 1/7 /09 for $191,220 Donald Bruce Wood on 1/8/09 for $310,000 451 S 2nd St., Grace Burcham to Financial Solutions Investment Group LLC on 1/9/09 for $25,000 321 Union Lake Rd., Miriam R Anderer (Aka, by Atty.) to Cynthia Carole on 1/9/09 for $178,000 1517 G St., RPJ Properties LLC to Stephen A Scaffidi on 1/12/09 for $203,910 COMMERCIAL TWP 402 Fern Rd., Lisa Garrison to Robert Kerr, Sr. on 1/7 /09 for $25,000 1410 E Buckshutem Rd., Taylor Fletcher Real Estate LLC to Panzini L LLC on 1/8/09 for $435,000 UPPER DEERFIELD 26 Westward Dr., Deutshce Bank Trust Co. Americas (Trust) to Shanda A Richer on 1/7 /09 for $202,500 VINELAND 324 W Cherry St., Joe Acosta (Est. by Exec) to Eligio Rodriguez on 1/5/09 for $7,000 23 Columbia Ave., Julio Ceasar Santiago to Madelyn Santiago on 1/5/09 for $60,000 1861 E Sherman Ave., Robert R Perna, Jr. (Ta) to Robert R Perna, Sr. on 1/5/09 for $150,000 1313 Nelson Ave., John C Reynolds to Erlentz Bernabe on 1/5/09 for $194,000 561 Timber Brook Dr., Freddie D Lavan, Sr. to James G Gillis, Jr. on 1/5/09 for $200,000 1624 Tomahawk Ct., NVR Inc. (Dba) to Quillon Longno on 1/5/09 for $252,715 2451 Magnolia Rd., Tracey E Pace (by Atty.) to Julio C Santiago on 1/5/09 for $299,900 2781 Rosemary Ave., Ezekiel Colon to Jeffrey T Lawrence on 1/6/09 for $199,900 801 Amber Ln., Courtney Dorsey to Desmond P Pessoa on 1/6/09 for $245,000 2782 Rome Rd., Coastal Properties Group LLC to Omar Cruz on 1/7 /09 for $164,000 511 Mayfair St., Eulogio Colon to Ezekiel Colon on 1/7 /09 for $164,000 1364 Venus Dr., Michael S Davis to Ramon J Rodriguez on 1/7 /09 for $168,000 167 E Butler Ave., RPJ Properties LLC to Katie Laferriere on 1/7 /09 for $192,500 2363 Lavalle Ave., Beazer Homes Corp. to Willie M Conley on 1/7 /09 for $286,400 415 W Almond St., Federal National Mortgage Assoc. to Juanita Torres on 1/8/09 for $112,900 711 Yale Terrace., Barbara L Dils (FKA, Est. by Exec.) to David Soto on 1/8/09 for $135,000 242 W Landis Ave., Melini Bros Inc. to Diversified Applications LLC on 1/8/09 for $166,000 800 Florence Ave., Bank of New York Mellon Trust Co. (Trust, by Atty.) to B&B Venture Group LLC on 1/9/09 for $16,500 920 New Pear St., Reinaldo S Vicente to Paul Letizia on 1/12/09 for $85,000 1542 Fela Dr., NVR Inc. (Dba) to Adriano S Regucera on 1/12/09 for $253,418 1950 Industrial Way, 1950 Industrial Way LLC to J&D Produce Inc on 1/12/09 for $2,900,000 DEERFIELD TWP Landis Ave., Frank S Martini to Salvatore F Tedesco, Sr. on 1/8/09 for $550,000 FAIRFIELD TWP 6 Laurel Dr., Maflda Spence to Issac Coombs on 1/6/09 for $5,500 Steward Ave., Dennis Spence to Issac Coombs on 1/6/09 for $8,500 170 Lummis Mill Rd., Judith A Layton (Est. by Exec.) to Domenick Puleo on 1/7 /09 for $121,069 GREENWICH TWP Gum Tree Corner Rd., Ricardo Slade to County of Cumberland on 1/5/09 for $445,574 743 Ye Greate St., James H Orr to Daniel J Orr on 1/6/09 for $200,000 HOPEWELL TWP 76 Hitchner Ave., Garrett E Corliss, III (Exec.) to Rebecca L Maltese on 1/7 /09 for $194,000 LAWRENCE TWP Cedarville Rd., Thomas B Kates, Jr. (Ind. Exec.) to County of Cumberland on 1/5/09 for $165,146 677 Ramah Rd., BBT Builders LLC to Karl J Duerr on 1/7 /09 for $182,000 MAURICE RIVER TWP 70 Leesburg Belleplain, John M Bailey, Jr. to Jason A Barbour on 1/6/09 for $187,000 MILLVILLE 333-334 1/2 W Main St., Joanne L Smith to Edward T Harvey on 1/2/09 for $70,000 2226 S Wedgewood Ct., Evelyne Wallace to Patrick E Williams on 1/5/09 for $215,000 316 W Green St., Jeffrey P Barnes to Michael R Sikora on 1/7 /09 for $23,890 15 Highland Dr., Alfred W Smedley (Exec.) to Thunderbolt Investments LLC on 1/7 /09 for $32,000 602 N 9th St., John Kaspar to Andre R Cephas on 1/7 /09 for $145,000 612 W Main St., Cosmo P Terrigno to www NEED REAL ESTATE? Find Out If You Qualify…. 856-696-CALL (2255) First Time Home Buyer Stimulus Bill **If you have not owned a home within the last 3 years, this also qualifies as a first-time home buyer.** OPEN HOUSE SAT 14TH FROM 1 – 4 & SUN 15TH FROM 1 – 4 Beautiful Bi-Level – Move In Condition Wow! Take a look at this almost new home on a quiet cul-de-sac street featuring 3 bedrooms (with a possible 4th) and 2 full baths. Open, bright & spacious. Beautiful hardwood floors, large master suite, giant family room, central air, high efficiency gas heat (low utility bills!), formal living & dining rooms, library, plenty of closets & 2 extra large storage closets. Spacious, wooded back yard features a slate patio and an above ground deck. Appliances included. Truly a Must See! Asking Price: $239,900.00 Price Flexibility: Willing to negotiate CONTACT INFORMATION: Eman & Allison 609-338-7155 • aheather9@hotmail.com PROPERTY DETAILS: Floors: 2, # of bedrooms: 3, Sq Footage: 2100 Lot Size: 120 x 110, # of bathrooms: 2 City Sewer/ Water: yes LOCATION: 695 Ridgewood Dr. Vineland, NJ 08361 Located near the soccer fields on Spring Rd. & maple Ave. Call for Directions. Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. What an incredible opportunity for first-time homebuyers! In addition to a huge selection of homes to choose from, and near-record low interest rates on solid, 30-year fixed rate mortgages, and far more affordable prices, first-time homebuyers now have the added incentive of a $8,000 federal income tax credit to help them buy their first home!* Stop paying rent. Become a homeowner instead! Come meet with us on Saturday March 14 between 10am-1pm and Tuesday March 17 between 6pm-8pm. While you’re at it, meet with a Gateway Funding loan officer in the same location and get pre-qualified for a mortgage. LOCATION: YMCA of Vineland 1159 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ OPEN HOUSE DATES Come between the hours of: Saturday, March 14 between 10am-1pm Tuesday, March 17 between 6pm-8pm WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Stop by and Meet with a friendly, knowledgeable Maturo Realty agent. We’ll answer all your questions regarding the incentives and benefits of becoming a first-time home buyer. 1080 East Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ Broker/Owner, Thomas Maturo (856) 696-2255 Held by: Maria Larrain, Evelyn Schweibinz, and Lisa Novicke of Maturo Realty, Inc. and Gateway Funding For More Information call: Maria 856-207-4678, Evelyn 856-498-6034, or Lisa 609-204-5541 Hablamos Español the grapevine { 23 } “OPENING DOORS TO HOME OWNERSHIP” Diversified Mortgage Services, L.P . Dave Mazowski, Brian Costanzo, and Blaise Menzoni Lobby Hours: Monday – Wednesday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM Thursday & Friday: 8:30 AM – 6:00 PM Saturday: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM It’s All About the 2.50% APY* Capital NOW Checking Account the Hard-to-Beat Rate with Hard-to-Top Benefits. We rolled out what is probably South Jersey’s best rate on a NOW Checking Account to celebrate Super Bowl and welcomed many new customers to Capital Bank. Now we’re doing it again—in anticipation of college basketball’s “March Madness.” So you can still get that amazing 2.50% Annual Percentage Yield (APY)—guaranteed through June 30, 2009! This account comes with unlimited check-writing privileges and free logo checks. There are no minimum balance, monthly fees or ATM/Debit card charges. What’s more, we’ll refund any ATM charges imposed by other banks! Capital Bank of New Jersey. Making hoopla. Making money. Making friends. Drive-Thru Hours: Monday – Thursday: 8:00 AM – 6:00 PM Friday: 8:00 AM – 7:00 PM Saturday: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM Or Anytime At CapitalBankNJ.com Se Habla Español COMING SOON TO VINELAND A NEW CAPITAL BANK BRANCH On West Landis Avenue, Next to the New Wal-Mart Supercenter And It’s All About Our “March Madness” 42” Flatscreen TV Drawing. Enter in time to see “March Madness” on the big screen. No purchase or account opening required to enter, nor do you need to be present at the 3 PM, March 20, 2009 drawing to win. Ask any employee for details or call 856.690.1234. And congratulations to Iqbal (Sam) Singh and Harinder Kaur of Vineland, winners of our January 30th TV drawing. *Annual Percentage Yield (APY). Offer may be withdrawn at any time without previous notice. Interest rate may vary. Fees may reduce earnings. Our Focus Is You. 175 S. Main Road, Vineland, NJ • 856.690.1234 Member FDIC

Posted on March 11th, 2009 by by Mike

March 4, 2009

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INSIDE LANDIS & WOOD • COOKING VEGAN • CONLEY DRIVE HOME • RECIPE VOLUME 2 | ISSUE 4 | MARCH 4, 2009 CONNECTING YOU T O V I N E L A N D . W E E K L Y. Visit us online www.grapevinenewspaper.com { VINCE FARINACCIO } { STEPHANIE FARRELL / PHOTO: MIKE EPIFANIO } Mayor Robert Romano reads to Mrs. Bordo’s fourth grade class at Petway Elementary. The Chamber at 90 Years The Vineland business networking group has changed with the times. inety years ago, 200 Vineland residents gathered at the now defunct Stanisic’s Hall on a Wednesday evening in early June. Amidst the music, entertainment and general camaraderie, a meeting was conducted. By the end of the night, 55 attendees had signed on as charter members of the Vineland Chamber of Commerce. By the following month, N Read Across Vineland Area schools have a full lineup of activities this week to inspire students to read. Parents and community leaders get in on the act, too. Continued on page 8 Executive Director Paige Desiere at the Chamber office on Delsea Drive. T his week Vineland schools are celebrating Read Across America, a nationwide event commemorating Dr. Seuss’ birthday. Dr. Seuss, officially Theodor Seuss Geisel, wrote more than 40 children’s books, hooking kids with his unusual characters and funny rhyming tales. At Johnstone Elementary School, Christopher Leistner and Usamah Oden, both fifth graders from Danielle Smith’s class, were checking out biographies on Dr. Seuss. They explained that although Dr. Seuss uses wacky and silly words, he gets across messages for real-life situations. Media Specialist Sonja Levin refers to that technique as Seuss’ sideways approach to deliver a serious message. “On equality and justice, Yertle the Turtle, ‘I know up on top you are seeing great sights. But down here at the bottom, we too, should have rights.’ Bartholomew and the Oobleck: ‘But even Continued on page 9 It’s About 2.50% APY* Capital NOW Checking & Our “March Madness” 42” Flatscreen TV Drawing.             NEW BRANCH COMING SOON! Ask any employee, call 856.690.1234 or visit CapitalBankNJ.com for details. *Annual Percentage Yield (APY). Offer may be withdrawn at any time without previous notice. Interest rate may vary. Fees may reduce earnings. Rates guaranteed through June 30, 2009 No purchase or account opening required to enter drawing. Our Focus Is You. 175 S. Main Road, Vineland, NJ • 856.690.1234 Se Habla Español  CapitalBankNJ.com DIV. OF ZUKERMAN FOODS The Top Banana Wholesale Outlet Wheat Road & Delsea Drive, Vineland • 641-0815 HOURS: Mon. – Thurs. 9-6:30; Friday 9-8; Sat. 9-6; Sun. 11-5 Sale Expires 3/4/09-3/10/09 EGGS & MILK LOW PRICE ALWAYS! Ready to pick up. Easy shop by Phone or Fax 641-0813 Major Credit Cards Accepted CHILE FRESH CALIFORNIA FRESH-JUICY FRESH ICEBURG FRESH GREEN GRAPES RED OR GREEN CLEMENTINES LETTUCE .99¢ $3.99 3 LB. Bag .99¢ Each SCALLIONS 2/$1.00 TROPICAL LEHIGH FARMS MANGO .99¢ Each { 2 } the grapevine | MARCH 4, 2009 WASHINGTON STATE FRESH2%MILK WHOLE 1% • • WHITE POTATOES 10 Lb. $2.99 PLUMROSE PREMIUM 1 GALLON $3.49/Each DUTCH-LAN EXTRA LARGE GALA OR FUJI APPLES $1.19 Lb. STELLA BRAND AGED OR MELLOW EGGS DOZEN $1.29 CAMPBELL’S FAMILY SIZE BACON FULL 1 Lb. $2.49 Each CANADIAN ASIAGO per cut pc. $4.99 Lb. CHICKEN NOODLE 51 Oz. $3.49 Ea. YUKON GOLD POTATOES 5 LB. $2.99 Each SHOP SMART • SAVE SMART • EAT SMART { CONTENTS } 1 1 Read Across Vineland Dr. Seuss’ birthday inspires kids to read. ST E P H A N I E FA R R E L L I Editor’s Letter Snowed In Blame in on Punxsutawney Phil. The famous groundhog got a glimpse of his shadow last month and his handlers thus proclaimed that we’d have to endure six more weeks of winter. Winter officially ends on March 19. And we almost made it through winter without any major snowfall in 2008 or 2009. But that all changed on Sunday night when the snow started to come down steadily and heavily after dark. Most parts of Vineland were blanketed with a foot of snow or more by Monday morning. My staff and I have decided to embark upon a grand experiment—we officially closed the offices for the day on Monday and worked independently from our homes. Our print deadline is on Monday each week and we knew that this snow-day strategy may have had its pitfalls. But the key to its success would come down to effective communication. Just a few short years ago this would have never been possible. Technology has brought massive changes to the media business in the past few years. We all have laptops and high-speed internet access at home and work and we all have the publishing software that allows us to lay out the pages and send the files back and forth to each other; and then to our printer when the pages are complete. Throughout the day, we’ve been e-mailing each other and following up with phone calls to make sure nothing falls through the cracks. The experiment has proved that we can work remotely to get a weekly issue of The Grapevine compiled and printed as scheduled in emergency situations. But the experiment has also proven to me that it’s not a practice I’d want to engage in week in and week out. For me, there are far too many distractions at home—especially on a snow day when my wife and kids are home from school. And I enjoy the convenience and comaraderie that comes with working together in the office with my staff as we collectively face down the pressures of a print deadline. While it’s nice to work in my pajamas on the couch with the fireplace warming my feet, I actually prefer the office environment while “on the job.” I’m hoping this storm is winter’s big finale. I’m also hoping that I won’t have to face down another print deadline from home again for a long time. MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher BELATED THANK YOUS In last week’s issue, we thanked the numerous businesses who either sponsored our Hometown Heroes Gala or donated items for our silent auction. We regret having missed two of the businesses that were particularly generous. Dondero Diamonds & Fine Jewelry donated a $100 Gift Certificate and T&F Camera donated the proceeds from the portrait sales during our event. We also would like to credit Robert Cervini/ T&F Camera for the photo (above) that appeared on our front cover last week. The Chamber at 90 Years The Vineland Chamber of Commerce has been a part of the town’s rich history. V I N C E FA R I N AC C I O 4 6 Community Calendar Credit Earned The Main Street Program maintains its accreditation. TO D D N O O N 7 Science Rules Two science fairs spotlight young minds. DEBORAH A. EIN 10 Faces in the News 11 Recipe Corner An 84-year-old shares her pork chop recipe. L I SA D I N U N Z I O 12 DINING: Deliciously Vegan Christine Scalfo-Glover teaches how to cook for a vegan diet. ST E P H E N W I L S O N 16 17 Entertainment The Land Purchase Free Movie Rental @ Coupon Good for One Free* Overnight Movie Rental when you rent one at regular price. A behind-the-scenes look at how land was transferred from Richard Wood to Landis. V I N C E FA R I N AC C I O 18 REAL ESTATE: Engineered Style A Conley Drive house was crafted with attention to detail and special features. MARIE TEDESCO Choose from THOUSANDS of popular DVD and Blu-Ray Rentals. { STAFF } MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor LORI GOUDIE Art Director GAIL EPIFANIO Controller JACK EPIFANIO Advertising Executive SHERRY MUNYAN Advertising Executive MELISSA FIORI-LACIVITA Advertising Executive TRACY BUSCHAM Graphic Designer MARIE TEDESCO Editorial Intern WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | *Free overnight movie rental when rented along with regular priced overnight movie rental. Regular additional day fees apply. One Free rental per coupon per customer per day. Expires 3/15/09 . LETTER TO THE EDITOR The Grapevine 3660 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361 PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816 EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2009. All rights reserved. This letter concerns the generosity of one business in particular. Rossi School is having a Chinese auction fundraiser on Friday night, March 6, and our room is putting together a basket for hair. I went to every business that had anything to do with hair and asked for any small donation. One business, Douglas Arthur, on Main Road next to the Acme was the only one who responded, and his generosity was something else. He not only gave us a coupon for a hair cut, blow dry and style, but one for a pedicure and manicure, and also another for a complete makeup consultation and application. I believe kindness should always be acknowledged, and if you could mention it, I would greatly appreciate it. — Linda Salerno, Vineland. Visit www.doublefeatures.com for info on all of the latest new releases on DVD and Blu-Ray Disc and sign up for our free weekly emailed newsletter. the grapevine { 3 } Open 10am to 9pm Mon.-Thurs. 10am to 10pm Friday and Saturday 12noon to 9pm Sunday I COMMUNITY CALENDER HAPPENINGS EVERY WEDNESDAY Single Parents Society Dance. North Italy Club, Virano Ln. and East Ave. Cumberland County Chapter holds the dances weekly, featuring live bands. 7:30-10:30 p.m. $7 members, $9 non-members. 825-6635. side Andrea Handy, Project Graduation president, and Andrew Anastor, a senior active in the club. Mayor’s office: 794-4011. A 50TH CLASS REUNION is scheduled for the Vineland High School Class of 1959. It will be held October 17, 18, and 19. An informal get-together will occur at Filomena’s (Harding Highway) in Buena on Saturday, October 17. On Sunday evening, the big event will occur at Centerton Golf Club. Then on Monday, October 18, a buffet breakfast will be held at the Ramada Inn. If you know of any member of the class who has not received an invitation, call Jackie at 697-1092. TOTALLY TOMATOES is a free lecture to be given Thursday, March 5, at 10 a.m. and again at 7 p.m. at the Carl Arthur Recreation Center (Third and Plum streets). Countryside Garden Club is hosting the meeting and encourages everyone to grow some of their own vegetables, especially tomatoes, to help stretch their food budget. Call 794-9434 for information. Photo: Peter Nitzsche/RUTGERS THE CUMBERLAND COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT has moved to a new location recently. The new address is 790 East Commerce Street, Bridgeton, NJ 08302. Phone numbers have remained the same. The Offiice’s normal weekday hours of operation are 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. FRIDAY, MARCH 6 Basket Auction. Rossi Middle School, 2572 Palermo Ave. Baskets up for bid can be viewed from 6-7 p.m. Winners announced after 7 p.m. Bake shop,” door prizes, too. 6-9 p.m. Tickets $7. 794-6961. EVERY WEDNESDAY IN LENT Bread and Broth. Lutheran Church of the Redeemer, 2384 E. Landis Ave. A Lenten meal at 6 p.m. followed by a 7 p.m. service. 691-4278. FRIDAY, MARCH 6 Basket Auction. 1452 Main Rd., Newfield. More than 65 baskets, featuring merchandise for all ages. 6:30-9 p.m. Drawings begin at 8 p.m. $5 per sheet of 25 tickets. 697-0220 before 4 p.m during the week. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4 Cooking Demonstration. Bellview Winery, 150 Atlantic St, Landisville. Wine with three courses by chefs from Scotland Run Country Club, Williamstown. 6 p.m., $47. Advance tickets required. 697-7172. MARCH 6 AND 7 Antiques, Collectibles & Crafts Show. The Woman’s Club of Vineland, 677 S. Main Rd. & Washington Ave. Friday 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m. THE LADIES BIBLE CONFERENCE at Faith Bible Church (3139 E. Chestnut Avenue) is set for March 20 and 21. Titled “Be Still My Anxious Heart,” the conference costs $30. Deadline to register is March 8; call 691-3460. FRIENDS OF RON MEJIA, Vineland resident and owner of Systec of Vineland, will host a benefit to help defray Ron’s cost for medical treatments. The benefit is set for Friday, March 13, from 7 to 11 p.m., at the North Italy Club (414 Virano Lane). Tickets are $30 each and include a buffet, DJ and dancing, comedian (WIP’s Big Daddy Graham), and other fun activities, including a silent auction. A cash bar also will be available. Tickets can be purchased and silent auction donations made through Mary Lundberg at 692-4406 or Denise Vizzini at 466-2664. Donations also can be made to “Benefit for Ron” at any Sun National Bank. TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH welcomed a new priest, The Reverend Ellen C. Rutherford on March 1, the first Sunday of Lent. Service of Holy Eucharist is at 9 a.m. All are invited to coffee hour following the service. On alternate Sundays (starting March 8) Rev. Rutherford will minister at St. Andrews Episcopal in Bridgeton. EVERY THURSDAY IN LENT Community Lenten Lunches. First Presbyterian Church, 800 East Landis Ave. Lunch and brief message by a different clergy from the community each week. Noon-1 p.m. MONDAY, MARCH 9 Environmental Commission and Tree Committee Meeting. City Hall, Fourth Floor Conference Room, 640 E. Wood St. 7:30 p.m. THURSDAY, MARCH 5 The Photographic Society of Vineland. Newfield Senior Center, corner of Catawba Ave and Church St, Newfield. New members welcome. 7:30pm. 691-4563. TUESDAY, MARCH 10 City Council Meeting. Council Chambers of City Hall, Seventh and Wood sts. Open to the public. 7:30 p.m. FRIDAY, MARCH 6 Stars that Shine: Class of 2009. St. Anthony’s Community Center, Wheat Rd. “Beef and beer” benefit to raise funds for Project Graduation. 6-11 p.m. Tickets $30 per person. Pictured: Mayor Robert Romano holds up a pair of tickets, along- WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11 Planning Board Meeting. Council Chambers of City Hall, Seventh and Wood sts. 7:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11 VPS Board of Education Meeting. 625 Plum St. 7 p.m. THE CUMBERLAND COUNTY BAR ASSOCIATION (CCBA) and its Foundation are now accepting applications for the CCBA Scholarship Program aimed at promoting and supporting deserving students of the law, or those choosing careers in related fields. Area high school and college students, and County residents currently attending law school may apply. All area law schools, high schools, and the Cumberland County College have the Scholarship Application packets on hand in their respective guidance departments. The deadline to postmark the applications is March 25. Students may obtain information and applications online at www.cumbnjbarassoc.org or by calling the Association at 696-5550. SUNDAY, MARCH 15 Pasta Dinner Fundraiser. North Italy Club, Virano Ln. VHS softball team benefits. $10. 794-6800, ext. 2745. SEND US YOUR EVENT NOTICES. We know that there’s more happening out there, and we want to help you publicize your events. Send them to us at the address listed on page 3. Do You Have Dangerous Trees? { 4 } the grapevine | MARCH 4, 2009 Call For Your Free Evaluation Good, Clean Work At Reasonable Prices Don’t Be Fooled. Call A Certified Aborist. For All Your Tree Care. Pruning • Tree Removals • Storm Damage Elevations • Shrubbery Trimming • Stump Grinding Owner Operated Local Business • Fully Insured Owner Working At All Jobs! FREE ESTI MATES www.forresttreesurgeon.com 10% Off Any Tree Service Forrest Tree Surgeon • 856-694-0922 Must present coupon at time of estimate. Not valid with other offers. Exp. 2/28/09 MARCH 15 THROUGH 17 Parish Mission & Healing Mass. The Parish of Saint Padre Pio at the Church of Our Lady of Pompeii, 4680 Dante Ave. Healing Mass and Anointing of the Sick, Sunday 3 p.m. Lenten dessert social to follow in Rosary Hall. Communal Lenten Penance Service, Monday, 7 p.m. Mass and healing service, Wednesday, 7 p.m. All invited to attend. 691-7526. Varicose • MONDAY, MARCH 16 NAMI Monthly Meeting. Chestnut Assembly of God, 2554 E. Chestnut Ave. County Chapter of National Alliance on Mental Illness meets. The guest speaker will be Gary Moellers, Dir. of Community Svcs. at the Cumberland County Guidance Center. 7-9 p.m. 691-9234. Veins? Reach Out To The Most Qualified Specialist Minimally Invasive Insurance covered and SPORTS SATURDAY, MARCH 7 Philadelphia Flyers Legends. Canlan Ice Arena, 2111 Industrial Way. The St. Augustine Prep hockey alumni vs. Philadelphia Flyers Legends. 1 p.m. Buffet dinner w/ Legends after the game. Game tickets $25/students $15, Game & buffet, $60/students $40. 697-2600 ext. 136. 30 min. Office Treatment Free Vein Screening Call to schedule an appointment • Featured on EVERY MONDAY Zumba. Vineland 1st Church of the Nazarene, 2725 N. Delsea Dr. Join Tamara for the latest exercise craze. 6:15 p.m. – low impact, 7 p.m. – high impact. 696-4380. EVERY TUESDAY Karate Class. Dr. Wm. Mennies School, 361 E. Grant Ave. Program of the Vineland Recreation Commission, for girls and boys ages 6 and up. Tuesdays 6-7:30 p.m. Registration fee $15, 794-4000, ext. 4681. Charles L. Dietzek, D.O., FACOS Raymond S. Wojtalik, M.D., FACS Voorhees • Sewell • Vineland 856.309.VEIN (8346) Specializing in spider and varicose vein treatment EVERY THURSDAY Free Yoga Class. Holly Heights School AVA room (2515 E. Main Street), Millville. Linda Schimmel, certified yoga instructor, teaches. Open to all age groups and suitable for most fitness levels. Dress comfortably; bring a yoga mat or beach towel to class. 6-7 p.m. Every Thursday through April 30. 2950 College Dr., Suite 2B, Vineland • www.VeinVascular.com WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the grapevine { 5 } I Downtown Vineland { TODD NOON, EXEC. DIR., VDID/MAIN STREET } Credit Earned The Vineland program has again received national accreditation, thanks to volunteers and everyone involved. s I was preparing to write this week’s column, I suddenly received an e-mail that not only made me change the topic of the column, but also made me proud of our volunteers and Main Street organization. The hard work all of us do on behalf of VDID/Main Street Vineland has paid off and is being recognized. We have been accredited again this year as a National Main Street Program by the National Main Street Center. This accreditation is not given out at random and has to be earned by adhering to certain standards of performance. Last year, we were one of fewer than 680 Main Street programs across the nation to receive such recognition. The criteria for accreditation, which touch on many of the aspects of our organization that I have explained in earlier columns, include: • Having broad-based community support—in A the public and private sectors—for the downtown revitalization process; • Developing vision and mission statements relevant to our community and the program’s stage of organization; • Having a comprehensive Main Street work plan; • Possessing and exhibiting an historic preservation ethic; • Having an active Board of Directors and committees; • Having an adequate operating budget; • Having a paid professional program manager; • Conducting a program of ongoing training for staff and volunteers; • Reporting key statistics; and • Having a recurrent membership in the National Main Street Network® membership program. What does all of this mean? In the words of Doug Loescher, Director of the National Main Street Trust Center, “These standards of performance help us keep the Main Street movement strong and focused nationally.” The work of each of the four committees— Organization, Promotions, Design, and Economic Restructuring—is evaluated based on these 10 standards of performance. Documentation of our work is sent in and our performance is evaluated by Main Street New Jersey. If you want to learn more about this accreditation process, visit www.mainstreet.org/nationalprograms. Closer to home, it means that the four committees that meet in rotation every Thursday morning—and the various event and project subcommittees that come out of those committees—are on the right track. It means that our dedicated volunteers—those who work hard to plan and put on the various events and festivals, who plan fundrais- ing activities, who work on projects to beautify our downtown, and who work to help downtown merchants market themselves— are pulling in the right direction. I can only echo the words I said when we received this accreditation last year. “This is a tremendous honor for downtown Vineland. The thousands of hours donated by our volunteers, coupled with the millions of dollars in private and public investment in Landis Avenue, demonstrate that the revitalization of downtown is in full swing. The future is certainly bright, and it is great to be recognized by the National Trust Main Street for achievements.” I *** I want to thank all those who helped with our “Chuckles and Cheese Steaks” comedy show. The organizers, those who sold tickets, those who worked at the event, and the performers who kept everyone laughing—all deserve my gratitude. Most of all, my thanks go out to all who came out and had a great time. Your support of the VDID/Main Street Vineland cause is also a key factor in what our accreditation is all about. For more information on all VDID/Main Street Vineland events and activities, call our office at 794-8653 or visit www.mainstreetvineland.org. DAYTON MICHELIN FIRESTONE GOODYEAR All Tires And Wheel Packages On Sale The Largest Tire and Custom Wheels and Truck Assessory Inventory in South Jersey COMPLETE AUTO REPAIR SERVICE | MARCH 4, 2009 FREE TIRE MAINTENANCE for the life of your tires when you purchase 4 tires Mount • Balance • Valve Stems NO DISPOSAL FEE Apply now for your 5,000 Mile Tire Preventive Maintenance Program for the Life of Your Tire FREE • • • • • • ROTATE YOUR TIRES BALANCE YOUR TIRES CHECK AIR IN TIRES INSPECT BRAKES INSPECT SHOCKS & STRUTS INSPECT FRONT END CREDIT FIRST CARD ED CONSTANTE TIRE Welcomes Wholesale to all Dealers 6 } the grapevine 480 S. Delsea Dr. • Vineland • 856.696.3206 or 856.696.2550 WWW.EDCOSTANTETIRE.COM 3.5% SALES TAX Open Mon-Fri 8am-5:30pm • Sat 8am-2pm FEDERAL MICKEY THOMAS DUNLAP KUMHO FALKEN I Gleanings { DEBORAH A. EIN, MANAGING EDITOR } Science Rules… Especially when you have a winning project or invention. ver since childhood, in school, then in my work, I’ve been torn between language and science. Between English and nature. Between words and scientific formulas. So when we decided to run Read Across America as a cover story this week, then I heard about two local science fairs, I was compelled to give science equal time. Thus, I am devoting my column this week to some of the great scientific minds in the Vineland schools. One of the science fairs was at The Ellison School: From the “five-second rule” to solar cooked brownies, to earthquakeproof construction, this year’s Ellison Science Fair projects were presented individually and in teams by fifth through eighth grade students on February 19. E “We’re proud of all the kids,” says Sarah King, a science teacher at Ellison. “We continue to be amazed by their creativity and unique interpretations of scientific concepts.” Top three overall CCC Science Fair winners— Luke Gedrimas, Trevor Blauth, and Zachary Horan—are all Notre Dame students. Science teacher Tracy Carrow and Principal Dr. Mary Alimenti proudly support the young scientists. The seventh and eighth grade student winners by category include: Earth/Plant Science: First Place, Rahi Patel (8th Grade, Vineland); Second Place; Kristen Natoli (8th Grade, Vineland); Third Place, Jillian Kutner (8th Grade, Vineland); Honorable Mention, Abiha Kazmi (8th Grade, Vineland). Human Health: First Place, Morgan Falasca (7th Grade, Vineland); Second Place, Nicole Libbey (7th Grade, Vineland; Third Place, Zachary Novick (8th Grade, Cape May Court House; Honorable Mention, Bryan Alcox (7th Grade, Mauricetown). Physical Science: First Place, Andrew Sager (8th Grade, Vineland); Second Place, Kasey Harmon (7th Grade, Vineland); Third Place, Tie between Jeremy Novick (8th Grade, Cape May Court House) and Thomas Scrivani (7th Grade, Vineland); Honorable Mention, Chris Painter (8th Grade, Pittsgrove). The other science fair in the region was at Cumberland County College on February 24. Grades 6, 7, and 8 from schools in the region entered the competition in categories including Behavior/ Morgan Falasca’s “Five Second Rule” project earned her First Place in the Human Health category at the Ellison Science Fair. Social Sciences, Biochemistry, Botany, Chemistry, Earth/Space Science, Environmental Science, Medicine/ Health, and Physics. Notre Dame students took the top three overall prizes. Eighth grader Trevor Blauth placed first for his project in Earth/Space Science. Zackery Horan, also an eighth grader, took second place overall for his project in the category of Medicine/Health, and Luke Gedrimas, a sixth grader, took third place overall for his project in the Physics category. Congratulations to all the young scientists who entered and placed in these two science fairs. I Safe & Secure Individual Retirement Accounts • Traditional & Roth IRAs • Education Savings • Health Savings • Simplified Employee Pension Plan • Savings Incentive Match Plans for Employees *Substantial penalty for early withdrawal. **Consult your tax advisor. Member FDIC • Save money for your retirement* • Reduce your taxable income now ** Don’t wait! Dial 1-800-690-3440 for more information or stop into a branch near you! WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the grapevine { 7 } 1-800-690-3440 • www.newfieldbank.com CHAMBER AT 90 (Continued from cover) its membership practically doubled. In the next year, it published a Monograph of Beautiful Vineland and clearly defined its purpose as uniting the borough’s citizens “in a common cause as to insure concerted action on the part of all good citizens in the interest of community betterment and sound progress.” “The broad concept still applies,” says Paige Desiere, Greater Vineland Chamber of Commerce executive director for the past 10 years. “Our focus is much more geared toward the business community today, which has a definite impact on the community at large.” “Some people don’t know what we are,” Desiere continues. “They don’t know that we’re a non-profit organization and not an arm of the city. Some believe the Chamber of Commerce is a place to call for the best hotels in the area or for ribbon cuttings.” While Desiere confesses that her office receives its share of inquiries from tourists looking for accommodations while visiting the nearby Motorsports Park, she clarifies that the Chamber’s programs and sponsored events better define the organization and how it serves its 600 members. A Young Professional Group for members in their 20s and 30s and faster-paced business networking are examples of how the Chamber is placing, according to Desiere, “more focus on specific issues and groups.” A Restaurant Association to help promote such establishments, particularly in the midst of the economic crisis, has been created. The organization has also become more involved with legislation lately, watching for how New Jersey laws will affect area business. And, the Chamber now hosts a monthly session for local businesspersons to meet one-on-one with First District Assemblyman Matt Milam. Desiere’s enthusiasm for and longstanding devotion to the Chamber is reminiscent of the spark that gave rise to the organization 90 years ago. Although a Board of Trade was established in 1888, Leo L. Reading, a former newspaperman who became the organization’s first secretary, convinced others that there was a need for a Chamber of Commerce in Vineland. He helped organize the first meeting, taking the minutes while Eugene M. Kimball, who would serve as president until 1923, chaired the event. In addition to promoting the business opportunities the town has to offer, the Chamber has also served the community by honoring businesspersons who have contributed to Vineland. Desiere explains that the selections have recently been based on themes chosen by a Chamber committee. “This year, the recipients will be chosen based on how they overcame obstacles or adversity,” Desiere says. She adds that the theme reflected the economic crunch currently gripping the country. In its early years, the organization fought vigorously for the consolidation of Vineland Borough and Landis Township. The issue was the only business item discussed at its first meeting, and it continued to lead the list of priorities until the two municipalities merged in 1952. Former Chamber executive secretary M. Murray Sternberg, writing shortly after his retirement during the group’s 50th Anniversary, admitted that the Chamber’s efforts included setting up a “master plan to embrace, explore and answer every conceivable criticism that could be directed against this merger.” At the time of Sternberg’s retirement, the Chamber, which had incorporated in 1934, sponsored a successful annual Mardi Gras festivity that culminated in crowning a Queen who represented Vineland at various functions throughout the year. Curiously, Sternberg also told the press at the time that locating missing children was an important behind-the-scenes Chamber function. Today, the New Orleans celebration has been replaced by the Chamber’s sponsorship of a Dandelion Dinner, in which the Residential & Commercial Service & Installation Heating & Cooling Equipment Hot Water Heaters Water/Sewer Underground Piping Sewer Drain Cleaning Serving Vineland for over 100 years! 691-1950 State Lic. # 12089 Vineland-grown delicacy is sautéed, fried, baked and bottled for a special evening that draws residents and travelers alike. Desiere is quick to point out that this year’s Dandelion & Beer Festival, scheduled for March 28 at Merighi’s Savoy Inn, pays tribute to one of Vineland’s oldest businesses. “It represents the agricultural side of the community, which is so important,” she says. After the turn of the millennium, the Chamber of Commerce moved its offices from center city, where it had once occupied a series of Landis Avenue locations as well as the recent city-owned building on East Avenue and Wood Street, to its current Delsea Drive site. “That was a decision we had to make,” Desiere says. “It was important for us to have an independent voice. It was the right step for us to move out on our own… Wherever our physical location is,” she says, “doesn’t change our intent.” What has changed, she notes, is how consumers purchase what they need. “Ninety years ago, you didn’t think about buying anywhere else but your local stores,” she observes. “Now there’s a change in retail thinking across America, but this community still recognizes the importance of local economy.” Like Leo Reading, Desiere sees a profound need for a Chamber of Commerce in Vineland. “The community needs a Chamber to fight in Trenton, make conditions better, recruit new businesses and maintain current businesses,” she says. For the past 90 years, Vineland has certainly agreed. I | MARCH 4, 2009 Getting Divorced? Bonnie L. Laube, Esq. Greenblatt & Laube, PC Divorce, Separation, Custody, Child Support, Parenting Time, Alimony, Asset Distribution, Emancipation, Domestic Violence Certi?ed by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Civil Trial Attorney 8 } the grapevine 856-691-0424 • email: bll@greenblattlaube.com 200 North Eighth Street • PO Box 883 • Vineland, NJ 08362 READ ACROSS VINELAND (Continued from cover) kings can’t rule the sky.’ This speaks of being accountable,” says Levin. “The Lorax, ‘I am the Lorax, I speak for the trees. I speak for the trees for the trees have no tongues.’ Seuss was our first environmentalist. On our planet Earth, all animals, small and great, have a right to have a clean habitat.” (This year, Johnstone’s theme for Read Across America is “Think Green with Friends and Family.”) Sun National Bank “Reading lets you have an open mind and opens doors to new adventures, experiences and ideas,” says Bart Speziali, executive vice president of wholesale banking at Sun National Bank. “I like that a book can take you away to a new place and see things through others’ eyes.” Speziali will be reading to two fourth grade classes at Sabater Elementary. Some 30 Sun Bank employees, including the CEO, will be reading Money Savvy Kids at schools throughout New Jersey. The book has a traditional story, but also focuses on building financial literacy. “We’ve had individual people reading before, but this is the first year we’ve done a corporate-wide effort,” says Christine Irving, VP of public relations at the bank. “If we read to kids today, we’re helping them write their own story that will have a happy ending and that ending is success.” The bank also hosted a book drive earlier this month at all 70 locations throughout the state, collecting over 1,300 books. Those books will be distributed locally, in the area in which they were collected. The 100-plus books collected at the Sun’s Vineland locations will be distributed to Sabater, Mennies, and D’Ippolito schools. Bishop Schad Regional School “We are celebrating Read Across America by reading some of Dr.Seuss’ classic books,” says Linda Stanewich, a first grade teacher. “To go along with our stories, we will be making Dr. Seuss hats, cooking green eggs and ham, and having students from upper grades come to our class to read. Every Friday afternoon, the school has DEAR (Drop Everything And Read) time in which each child reads or listens while the teacher reads a story. This week, we will have DEAR time every afternoon.” Parents and grandparents are also coming in to read their favorite books to the class. Veronica Glogau’s second grade class will celebrate Green Eggs and Ham with a breakfast. “Our goal is to encourage reading as a pleasurable pastime,” says Glogau. “Students will bring bedroom slippers to school with their favorite books and will find a comfortable spot to read. They may even sit in the hall or at the teacher’s desk.” Petway Elementary School “Through the craziness of this wacky week, we hope to plant the seed to read,” says Debbie Eisinger, Petway’s media specialist. The school has hosted theme days based on Dr. Seuss’ books, such as a day to wear brown (Mr. Brown Can Moo Can You?), crazy or mismatched socks (Fox in Soxs), and pajamas (I Am Not Going to Get Up Today). Petway also has a full slate of guest readers lined up, including Mayor Romano, county freeholders, a Phantoms hockey player, and authors Lisa Funari-Willever and Chris Rumble. The school plans to keep a rocking chair going, inclusive of a student reader, for a “Rock and Read” marathon. Petway and Winslow schools are joining forces to include the whole family for an evening event, having breakfast for dinner to celebrate Green Eggs & Ham. In addition to crafts and activities, the schools plan to give each student a free book to encourage them to build home libraries. Kids appreciate Dr. Seuss’ books for their creativity. From the wide range of events planned for the week, it is also evident that his books inspire creativity in our educators and community leaders. I The smart way to work and play. > Full QWERTY keyboard > Nextel Direct Connect® > WI-FI, email access $ 149 99 WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | $249.99 two-year price. Plus $100 mail-in rebate with new line activation, $30 or higher data add-on or Everything plan with data and two-year agreement. Simply Everything Plan Optimize your phone with a plan that gives you unlimited use of virtually all of its capabilities. Stripers, Drum Fish, Flounder, Blue Fish, Weakfish, Sharks, Tuna, Mahi-Mahi Anger Management Sportfishing $ 99 99/mo. Other monthly charges apply.** For more details visit your nearest Sprint Retailer. No contract extension required for current customers. Available for new lines of activation with a two-year agreement. Premium content excluded. 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Requires activation at the time of purchase. Data plan required on all active BlackBerry handsets. Voice & data may be purchased separately. Calls made without a voice plan: airtime (0.20/min.) plus long distance ($0.20/min.). Mail-in Rebate: Requires purchase by 4/18/09 & activation by 5/2/09. Line must be active 30 consecutive days. Allow 10 to 14 weeks for rebate. Simply Everything Plan: Offer ends 4/18/09. No plan discounts apply. Premium content/downloads (games, ringers, songs, certain channels, etc.) are add ’l charge. Text to 3rd parties to participate in promotions or other may result in add’l charges. Sprint Music Premier includes 150 radio channels and access to $0.99 song downloads. Sprint TV Premier includes select channels. See sprint.com/tvguide for channel information. GPS Navigation includes Sprint Navigation for Sprint phones or Telenav GPS Navigator for Nextel phones. GPS reliability varies by environment. International services are not included. E-m ail includes use of Sprint Mobile Email, Microsoft Direct Push technology via Active Sync™, Versamail, IBM Lotus Notes Traveler ® or BlackBerry® Internet Service (BIS). Direct Connect and Group Connect (20 max. participants) allows connection to other Nextel Direct Connect subscribers on the same push-to-talk network platform. Usage limitation: Sprint may terminate service if (1) more than 800 minutes, (2) a majority of minutes or (3) a majority of kilobytes in a given month are used while roaming. Servic es are not available for use as a modem, in connection with server devices or host computer applications, other systems that drive continuous heavy traffic or data sessions, or as substitute for frame relay connections. Other Terms: Coverage not available everywhere. The 3G Sprint Mobile Broadband reaches over 249 million people. Nationwide Sprint Network reaches over 262 million people. Offers not available in all markets/retail locations or for all phones/networks. Pricing, offer terms, fees & features may vary for existing customers not eligible for upgrade. Other restrictions apply. See store or Sprint.com for details . 2009 Sprint. Sprint and the logo are trademarks of Sprint. Research In Motion, the RIM logo, BlackBerry, the BlackBerry logo and SureType are registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and may be pending or registered in other countries – these and other marks of Research In Motion Limited are used with permission. Other marks are the property of their respective owners. I Faces in the News Silver State Champs The YMCA Silver State Championships included over 1,700 swimmers from more than 30 teams across New Jersey. A highlight for the Vineland Seals—the 13-14 boys relay team of Austyn Petyan, Robbie Moorhouse, Everett Carson, and Samuel Sheppard won a championship title. Also, Seals swimmers logged 90 personal best times at the three-day competition. Some swimmers now advance to the YMCA State Championship meets in Ocean County and Franklin & Marshall College. The 9-10 boys who dropped time in 15 different swims: Jack Choko, Keith Harris, Alan Hsueh, Ben Jones, and Anthony Santoro. Wood at Woman’s Club Capital Bank Breaks Ground on Branch Office Capital Bank of New Jersey, the Vinelandbased community bank owned by hundreds of local stockholders, held a groundbreaking ceremony at the site of its first branch office, to be located at 1234 W. Landis Avenue, adjacent to Vineland’s new Wal-Mart. From left: Richard (Doug) Smithson, Gary Galloway, Michael Guadagno, Joe Bilbee, Dominic Romano, Mayor Robert Romano, David Catalana, Sam Pipitone, David Manders, Caleb Soto, Harry Hearing. DIVONNA ALLETS HANKINS was dedicated to the Lord on Sunday, February 22 at Pentecostal Church of God MI, located on 1115 South Main Road. Proud parents are Eric and Divad Hankins. Godparents are Lester Ramirez and Connie Mercado. “Thank you to everyone who shared this blessed day with us.” The Woman’s Club of Vineland, at its February business meeting, had guest speaker Kimberly Wood, Director of Planning & Development of Cumberland County. In her job, Wood collaborates between all the local County Chamber of Commerce offices and also the County College to keep the quality of life in balance with the County’s growth. The group learned much from her discussion. Pictured from left, Shirley Burke and Kimberly Wood. Dancing Seniors A dedicated group of Vineland seniors from the Senior Center entertained residents of the Bishop McCarthy Residence with line dancing. Vineland Senior Center has a group who gather at the center for dance lessons and recreation on a regular basis; their ages range from 65 to 81. The group has been together for more than two years. WE WANT YOUR FACES! Send your news and photos to us at the address listed on page 3. DR. JOHN MAINIERO Affordable CHIROPRACTIC CARE $ | MARCH 4, 2009 25.00 A VISIT Come Peek at our NO INSURANCE NEEDED! NO REFERRAL NEEDED! WALK-INS WELCOME. Wedding Invitations NO 691-5900 1420 S. Lincoln Ave. • Vineland, NJ 08360 10 } the grapevine www.HereComes www.doctormainiero.com ~ We Deliver Quality Product ~ At A Discount ON AND WELLNESS CENTER Holiday Greeting Cards Baby Products and Much More… eBride.cceasy.com I Recipe Corner oldier Surprises Wife hen Connie Richmond, a third-grade teacher t Sabater Elementary School, opened the door o the media center one day last week, she hought she was getting an award for the “buterfly” project she directed to honor soliders lost n Iraq and Afghanistan. The project had special significance to ichmond, whose husband, Staff Sergeant illiam Richmond, is serving his second tour f duty in Iraq. Flanked by students who helped reate the “butterflies,” she seemed stunned hat the “award” ceremony attracted a throng of elevision and newspaper reporters. Then Monica Dannenger, the school’s princial, announced that “a special person” would be resenting the award. It was Sgt. Richmond and he raced across the room to embrace her husand, whom she hadn’t seen since September. The couple has been married less than a ear. The Sergeant wasn’t due home until aturday, his wife’s birthday, but made the twoay journey from Baghdad to Philadelphia with tops in Germany and Atlanta to surprise her. Sgt. Richmond is assigned to the 328th ilitary Police Unit/Cherry Hill. He will be home or 15 days and then return to the war zone until is tour is over in June. { LISA ANN DiNUNZIO } Recipe Swap From a lifetime of cooking for family and friends, Sara Rose Chinnici Conahan shares a favorite. reetings! Every year my Mom and I share in a friendly little competition, as each of us tries to be the first to spot a robin. This year for three days straight I could hear the robin’s call, but could not spot him anywhere in my yard. I would say to myself “I hear you, but I cannot see you!” as I wished he would make himself visible. Sure enough, my Mom called me last week and said with obvious enjoyment in her voice “Lee, guess what I saw?” I knew what was coming next, “a robin!” So, yes, this year my Mom beat me in our yearly tradition. But, I look at it as a winwin situation, it’s a sure sign that Spring is on it’s way! So, despite our Monday snowstorm, now’s the perfect time to send in those special spring or Easter recipes to share with other readers! G The following recipe and story is shared by Sara Rose Chinnici Conahan, who writes: “I have enjoyed cooking for family and friends for as long as I can remember. I love family gatherings during the holidays, birthdays, and summer barbeques. Actually, any time we all get together is a special time. And besides the company and great food, I am never seen without my camera to catch those special moments on film. It’s wonderful to look back at the photos later and cherish the fond memories. Here is a recipe I have made many times throughout my lifetime (I am 84 years young!) and I hope you and your family have many happy meals together, as I have with mine! 5 potatoes, peeled and quartered 5-6 Italian frying peppers, seeded, cut in half lengthwise Salt and pepper, to taste Preheat oven to 350°. Place pork chops into a baking pan. Add onion, carrots, potatoes and peppers around the pork chops, season well with salt and pepper. Cover pan with aluminum foil and place into the oven. Cook covered for 40 minutes, then remove foil and cook uncovered for 20 minutes or until pork chops are browned and juices run clear. As always, Bon Appetit! I Lisa Ann is the author of Seasoned With Love, Treasured Recipes and Lisa Ann’s Seasoned With Love II. Send recipes for publication to lapd1991@aol.com or by mail to The Grapevine, 3660 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361. Sara’s Oven Baked Pork Chops 4 bone-in pork chops 1 med. onion, peeled and sliced ½ (16 oz.) bag peeled baby carrots WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the grapevine { 11 } I Culinary Adventures { STEPHEN WILSON / PHOTOS: JILL MCCLENNEN } Deliciously Vegan Christine Scalfo-Glover cooks flavorful meals minus the meat, eggs, and dairy. J Family Restaurant & Pizzeria ingredients and cooking methods to achieve wellness through diet. In these classes, Scalfo-Glover cooks in the vegan tradition, which means she uses no meat, eggs, or dairy. A misconception is that these three ingredients add all the flavor to food, but Scalfo-Glover bucks this idea by making some delicious food without them. Jill and I arrived at the new Evolutions for Conscious Living building (1350 Southwest Boulevard) where the classes are taught. We spotted a yoga class in sesust recently, Jill and I acquired sion in another section of the building. tickets to a cooking class taught by Warrior pose was being practiced, and it Christine Scalfo-Glover. I had was silent and serene inside Evolutions. spoken with Christine back in We were guided around the corner and December to get her take on New Year’s into a small, brightly lit kitchen. Scalforesolutions, and thought that it would be Glover was there, talking with a woman fun to take one of her classes. who had arrived before us. Jill and I found The classes focus on using healthy a seat at a tall bistro table. 3600 E. Landis Ave. (In Lincoln & Landis Shop Rite Center) 856-691-3099 Delivery!! March is FREE LUNCH Month! NO NEED TO WAKE UP EARLY! Our Breakfast Menu Is Now Available All Day Long!! Want the “Real Thing?” | MARCH 4, 2009 It’s an intriguing steak sandwich served on an oversized poppyseed kaiser roll baked exclusively for Donkey’s Place. That’s right, a round roll. The meat is a block of thinly sliced ribeye steak grill-cooked, but never chopped, covered with American cheese and topped with tender onions cooked until they are caramelized from our secret seasoning. It’s the loads of our signature onions that gives Donkey’s Steaks its personality. The red pepper relish is a tangy addition to the flavorful taste. COUPON Gourmet Lunches & Dinners Take Outs & Package Goods SERVING THE FOOD YOU LOVE IN A VERY DIFFERENT WAY. Milmay Tavern has You no longer have to drive to Philly! Authentic “food with flavor” Better Food Better Prices Tuckahoe Road & Millville-Mays Landing Road, Milmay N.J. “Philly Cheesesteak” “Wit Wiz” or Without! Purchase one Lunch at regular price. Get a second of equal or less value FREE! French Fries, Fountain Soda or Coffee No Purchase Necessary 20 South 6th Street, Vineland, NJ Limit one per customer • Expires March 15, 2009 12 } the grapevine Free o er excludes veal or seafood Lunch served from 11am-4pm Expires March 31, 2009 Dine—In Only Phone (856) 690-1777 • Fax (856) 690-1677 E-mail: Donkeys4Vineland@verizon.net • Website: www.donkeyscheesesteak.com Donkey’s Place now booking Cash Benefit Night Fundraising for all schools. Donkey’s Place is located in Cumberland, Cape May, Camden and Burlington Counties. 20 South 6th Street, Vineland, NJ (609)476-3611 Open 6 days 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Closed Monday The kitchen was open and spotless with an island in the middle that had some workspace and gas burners. A freestanding exhaust hood hung over the burners, ready to remove the heat and cooking fumes. The kitchen was decked out with standard culinary wares; oven, dishwasher, big sink, fridge. Wood cabinets lined the rear of the kitchen, and several bistro tables lined the front. More chairs surrounded the island, providing an excellent view of the demonstration area. More folks started trickling in, and soon the kitchen was filled with people hungry to learn. After introductions, Scalfo-Glover passed out menus and recipes. We would be preparing a whipped white bean puree, sautéed mushrooms, spicy roasted sweet potatoes, and broccoli with shallots and walnuts. The cooking portion of the class began with the sweet potatoes. They would take the longest to cook, so the instructor sliced them into wedges and placed them in a bowl. She tossed them with olive oil, salt, curry powder, a little chili powder, and cinnamon. The wedges went onto a tray and into the hot oven. In a pan on the stove, a little oil was heated. Into the pan went chopped leeks, which cooked until softened. Then white beans were added, along with veggie broth, garlic and thyme. This mixture simmered for eight or nine minutes, and then was seasoned with salt and pepper. The contents of the pan went into a food processor, where everything was blended together into a yummy white bean puree. A large pot of water was put on the stove and brought to a boil with a little salt. The broccoli was cut into pieces and blanched in the boiling water, long enough to cook them to a bright green. The shallots were then sautéed in a pan until they got some color, and the broccoli was added with a loud sizzle and spatter. Scalfo-Glover quickly tossed the broccoli in the pan to coat with the shallots and oil, and with a quick seasoning, they were done. The mushrooms were sautéed in a bit of oil, salt, and pepper until they were soft and brown. At this point, the timer for the sweet potatoes went off, which signaled that they were done. Scalfo-Glover took them out of the oven and drizzled a little lemon juice on the browned wedges. It was time to eat! The plates were stacked next to the gas burners, and the food began to be portioned out. A large spoonful of the white bean puree, followed by a sprinkling of mushrooms on top. Several wedges of sweet potatoes found their way next to the white beans. The bright green, perfectly cooked broccoli was spooned onto the plate next. Everything was very pretty and fresh looking, and smelled good, too. The sweet potatoes were awesome. The curry, lemon and sweet potato was an interesting combination and it worked really well. The beans supplied the meal with copious amounts of protein, and the mushrooms added an earthy, meaty flavor to the dish. The broccoli was fresh tasting, and delicious. All in all, quite tasty, and not a drop of animal product! Eating healthy on a regular basis is not easy. It takes a lot of work to learn how to cook well, but it really just takes practice. If you ever need a little inspiration, or want to learn how to cook without using animal products, I recommend that you give Scalfo-Glover a call at 696-4234. You can also get more information on her website at www.foodforliving.net. I Stephen Wilson along with his wife Jill McClennen owns The Sweet Life Bakery. You may contact him via e-mail at thesweetlifebakery@verizon.net. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the grapevine { 13 } Eating Out From fine dining to lunch spots to bakeries, the area has choices to satisfy any appetite. Call for hours. Amato’s Restaurant, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 692-5756. Veal, chicken, seafood, and pasta specialties for dinner. Open for lunch, too. Closed Sundays. Andrea Trattoria, 1833 Harding Hwy., Newfield, 697-8400. Chef/owner Andrea Covino serves up Italian specialties in an atmosphere of fine dining. Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave, Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food served tapas style, specialty martinis, catering, private parties. Extensive wine list. Live music every Friday 10 p.m.-1.a.m. Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-0909. This breakfast and lunch spot offers a menu of sandwiches named for colleges near and far. Bain’s Deli, 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. Come in for breakfast, lunch, or dinner, or take it with you. Daily specials include coffee of the day. Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees, desserts, drink specials. Take-out, too. Happy Hour buffet Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. NFL flat-screen TVs. Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy., Vineland, 697-5500. Steaks, veal, chicken dishes. Meet friends at the bar, gather for dinner. Open daily for lunch and dinner. Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 205-0012. Home of the “Gutbuster” 21-oz. burger, as well as pizza, salads, wings, subs, and dinners. Casa Dori II, Brewster Rd. and Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 794-1888. Authentic Italian, lunch and dinner; catering available. Continental Room at the Ramada Inn, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 6963800. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Open to hotel guests and the public. Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call for lunch and dinner specials. Soft ice cream and cakes year-round. Mon.-Sat 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 696-1900. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Takeout, too. Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. Open 24 hours. Kids eat free Tues. and Sat. Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave., Vineland, 691-5511. Family time-honored recipes, fresh ingredients. Donkey’s Place, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland, 690-1777. One-of-a-kind cheesesteaks made on large, fresh poppyseed rolls. Dreamz Cafe, 2184 Union Lake Crossing, Millville, 765-5029. Panini, sandwiches, salads, soups. Also, gelato, Italian coffee, desserts, smoothies, and frappuccino. Esposito’s Maplewood III, 200 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks, seafood and pasta dishes at this Italian restaurant. Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. & Tuckahoe Rd., Vineland, 691-6080. Italian cuisine and dinner buffets to savor. Family-owned. Fresh Restaurant, 1405 Mays Landing Rd., Millville, 327-3435. Jumbo lump crabcakes, Black Angus burgers. Wed. is pasta night. Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli, 527 S. Brewster Rd. and Janet St., 697-3509. The name says it all. Daily specials, catering. Open daily except Sun. General Custard’s Last Stand, 2578 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 696-2992. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Tues.-Sat. Gina’s Ristorante, 110 N. High St., Millville, 825-4241. Italian cuisine, BYOB, nothing over $20. Open for lunch and dinner, beginning March 9. Giorgio’s Restaurant 363 E. Wheat Rd., Buena, 697-2900. Serving lunch and dinner. Italian cuisine, pizza. Sun.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Giovanni’s Italian-American Deli. 1102 N. East Ave., Vineland, 692-0459. Pizza, Italian subs, all your lunch favorites. The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf Course, 4049 Italia Rd., Vineland, 691-5558. Restaurant and lounge open to the public for lunch Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Joe’s Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-8860. Barbecue and Kosher chickens, homemade sides, catering. Landicini’s Family Restaurant & Pizzeria Landis and Lincoln aves., Vineland, 6913099. Italian cuisine, gourmet pizza, gourmet salads. Open for lunch and dinner. Larry’s II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-9001. Bring the family for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Sunday breakfast buffet and early-bird dinners. Library V Restaurant, 206 Rt. 54, Buena, 697-9696. Renowned for prime rib, steaks, seafood, salad bar. Closed Mon. and Tues. La Locanda Pizzeria and Ristorante, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 794-3332. Pasta, veal, chicken dishes. Open for lunch and dinner. Closed Sunday. Lucia’s Ristorante, 785 W. Sherman Ave., Vineland, 692-0300. Italian fine dining and regional cooking. Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 563-0030. ItalianAmerican cuisine, seafood and veal. Open daily for lunch and dinner, Sunday breakfast buffet. Martino’s Trattoria & Pizzeria, 2614 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 692-4448. Dinners, brick oven pizza, risotto, polenta. Open daily for all three meals. Merighi’s Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. A banquet/wedding facility as well as intimate restaurant. Friday Night Flashback with Nicky G. Fridays 9 p.m. –midnight. Vineland’s Serving Breakfast & Lunch Daily Dinner Wednesday-Saturday 3 Featuring Steaks, Seafood & Pasta 3 2 DON’T FORGET OUR SPECIAL 2 7 Wednesday Night 7 Pasta Night • Fight the recession and your • 3 financial depression with our 3 new Fresh For Less Menu!! 4 Dinner entrees from $8.95 to $13.95 4 Overstuffed Sandwiches • Black Angus Burgers 3 Chef Fred’s Jumbo Lump Crabcakes 3 FREDRIC BELFUS 5 5 Executive Chef/Owner neighborhood bakery, where everything is made from scratch and quality counts. a 6th street between Landis and Elmer in Downtown Vineland { 14 } the grapevine | MARCH 4, 2009 856-692-5353 www.thesweetlifebakery.com The Sweet Life Bakery was recently named ‘Best Muffins in South Jersey? by SJ Magazine Readers Poll 1405 Mays Landing Rd., Millville, NJ 08332 Between Custard Corral & Old Vineland Tavern Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s Head rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet lunches and dinners in a casual setting. Neptune Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge, 1554 South Delsea Drive, Vineland, 6922800. American cuisine, array of cocktails. Next Oar, 127 N. High St., Millville, 2931360. Weekly menu, made-to-order dishes. Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek cuisine—lamb dishes and salads. Paperwaiter Restaurant & Pub, 1111 Village Dr., Millville, 825-4000. A special place for all your special occasions. Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland, 6940500. Breakfast, lunch, dinner specials; convenient drive-thru, mini-meal specials. Positano Ristorante, 419 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 696-0477. Veal, chicken, and seafood specials, BYOB. Richland House, 1303 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-5700. Eclectic dinners and casual lunch fare. Closed Mondays. Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville, 327-8878. Authentic Vietnamese cuisine—noodle soups, curry, hotpot, Buddhist vegetarian. South Vineland Tavern, 2350 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-7888. Breakfast, lunch, dinner daily. Seafood and prime rib. Steakhouse at Centerton Country Club, 1136 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3325. Open for lunch and dinner. Steaks and reserve wines, upscale casual atmosphere. Sweet Life Bakery, 601 East Landis Avenue, Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood bakery. Homemade pastries, cakes, coffee. Tony Sopranos, 107 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 405-0200. Pizza, Mexican Southwest fare, Atkins-friendly salads. Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs, chicken, fish, pasta, steaks, and sandwiches. Always clams, eat at the bar or take out. Venuto’s Old World Pizza, 2166 N. Second St., Millville, 327-4002. Pizzas, gourmet salads, appetizers. Villa Filomena, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena Vista, 697-7107. Dinner combos, grilled meats, fish. Lunch and dinner daily. Wheat Road Cold Cuts, 302 Wheat Rd., Vineland, 697-0320. Deli and catering. Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-8899. Dinners, grilled sandwiches, wings in eight flavors. Willmott’s Pizza. 12 S. Seventh St., Vineland, 696-1525. Hand-tossed pizzas, stromboli, breakfast pizza. Take-out or eat in. Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville, 3270909. Continental cuisine and spirits served in a casually upscale setting. Ye Olde Centerton Inn, 1136 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3201. American classics served in a building right out of a Rockwell painting. Live t: en ntertainm t E . Nigh Thurs The & Cheesy kers Crac Liv Entertaine m Saturda ent: y Night Satin S teel Hours: Mon.-Sat. 11am–2am Sunday 8am–2am Monday Tuesday $2 Miller Light Bottles; $6.95 Miller Light Pitchers $2 Bud Lime Bottles; $6.95 Bud Light Pitchers $2 Miller High Life Bottles; $6.95 Coors Light Pitchers $2 Miller Light Bottles; $6.95 Miller Light Pitchers $2 Coors Light Bottles; $6.95 Yuengling Pitchers $2 Corona & Corona Light Bottles; $7.50 Heineken Pitchers Wednesday $2 Bud & Bud Light Bottles; $6.95 Bud & Bud Light Pitchers Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday 10 % Off Any Food Purchase Now Serving Breakfast on Sundays Starting March 8, 8am–2pm All-U-Can-Eat Wings – Sunday, $7.95 Mention this ad to receive discount 408 Wheat Rd., Vineland • (856) 697-9825 WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | ON & OFF SITE CATERING AVAILABLE PUERTO RICAN BUFFET FIRST THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH ENJOY THE TASTE OF THE CARIBBEAN MARCH 5TH Enjoy Drinks, Dinner or Light Fare Wed. & Fri. on our Heated Outdoor Deck • Heated Outdoor Deck (Open Wednesdays & Fridays) • Full Service Bar • Happy Hour Tues. – Fri. starting at 4pm • Beautiful Lakeside View the grapevine { 15 } HOURS: Tues., Weds., Thurs., 4-10pm • Fri. & Sat. 4-11pm Sunday Brunch 10am-1:30pm ($13.95) Dinner 3pm-9pm RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED • 611TAYLOR ROAD • FRANKLINVILLE, NJ (856) 694 – 5700 I Entertainment FRIDAY, MARCH 13 Slices of Americana. La Bella Art Gallery & Gifts, 715 E. Landis Ave, Vineland, 264-3711. An exhibition of works by Vineland artist George Perez will open with a reception on March 13 from 7-9 p.m. The exhibition, which will run through March 27, is a series of sketches in oils, watercolor, and pencil of typically American scenes. Pictured here is “Lil Lighthouse.” “This is how I see various facets of American life and culture through the eye of an artist,” Perez said. “I am really excited about sharing this artistic vision with the public.” Perez has worked in the fine arts field for 35 years. He attended the High School of Art & Design in New York prior to moving to New Jersey where he attended Glassboro State College. His portfolio includes commercial and fine art, portraits, caricatures, logo designs, and murals. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday, from noon to 4 p.m., and Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. MEET THE ARTIST, JAZZ AND ACOUSTIC, COMEDY, BATTLE OF THE BANDS, AND SCHOOL PRODUCTIONS. MARCH 6 AND 7 Nightlife at Villa Filomena. Villa Filomena Ristorante & Lounge, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena, 697-7107. Thurs.: Ladies Night, Fri.: Live music, Sat.: Italian Accordian. LOVESICK’S ROMEO HILL Vineland born-and-bred musician, Michael “Lovesick” Amari, is making his first official release, the Romeo Hill EP, this week. Mike graduated in 2005 from Vineland High, and is nearly finished with a BA in Music Industry at SUNY Oneonta, located in upstate New York. While at college Mike further developed his talent in the studio and on stage, performing with just an acoustic guitar and harmonica at various open mics and shows. While he has collaborated with many musicians over the years (he fronted former Vineland-based band The Bubbachucks), Mike has made this EP a personal and focused effort by recording, performing, producing and releasing it entirely himself. Musically, Lovesick’s biggest influence is Bob Dylan. He makes it apparent on the EP’s poetically sinister “Atlantic City Girls.” This song gives the listener a first-person take on the serial murders that occurred in A.C. two years ago. The music is folk/blues based, and the focus is clearly on the lyrics. From the first track, “Romeo Hill,” to the last, “Walter (At The Pearly Gates),” there’s a mix of standard blues guitar, beautiful piano, as well as a gritty and raw rock ‘n’ roll sound. The Romeo Hill EP is set for release March 4, and will be available for just $5 at Brenner’s Brew (in Bridgeton), Bogart’s Books and Don’s Guitar Shop (in Millville), and Fuel House Coffee Co. (in Vineland). Check it out at www.myspace.com/Mike lovesick. —Jacqueline Voegtlin SATURDAY, MARCH 7 Just Surrender. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland. Also, The Harsh, Last Try, Eyes on the Prize, Almost Arlington, The Crosstown Rivalry. 6 p.m. $10-$12 (frontgatetickets.com). SATURDAY, MARCH 7 Savoy Unplugged: Rob Lipkin. Merighi’s Savoy Inn Bistro, Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. 9 p.m.-midnight. No cover. SATURDAY, MARCH 7 Solas. Appel Farm Arts and Music Center, 457 Shirley Rd., Elmer. 8 p.m. Pre-show conversation with Gene Shay and Sample the Bounty reception add to Celtic music sensation. Tickets to Solas $26.50, Conversation and Concert $36.50, and Sample the Bounty $45.; 800-394-1211. MARCH 4, 5, 6, 7, AND 10 Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Wed.: ’70s and ’80s Throwback Night (frozen drink specials) 8 p.m.-midnight, Thurs.: Karaoke with DJ Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.1 a.m. Fri.: Blue Moon Dance Party, $3 Blue Moon drafts, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Sat.: Latin Dance Party, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Tues.: Country Western Dance Party (beer and shot specials), 8 p.m.-midnight. Vineland, 691-8051. DJ Nicky G from 95.1 WAYV, music from ’60s, ’70s, ’80s and today. 9 p.m.-midnight. No cover. FRIDAY, MARCH 6 Ann Hampton Callaway. Appel Farm Arts and Music Center, 457 Shirley Road, Elmer. Vocalist and songwriter performs. 8 p.m. Tickets $40; 800-394-1211. SATURDAY, MARCH 7 JerseyShows.com Battle of the Bands. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. 6 p.m. FRIDAY, MARCH 6 Dark Hollow. S.R. Rileys, 101 E. Commerce St., Bridgeton, 459-1109. SUNDAY, MARCH 8 Madeline and the Bad Hat. Guaracini Arts Center, Cumberland County College, Sherman Ave. and College Dr., Vineland. Appropriate for grades preK-2, all seats are $5. Call 692-TIXX (8499) to reserve your seats. 3 p.m. THURSDAY, MARCH 5 I Set My Friends on Fire. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland. 6 p.m. $12-$15 (frontgatetickets.com). FRIDAY, MARCH 6 Tom Moran/Zack Caruso. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. Acoustic, 5 p.m./7 p.m. MARCH 5 AND 6 Open Mic/Wine and Cheese. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. 7 p.m./6 p.m. MARCH 12, 13, AND 14 Once Upon a Mattress. VHS South Auditorium, E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland. The Vineland High School Cap ’n’ Dagger Club performs. 7:30 p.m. $15 for reserved seats, $10 general seating. 692-9231. SATURDAY, MARCH 7 Dan Barry. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. 7 p.m. MARCH 5, 6, AND 7 Oliver. Veterans Memorial School, Main Rd. and Chestnut Ave., Vineland. The intermediate schools of Vineland present their fifth annual production. 7 p.m. $10, senior citizens and students $8. 794-6918. MARCH 5, 6, AND 7 Nightlife at Old Oar House. Old Oar House Brewery, 123 N. High St., Millville, 2931200. Thurs.: Open mic, 9 p.m. Fri.: Revolver, 9 p.m., Sat: Retrospect, 9 p.m. AT THE CASINOS Tickets: 1-800-736-1420; www.ticketmaster.com unless otherwise noted. HEADLINERS, COMEDY ACTS, AND REVUES comedians nightly. Sun.-Thurs., 9 p.m., $23; Fri., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $23; Sat., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $28. Order tickets by phone at the Comedy Stop Box Office: 1-877-FUNNY-AC or 609-348-0920. Visit www.comedystop.com. | MARCH 4, 2009 Gary Allan. Showboat House of Blues. 9 p.m. $42, $37. AnnaLynne McCord. Harrah’s The Pool. From the hit series 90210. 10 p.m. $25. HEADLINERS FRIDAY, MARCH 6 Profapalooza. Showboat House of Blues. Stockton Faculty Band, Dangerboy, Faculty Lounge. 7:45 p.m. $35, $25. 16 } the grapevine COMEDY & MORE Comedy Club at Borgata. Borgata Music Box: three comedians daily, 9 p.m. (except during headliner engagements) 1-800-298-4200. Comedy Stop at the Trop. Three Yesterday: A Tribute to the Beatles. Tropicana. Liverpool Club Theater in North Tower. Wed.–Sun., 8:30 p.m., $25. FRIDAY, MARCH 6 Friday Night Flashback. Merighi’s Savoy Inn Bistro, Landis Ave. and Union Rd., SATURDAY, MARCH 7 Russell Thompkins Jr. and the New Stylistics. Hilton. 8 p.m. $25. MARCH 6 THROUGH 8 Rock n’ Roll Will Never Die. 9 p.m. Fri, 3 and 8 p.m. Sat, 7 p.m. Sun. $25. I Historical Vineland { VINCE FARINACCIO } The Land Purchase Journals reveal details about the negotiations that led Landis to purchase land that would become Vineland. W e’re familiar with the story of how Charles K. Landis settled on this area to conduct his experiment of a city surrounded by farms and vineyards, free of alcohol and broad-minded in its acceptance of different creeds and philosophies. But, what if the behind-the-scenes snags in the negotiations between Richard Wood and Landis prevented the deal that led to Vineland? There were several problems that had the potential to change the history we know. Richard Wood was born and raised in Greenwich, New Jersey. His family arrived with one of the first Quaker settlements to Philadelphia in the late 17th century. Wood established a business in Philadelphia, but returned to his home state, building an iron foundry and cotton mill in Millville. By 1858, Wood had acquired from his half-brother, David, the New Jersey land that once belonged to Pennsylvania founder William Penn. Thus, his ownership extended through most of Cumberland County, including Millville and land north of it. Wood and his partner, William Wilson, owned a lumber business in the Forest Grove area, but there was no sign that the land was being groomed for development by its owner. Selling it would offer more possibilities for progress. On April 1, 1861, Wood writes in his journal that “a person called Landis came to talk about the purchase of a large tract of land.” Landis’ account says the initial meeting occurred in Philadelphia and that Wood seemed to “appreciate the idea” for a planned city. After touring the land together, the prospective buyer found Wood “to be slow and cautious” and his price “exorbitant” at $10 per acre but decided to “humor him in the negotiations” by visiting every day. After a week, Wood chose to visit Hammonton, which had been founded by Landis, and was impressed to see the town’s growth. Landis was offered a second invitation to inspect the land he wished to purchase and visited Wood at his home the day before the tour. When Mrs. Wood asked Landis what he had in mind for the avenues in his new town, the Vineland founder gave a detailed description of how they would be 100 feet wide and “lined with a double row of shade trees.” Landis writes that he had already been called “demented” by Wilson when he explained that a swampy area of land could be drained and reclaimed “to make a good carriage road,” and now his unorthoLandis dox view of Vineland’s main streets would also land him in hot water. The following day, Wood cautioned his interested buyer to refrain from discussing his plans since Mrs. Wood had awakened him during the night to warn him “against making any agreement with you, as she is afraid you are of unsound mind owing to your description of the avenue last night.” Wood seemed convinced of what Landis could accomplish and suggested he not tell people “any more than their minds are prepared for.” Landis writes that Wood gave permission to commence operations on the land while negotiations continued, but Landis insisted on having a deal first. By May 8, 1861, the day after Landis was asked to write what he felt was an appropriate deal, Wood wrote in his journal that they had “agreed upon seven dollars per acre as the price he is to pay.” According to a May 27, 1861 entry in Wood’s journal, Landis was eager to finalize the deal, but by June 20, Wood writes that he had “read [a] letter from Landis, demanding a matter that I cannot comply with; I so informed him. It probably closes our negotiations.” Landis makes no mention of this in his own account. Wood hints in his June 21 entry that the issue involved “interferences in the survey I sold him.” By July 4, at a meeting with his attorney and Landis, Wood “agreed to sign a paper of stipulations previous to the signing of the deed…” On July 22, 1861, one day after, as Woods notes in his journal, Federal troops were defeated at Manassas, the agreement with Landis was finally signed. I Beautiful Smiles, Made Affordable OUR SERVICES MILLVILLE FAMILY DENTAL Union Lake Crossing Shopping Center 2144 N. 2nd St., Millville WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | NEW PATIENT WELCOMING PACKAGE $ 80( reg. $230.) Includes oral exam, full mouth series of x-rays, cleaning & polishing, oral cancer screening, periodontal (gums) evaluation. With coupon only. Not valid with other offers. 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Vineland’s Premier Car Wash Offers To You: EXPRESS WASH No Waiting for vacuum customers. Stay in your car!! 2611 S. Main Rd., Vineland Vo te d # 1 t” “B es t of B es 20 08 Only $6.00 to get the salt off!! (Between Grant & Sherman) { STORY & PHOTOS: MARIE TEDESCO } Gift Boo k Availables Engineered Style A homeowner’s engineering eye helps create a special home. Located in every room but the kitchen are long casement windows topped with half-moon panes. The living room has the most windows, making it the brightest room in the house. To compensate for the windows, the home’s insulation is upgraded. The master bedroom suite encompasses the entire second floor. An endearing feature of the bedroom is a large walk-in closet with enough space for two full rows of clothing on both sides and a portion sectioned off with room to fit large items such as exercise equipment. It even has its own window. “Most women would die for this kind of closet,” Ceriani notes. As an additional bonus, the master suite has its own loft with pine wooded balcony rails overlooking the living room area. From the loft’s overview, a person sees one of the many special designs of the home. The living room’s double-sided gas fireplace, plated with ceramic tile, is unusually lifted above the flooring. In fact, both fireplaces have this unique feature. “I had the fireplaces designed myself because I never liked the hearth too close to the floor. It’s simple but different,” comments Ceriani. On the opposite side of the fireplace, French style doors lead into the third bedroom, which Ceriani used as office space. Just next to it is the second bedroom with its own bathroom. Pinewood accentuates all of the finished molding and trim throughout the house. At the other end of the house, the T wo open-hearth fireplaces, a pinewood cathedral ceiling and a loft with a balcony view of a living room sunlit by a half dozen windows. These are a few of the unique features in a finely crafted home at 2112 Conley Drive. Its characteristics combine traditional and contemporary elements, a look that homeowner Jim Ceriani sought to achieve when he had the house custom built in 1988. On less than one acre, the home is catalogued by Coldwell Banker Excel Realty with three bedrooms and two full baths. Diane Risdon, the realtor agent selling the home, calls it “magazine picture perfect.” Risdon adds, “It’s in an exclusive area and well established neighborhood.” Not one home within the surrounding development is alike. In particular, Ceriani’s house has a modern appearance with a large deck out back, a two-car garage and a path leading to a small patio at the home’s front door. It is landscaped with shade perennials, hostas, and ferns that enhance the neutral colored exterior. kitchen is tiled in green and has cabinets galore as well as spacious countertops. The highlight of this room is its large island. Risdon describes its versatility: “It’s great for entertaining a couple of people or several because of the spaciousness.” Lastly, the basement is unfinished but its layout and structure allows new homebuyers to customize it to their particular wants and tastes. Ceriani works as an engineer and Risdon comments that his “engineering eye” beautifully designed the home to be flexible for any homebuyer. Whether a person wants to furnish it contemporary or traditional, she says, “it lends itself to both.” I The asking price for this home is $306,900. For more information or to make an appointment to see it, call Diane Risdon at 696-1111 or 293-1985. 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