Archive for July, 2009

Posted on July 31st, 2009 by by Mike

July 29, 2009

INSIDE ZONING BOARD ACTS • HOME & GARDEN: TOMATO BLIGHT • A.C. POP FESTIVAL VOLUME 2 | ISSUE 25 | JULY 29, 2009 CONNECTING YOU { STORY AND PHOTOS; MICKEY BRANDT } T O V I N E L A N D . W E E K L Y. Visit us online www.grapevinenewspaper.com Chris Caverow, of men’s tournament champion Bud Light, smacks a home run in the most recent Rob Shannon Tournament. Local tournaments, such as the 43rd annual Bridgeton Invitational Baseball Tournament beginning Friday, are popular spectator events. aseball fever runs high these days, with the Major League World Champion Phillies threatening to make this another winning season. But America’s favorite pastime has roots locally, also. Two local tournaments—one baseball, one softball—have been in existence for a combined total of 82 years. The 39th annual Rob Shannon Slo-Pitch Softball Tournament was held in Millville on July 18 and the 43rd annual Bridgeton Invitational Baseball Tournament begins Friday at Alden Field. Vineland-based Garton’s Rigging won last year’s Invitational, which features semi-pro teams from throughout the Delaware Valley. Many think the team, which finished first in the regular season in its Salem County League, is a good bet to repeat. “Our lineup one through five will be very dirty,” said Garton’s manager, Chris Williams, using baseball slang for his first five hitters being powerful. “We do have a lot of talent, but baseball is a weird game—when you’re hot you’re hot, but when you’re not, you’re not.” Williams gave a disheartening example: While Garton’s finished first in its league this year with a 19-5 record, it was eliminated from the post-season tournament by the seventh place team. The Invitational has a storied history. From the outset, it used a clock to Continued on page 16 B May Pang signs her book for Dara Roberts at last year’s book signing. For Dara John Lennon confidant May Pang at local fundraiser on Saturday. { JANET NIEDOSIK } One doesn’t have to be a Beatles fan to recognize the illustrious words of John Lennon who wrote: “All You Need Is Love.” Or the familiar: “I Get By With a Little Help From My Friends”—song lyrics that will be put into action this Saturday, August 1, when S.R. Riley’s Musical Café hosts a fundraiser for a young woman, Dara Roberts, who suffers from cerebral palsy. Why the Beatles references? Dara, 19, is a devoted Beatles fan; S.R. Riley’s Musical Café is an all-things Beatles restaurant in Bridgeton. “In late 2000, as I was recovering from one of my surgeries [at home], I got my first taste of Beatlemania,” Dara said recently in an article she is preparing for a Beatles site on the web. In the day’s mail was an Continued on page 12 CASH FOR 2009 Model Clearance CLUNKERS Your vehicle may be eligible for up to $4500.00 Voucher HURRY BEFORE THE MONEY RUNS OUT!! 2008 President’s Award Winner & 2008 Council of Excellence Winner Is On NOW! Se Habla Español 1517 SOUTH DELSEA DRIVE, VINELAND NJ 856-692-1700 • www.rossihonda.com Visit Us At www.rossihonda.com 18 -H o l e C o u r s e H a n d i c a p – A c c e ss i b l e Gold & Silver is at a 25 Year High! • Gold Jewelry • Silver Jewelry • Sterling Silver Flatware • Gold Rings • Gold Bracelets • Gold Chains • Gold Class Rings • Dental Gold • Other Gold or Silver Items • U.S. Eagles • K-Rands • Pandas • Mexican-Pesos • Canadian Maple Leaf • Gold and Silver Bars • National Currency • U.S. Paper Money 1864 to 1922 • Don’t Forget That Old Jewelry Box That’s Full of Jewelry (1) Round of Golf for a Group of 4, FREE Hot Dog or Nachos & (1) FREE Soda – Only $25.00 Hot Dogs• Chili/Cheese • Nachos • Sausage • Sodas & Soft Pretzels Indoor & Patio Seating Gift Certificates Available Wednesday N ig h t S p e c i a l 5pm- close Fund Raising Opportunities for your school or organization Senior Citizen Rates • Visa & Mastercard Accepted $5.00 until 5PM • $6.00 5PM to Close B i r th d a y P a r t y P a c k a g e s 73 Landis Ave. Upper Deerfield Twp. 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MICKEY BRANDT I Editor’s Letter New Operator Announced for Landis Theatre Restaurant If there’s any doubt about the difference a successful new restaurant can make in a downtown area, take a look at Annata on Bellevue Avenue in Hammonton. While Hammonton’s downtown revitalization effort has been heralded widely as a slam-dunk success—and the new wine bar/eatery owned and operated by the Brunozzi and Rodio families of Vineland and Hammonton is at the core of that momentum—Hammonton has had a much more manageable task than Vineland does in turning around the fortunes of their town’s main drag. Hammonton’s downtown business district is three blocks long; Vineland’s downtown redevelopment area is three times as large. But Vineland’s city leaders made the right decision several years ago to focus their efforts on a small number of very substantial projects, including the Four Corners redevelopment plan, Facade Improvement Program, and Restaurant Row initiative. A key component of the Four Corners project at the intersection of East and Landis avenues is the renovation of Landis Theatre and the addition of a top-shelf restaurant and banquet facility adjacent to the theater. During a press conference last week in Mayor Robert Romano’s office, the operator of the new restaurant was introduced as were some of his plans for the high-profile space. Louis Ferretti, the owner/operator of the Centerton Country Club banquet facility and the new eatery at that location, The Steakhouse, was all smiles as he outlined his vision for the dining venue. “We’re going to have an Art Deco flavor,” to mesh with the adjoining theater, which is being refurbished and restored in keeping with its original 1920s-era design elements, said Ferretti. “We’re going to have a wood-burning oven in our open kitchen to add a little ambiance. If you’ve been to the restaurants at the Borgata [in Atlantic City], then you’ve seen the exposed kitchens they have.” Ferretti explained that these open kitchens add a feeling of intimacy, but that they also are highly functional as a spacesaving design where restaurants are built in confined spaces. “Culinary 101 teaches you, ‘looks good, tastes good’.” They’re going to come in and smell it, they’re going to taste it, love it and spend it.” The new 180-seat restaurant (with capacity for 200 more upstairs in the banquet room), which remains unnamed for the time being, will have a liquor license and the lounge, to be located in front and facing Landis Avenue, will be upscale and will be open when the restaurant is open, in accordance with the law. In other words, the restaurant and lounge will not only be attractions for when there are events taking place at the theater. Also present at the press conference was Hans Lampart, who is spearheading the redevelopment of the Four Corners, starting with the northwest corner where the theater is located. He expressed his satisfaction with the agreement between his company and Ferretti to complete a long-term lease for the dining and banquet operation. “With Lou’s vision, and considering the incredible success he’s created at Centerton in such a relatively short time,” he said, “we’re confident that we have found the right partner.” MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher LEFT: Hans Lampart, President of Eastern Pacific Development, shows where the kitchen is being framed for the new restaurant adjacent to the Landis Theatre. BOTTOM LEFT: Louis Ferretti, owner of the Centerton Country Club Banquet Facility and The Steakhouse; Mayor Romano and Lampart at a press conference announcing that Ferretti will operate the restaurant at the theater location. BELOW: Demolition began last week at the old firehouse and nurses’ station at Wood St. and East Ave. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | 1 For Dara A fundraiser at S.R. Riley’s in Bridgeton draws Beatle fans as well as May Pang. JANET NIEDOSIK High Efficiency Heating and Cooling and Water Heating Equipment Eligible for up to $1500 in Federal Tax Credits and up to $400 in Rebates 4, 6 7 Faces in the News Pop Goes the Summer The Atlantic City Pop Festival created memories, even for onlookers. DEBORAH A. EIN 8 Zoning Board Actions Menantico Colony and a wind turbine are two items on the agenda. LEE BURKE Serving Vineland for over 100 years! 9 Grass Roots Volunteers are crucial to downtown efforts. TODD NOON 10 18 Community Calendar DINING: Food Festivals The Russian and Puerto Rican fesivals whet the appetite. STEPHEN WILSON 691-1950 State Lic. # 12089 21 Recipe Corner An idea for spicing up chicken. LISA DINUNZIO 22-23 HOME & GARDEN 24 The Pop Festival Held just east of Mays Landing 40 years ago this weekend, it foreshadowed Woodstock. VINCE FARINACCIO 25 26 27 Entertainment Crossword REAL ESTATE SPECIAL STARTS BACK TO SCHOOL { STAFF } MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor LORI GOUDIE Art Director GAIL EPIFANIO Controller JACK EPIFANIO Distribution SHERRY MUNYAN Advertising Executive MARIE HALPIN-GALLO Advertising Executive PATTY ALI Graphic Designer MARYANNE BERTRAND Advertising Assistant Get the kids in for their haircuts before school starts! KIDS HAIRCUTS (cannot be combined with any other offers or specials.) exp 08/31/09 ONLY 8 WOW Get your Loved One A Gift Certificate Today 14 Years & Younger $ The Grapevine 3660 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361 PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816 EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2009. All rights reserved. HOURS Mon. – Wed. 9-5pm, Thurs. & Fri. 9-7pm Sat. 8:30-3pm & Sun., 9-1 pm the grapevine { 3 } WALK-INS WELCOME! NO APPOINTMENTS NECESSARY 5006 E. Landis Ave.Vineland (856) 691-2202 I Family Ow Operated ned & for Over 25 Year s! Faces in the News Why Pay Higher Prices? We have everything you need & the personalized service you deserve! Expert Installation Available Large & Unique Selection Carpet • Ceramic Tile Hardwood • Laminate Marble • Vinyl Campers Make Lava Lite, Volcano for Science Week The Summer Camp at Notre Dame is filling campers with excitement and knowledge as they enjoy the fun and company of their friends. The campers used glass jars, vegetable oil, salt, water and food coloring to create their own Lava Lites. They learned the Lava Lite uses wax to float around the light while it is heated and was invented by Craven Walker in 1964. The campers used oil and salt to dispense the colored oil through the water. Each camper created their own version of a different colored Lava Lite. Pictured, from left: Evan We carry all major brands! 1560 North Main Rd. Vineland, NJ 08360 Rodger, Zachary Hurban, Alexis Weaver, Camp Counselor Lori Bertonazzi, and Samantha Hurban. Also under the direction of Camp Counselor Lori Bertonazzi, students also built a volcano to celebrate Science Week. They started with an array of materials including chicken wire, newspaper, plaster of paris, baking soda and vinegar. Working to complete their volcano while laughing and enjoying the project the campers, grades first to fourth, watched as a pile of materials quickly became a realistic and functioning volcano. Pictured, from left: Aliyah Perry, Samantha Hurban, Zachary Hurban, Imani Perry, Alexis Weaver, and Addie Davis. 856-691-6000 www.mainlinefloor.com Seeking Treasure and Learning the Ropes Campers from the Ellison Explorers Summer Camp recently participated in a Beachcombing Walk sponsored by the Sea Isle City Parks and Recreation Department. The campers had a brief lesson on the ocean, tides, sea creatures, birds, shells, sea weed, sand dunes, ghost crabs—then set out on a treasure hunt of their own. This activity was part of the “Deep Blue Sea” week of Ellison’s eight-week long summer camp. Pictured, from left: Gianni Finizio (Vineland) and John Schossig (Vineland) identify a shell, while Nicole Wolkowitz (Vineland) looks on. For “Let the Games Begin” week, campers literally learned the ropes from members of the Cumberland County 4-H Double Dutch team. The three-person team demonstrated the type of moves they prepare for competition. These include compulsory, speed and tricks. Shown here, Justin Holton (Vineland) learns the “ropes” quite quickly! Don’t just dream it… now you can travel the world! Featuring 5 Cruises & 25 Vacations or Use Us For Single Vacation Bookings! Call Now & Ask About Our Lifetime Package! www.TvTravelPackage.com/HA8467 Getaway Lifetime Vacations, LLC (856) 979-8467 • Hilberto Andujar { 4 } the grapevine | JULY 29, 2009 CRABTREE’S LANDSCAPING And Turf Management Beautifying the outside since 1989 Serving Vineland, Millville & Bridgeton Areas COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL OVER 2 0 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE! Total Landscape Renovations In-ground Irrigation Systems Sodding, Mulching, Hydroseeding Waterfalls & ponds 856.875.0774 Bring a friend and share the fun Buy one, get one FREE! Buy One Buy One $ 29 29 99 99 FREE FREE Get One Get One Neil Ensslen of Vineland poses with the bluefin tuna he caught on July 22. He was on the Liquidity, captained by Dave Shockley, 40 miles off Cape May, when the fish was hooked. 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Pricing, offer terms, fees features may vary for existing customers not eligible for upgrade. Other restrictions apply. See store for details. 2009 Sprint. Sprint and the logo are locations or for all phones/networks. Pricing, offer terms, fees & features may vary for existing customers not eligible for upgrade. Other restrictions apply. See store for details. © 2009 Sprint. Sprint and the logo are trademarks of Sprint. Other marks are the property of their respective owners. trademarks of Sprint. Other marks are the property of their respective owners. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Do You Have Dangerous Trees? Call For Your Free Evaluation Good, Clean Work At Reasonable Prices Don’t Be Fooled. Call A Certified Aborist. For All Your Tree Care. the grapevine { 5 } Pruning • Tree Removals • Storm Damage Elevations • Shrubbery Trimming • Stump Grinding Owner Operated Local Business • Fully Insured Owner Working At All Jobs! FREE ESTIMATES www.forresttreesurgeon.com 10% Off Any Tree Service Forrest Tree Surgeon • 856-694-0922 Must present coupon at time of estimate. Not valid with other offers. Exp. 8/31/09 I Faces in the News New Athletic Complex Named for DiTomo The new athletic complex at Vineland High School will bear the name of Anthony DiTomo, a Vineland High School student, athlete, educator, coach and administrator whose career spanned six decades. The Vineland Board of Education unanimously chose to name the complex for DiTomo at a special meeting on July 15. The complex includes baseball, softball and lacrosse fields, which will later be named individually. DiTomo, who died in 2001, was chosen from among 10 nominees who have all made significant contributions to the community, athletics and improving the lives of young people. DiTomo was nominated by the Vineland High School Historical Committee, led by Dr. Dane Barse and John Casadia Jr. As a student athlete, DiTomo was a varsity letter winner in football, basketball, baseball and track. He was a member of the undefeated and untied VHS football team of 1939, and led his team and the South Jersey Group IV scoring race with 74 points (nine TD’s and 20 extra points). DiTomo attended Temple University on a scholarship, and was a standout player on the football team. He left school to join the Air Force in 1942, and served during World War II. He received a bachelor’s degree from Wake Forest University and a master’s degree from Temple University. DiTomo also attended the 1949 Buffalo Bills Fall Football Camp and was offered a contract to play for the team. Returning to his hometown, DiTomo accepted a position at Vineland High School where he taught physical education and coached football, baseball, tennis and wrestling. SOIFER SCHNEIDER PETRIL Symphony Names Three New Trustees The Bay-Atlantic Symphony announced the appointment of three new members—Mark Soifer, Esq. of Somers Point, NJ; Richard R. Schneider of Mays Landing, NJ; and Robert D. Petril, Sr. of Margate, NJ—to the orchestra’s Board of Trustees. Soifer is a partner at the law firm of Cooper Levinson in its Atlantic City office, with a practice devoted to commercial, real estate, and business litigation. His involvement with the arts community dates back more than 20 years. He served as a member and as Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the South Jersey Regional Theater. He is also involved as board member of the Pop Lloyds Committee, which is involved in community outreach and the legacy of Pop Lloyd and Negro League Baseball. Schneider, the Vice-President of Food and Beverage for Bally’s Atlantic City, is an Atlantic City native with nearly 20 years of experience in that business. He has served in similar capacities with the MGM Grand Detroit, in Detroit, MI; National Amusements, Inc., in Dedham, MA; Trump Taj Mahal/Trump Entertainment Resorts, in Atlantic City; and the Trump Marina Hotel and Casino, in Atlantic City. Petril has been an executive in the furniture manufacturing business for more than 40 years. Having been involved with the Bay-Atlantic Symphony for the past eight years, he follows in the footsteps of his late wife Sherrylee Petril, who was on the Board. SEND US YOUR FACES — IT’S FREE! Get your photos published in The Grapevine… birthdays, engagements, weddings, anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them the address listed on p. 3. NOW OPEN 3.5% SALES TAX 1853 Vine Rd. Vineland 691-4848 Fax: 856-691-2294 Specials For July 26-Aug 1 EBT marcaccimeats@verizon.net FRUIT • PRODUCE • DELI • SANDWICHES 1362 S. Delsea Dr. Vineland • 856-362-5978 (next to T& F Camera) JERSEY TOMATOES……..75¢lb. SPECIALS $ DELI SPECIALS ROAST BEEF $ DIETZ & WATSON DIETZ & WATSON { 6 } the grapevine | JULY 29, 2009 RED or WHITE GRAPES…$100 lb. MANGO’S…. 5 00 Box or 80¢ea 5.99 lb. 5.29 lb. 2.59 lb. JERSEY PEACHES……..75¢lb. BLACK PLUMS……..2 lbs/$200 RED PEPPERS……..3 lbs/$200 SEEDLESS WATERMELON. $ FRESH BEEF CHICKEN PICNICS SHORT BREAST RIBS $ 75 ¢ $ 49 BONELESS AVERAGE (8-10 LB) 1 lb. .89 lb. lb. 2 lb. SOUTHERN FRIED CHICKEN $ 3 99 ea LIMES……..12 For $100 CELERY……..2 For $100 BLUEBERRIES……..2 Pints $300 ea EGGPLANT……..75¢ea MILK • EGGS • FRUIT BASKETS LISCIO BAKERY ROLLS • BREAD DELMONICO STEAKS WHOLE BONELESS CENTER CUT PORK LOIN SMOKED OUR PORK FAMOUS CHOPS BACON lb. lb. AMERICAN CHEESE $ Open 7 Days Mon-Sat 8am-7pm Sun 8am-2pm DIETZ & WATSON $ 99 $199 $289 $259 Come in and check out our great selections and prices on all your Bar B Q Meats! 6 lb. I Gleanings { DEBORAH A. EIN, MANAGING EDITOR } Pop Goes the Summer In summer 1969, a rock concert brought the world to our front yard. E diting Vince Farinaccio’s history column this week transported me right back to 1969. In submitting the story, Vince wrote: “Here’s this week’s article on an event very few people seem to remember around here, but it preceded Woodstock by two weeks…. Unfortunately, I didn’t get to go. My parents objected when I brought it up, and now as a parent myself, I wouldn’t have let my kids at the age of 13 go to a three-day festival either, no matter how close. But five years later, I got to see CSNY [Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young] at the same spot, and it’s been one of my concert highlights.” Well, here’s someone who remembers, although only from the outside looking in. Not quite a teenager and living within walking distance of the Atlantic City Race Course where the mini-Woodstock occurred, I was equally intrigued. My sister and I set out on our Schwinn bikes to get a closer look. We made it as far as the entrance gate (now the Hamilton Mall parking lot) and peered curiously about. We were peeping into a world that we had only heard of. It really existed—the psychedelic clothing, the love beads, the peace signs. We were not quite old enough to enjoy the gathering for what it was, I’m sure my parents were thankful for that. I was mostly curious—as well as intimidated—by the long-haired, colorfully dressed, peace-loving “hippies” who had invaded our childhood summer, parking streetside and camping out in tents and vans. The highway was lined with vehicles, and groovy people not much older than I were streaming toward the gates. A vacant lot across the street from my house drew vans and cars, and folks camping out under the stars. We could hear their chatter into the night. Despite the excitement, I can’t even say the Pop Festival was the highlight of my summer. Last week, I wrote about the first moon landing, which happened a My sister and I set out on our Schwinn bikes to get a closer look…. groovy people not much older than I were streaming toward the gates. couple of weeks before the Atlantic City Pop Festival came to my neighborhood. Staying up to watch Neil Armstrong take those first steps on the lunar surface was somehow more age-appropriate than access to a hippie fest. I really don’t even remember Woodstock happening two weeks after the Pop Festival, I guess because rock concerts weren’t really part of my world. It was a summer to remember, nonetheless—perhaps the first summer when I became aware of the world outside my circle of extistence. Coincidentally, this issue of The Grapevine also includes news of Menantico Colony (next page), where a similar large-scale music concert was being planned for last August. Depending on how you look at it, you might say that not going forward quickly enough to secure the concert resulted in a missed opportunity for Vineland. Revenue forgone, memories never made. Some concert sites become shopping malls, others become art centers/museums as Woodstock has, others get shot down before they become the stuff of memories. But I have my memories of the Atlantic City Pop Festival. The music, the hippies, the culture… I was too young to appreciate their music or understand their lifestyle, but I could relate to their freedom of spirit. At least until school started a few weeks later. I FEED THE BEST AND SAVE…SEE A BETTER ANIMAL WITH PURINA MILLS® WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | PURINA OMOLENE #100 for Light to Moderately Worked Horses PURINA OMOLENE #200® For Performance, Breeding & Growing Horses PURINA MILLS STRATEGY® for Maintenance, Eÿcient Breeding and Winning Performances PURINA EQUINE SENIOR® for the Special Needs of Older Horses PURINA MILLS LAYENA® SUNFRESH RECIPE® forTop-ProducingLaying Birds OnceTheyReach 18Weeks ofAge PURINA MILL GOAT CHOW® forAll Breedsof Goats PURINA MILLS RABBIT CHOW® for Overall Healthand Longevity ofYour Rabbit $ 1370 $1450 $1310 $1610 $1195 $1350 $1370 GAROPPO Feed & Pet Supplies 1200 Harding Highway (Rt. 40) Newfield, NJ 08344 the grapevine { 7 } HOURS MON.-FRI. 7AM-5:30PM SAT 7AM-5PM SUN. 9AM-1PM 856-697-4444 I Civic Engagement { LEE BURKE } Variance For Menantico Colony City’s second residential wind turbine also receives Zoning Board approval. T he Zoning Board of Adjustment unanimously approved a use variance requested by Daniel Cervini at its July 15 meeting. Cervini, owner of Cervini’s Auto Body and lifelong Vineland resident, wants to purchase the 570acre property located off Hance Bridge Road. He plans to rehabilitate and preserve some of the 11 vacant structures as single-family dwellings on a 40-acre portion of the formerly state-owned Vineland Training School property, also known as the Menantico Colony. The property includes the now-dry Menantico Lake as a result of a broken dam of the Menantico Creek. The other 530 acres is woodland and farmland. The property, now owned by Elwyn Inc., has been vacant for more than a decade. In 2005, a potential buyer proposed a 400-unit high-density senior citizen housing complex. A large-scale music festival was scheduled on the property last summer. Both projects met with opposition and were defeated. In other business, the Zoning Board approved the request of Richard Cheli, Piacenzia Avenue, for construction of a 120foot wind turbine for private use on his 10acre lot. In April 2009, a similar request was granted to Thomas Zucca, Genoa Avenue, on a 4.5-acre lot. In both cases, the board was concerned with possible noise and height issues. The wind turbines are considered equipment rather than building structures and are not subject to any height or setback restrictions. However, the board advised the residents to check with the Federal Aviation Administration on its height requirements. According to Steve Hawk, senior planner and staff advisor to the Zoning Board, the city has no ordinance to regulate wind turbine or solar equipment on residential property. The Vineland Zoning Board of Adjustment consists of seven regular members and two alternates appointed by the Mayor and City Council. No member may hold any elective office or position under the The 2009 roster of Zoning Board members: • Edwin Bergamo, Jr., Chairman • Elaine Greenberg, Vice Chairman • John Zagari, Edward Avena, Leroy Goldblatt, John Cheli, Alan Angelo • Marcello Cavallo, 1st Alternate Samuel Fiocchi, 2nd Alternate • Frank Di Domenico, Esquire-Solicitor municipality. No member shall be permitted to act on any matter in which he/she, either directly or indirectly, has any personal or financial interest. The board is empowered by the state “Municipal Land Use Law” (NJ 40:55D) to: • Hear and decide appeals of decisions made by the zoning officer. • Consider requests for variances including use variances. Most common applications are for “C” variances for relief from a setback dimension such as front or side yards. “D” variances, or “use” variances, are generally a request in which a use not permitted in a zone is being expanded or proposed. The burden of proof in each case is on the applicant. The board may not grant a variance unless evidence submitted shows it has the power to grant or recommend a variance in accord with State Statue. Corporations, partnerships and LLCs must be represented by an attorney. All meetings of the Zoning Board of Adjustment are open to the public, including the pre-meeting conference. The regular meetings are held (unless otherwise indicated) on the third Wednesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. in Council Chambers (second floor of City Hall, 640 E. Wood Street). A premeeting conference commences at 7 p.m. The next scheduled meeting is August 19. The mission of the Vineland Zoning Office is to guide the appropriate use or development of land. Patrick Finley, Zoning Officer, is responsible for the enforcement of the Land Use Ordinance and assists the public with compliance. He may be reached at 794-4113 or pfinley@vinelandcity.org I Questions regarding the Zoning Board of Adjustment may be directed to Yasmin Ricketts, Zoning Board Secretary, at 794-4646 or yricketts@vinelandcity.org. Feel The Difference With Fabrizio Chiropractic Get Relief From HEADACHES NUMBNESS NECK PAIN LOWER BACK PAIN Start Fresh Today! Credit Card Debt • Medical Bills Utility Bills • Surcharges And Even Some Income Taxes Stop Wage Executions Reduce Car Payments Free Office Visit-Start Fresh Financially! Want to wipe out your debt? WIPE OUT: STOP SHERIFF SALE BANKRUPTCY IS YOUR LEGAL BAILOUT! Listen to Seymour Wasserstrum Esq. Live on the Radio Every Thursday Night From 8-9 pm on 92.1 FM Helping people wipe out their bills – since 1973 205 Landis Ave., Vineland www.wipeoutyourbillstoday.com $100 OFF w/this ad – CR We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for Bankruptcy Code. Come In For A { 8 } the grapevine | JULY 29, 2009 FREE CONSULTATION & Learn How You Could Win A Seymour Wasserstrum, Esq. FREE IPOD SHUFFLE! Dr. Theresa A. Fabrizio DC 856.692.0077 1790 N. Main Road, Vineland, NJ FAX: 856.692.4008 SEYMOUR WASSERSTRUM Esq. -Bankruptcy Attorney- 856-696-8300 I Downtown Vineland { TODD NOON, EXEC. DIR., VDID/MAIN STREET } Grass Roots The input and participation of volunteers is crucial to the success of the downtown. W ith the Vineland Seafood Festival behind us, this is the perfect time to let all of you know how much your input and participation are needed and valued in VDID/Main Street Vineland. The four committees that comprise VDID/Main Street Vineland—Organization, Promotions, Design, and Economic Restructuring—are made up of volunteers from the community. No committee member is appointed and, while the chairperson of the committee is elected and then approved by the Board of Directors, that person comes from among the volunteers making up the committees. It is true that the members of the Board of Directors are appointed by the Mayor or City Council, and the Executive Director serves at the pleasure of the Board. That should not—and does not—detract from the fact that the volunteers who make up the four committees are the grass roots who conceive, plan, and carry out the projects, activities, and events of VDID/Main Street Vineland. The initiative comes from the volunteers and then the Board approves or disapproves of the project work plan put before them. This is why your input and participation can mean so much. VDID/Main Street Vineland committee and Board meetings are public meetings and are open to you. You can learn first-hand what is going on, but you can also give your input. You can make your input carry further by working with our committees, which meet on a rotating basis each Thursday of the month, at 8:30 a.m., at the VDID/Main Street office at 603 E. Landis Avenue. By coming to the committee meetings, you can contribute your ideas and become part of the process. If the meeting times are not good for you— or if you would rather meet with me or a committee chair first—our door is open to you and we can set something up. We are currently in the initial budgetary stage of planning the committees’ activities and projects for next year. This is a great time to come in. You will then see how very much you have to offer to VDID/Main Street Vineland. *** If you like to go to the zoo and are enchanted by the fascinating world of small animals, we’re going to bring the zoo to you at this Saturday’s Fresh and Specialty Foods Market on the 700 block of Landis Avenue. From 9 a.m. to noon, some little critters will be on hand at the Market, courtesy of the Cohanzick Zoo in Bridgeton, to delight young and old alike. Among our “visitors” will be a ball python, lizards, turtles, a screech-owl, and various others. Also, you can cast your vote every week of the Market, in the Little Miss & Mister Cherry Tomato photo contest. The winner will be crowned at the International Food & Cultural Festival on Saturday, August 22 and will ride in the Holiday Parade on November 28. All the proceeds will go toward the great cause of downtown revitalization. The following week’s Market, on August 8, falls on Vineland’s 148th birthday. The Market that day will be part of a daylong birthday party, with help from the Friends of Historic Vineland and the Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society. Watch for further details because you won’t want to miss it! Presented by VDID/Main Street Vineland and sponsored again by Sun National Bank, the Market runs each Saturday until August 15 from 8 a.m. to noon. *** Remember that for all our downtown events, please support your downtown merchants and businesses. If you can stop into any of them during the events, please do so. If you do not have an opportunity during that time, make a point of coming back at a later time. The businesses, and we at VDID/Main Street Vineland, will greatly appreciate your support and patronage. I For more information on VDID/Main Street Vineland’s “endless summer” of events and activities, call the office at 794-8653 or visit www.mainstreetvineland.org. FRESH m This Week’s Feature FO ODS MARKET (Opposite Vineland Post O ce) & Zoo Day Cohanzick Zoo Day SPECIALT Y WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Featuring Some of the Exotic Residents of the Cohanzick Zoo Zoo Animals from 9 am & Noon Ball Python, Lizards, Turtles, Screech Owl and More Every Week — Jersey Fresh Produce Market Runs ru Aug. 15 WIC & Senior Coupons Accepted the grapevine { 9 } VINELAND TROLLEY VINELAND TROLLEY RIDE THE TROLLEY TO AND FROM THE MARKET FREE! Runs Landis Ave – Kidston Towers to WalMart This event is sponsored in part by VDID/Vineland Main Street. This ad has been paid for with funds approved for such use by the New Jersey Urban Enterprise Zone Authority. I COMMUNITY CALENDAR HAPPENINGS SATURDAY, AUGUST 1 The Cultural and Heritage San Juan Festival. North Italy Hall, 414 Virano St. 10 a.m.–11 p.m. 692-2331 ext. 108. Casa P.R.A.C. Inc. hosts. DJ and live bands, dancers, vendors, dance and domino contest, talent show, car show, party inflatables, dunk tank, cartoon characters, karate, puppets and face painting, clown and magic show, and cash prizes. Animals. 700 block of Landis Ave. 8 a.m.noon. p.m. each Saturday through August 15. Vendors will sell fresh fruits and vegetables and various crafters and other exhibitors will be on hand. Small animals from Cohanzick Zoo will delight kids of all ages. Trolley will shuttle between Kidston Towers and Walmart, providing free transportation for anyone going to the Market. 794-8653. meaningful activities and begin to understand their grief. This free event offers a wide range of activities including a rope course, outdoor games, crafts and a memorial celebration. Camp Kaleidoscope will be staffed by experienced grief counselors, Camp Edge counselors, hospice staff and volunteers along with medical staff. www.sjhealthcare.net. SATURDAY, AUGUST 1 Camp Kaleidoscope. Camp Edge, 26 Camp Edge Rd., Alloway. A day-long event providing a supportive environment where grieving children and teens will meet others who experienced similar losses, participate in SATURDAY, AUGUST 1 Movie Night. Bridgeton City Park Amphitheater. Movies are PG rated. Bring your favorite lawn chair or blanket and watch the movie on a huge movie screen. Dusk. Free. SATURDAY, AUGUST 1 Fresh and Specialty Foods Market/Zoo LEARN-TO-ROW CAMP for firsttime rowers (grades 6 to 11 for the fall 2009 school year) will be held for a two-week session Monday through Thursday 5 to 7 p.m. August 10-13 and 17-20. Camp will occur at Harris Industrial Park Boathouse (home of the Vineland HS Crew Team), 328 S. 2nd Street, Millville with rowing on the Maurice River. Cost is $150 per session with a $50 deposit to hold your spot. Call 498-1057 or 293-1848 for details. CHRISTOPHER GARDNER, inspirational author and successful investment broker, will appear at Cumberland County College on Monday, September 14. Gardner’s autobiographical book, The Pursuit of HappYness, later a movie starring Hollywood’s Will Smith, tells the true story of Gardner’s rise from homelessness and despair as a single father in San Francisco to an international business career successful beyond his wildest dreams. “Chris Gardner’s story should be an inspiration to anyone struggling to create their own personal success in these extraordinary times”, said Francis J. Reilly, executive director of CEO Group, sponsor of Gardner’s appearance. Reilly explained that CEO Group members, executives representing 37 private sector companies in Cumberland County, have long recognized the need to help young people understand the importance of hard work and dedication as they pursue their place in the world. The fact that Mr. Gardner is an AfricanAmerican may help get the message out in Cumberland County, Reilly believes. “We have a substantial and growing minority population,” Reilly said, “and these kids need to see a role model like Chris Gardner with whom they can better identify than, say, if we brought in Bill Gates to talk to them.” Gardner will appear at Cumberland County College’s Fine and Performing Arts Center at 3:30 p.m., where he is scheduled to address students of middle school age and up. Group tickets are available by calling The CEO Group at 696-4130. Admission is free but no one will be admitted without a ticket. DINING OUT FOR KIDS is an only at South Jersey’s Premier Car Wash Just $850 YES! Voted #1 “Best of Best” 2008 + Tax Can get my car clean INSIDE & OUT??? event that will be held by the Boys & Girls Club of Vineland on Wednesday, September 16, at area restaurants. Invite friends and family out for dinner that day at participating restaurants and they, in turn, will contribute a portion of the evening’s food receipts to the Boys & Girls Club. The Club is now seeking restaurants to participate in the 4th annual event. The restaurant will receive a 100 percent tax deduction, valuable publicity for their restaurant, and the distinction of being a contributor to a worthy cause— helping at-risk youth in the community. For more information, call Chris Volker at 696-4190. Manufacturers (AGEM) representative Mac Seelig, President of AC Coin & Slot, ACCC President Dr. Peter Mora, CCI Slot Technology Program Coordinator, Thomas Giardina and Worthington Atlantic City Campus Dean, Bobby Royal present the $25,000 AGEM scholarship donation check. DRIVE IN FOR DURAND 2nd Annual Classic Car Show is slated for Saturday, September 19, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Crafters may set up inside or outside (approx. 200 people are expected to attend). Call 207-9629 to reserve a table at $10. Show will be held at Marie Durand School (371 W. Forest Grove Road). THE ASSOCIATION OF GAMING Equipment Manufacturers (AGEM) donated $25,000 to the Casino Career Institute at Atlantic Cape Community College recently. The donation will offer $1,000 tuition assistance scholarships for students in its slot technology training program. Approximately 25 potential trainees will be awarded AGEM scholarships over the next two years. To apply for the scholarships, students must demonstrate financial need and complete an application through ACCC. For more information, visit www.atlantic.edu or call 609-343-4848. Pictured, from left: Director of the Casino Career Institute (CCI), Carol Drea, Association of Gaming Equipment GV { 10 } the grapevine | JULY 29, 2009 EVER Guaranteed! Windows included with this ad. Best Wash 2611 S. Main Rd. Vineland, NJ 08360 (Between Grant & Sherman) CYNTHIA ROBERTS SALON, Spa & Studio (corner of Oak Road and Lincoln Avenue) will provide the end-ofthe-week activity for students ages 8, 9, and 10 who selected the “Tea, Etiquette & Fun” class at the Summer Academy for Kids 2009, offered by Cumberland County College. The students in the “Tea, Etiquette & Fun” class (Week 7, August 3-7, 1 to 4 p.m.) will wrap up their week of learning the social graces—including the art of conversation, table manners, and social challenges—with a trip to Cynthia Roberts Salon, where they will have their hair styled and nails done. Cindy Gentiletti, Owner/Stylist of Cynthia Roberts Salon, Spa & Studio, and her staff, look forward to meeting all of the well-mannered students. VINELAND’S 148TH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION Open House at the Vinealnd Antiquarian and Historical Society: Saturday, August 8, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. • 11 a.m.: Doors open • Noontime: Singing of national anthem outside around flagpole by Vinelander Ashley Birmingham and prayer by Rev. Ellen Rutherford of Vineland’s First Church, Trinity Episcopal Church • 12:20 p.m.: Politicians speaking • 1 p.m.: Cake cutting • 1:30 p.m.: Lecture by Vince Farinaccio • 2 p.m.: Kids’ program Newfield. New members welcome. 7:30 p.m. 794-2528. SATURDAY, AUGUST 8 Wild Edible Plant Walk. Parvin State Park, 701 Almond Rd, Pittsgrove. 1:30 p.m. 358-8616. Pageant Wagon Productions 5th Anniversary Old Fashioned Melodrama Summer Family Theatre presents or “The Villain Vaudevillian” by Kathryn Ross with The Pageant Wagon Players SATURDAY, AUGUST 8 Downtown Car Show. Glasstown Arts District, High St. from Main to Broad, Millville. Cars made before 1981 are eligible to participate, as well as special-interest and modern collectibles of any age. Trophy presentation 2:45 p.m. Judges will award over 50 trophies, including two Best of Show. Rain date August 15. For car registration, call 825-3047. For event information, call 825-2600. SHOWSTOPPERS AT STARR’S THEATRICAL EMPORIUM FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Worldwide Convenience • Personal Attention July 30-31, August 1, 2009 Eves. @ 7:00pm – Saturday Matinee @1:30pm At the Calvary Chapel Playhouse – 930 N. Main Road, Vineland (just south of Oak) All Singing – All Dancing – All Comedy & Chaos! Plus Clementine’s “Just Desserts Bar”! Tickets: $10 Adults, $7 Senior Citizens, $5 Children under 12 • Group Rates Available Call 856 205-9334 for tickets and information Savings Home Equity Checking VISA Credit Cards Auto Loans VISA Check Cards Personal Loans Online Banking Plus Much More! SUNDAY, AUGUST 2 Weekly Dance. North Italy Club Hall, East Ave. and Virano Ln. County chapter of the Single Parents Society holds the dances for people age 50 and up, married or single. Live band performs music for waltz, rhumba, swing, foxtrot, line dances, and more. 7:30-10:30 p.m. $7 members, $9 non-members 697-1814. TUESDAY, AUGUST 11 City Council Meeting. Council Chambers, City Hall, Seventh and Wood sts. 7:30 p.m. “Serving Members for Over 70 Years” 37 West Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08360 Sponsored in part by: WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12 Planning Board Meeting. Council Chambers, City Hall, Seventh and Wood sts. 7:30 p.m. TUESDAY, AUGUST 4 National Night Out. Pagliughi Park, 2245 E. Magnolia Rd. An annual event designed to heighten crime prevention, and build support and participation in local anti-crime programs. 5-9 p.m. GOLF, SPORTS, ETC. SATURDAY, AUGUST 1 Joshua Moren Memorial Slo-Pitch Softball Tournament. Fiocchi Field, 1755 Galli Dr. Fee per team $150, Home Run Derby $10 per player. Team registration deadline 7 /28, game day check-in 8 a.m. rmg0004@auburn.edu for details about tourney and sponsorship opportunities. Vineland Downtown Improvement District/Main Street, Calvary Chapel Vineland, Colonial Bank, FSB, Newfield National Bank, The Sweet Life Bakery, Quality Printing, Cumberland Christian School, The Sweet Tooth, Sweetpea’s Children’s Consignment Shoppe, Auctions by Mesiano, LLC, and the Robert S. Greenberg Law Office. 856-696-0767 Also serving members at: 28A Cornwell Dr. Bridgeton, NJ 08302 856-453-9094 www.cumcofcu.org THURSDAY, AUGUST 6 Cataract Coffee Talk. SurgiCenter, 251 South Lincoln Ave. Learn more about cataract surgery. 9 a.m. Register with Stacey, Nurse Manager at 691-8188 ext. 272. THURSDAY, AUGUST 6 Photographic Society Meeting. Newfield Senior Center, Catawba Ave. and Church St, DICK BAUM MEMORIAL GOLF TOURNAMENT CUMBERLAND COUNTY HABITAT FOR HUMANITY hosts on Friday, August, 21, at Ron Jaworski’s Running Deer Golf Club, 1111 Parvin Mill Road, Pittsgrove, 11 a.m. registration; noon lunch; 1 p.m. shotgun; 5 p.m. dinner. $100 golfer donation (includes: greens fee, golf cart, lunch, dinner). Call 563-0292. CHURCH NEWS Trinity Episcopal Church at Eighth and Wood streets, Vineland, will be holding its Sunday service outside on August 2. (Rain will move it inside.) The 9 a.m. Holy Eucharist will include a saxophone soloist. Refreshments will follow the service. Everyone is invited to attend. New Bethel African Methodist Church, 414 N. Seventh Street, will hold its Vacation Bible School August 3-7, from 6 to 8 p.m. Adults and children are invited to come and take part in the various lessons and craft making throughout the week. Summer Art and Learning Camp at New Hope Presbyterian Church (65 Hitchner Avenue, Bridgeton). Wednesday afternoons (July 29, August 5, 12, 19, 26) for ages 7 to 12, from 1 to 5 p.m. Arts, crafts, reading, dance, music lessons, science exploration, outdoor recreation. No cost. Come one afternoon or come all summer. Call 451-7644. Salon Fabrojae’ Wishes to Thank You For Your Support In The Team Barbara Cook Run, Ride & Walk For Cancer We were able to raise over $1400 with your contributions. Please Join Us Tuesday, August 4th 12:00 – 4:00 pm WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | WEEKLY THROUGH OCTOBER 6 Senior Golf Association Events. Various courses throughout southern New Jersey. Annual membership $20. July 28 (Westwood). Aug. 4 (White Oaks), Aug. 11 (Patriots Glen), Aug. 18 (off), Aug. 28 (TBA). Call to join or for additional information, 691-4098. Everything’s Okay by Alesia Shute (former owner of Sweetwater Casino) Everything’s Okay is a triumphant and endearing story of survival after being diagnosed with cancer at the age of 7. Alesia’s story details not only her recovery, but also her struggles through school, boys, marriage, and pregnancy with some hilarious tales of business to boot. www.everythingsokaybook.com All of the proceeds from the sale of the book will go to The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia For A Book Signing Everything’s Okay by Alesia Shute (former owner of Sweetwater Casino) Purchase the Book & Receive a $15 Gift Certificate SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 13 2nd Annual Run For Life. Wheat Road Golf, 2142 E. Wheat Rd. 5K this year in memory of Ronald K Brownlee Jr, who lost his battle with leukemia last June. All proceeds benefit The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. 9 a.m. 5 K Run or 1 Mile Walk $20 if reg by Sept. 5, $25 day of race. www.therunforlife5k.com. at Salon Fabrojae’ the grapevine { 11 } All of the proceeds from the sale of the book will go to c o n c e p t s a lo n For Dara Continued from page 1 Ed Sullivan video: “Smash Hits of the ’60s. I asked my mom to tell me about the Beatles,” then Dara said she watched the video. “I looked at the Beatles for the first time … I instantly fell in love with them! They were singing ‘I Want to Hold Your Hand.’ From that moment on, I became a Beatles fan … My love for the Beatles and their music [has supported] me throughout my surgeries,” Dara said. Saturday’s fundraiser is—like the restaurant itself —centered on all-things Beatles. John Lennon’s confidant, May Pang, whose career in the music industry spans more than 25 years, will be at the café. Pang wrote a book entitled Loving John in 1983, which detailed her liaison and working association with the late Beatle as well as his relationships with Paul, Ringo, George and son Julian, according to her website. This will be her second visit to the Bridgeton restaurant and a chance to reacquaint with Dara. “I met Dara last year at S.R. Riley’s when I came down to do a book signing, which was quite successful,” Pang said. “Sandi [Riley] approached me again to do another event at her place but only this time, it was for Dara and getting her a new wheelchair, which I am happy to do. “ Pang now has a line of stainless steel feng shui jewelry (http://maypang.com/fsc.html) and furniture. She continues to do consulting work on music for films. She has been exhibiting in galleries across the country, fine art prints of John Lennon and friends from her latest book on St. Martin’s Press, Instamatic Karma, Photographs of John Lennon. She will have copies of her book and some of her jewelry at the fundraiser, which will run from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the café at 101 E. Commerce Street. “Reservations would be a good idea, although I think people will be coming and going, as it is five hours,” said owner, Sandy Riley. In connection with the fundraiser, Philadelphia Radio Station WMGK 102.9 is sponsoring a contest on its website. The prize is a Beatles basket. “The basket will have a We are currently accepting new students in the following programs * Adult – Tang Soo Do * Youth – Tang Soo Do * Little Tigers – 4-6 yrs. Martial Arts (Sundays 9:00-10:30AM) (Mondays 6:45-7:30PM) $50 gift certificate from S. R. Riley’s, a signed May Pang book, Instamatic Karma, a signed book Meet the Brittles, and a print from [illustrator] Anthony Parisi. Anyone can enter the contest on WMGK’s website (www.wmgk. com),” Riley said. Meet the Brittles, by Hal Pollock, a new children’s book whose characters trace the story of the Beatles with song lyrics in the prose will be available for sale at the cafe, along with an Bridgeton, they are loaning us the backdrop of Abbey Road to take pictures,” Riley said. PhotoGraphix photographer David Mitchell of Vineland will be taking 5×7 pictures in front of the Abbey Road backdrop. “The pictures will be $15 of which $10 goes back to the fundraiser. Pictures can be picked up at the restaurant after processing or mailed,” Riley added. Shannon “World’s Greatest Beatles Artist,” will also be at S.R. Riley’s on Saturday. Beatles memorabilia line the walls of S.R. Riley’s, where May Pang will attend a fundraiser for Dara Roberts, shown below in her high school graduation photo. Sandi Riley is far right in photo below, in which Jude Kessler, author of John Lennon: Shoulda Been There, far left, joins Dara and other Beatles fans. * Tai Chi * Kardio Kickboxing For more information on these programs and our summer Specials call or check our website: www.vinelandmartialarts.com 3722 E. Landis Ave., Ste G Vineland, NJ 856-405-0008 west40autodetailing.vpweb.com (Bluebell Rd & Rt. 40 Vineland) Headlight Restora on WEST 40 Auto Detailing & (856) 305-2884 accompanying jewelry line. Susan Ryan, owner of NYC Fab Four Walking Tour, Editor of Rooftop Sessions and co-host of the movie, John Lennon’s New York will be on hand, as well as musician Scott Erickson. Patrons can shop for Beatles treasures, bid on one-of-akind Beatles auction items, enjoy food from a Beatles-inspired menu—oh, and have their picture taken crossing Abbey Road. “Percussion One is a music store in Shannon decorated the Hard Day’s Night Hotel in Liverpool, England. She currently has her work on display at both Jonas Brothers concerts and Rain. Dara’s story is a remarkable one. Dara was born three months early, diagnosed with cerebral palsy, osteoporosis, and scoliosis. She is a wheelchair user and has had 12 major surgeries in her life. Most of her surgeries were long, 10 to 12 hours, and rather involved—on her { 12 } the grapevine | JULY 29, 2009 Getting Divorced? Bonnie L. Laube, Esq. Greenblatt & Laube, PC Divorce, Separation, Custody, Child Support, Parenting Time, Alimony, Asset Distribution, Emancipation, Domestic Violence Certi?ed by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Civil Trial Attorney Curves Works. So you can get more out of your summer. At Curves, our 30-minute circuit works every major muscle group and you can burn up to 500 calories. All with a trainer to teach and motivate. JOIN NOW, REST OF SUMMER ON US* * Offer based on first visit enrollment, minimum 12 mo.c.d. program. Discount applies to monthly dues. Service Fee paid at time of enrollment. New members only. not valid with any other offer. Valid only at participating locations through 08/29/09. © 2009 Curves International, Inc. 856-691-0424 • email: bll@greenblattlaube.com 200 North Eighth Street • PO Box 883 • Vineland, NJ 08362 All major credit cards accepted curves.com OVER 10,000 LOCATIONS WORLDWIDE 2205 S Delsea Dr St 6 Franklinville, NJ 08322 856-694-2141 597-3 Shiloh Pike Bridgeton, NJ 08302 856-453-4700 hips and legs—and required her to wear fullbody casts. One of her last major surgeries was on her spine. The doctors were able to correct a 120-degree curve. She is now able to sit independently, something she was not able to do for many years, said her mother, Debbie. Against all odds, Dara fought her way through the surgeries and through a Pennsylvania school district that wasn’t equipped to handle her special needs. She graduated with honors a year ago this past June. After deferring her college acceptance for a year, during which she underwent three surgeries, this September she is Californiabound to attend Stanford University. On this topic, she says she is “very excited but a little nervous at the same time.” Sandi Riley was a teacher for 29 years at Mt. Pleasant School in Millville and also had a catering business that “snowballed” into a second full-time job. “My goal was to open a small restaurant and bring the catering in when I could do an early retirement,” Riley said. In 2005, S.R. Riley’s opened. It is a family business. Riley’s son, Brett, is the chef; her mother usually serves as hostess on weekends, her son, Chris is “a graphic artist and did our logo, menu, etc. and built our website,” Riley said. Riley’s husband died suddenly in 2002 at the age of 50. She said they wanted to keep him a part of their venture. He was the collector of Beatles memorabilia, and it is his collection that lines the walls and tables of the restaurant. Dara said she met Riley after her dad heard about the restaurant on a radio station and her parents brought her there as a surprise. “When I arrived, I could not believe my eyes … Beatles artifacts and collectibles everywhere! And an entire menu of Beatle burgers and other Beatle food! We became instant friends, and Sandi and her family have been a part of mine ever since. “Sandi has put together [this] fundraiser to help me,” Dara said. “Most kids pack up with a few things in a suitcase and are off to college. Because of my physical disability, I need to bring a lot of equipment (wheelchairs, prone stander, lifts, etc.). I feel blessed to have so many caring and loving friends,” Dara said. “I think the fundraiser is going to be a blast, and I can’t wait to see all my Beatle buddies.” I Varicose • Veins • Featured on ? and WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Reach Out To The Most Qualified Specialist Minimally Invasive Insurance covered 30 min. 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Main Road Vineland, NJ (856) 213-6739 Tue-Th 10-5 • Fri 10-6 Sat. 10-4 • Sun-Mon Closed D O N K E Y ’ S P L A C E any any Create-A-Salad Create-A-Salad e with with this ad DonkeysChee esteak.com es DonkeysCheesesteak.com $ 00 1 We Are We Are Invest in Your Community Bank Locally Celebrating 75 Years of Service to the Community You Call Home y Steven Forrest, M nager, Bain’s Deli Steven Forrest, Manager, Bain’s Deli t v r t Ma r Jill McClennen & Stephen Wilson, nen Stephen Wilson, Sweet Bakery k r Sweet Life Bakery Full Service Printing & Copy Center Ser vice ng Copy Ph. VINEL AND VINELAND L the best. the best. “I am Downtown Vineland.” “I am Downtown Vineland.” { 14 } the grapevine | JULY 29, 2009 “We are Downtown Vineland.” “We are Downtown Vineland.” Enjoy the sweeter side of life. Enjoy the sweeter side of life. FUEL HOUSE FUEL HOUSE U O e Coffe Co. Licensed Real Estate Broker Licensed Real Estate Broker (Behind Wells Fargo) (Behind Wells Fargo) 856- 690-9482 856-690-9482 VINELAND VINELAND Brian Lankin, Al’s Shoes Brian Lankin, Al’s Shoes nkin, l’s Jew er Je elers J wellers Jewelers We Buy Gold Diamonds We Buy Gold & Diamonds Jewelry Wa Repairs Jewelry & Watch Repairs Watch While You Wait While You Wait Yo Wa QUALIT QUALIT Y QUALITY MUFFLER & BRAKE BRAKE Lamar Lamar Upham Ott Upham Ott Large Selection Diamond Large Selection of Diamond Engagement Rings Lowest Prices Pric rices Engagement Rings at Lowest Prices Ma Martini Shoes Martini Shoes Shoe oes The Brands You Want Bra Brands You Wa Want WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | “I am “I am Downtown Vi Vineland.” Downtown Vineland.” We Have We Have Chef Wear! Wea Wear! the grapevine { 15 } $ 5 O a $25 purchase purchase with this ad with this Expires 10/15/09 Expires $ Quality Shoes. Reasonably Priced! Quality Shoes. Reasonably Priced! 5 o any purchase of $25 or more any purchase of $25 or more O er Expires 10/15/09 er Expires 10/15/09 Baseball Continued from page 1 speed up games. The huge timer in centerfield permits a pitcher only 20 seconds between pitches and gives a batter just 10 to be ready to start his at-bat. The tournament introduced a designated hitter years before it was accepted in the American League. Organized baseball’s first female umpire, Bernice Gera, worked games in Bridgeton. Changes have been made to the tournament in recent years after a period when some thought the games were losing their appeal. “We’re sticking to the traditions I know from my childhood and adding new ideas,” said tournament director Dave Elwell, who is in his first year. “We’re trying to get people to come out to the tournament again.” The format was changed several years ago from a system where a team was done if it lost two games (double elimination) to a system of “pool play,” where each team is guaranteed to play four games. Also, Elwell said he is trying to attract more young people to games. The tournament runs July 31 through August 15. There are two games every evening and triple headers on Saturdays. Special events abound, beginning with fireworks on Opening Night and a pig roast on August 1. If you go, be sure to visit the concession stand, which is run by Sam Hunter. Among the offerings: Snow cones with a lot of syrup and ham- Christie Musey of Millville, playing for Forss Painting, puts a ball in play. Baseball At Its Best Directions to Alden Field: Travel Route 49 West. Turn right on West Avenue in Bridgeton (There is a cemetery on the left and a large school on the right). Make the second right onto Burt Street. Alden Field is at the end of the street. Look for the towering lights of the ballpark. Weeknights: First game 6:30 p.m.; Weekends: First game 4:30 p.m. Full tournament ticket: $25 in advance, $30 at the gate. Individual days: $5 adults, $3 children over 12 and senior citizens. Children under 12: free. 453-1675. { 16 } the grapevine | JULY 29, 2009 burgers cooked in a unique tasty sauce. While the Shannon Tournament was only a single day, the 16 teams competed fiercely and a good-sized crowd enjoyed the afternoon. Rob Shannon, 65, a tireless champion of youth sports in Millville, started the event in 1969 as a vehicle for raising money for the city’s programs. There were years when dozens of teams competed over a two-day schedule. The scale is smaller now, but the money is still vital to the 14 benefiting organizations. Shannon said while he was a player his team missed a tournament enrollment deadline, so he decided to start his own so his team could play. Afterward, there were a few hundred dollars left over. “Instead of having a beer party or something, we decided to give it to the kids,” he said. The annual Shannon Tournament was born. It is now played in a complex also named for its benefactor. “It’s a labor of love,” Rob Shannon, right, speaks with grounds crew members Dave Bingham, left, and Paul Ewan in between games of the tournament. Shannon, a former Millville mayor, said. Dedicated volunteers have sustained Shannon’s efforts through the years, including grounds crew chief Paul Ewan, with 15 years of service. “I have no problem giving up one golf day to help him,” Ewan said. Bud Light of Cape May County won the men’s division and took home a $1,000 prize with its trophy. J and D Trucking of Vineland won the women’s division. (The prize amount was not available.) I More for Baseball Fans SATURDAY, AUGUST 1 Joshua Moren Memorial Slo-Pitch Softball Tournament. Fiocchi Field, 1755 Galli Dr. Fee per team $150, Home Run Derby $10 per player. Game day check-in 8 a.m. rmg0004@auburn.edu for details. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 Old Timers Baseball Reunion. Semper Marine Hall, W. Landis Ave. (opposite 84 Lumber). All former players, family members, and fans are invited to come out and mingle with old teammates and to honor newly elected members to the Hall of Fame. 5 p.m., dinner at 6 p.m. $20 payable at the door. Newly Renovated & Open All Summer The Best Sushi Bar in Cumberland County Beer Garden Let BJ’s Cook for You Tonight! To Place an order Call (856)825-8123 BYOB LUNCH SPECIAL Lunch Specials all served w/Free Small Fountain Soda Whole Roaster $6.99 +tax Tues.-Thurs. Tuesdays Available 11am -2pm Tues. Thru Fri. only Closed Mondays in July & August Now serving soft serve and water ice Daily Specials OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Breakfast & Lunch Monday – Saturday 8-3 Come Check Out Our Popular Under $15 Menu Including: Dinner Stuffed Peppers-Pork Ribs-Stuffed Shells Rosemary Chicken-Pub Steak AFTER 5:00 BAR SPECIALS Chinese & Japanese Cuisine Fiesta Dog $3.99 Fish & Chips $5.99 Slider Cheeseburgers w/Fry Platter $3.99 TUESDAY – THURSDAY Thursday – Saturday 5-8 Wednesday Thursdays Offering a new dinner menu for 2009 Always Fresh, Never Over-priced The Looking Glass Cafe is Millville Arts Districts’ Original and Longest Running Casual Dining Establishment Catering On- and Off-Premises Available for Your Special Event 16 N. High St. Millville NJ 08332 10% OFF ANY REGULAR PURCHASE (minimum purchase $15) w/this coupon-Not Valid w/other offer-GVN-Expires 8/30/09 231 N. High Street (corner of High & Mulberry Sts) Millville, NJ 08332 856-327-1666 Sunday $1.00 Slider $5.00 Martini menu Monday $1.00 Hot Dog $5.00 Dog Fish Head 60 minute IPA 20 oz Tuesday $1.00 Taco’s $5.00 Margarita’s Wednesday $1.00 Sloppy Joe’s $5.00 Long Island Iced Tea Thursday $1.00 Pizza $5.00 Import/Micro 20 oz. Friday & Saturdays Live Entertainment 856-293-1200 123 North High St. Millville, NJ Coming Soon Hibachi Japanese Steak House • Catering • Banquet Facilities/Wedding Reception • Eat In/Take Out & Delivery We deliver min. $25-$30 Hours: Open 7 Days A Week M-Th: 11am-10pm Fri & Sat: 11am-11pm Sunday: 12 noon-10pm (856) 765-1818 Fax: (856) 765-0588 WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | 101 E Main St. Millville, NJ 08332 Gypsy Smokehouse Tues.- Sun. 11am-7pm Closed Monday Served with celery & Blue cheese BBQ, Honey Mustard, Mild (Spicy) Medium (Hot), Hot (Very Hot), Insane (Need we explain) Beef Brisket, Pulled Pork, Pulled Chicken, Smoked Sausage Served S.O.S. (Sauce On Side) All Platters include sandwich, cornbread & 2 sides BBQ Extended Hours on Fridays & Weekends All Summer Long! 19 E. Oak Street Millville, NJ Phone: 856-327-1000 Fax: 856-327-1009 WINGS 10/15/20/25 Pieces Seasoned & Smoked until they are fall off the bone tender! Served Wet (Sauced), Dry (No Sauce) and S.O.S. All Platters include sandwich, cornbread & 2 sides Half Rack or Full Rack RIBS the grapevine { 17 } ! ”      Open ’Til 9:00 Every Friday MyArtMyMillville.com I Culinary Adventures { STEPHEN WILSON | PHOTO: JILL McCLENNEN } Two Food Festivals The first annual Russian Festival and the Puerto Rican Festival whet the appetite for more international flavors. his past week, I had the opportunity to experience two totally different cultures that exist here in Vineland, at the first annual Russian Festival and at the Puerto Rican festival. I began to see advertisements for the Russian festival at least six weeks ago on lawn signs scattered around town. On the morning of the Russian Festival, the Sweet Life crew (as well as several guests of ours) picked up litter on the road we have adopted. The weather was beautiful and we spent a few hours in the sun picking up bottles and plastic food wrappers. We worked up quite an appetite. After freshening up, we all made our way over to the Holy Trinity Russian Orthodox Church on Landis Avenue near the Route 55 interchange. As we pulled close, we saw a long line of cars waiting to get in and several police cars directing traffic. We found a T parking space in the hotel lot across the street and made our way to the festival. There were tons of people there… apparently I wasn’t the only one to put the event down in my datebook. Our friend John had gotten there before us, and went ahead and got tickets for food. Kate and her boyfriend, Greg, had done the same and even scored seats and a table under the tent. Jill, Greg and John got into the food line while Kate and I stayed at the table and fended off table-invaders. I was thirsty, so I walked over to the beer counter to grab some bottles of Russian beer. I got several bottles of Baltika for us to share; two different lagers and one wheat beer. Kate and I were soon joined by the food-gathering folk, who reported that the organizers were running out of Russian food. Thankfully, they managed to get a few dishes for all of us to try. As usual, we divided our food into a communal dish so that everyone could try a little bit of everything. Pirozhki, golubtzi, and other Russian goodies were eaten with great joy, although there wasn’t really enough for everyone. Sadly, there was some grumbling from those who didn’t get to eat, but it’s understandable that the organizers misjudged the turnout. It was their first year, after all, and estimating the crowd for such events is incredibly difficult. The weather was nice, and more people are staying close to home these days on nice weekends (staycations!). I’m not sure I understand the need for buying tickets before getting food, so hopefully the organizers will follow the Greek festival’s lead and allow people to simply pay after purchasing food. All-in-all, it was a nice first attempt at a cultural festival and I give kudos to the organizers for putting it all together. I look forward to trying the beef stroganoff next year. Then, a few days after the Russian Festival, the Puerto Rican festival took place at Landis Park in Vineland. I hadn’t gone in a few years because there are so many good Puerto Rican restaurants around town, but I checked it out again this year. My friend John and I went down there on Thursday evening, around dusk. The crowd was smallish, but growing, and the Latin music reverberated through the air as we walked around. We ended Experience The Difference RESTAURANT • LOUNGE • BAKERY ! NOW OPEN Vineland’s neighborhood bakery, where everything is made from scratch and quality counts. Serving Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Sunday Breakfast Buffet 8am-2pm • Starting July 26th { 18 } the grapevine | JULY 29, 2009 Take Out Available a 6th street between Landis and Elmer in Downtown Vineland 856-692-5353 www.thesweetlifebakery.com Join Us For Happy Hour Try Our Fabulous Cakes And Treats From Our Monday-Friday 3-6pm Reduced Drinks Appetizers 3513 Delsea Drive • Vineland • 856-765-5977 • Fax 856-825-0707 Major Credit Cards Accepted • Gift Certificates Available Hours: 10 am – 2 am Mon.-Fri. • 8 am-2 pm Sat. & Sun. Bakery Try our award-winning Chocolate Chip Cookies the best in South Jersey, according to the most recent SJ Magazine annual readers’ poll up stopping at Las 3’s B De Utaudo, (the three B’s; Bueno, Bonito and Barrato mean “good, pretty and cheap”). The ladies at the counter helped me pick out a cheesesteak pastallio (the orange half-moon shaped fried pastries you see at PR restaurants), bacalaitos (salt cod fritters), and piononos (ground beef and plantain fritters). We went back to the bakery and ate the fried, salty Puerto Rican specialties. I must say that Puerto Rican food is not my favorite, but every once in a while, I’ll get a hankering for some. And these treats were actually pretty good. Las 3’s B’s does not have a restaurant, though, so if you want good Puerto Rican food, check out Penelvert’s, Cidra’s, La Favortia, or Downtown Deli (among many others). My next major stop for foods of an international flavor comes August 22 when the International Festival rolls onto Landis Avenue. We’ll be there, and I hear there’s going to be Indian food… I can’t wait for you to try some! I Stephen Wilson along with his wife Jill McClennen owns The Sweet Life Bakery. You may contact him via e-mail at thesweetlifebakery@verizon.net. EATING OUT From fine dining to lunch spots to bakeries, the area has choices to satisfy any appetite. Call for hours. Amato’s Restaurant, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 692-5756. Veal, chicken, seafood, and pasta specialties for dinner. Open for lunch, too. Closed Sundays. Andrea Trattoria, 1833 Harding Hwy., Newfield, 697-8400. Chef/owner Andrea Covino serves up Italian specialties in an atmosphere of fine dining. Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave, Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food served tapas style, specialty martinis, catering, private parties. Extensive wine list. Live music Friday nights. Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-0909. This breakfast and lunch spot offers a menu of sandwiches named for colleges near and far. Bain’s Deli, 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 5631400. Come in for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Daily specials include coffee of the day. Barbera’s Chocolates on Occasion, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 690-9998. Homemade chocolates and candies, custom gift baskets. Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees, desserts, drink specials. Take-out, too. Happy Hour buffet Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. MLB games on flat-screen TVs. Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy., Vineland, 697-5500. Steaks, veal, chicken dishes. Meet friends at the bar. Open daily for lunch and dinner. Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 205-0012. Featuring the “Gutbuster” a 21-oz. burger, pizza, salads, wings, subs, dinners. Bojo’s Ale House, 222 N. High St., Millville, 327-8011. All food is homemade, including the potato chips. Casa Dori II, Brewster Rd. and Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 794-1888. Authentic Italian, lunch and dinner; catering available. Continental Room at the Ramada Inn, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 6963800. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Open to hotel guests and the public. Crust N Krumbs Bakery, Main and Magnolia rds., 690-1200. Cakes, pies, cookies, breads, and doughnuts. Custom wedding cakes, too. Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call for lunch and dinner specials. Soft ice cream and cakes year-round. Mon.-Sat 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 696-1900. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Takeout, too. Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. Open 24 hours. Kids eat free Tues. & Sat. Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave., Vineland, 691-5511. Family time-honored recipes, fresh ingredients. Donkey’s Place, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland, 690-1777. One-of-a-kind cheesesteaks made on large, fresh poppyseed rolls. Dreamz Cafe, 2184 Union Lake Crossing, Millville, 765-5029. Panini, sandwiches, salads, soups. Also, gelato, Italian coffee, desserts, smoothies, and frappuccino. Esposito’s Maplewood III, 200 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks, seafood and pasta dishes at this Italian restaurant. Eric’s, 98 S. West Ave., Vineland, 2059800. Greek and American cuisine. Pizza, too. Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. & Tuckahoe Rd., Vineland, 691-6080. Italian cuisine and dinner buffets to savor. Family-owned. Fresh Restaurant, 1405 Mays Landing Rd., Millville, 327-3435. Jumbo lump crabcakes, Black Angus burgers. Wed. is pasta night. Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli, 527 S. Brewster Rd.., 697-3509. Name says it all. Daily specials, catering. Closed Sunday. General Custard’s Last Stand, 2578 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 696-2992. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner served Tues.-Sat. Gina’s Ristorante, 110 N. High St., Millville, 825-4241. Italian cuisine, lunch and dinner, BYOB, nothing over $20. Continued on next page t Food Excellen able Prices fford At A nt Food s Excelle fordable Price Af At Monday – Thursday Sunday Night Entertainment Dinner & 2 hr Comedy Show Sunday, August 30, 2009 Dinner: 6 pm / Show: 8 pm WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | 2 for $20 Choice of (1) Appetizer & (1) Entrée Take Sunday Off From The Kitchen & Let Us Cook For You Featuring: • Eggs Any Style • Omelettes Made To Order • Bacon, Sausage, Ham • Italian Sausage, Peppers & Onions • Cream Chipped Beef • French Toast • Hotcakes • Home Fries, Fresh Fruit, • Danish, Donuts & • Breakfast Pizza Enjoy Our Sunday Breakfast Buffet 8 am – 1 pm $ 40 Dining For 2 Ask About Plus Special Guest! Choice of any entrée of regular menu & a bottle of wine “Dinner of the Week” Giorgio’s Supports Non-profits please call for details FOR RESERVATIONS OR TAKE-OUT CALL: 856-697-2900 or 856-697-2902 Pat McCool Jeff Norris For Tickets & Table Reservations the grapevine { 19 } 363 E. Wheat Road • Vineland, NJ 08310 Call: 856-697-2900 $ 35 per person (open seating) Or Reservations for 4, 6 or 8 363 E. Wheat Road • Vineland, NJ 08310 Adults: $8.95 Children 10 & Under $5.95 Lunch Buffet $5.99 Mon.-Fri. Pizza, Pasta, Soup Salad Bar HOURS: Sun. thru Thurs. 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. HOURS: Sun. thru Thurs. 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. 856-563-0030 947 North Delsea Dr. Vineland, NJ 08360 Continued from preceding page Giorgio’s Restaurant 363 E. Wheat Rd., Buena, 697-2900. Serving lunch and dinner daily. Italian cuisine, pizza. Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s Head rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet lunches and dinners in a casual setting. Moe’s Southwest Grill, 2188 N. 2nd St., Millville, 825-3525. Tex-Mex, burritos, catering. I Recipe Corner { LISA ANN DiNUNZIO } Giovanni’s Italian-American Deli. 1102 N. East Ave., Vineland, 692-0459. Pizza, MVP Bar, 408 Wheat Road, Vineland, 6979825. Full bar menu, live entertainment, Italian subs, all your lunch favorites. drink specials. The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf Course, Neptune Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge, 4049 Italia Rd., Vineland, 691-5558. Restaurant and lounge open to the public for 1554 South Delsea Drive, Vineland, 6922800. American cuisine, array of cocktails. lunch Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Next Oar, 127 N. High St., Millville, 293Jake’s. 611 Taylor Rd., Franklinville, 6941360. Weekly menu, made-to-order dishes. 5700. Italian-American, served lakeside. Lunch, dinner, happy hour, Sunday brunch. Joe’s Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-8860. Barbecue and Kosher chickens, homemade sides, catering for all occasions. Kawa Thai & Sushi, 2196 N. Second St. (Rt.47), Millville, 825-9939. Thai and Japanese cuisine. BYOB. Landicini’s Family Restaurant & Pizzeria Landis and Lincoln aves., Vineland, 6913099. Italian cuisine, gourmet pizza salads. Open for lunch and dinner. Larry’s II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-9001. Three meals daily. Sunday breakfast buffet, early-bird dinners. Library V Restaurant, 206 Rt. 54, Buena, 697-9696. Renowned for prime rib, steaks, seafood, salad bar. Closed Mon. and Tues. Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek cuisine—lamb dishes and salads. Paperwaiter Restaurant & Pub, 1111 Village Dr., Millville, 825-4000. A special place for all your special occasions. Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland, 6940500. Breakfast, lunch, dinner specials; convenient drive-thru, mini-meal specials. Pete’s Pizza, 20 W. Park Ave., Vineland, 2059998. Pizza (including whole wheat), subs, wings. Open daily 11 a.m-10 p.m. The Rail, 1252 Harding Hwy., Richland, 6971440. Bar and restaurant with daily drink specials and lunch specials. Richland House, 1303 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-5700. Eclectic dinners and casual lunch fare. Closed Mondays. Recipe Swap Frank Lopez invites you to spice up your chicken. reetings! I can’t believe that August is almost here! Summer is in full swing and fields and gardens are yielding a bounty of vegetables. Folks have been e-mailing me asking if I could request recipes from other Grapevine readers using the abundance of fresh corn and tomatoes that are (or will be) producing from their home gardens. So if you have a recipe you’d like to share, I know it would be greatly appreciated by many vegetable gardeners in the area. This story and recipe was submitted by Frank Lopez, who writes “This dish is simple, quick and tastes great. Serve with a few favorite sides and you have a great meal.” G 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1/4 tsp. salt 4 chicken breasts, skinless & boneless 3 tbs. butter melted Preheat oven to 400°. Mix Parmesan cheese, breadcrumbs and seasonings in a shallow dish. Dip each piece of chicken into the butter then coat with Parmesan cheese and seasonings mixture. Place chicken in a shallow baking pan sprayed with non-stick cooking spray. Bake for approximately 20 to 25 minutes or until chicken is cooked through. As always, Bon Appetit. I Lisa Ann is the author of Seasoned With Love, Treasured Recipes and Lisa Ann’s Seasoned With Love II. Send recipes for publication to lapd1991@aol.com or to The Grapevine, 3660 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08361. La Locanda Pizzeria & Ristorante, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 794-3332. Pasta, Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville, 327veal, chicken. Lunch and dinner. Closed Sun. 8878. Authentic Vietnamese—noodle soups, curry, hotpot, Buddhist vegetarian. Lucia’s Ristorante, 785 W. Sherman Ave., Vineland, 692-0300. Italian fine dining and regional cooking. Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 563-0030. Italian-American cuisine, seafood and veal. Open daily for lunch and dinner, Sunday breakfast buffet. Manny & Vic’s, 1687 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 696-3100. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Manny’s Pizza, 426 N. High St., Millville, 327-5081. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Martino’s Trattoria & Pizzeria, 2614 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 692-4448. Brick oven pizza, risotto, polenta. Three meals daily. Serene Custard, NW Blvd. and Garden Rd., Vineland, 692-1104. Pulled pork, hot dogs, homemade ice cream, party cakes. South Vineland Tavern, 2350 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-7888. Breakfast, lunch, dinner daily. Seafood and prime rib. Steakhouse at Centerton Country Club, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3325. Lunch and dinner. Steaks, reserve wines, upscale casual. Stewart’s Root Beer, 585 Delsea Dr., Vineland, 696-8062. Burgers, hot dogs, fries, floats and shakes. Sweet Life Bakery, 601 East Landis Ave., Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood bakery. Homemade pastries, cakes, coffee. Parmesan-Coated Chicken Breast 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese, grated 1/4 cup Italian-style bread crumbs 1 tsp. dried oregano flakes 1 tsp. dried parsley flakes Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs, chicken, fish, steaks. Always clams, eat in or take out service. Villa Filomena, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena Vista, 697-7107. Dinner combos, grilled meats, fish. Lunch and dinner daily. Wheat Road Cold Cuts, 302 Wheat Rd., Vineland, 697-0320. Deli and catering. Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-8899. Dinners, grilled sandwiches, wings in eight flavors. Willmott’s Pizza. 12 S. Seventh St., Vineland, 696-1525. Hand-tossed pizzas, stromboli, breakfast pizza. Offering Take-out or eat in service. Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville, 3270909. Continental cuisine and spirits served in a casually upscale setting. Ye Olde Centerton Inn, 1136 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3201. American classics served in a building right out of a Rockwell painting. Merighi’s Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. Banquet/wed- Tony Sopranos, 107 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 405-0200. Pizza, Mexican ding facility as well as intimate restaurant. Southwest fare, Atkins-friendly salads. Nicky G. Fridays 9 p.m.–midnight. { 20 } the grapevine | JULY 29, 2009 of July BBQ 4th DADS SEAFOOD CRABS FRESH DAILY Scallops * Shrimp * Clams All Types of Fresh & Frozen Fish Fresh Homemade Red Sauce and Fried Platters Dad’s Stuffed Shrimp, Stuffed Mushrooms & Stuffed Flounder – No Fillers! Try Our Bacon Wrapped Scallops – Delicious! Graduations, Reunions, BBQ’s, Dinner Parties, Engagements, Weddings, Bar/Bat Mitzvahs, Birthday, Retirement, Teen Parties, Christenings, Showers, Etc. No job too big or small We can accomodate any multi ethnic cuisine including asian, spanish, italian you name it we can make it over 14 years experience vegan and gluten free Dungeness Crabs Every Wednesday Comes with pasta red or white, salad, garlic bread $ 856-692-7473 • Cell 609-247-8341 • Fax 856-692-7664 4940 Landis Ave• Vineland, NJ 08360 1999 . OPEN 7 DAYS Mon – Sun 11 am – 6 pm (Across from Wheat Road) Vineland (856) 692-0083 (856) 691-8051 Restaurant Profile Vineland Resident Participates in A.C. Food and Wine Show Rick and Danielle Collini, owners of Bruni’s Pizzeria in Hammonton for almost three years, were selected along with 10 other pizzerias to compete at the Atlantic City Food Old Oar House Irish Pub The Old Oar House Irish Pub located at 123 North Main Street in downtown Millville, is nestled between art galleries and revitalized buildings in the heart of a small town. The Oar House embraces the tradition of Irish pubs as a place to socialize, relax, tell stories and listen to music. Similar to the public houses or pubs of the 19th century, the Oar House is steeped in culture from the building to the Irish artifacts that decorate the walls. Staff members pride themselves on the warm atmosphere brewed over traditional comfort food and good beer. There are 17 different beers on tap, ranging from microbrews to domestics, and several bottles of craft beer, such as Rogue Dead Guy Ale and Sly Fox Pilsner. Cumberland County’s only Irish Pub has two different rooms for eating and drinking along with the famous outside Beer Garden. No matter where one sits, laughter and cheers will abound. The bar boasts live music because it has always been a Kevin Killeen has perfected the Guinness Irish Stew and his family’s Shepherds Pie recipe. The menu also includes salads, sandwiches, and dinners, all with a home-cooked feel. Be sure to ask your server about the cream of crab bisque, it is not mentioned on the menu but will bring you back for more. There are nightly $1 food specials with any drink from the bar, and $5 drink Stop in for a bowl of Guinness Irish Stew or one of 17 different beers on tap. It’s a great place to meet friends, too. specials. So visit the Old Oar House Irish Pub—it’s a priority to owner Brian Tomlin. place where you will want to be a reg“I think music is what really draws ular. It’s a meeting place where you people out, so I personally book all of can eat, drink, dance and have good the musicians to ensure quality,” says craic. The local pub that everybody Tomlin. knows. No pub can survive on beer and Hours of operation: Monday to music alone, and the food caters to Saturday 11 a.m. till 2 a.m., Sunday 2 various appetites. Featuring delicious p.m. till midnight. For questions and cheesesteaks, hearty hamburgers and reservations: 856-293-1200. wipe-your-face good wings, Manager —Jennifer Martin and Wine Festival. The “Jim Beam Gourmet Pizza Bash with Tom Colicchio” event is Thursday, July 30, from 7 to 10 p.m., at Caesars Atlantic City’s Palladium Ballroom. Cost is $50 per taster (includes food, beverages, entertainment). Hosted by Colicchio of Bravo’s Top Chef, the event kicks off the weekend-long culinary festival. The Collinis serve Bruni pizza from a recipe handed down from more than 50 years ago. Their pizza was recently voted “Best Pizza” by The Hammonton Gazette. Beautiful Smiles, Made Affordable OUR SERVICES MILLVILLE FAMILY DENTAL Union Lake Crossing Shopping Center 2144 N. 2nd St., Millville WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | NEW PATIENT WELCOMING PACKAGE $ 80 (reg. $230.) Includes oral exam, full mouth series of x-rays, cleaning & polishing, oral cancer screening, periodontal (gums) evaluation. With coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Emergency Walk-Ins Welcome • Same-Day Denture Repair • • • • • • • • • • • Cleaning & X-Rays Porcelain Veneers Cosmetic Dentistry Periodontal Therapy (Gum Treatment) Full Mouth Reconstruction Implant Rehabilitation Root Canals (One Visit) Full & Partial Dentures Bleaching White Fillings Crowns & Bridges 856-825-2111 Open 7 Days a Week. Day & Evening Hours Proud Member Of The Allied Dental Practices Of NJ Personalized Dentistry SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO OUR SENIOR CITIZENS the grapevine { 21 } Se Habla Español E D W A R D P O L L E R , D D S • G L E N N P R A G E R , D D S • TO D D P R A G E R , D D S • D A N I E L D I C E S A R E , D M D Home Garden and Averting the New Jersey Tomato Famine Source: Rutgers Cooperative Extension For those of us with short memories, it felt like the coolest, rainiest June ever. According to New Jersey State Climatologist Dave Robinson, 2003 and 2006 were wetter, but June 2009 does fall into the “top ten rainiest Junes” on record. June 2009 also ranks as the 24th coolest of the past 115 years. Robinson explains that the culprit for this weather is a very persistent spring weather pattern that maintained itself for the month of June rather than “lifting” into Canada by this time of year. (For the warmest/coldest and wettest/driest months on record for New Jersey since 1895, visit the Rutgers State Climatologist website at: http://climate.rutgers.edu/stateclim.) While New Jerseyeans endure this weather, lamenting over their mildewed basements, mushroomy lawns, and frizzy hair, our agricultural neighbors are dealing with another set of problems. Bill Walker of New Jersey Department of Agriculture reports that we can expect seeding/planting and harvesting schedules to be delayed or interrupted, if not from the rain, then from the wet fields that are unable to sup- port heavy machinery. And to top it off, the temperatures, combined with moisture in the fields, leave farm fields ripe for disease development. The Irish Potato Famine Every growing season brings the usual collection of plant diseases that are managed with minor crop loss. However, ever-vigilant plant pathologists keep a watchful eye for those diseases that manifest infrequently, but leave much damage in their wake. This year the disease that has New Jersey’s tomato and potato industry on high alert is late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans. This pathogen was responsible for the Irish Potato Famine in the mid-1800s. While social, political, and economic factors played a role in the devastation the potato famine caused in Ireland, the actual culprit was a fungal-like organism (Phytophthora infestans) that was originally transported in seed potatoes in the holds of ships traveling from North America to England. “The Famine began quite mysteriously in September 1845 as leaves on potato plants suddenly turned black and curled, then rotted, seemingly the result of a fog that had wafted across the fields of Ireland. Winds from southern England carried the fungus to the countryside around Dublin. The blight spread throughout the fields as fungal spores settled on the leaves of healthy potato plants, multiplied and were carried in the millions by cool breezes to surrounding plants. Under ideal moist conditions, a single infected potato plant could infect thousands more in just a few days. The attacked plants fermented while providing the nourishment the fungus needed to live, emitting a nauseous stench as they blackened and withered in front of the disbelieving eyes of Irish peasants. There had been crop failures in the past due to weather and other diseases, but this strange new failure was unlike anything ever seen. Potatoes dug out of the ground at first looked edible, but shriveled and rotted within days. The potatoes had been attacked by the same fungus that had destroyed the plant leaves above ground.” (For more on the Irish Potato Famine, see “The History Place, The Irish Potato Famine,” at www.historyplace.com/worldhistory/famine/index.html A Summer Without Jersey Tomatoes? While the factors set in place in 1845 in Ireland do not apply to our scenario, late blight is a disease that can cause devastation to an industry—and in this case, we are talking about the New Jersey tomato and potato industries. Late blight has been 30 YEAR TIMBERLINE Roof Shingle Upgrade With new roof system. Offer good to August 31, 2009. { 22 } the grapevine | JULY 29, 2009 www.scottibrothersinc.com John’s Cell: (609) 381-4289 • Tom’s Cell: (856) 498-4841 FREE ESTIMATES • FULLY INSURED LIC# 13VH00096200 confirmed in fresh-market tomatoes in southern New Jersey, and the potential for this disease to quickly destroy an entire crop is great. Does this mean a 2009 loss of New Jersey’s beloved tomato crop? New Jerseayans are already cranky about the mildew, mushrooms and hair frizz—don’t take away our tomatoes! TOMATO AND PEACH TASTING • Tuesday, August 18, from 4 to 6 p.m. • Rutgers Agricultural Research and Experiment Center, 121 Northville Rd. Upper Deerfield (near Bridgeton) Cumberland County. NJ’s Agricultural SWAT Team to the Rescue Unlike the mystery and surprise that met the Irish in 1845, New Jersey is equipped with a team of specialists that are taking action to avert any catastrophe. The first steps in the process involve the sharing of information from surrounding states. Vegetable plant pathologists alert colleagues in other states when diseases such as late blight are confirmed in their home state. Rutgers NJAES specialist in vegetable pathology Dr. Andy Wyenandt alerted New Jersey growers of the encroaching disease with recommendations for preventive measures. Commercial growers are updated through the weekly Plant & Pest Advisory newsletters that they receive from Rutgers NJAES. When the disease was first diagnosed in New Jersey, an urgent alert was sent to growers by e-mail. With growers on high alert, they are instructed to continue their preventive measures and transition to scouting their fields for signs of the dis- vegetable pathologists throughout the Northeast spread the word of this potential disaster, and within days the original supplier, working with the Department of Agriculture in the affected states, has begun to remove most of the infected plant material. If you are a home gardener with tomato plants purchased from a “big box” store, read our advisory posted here: www.njfarmfresh.rutgers.edu/JerseyToma to.html ease. Rutgers NJAES Cooperative Extension county agricultural agents are then employed to assist in scouting farms for signs of the diseased plants and instructing on proper disposal of the diseased crop. What Does This Mean for New Jersey Consumers? While home gardeners that are affected may still be able to replace their diseased tomato plants, how will it affect the Jersey tomatoes and potatoes at our farm stands and farm markets this summer, not to mention the wholesale supply that is the bulk of commercial farm sales? If the preventive and cautionary measures can keep late blight from massive spread, there may be only a subtle dent in the marketplace, which consumers will barely notice. If the disease takes its toll requiring the destruction of a few commercial crops, we may see a slight decrease in quantity with an expected increase in price. With all the precautionary strategies that have been put into place, crop loss statewide is unlikely, but it requires vigilance from commercial growers and home gardeners alike. I We Have Everything You Need To Beautify Your Backyard! EVERY THURSDAY IN JULY Receive 25% Off Your Entire purchase! (IN-STOCK ONLY) EXCLUDING SALES & SPECIALS Home Gardens at Risk The occurrence of late blight in 2009 is different compared to most seasons. This is the earliest the disease has been reported over such a broad region of the country. More tragic for the Northeast is that infected plants have been distributed to large local retail stores throughout the region (Ohio to Maine). Never before has such an extensive distribution of infected plants occurred. The inoculum is exceptionally contagious, thus it has most likely spread on garden center shelves to tomato plants that were not involved in the original and initial source of the inoculum. In recent days, Butterfly Bushes Now $ 9.99 Many Colors Available (WHILE SUPPLIES LAST) EXCLUDING SALES & SPECIALS MONDAY TO FRIDAY 9am – 5pm SATURDAY 9am – 3pm • Gift Cards Available • SEPERS RETAIL CENTER 1114 W. Weymouth Road Newfield, NJ 08344 856-696-4220 All Major Credit Cards Accepted CANNING HEADQUARTERS CANNING HEADQUARTERS Your One Stop Canning Source Your One Stop Canning Source Blue Granite Ware Covered Canner ON SALE NOW! $ All Annuals, Patio Planters & Hanging Baskets Summer Sale 12 Pack Quart Jars 12 Pack – 1-pt. or 1/2 pt. Jars 12 Pack – Wide Mouth Pt 12 Pack – Wide Pack Qt. Complete with bands and dome lids. 21.99 Reg. $28.95 Mandevillas on Sale Plus w/Coupon take additional $4.00 OFF $5.00 OFF exp. 08/04/09 Reg. Price WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | • With Rack • Holds 7 qts. • Large Model Available Canning Accessories & Supplies • Canning Jars • Blanchers • Canners • Funnels Presto Pressure Canners Double as water bath canners for preserving fruits, jams,jellies pickles and salsas. Constructed of extra strong, warp resistant alum. and is suitable for use on reg. and smooth-top ranges. includes cooking/canning rack & complete instruction & recipe book. Growers Of Quality Plants For All Your Gardening Needs $ 99.95 & UP LaTORRE HARDWARE 3.5% Sales Tax Preserve Tod ay Enjoy Whene ver Hanging Baskets • Bedding Plants • Garden Decorations • Flowering Shrubs • Soils • Mulches, and much more! 470 N. Union Rd. East Vineland (between Oak Rd. & Landis Ave.) Mon. – Sat. 8am-6pm Sun. 9am-5pm Wide Selection Of Old Time Favorites & The Newest Varieties 20% off Any Plant Purchase Grown & Sold Here the grapevine { 23 } &GARDEN CENTER www.Latorre-Hardware.com 1607 S. Delsea Dr. • Vineland 856-691-9468 856-691-7881 www.cmgrowers.com Cannot be combined with any other coupon. (Before Taxes) Must present coupon. of $25.00 or more. Mon.-Fri. 7:30-6pm • Sat 8:00am-4pm • Sun 8am-2pm exp. 08/04/09 I Historical Vineland { VINCE FARINACCIO } The Pop Festival Held just two weeks before Woodstock some 40 years ago, it included an amazing collection of musical acts. T ADVERTISE IN The Grapevine and get incredible results. Get amazing results from your advertising campaign in The Grapevine. Get the benefit of our distribution to every residence in Vineland (approx. 22,250)! Ride the wave of excitement as The Grapevine’s debut has excited our town’s citizens. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. { 24 } the grapevine | JULY 29, 2009 he summer of 1969 was filled with an abundance of rock festivals throughout the country, all overshadowed and forgotten once Woodstock carved out its permanence in rock music history. One of those overlooked gatherings happened to be in this area two weeks prior to the legendary festival. For Vinelanders and other southern New Jersey music fans, the Atlantic City Pop Festival, held at the Atlantic City Racecourse in Mays Landing, provided an easier trek than to upstate New York. The Atlantic City Pop Festival, according to Rolling Stone’s report, drew an estimated 110,000 over the course of three days in the first weekend of August. Fans from as close as nearby New Jersey towns and as far away as California and Canada, arrived in Mays Landing for what Rolling Stone called the first such event in the Boston to Washington, D.C. corridor and witnessed an amazing collection of musical acts, some of whom would become immortalized when they played Woodstock two weeks later. Originally, an area west of the racetrack was designated for camping, but Rolling Stone reported that by Saturday “green canvas dotted every approach to the grounds.” Local law enforcement, fearing the worst, recruited additional officers from the State Police as well as homicide detectives who were stationed in makeshift barracks in Oakcrest High School, according to the Associated Press. In the end, the Times Journal reported that one person was arrested for lewdness, six for alcohol charges and 24 others for disorderly conduct. More than 300 were treated for minor injuries or drug-related sickness. Music was underway at 2 p.m. on Friday, August 1. To facilitate quick changeovers, the festival employed revolving stages. Chicago and Mother Earth turned in complete sets on that humid afternoon, but Joni Mitchell delivered only three songs before leaving the stage after being harassed by the crowd. Her musical compatriots Crosby, Stills Nash and Young, originally scheduled to play that day, backed out. Despite sets by Santana, Johnny Winter and the first night’s closing act, the Chamber Brothers, Rolling Stone’s John Lombardi declared Procol Harum Friday’s standout band. For those interested, most of Procol Harum’s Mays Landing set, including their rendition of Strauss’s “Thus Spake Zarathustra” (the 2001: A Space Odyssey theme), can be found on the internet and is well worth seeking out. Saturday’s noon start soon led to problems that had already plagued other festivals that summer. Foreshadowing what would transform Max Yasgur’s farm into a “free” concert site, ticketless fans stormed the fences, gaining entrance during the Byrds set and forcing bandleader Roger McGuinn to deliver a plea from festival promoters, which included Philadelphia Electric Factory owner Herb Spivak. Rolling Stone reported that the reserved seating section adjacent to the stage was overrun by gatecrashers who enjoyed the remaining sets that day without having paid a cent. What they got to see up close were performances by Creedence Clearwater Revival, B.B. King, the Butterfield Blues Band and a two-and-ahalf hour closing set by Jefferson Airplane. During the day, according to Associated Press reports, water trucks that normally sprayed the track during races were used to cool the audience baking in the 90degree heat. Rain arrived Sunday, but fans remained to hear an hour set by Canned Heat followed by 40 minutes of Joe Cocker and the Grease Band and a performance by Frank Zappa’s Mothers of Invention according to the Times Journal. Little Richard closed out the final night, but his set was preceded by Janis Joplin’s 90-minute tour de force performance. The Atlantic City Pop Festival was somewhat preserved in a collection of Joseph J. Sia’s photographs taken that summer and published as Woodstock 69: Summer Pop Festivals. There are 33 pages of photos capturing the audience as well as the musicians, plus Sia’s comments about the event. Unfortunately, the book has been out of print for years, but can still be found at used bookstores and online. If you have an interest, locate a copy and then turn to the third section. It’s the chapter right before the one about that other festival. I BELOW: One of the original posters promoting the A.C. Pop Festival 40 years ago. LEFT: A 40th Anniversary banner posted on the web site for the Festival, www.atlanticcitypopfestival.com. I Entertainment SUMMER CONCERTS, SALUTE TO VAUDEVILLE, NIGHTLIFE, AND HANGAR 84 ROCK SHOWS. Hilarity ensues onstage with the Pageant Wagon Players as they celebrate their 5th Annual Melodrama Summer Family Theatre production. 7 p.m. and a Saturday matinee at 1:30 p.m. $10, children under 12 $5, senior citizens $7. Tickets may be purchased at the door. 205-9334. FRIDAY, JULY 31 Mark Forchic Trio. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 5631400. 7 p.m. St., Vineland. 6 p.m. $12-$15. (frontgatetickets.com). FRIDAY, JULY 31 Tom Moran. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. Acoustic. 7 p.m. SUNDAY, AUGUST 2 Brown Street Chowder. Bridgeton Riverfront Park, Bridgeton. 7 p.m. Free concert. 453-1675. FRIDAY, JULY 31 Ugly Girls Crying. Hangar 84, 20 S. Free Concert … and an Encore! TUESDAY, AUGUST 4 The John Clark Big Band. Joe Dale Pavilion at Bruno Melini Park, 616 Central Ave., Minotola. Features the fabulous vocal talents of Paula Johns and plays the swinging jazz sounds of the Big Band era, performing compositions that people of all ages have come to enjoy. These classic songs were made famous by Glenn Miller, Jimmy and Tommy Dorsey, Count Basie, Harry James, Artie Shaw, Benny Goodman, Stan Kenton and Maynard Ferguson, as well as arrangements by more contemporary talents. 7-9 p.m. All are welcome; bring your own chair. Free concert. Sixth St., Vineland. Also, The Other Car, Solar Session, This Minus You, Cut The Act. 6 p.m. $10-$12. (frontgatetickets.com). MONDAY, AUGUST 3 Greg Albert Duo. Giampetro Park Enrico Serra Band Shell, E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 7 p.m. Free concert. JULY 31 AND AUGUST 1 Nightlife at Old Oar House. Old Oar House Brewery, 123 N. High St., Millville, 293-1200. Fri.: TBA, 9 p.m. Sat.: TBA, 9 p.m., TUESDAY, AUGUST 4 Trust Company. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland. 6 p.m. $12-$15. (frontgatetickets.com). SATURDAY, AUGUST 1 Bread & Butta. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. 7 p.m. FRIDAY, AUGUST 7 Cumberlads. Cumberland Mall. Men’s a capella chorus under the direction of Gene Tubertini. 7 p.m. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 5 The John Clark Big Band. Michael Debbi Park, Cedar Ave., Richland. Hot dogs, deserts and beverages sold. Bring your dancing shoes. 7 p.m. rain or shine. Seating available or bring a lawn chair. Free concert. SATURDAY, AUGUST 1 Fear Before. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland. 6 p.m. $12-$15. (frontgatetickets.com). THROUGH AUGUST 10 Tara Jacoby Art Exhibit. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. Her work ranges from ink drawings, watercolor paintings, digital media and oil paintings. JULY 29, 30, 31, AUGUST 1 AND 4 Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Wednesday: ’70s and ’80s Throwback Night (frozen drink specials) 8 p.m.midnight, Thursday.: Karaoke with DJ Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday: Blue Moon Dance Party, $3 Blue Moon drafts, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Saturday: Latin Dance Party, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Tuesday: Country Western Dance Party (beer and shot specials), 8 p.m.-midnight. JULY 30, 31, AND AUGUST 1 The Villain Vaudevillian. Calvary Chapel Playhouse, 930 N. Main Rd., Vineland. SUNDAY, AUGUST 2 Bury Your Dead. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth AT THE CASINOS Tickets: 1-800-736-1420; www.ticketmaster.com unless otherwise noted. HEADLINERS, COMEDY ACTS, AND MORE Yesterday: A Tribute to the Beatles. Tropicana. Liverpool Club Theater in North Tower. Wed.–Sun., 8:30 p.m., $25. SUNDAY, AUGUST 2 Black Label Society. Showboat House of Blues. 9 p.m., $35, $30. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | THROUGH JULY 26 THURSDAY, JULY 30 Don’t Call Me Francis. Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave., Hammonton, 609-7049797. 9 p.m. Tickets $10. HEADLINERS THURSDAY, JULY 30 Katy Perry. Borgata. 8 p.m. $39.50. COMEDY & MORE Comedy Club at Borgata. Borgata Music Box: three comedians daily, 9 p.m. (except during headliner engagements) 1-800-298-4200. Comedy Stop at the Trop. Three comics nightly. Sun.-Thurs., 9 p.m., $23; Fri., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $23; Sat., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $28. Order tickets by phone at the Comedy Stop Box Office: 1-877-FUNNYAC or 609-348-0920. comedystop.com. Fame. Tropicana. Monday and Thursday 8 p.m., Tuesday and Wednesday 3:30 and 8 p.m., Sunday 7 p.m. Beatlemania Now. Bally’s. Wed, Fri, Sun. 8 p.m.; Saturday 8 and 10:30 p.m. $25. THROUGH AUGUST 9 A Bronx Tale. Harrah’s. Tues.-Thurs. 8 p.m., Fri.-Sun. 9 pm. $65, $55, $40. JULY 30 AND 31, AUGUST 1 Nightlife at Villa Filomena. Villa Filomena Ristorante & Lounge, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena, 697-7107. Thurs.: Ladies Night, Fri.: Live music, Sat.: Italian Accordian. FRIDAY, JULY 31 Daryl Hall & John Oates. Borgata. 8 p.m. $85, $65, $55. Drew Hastings/Bob Zany/Craig Shoemaker. Borgata. 9 p.m. $35, $25. Pink Floyd Laser Show. Hilton. 9 p.m. $15. Foreigner. Tropicana. 9 p.m. $35-$75. THROUGH SEPTEMBER 5 Hypno-Sterical. Trump Marina. Thurs, and Fri. 9 p.m., Sat. 10 p.m. $22.50. the grapevine { 25 } JULY 30 AND 31, AUGUST 1 Nightlife at Bojo’s. 222 N. High St., Millville, 327-8011. Thurs: Ladies Nite with Charlie. Fri: Buddy and the Blue Flames. Sat: Singalong. Sun: Nascar/Baseball. THROUGH SEPTEMBER 6 Carnival of Wonders. Trump Plaza. 8 p.m. Tues., Wed., Thurs., Sat.; 9 p.m. Fri.; 3 and 7 p.m. Sun. $25. The Grapevine’s Crossword Puzzle ACROSS 1. Reject outright 5. Successively in order 9. Sword with a curved blade 14. British nobleman 15. Hannibal’s Waterloo 16. 1/6 drachmas 17. Lubricate 18. ____t: separate 19. Move rapidly in music 20. 14th president 23. Released a knot 24. Yeddo 25. ___mania: Australian island 26. Was an indication of 31. Leg joints 35. Blanket shawl 36. Frog genus 37. Brews 38. Staves off 41. Pikas 43. Report on a mission 45. An upper extremity 46. Macaws 47. Having vision 51. 29th president 56. Island in Bay of Naples 57. N.M. art community 58. Gelled culture medium 59. No. French river 60. Shreck is one 61. Queen of the gods 62. Supplications 63. Weekly Top 40 DJ Rick 64. Paris airport DOWN 1. Essence of your being 2. AKA Pleasant Island 3. About metropolis 4. Mixed 5. Subgenus of rhododendron 6. Fast river currents 7. Gulf and Sultanate 8. Twisted boards 9. A human being 10. ____al: away from the mouth 11. A type of pear 12. Other 13. ___ de Janeiro 21. Write bad checks 22. 15th of March 27. N.W. Algerian port 28. Anklebones 29. Fencing sword Solution to last week’s puzzle 30. ____ert: last course 31. W. Romanian city 32. Central area of a church 33. Drawer pull 34. Den of wild animals 39. Personal journals 40. Dried up vegetation 41. Pressed folds 42. H____: Greek poet 44. Outburst of emotion 45. Towards land 48. State and potato 49. African river & republic 50. A tree knot 51. Lament loudly 52. A domed or vaulted recess 53. Ribosomal ribonucleic acid 54. Gov. of Mass. until 1775 55. Between black and white 56. A bottle top With rates at historic lows, now is a great time to buy a new home or consider refinancing your existing mortgage. For unparalleled service, great rates and a variety of financing options, call Blaise R. Menzoni. FHA • VA • Conventional NEW!!! NEW!!! NEW!!! NEW!!! NEW!!! Grapevine Business Directory ads! Black & white only. Optional – One photo per ad permitted at no extra charge. Only $27 per week! Advertise in CORNERSTONE HARDSCAPE & CONSTRUCTION, LLC • Landscaping • Driveways • Sidewalks • Concrete • Pavers • Walls • Porches • Fencing The Grapevine and get incredible results. For a no-obligation consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com. While you’re away or at work, leave your home & your pet in the capable care of appy A Fully Insured Call: (609) 383-0055 Bud’s Pet Home Care, LLC Bud Sulzman • Care For Your Pets • Take In Your Mail • Check Our Your • Water Your Plants House Daily “Since 1987” 2004 HD Heritage Softail Black, new tires. Exc. mech. cond. 17,300 mi. $10,800 OBO { 26 } the grapevine | JULY 29, 2009 me! t Ho I’m S o H Blaise Menzoni LOAN OFFICER Gateway Funding DMS, LP Office 856.692.9494 Fax 856.691.3687 Cell 856.297 .7087 696-8290 609-929-2150 1 17 E. Landis Ave • Suite C • Vineland, NJ 08360 1 Licensed by NJ department of Banking and Insurance CONSTRUCTION Kitchens, Bathrooms, Flooring & Tile REMODELING Fully Insured Call: (609) 383-0055 CHC 5×5 • 5×10 • 10×10 • 10×15 • 10×20 • 24 Hour / 7 Day Available • Car/RV/Boat Storage • File Storage • Computerized Gate Access Opening Doors to Home Ownership 856-691-3613 1348 S. Main Road • Vineland I Real Estate Realtors Meet with Congressman Area realtors meet with Congressman LoBiondo to discuss issues affecting southern New Jersey. Joyce Conrow, President, and President Elect, Evelyn Schweibinz, of the Cumberland County Board of Realtors® attended a recent breakfast with Congressman Frank LoBiondo. Several topics were discussed with the Congressman, one of them being the positive effect the recent stimulus money has made on the real estate market in southern New Jersey, and how the area’s real estate market did not suffer as much as other communities nationally. “In attendance were other southern New Jersey county Realtor® board presidents,” said Conrow. “Congressman LoBiondo talked to us about how his new solar power initiative could be a positive force for us as well as the state, and touched on other programs that will affect us in southern New Jersey.” Conrow added: “This was a great opportunity for us as representatives of the Cumberland County Board of Realtors to get the latest information from our congressional representative on the state of real estate in New Jersey as well as other pressing issues.” For more information on area real estate, contact the Cumberland County Board of Realtors® at 856-692-1118, or visit www.ccbor.com. In photo, from left: Joyce Conrow, President, Congressman LoBiondo, President-Elect, Evelyn Schweibinz. THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING and Urban Development (HUD) will be at Vineland Public Library (1058 E. Landis Avenue), on Monday, August 24 from 1 to 4 p.m. HUD representatives from will answer questions about refinancing, the stimulus, fair housing and subsidies, mortgages and other housing questions. This free event takes place in the library’s Community Event Room located on the first floor. For more information, call 794-4244. OPEN HOUSE Thursday, July 30th 5:30 – 7:30 pm WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | 1964 E. Oak Road Vineland (F-5) On Your Way From Work Stop In To See This Affordable Easily Maintained Condo In A Nice Neighborhood For All Ages! Thomas Riggione, Broker-Associate (856) 696-1111 1100 E Landis Avenue Vineland, NJ 08360 the grapevine { 27 } CALL VISIT PLAY 1234 All Summer Long At Our New West Landis Avenue Branch Now, those living or working on both sides of Vineland can enjoy the full banking services that have made our 175 S. Main Road headquarters Cumberland County’s fastest growing bank. Call 691-1234 to learn more. Or better yet, visit 1234 W. Landis during our Endless Summer Fridays 2. While you’re at our new branch, meet our professional staff and enter to win $1234 in the Capital moneycard grand prize drawing.† NEW BRANCH NOW OPEN At 1234 West Landis Avenue Next to the Wal-Mart Supercenter 2.02% APY* NOW Checking Account No minimum balance or monthly fees. Free logo checks. Unlimited check writing. No fee ATM/Debit card. Lobby Hours Both Locations: Monday – Wednesday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM Thursday & Friday: 8:30 AM – 6:00 PM Saturday: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM Drive-Thru Hours Both Locations: Monday – Thursday: 8:00 AM – 6:00 PM Friday: 8:00 AM – 7:00 PM Saturday: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM Or Anytime at CapitalBankNJ.com Plus! Spin The Endless Summer Fridays 2 Wheel of Prizes and Win! Opening any new account at either Capital branch during our Endless Summer Fridays 2 gets you a spin of the wheel for the chance to win a beach towel, hibachi, cooler bag, or camp chair. Se Habla Español All rates are guaranteed through December 31, 2009. Offer may be withdrawn at any time without previous notice. Fees may reduce earnings. *Annual Percentage Yield (APY). Interest rate may vary. Limitations may apply. †You need not open an account to play or win, nor do you need to be present at the time of the drawing to win. Drawing date: Friday, September 4, 2009. All federal, state and local tax liabilities and gratuities are winner’s responsibility. Our Focus Is You. 175 S. Main Road & 1234 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland, NJ • 856.690.1234 Member FDIC

Posted on July 28th, 2009 by by Mike

July 22, 2009

INSIDE PET CARE • HOME & GARDEN • BARBARA COOK RUN-RIDE-WALK • VAUDEVILLE VOLUME 2 | ISSUE 24 | JULY 22, 2009 CONNECTING YOU { JANET NIEDOSIK } T O V I N E L A N D . W E E K L Y. Visit us online www.grapevinenewspaper.com The centennial anniversary of the first Mass offered at Our Lady of Pompeii Church was celebrated July 12. “Let us ask God to bless all those who have gone before us and let us remember them in our prayers today. Those who donated land, those who built our church, those who served …” With those words, Father Peter Saporito began the celebration of the 100th anniversary of the first Mass said in Our Lady of Pompeii Church. Of course, it’s a different church building today. Indeed, it’s even a different parish, and it’s a very different time than it was when that first Mass was offered on July 5, 1909, but one thing remains constant—the faith of this church community. In an interview last week, Saporito said it was important to understand that the celebration was for the 100th anniversary of the first Mass offered at Our Lady of Pompeii Church, not the 100th anniversary of the parish. The parish of Our Lady of Pompeii, in actuality, ceased to exist in 2002, when St. Mary’s (East Vineland) was merged with Our Lady of Pompeii. While the churches retained their names, the merger created the Parish of Saint Padre Pio. Our Lady of Pompeii Church, at Dante and Cornucopia avenues, was filled to capacity at the 10 a.m. anniversary Mass on July 12, a day proclaimed by Mayor Robert Romano as Our Lady of Pompeii Day in the city of Vineland. It was a day that started with prayer, followed by food and fellowship at Merighi’s Savoy Inn. It was a day to celebrate the faith, foresight and perseverance of four farmers who, in 1904, had the idea to build a church in what was then called New Italy, and who, within five years, saw that church opened for the faithful. Continued on page 10 Crowning Achievement A local business helps pave the way for visitors to climb to Lady Liberty’s crown for the first time since before September 11, 2001. {DEBORAH A. EIN} nton Popeskic was just 13 years old when he arrived in America with his parents and sister. It was March 1969 when the four of them first saw the Statue of Liberty in New York harbor. It was symbolic of hope and a new life in America, as his parents yearned for a better life than they had known in their native Croatia (Yugoslavia). Popeskic could not have known then that 40 years later, in June of A Continued on page 12 I Faces in the News Students Celebrate Priests The students at Notre Dame Regional School honored two priests at their end of the year mass in June—Father John Tumosa of St. Rose of Lima in Newfield where he has been pastor for 15 years and Father Allain Caparas of Queen of Angels Parish in Minotola. Father John was celebrated for his 40 years in the priesthood and his active role at Notre Dame Regional School. Father Allain was honored for his dedication to NDRS where he taught eighth grade religion. Father Allain was recently transferred to St. Peters in Merchantville after three years at Queen of Angels. Dr. Mary Alimenti, Principal, fought back the tears as she presented both priests with Stoles that pictured children from around the world. Pictured, from left: Head Teacher of Landisville Campus Mrs. Tracey Carrow, Fr. Allain Caparas, Dr. Mary Alimenti, Fr. John Tumosa, and Head Teach Newfield Campus Mrs. Kathy Mulutzie. U8 Babe Ruth All-Stars The U8 Vineland Allstars recently competed in the Babe Ruth Softball tate finals. Morgan Hagerty, Shannon Connolly, Veronica Fennimore and Frances Lugo (not pictured) were awarded MVP medals by the opposing teams for outstanding performances. Great job girls! Fabulous Finishes Vineland YMCA Seals swimmers Kelsey DeMatte, 11, Alan Hsueh, 10, and Coach Dennis DeMatte competed in the 13th Annual Swim for the Dolphins, 1-mile open ocean swim. The event was held in Wildwood Crest on Saturday, July 11, in very rough surf. Kelsey finished second in 12&under girls and Alan finished third in 12&under boys. More than 250 swimmers of all ages competed. Kelsey finished 124th, Alan 135th and Coach DeMatte finished 210th overall. CALL VISIT PLAY NEW BRANCH NOW OPEN            All Summer Long At Our New West Landis Avenue Branch 1234 2.02% APY* NOW Checking Account No minimum balance or monthly fees. Free logo checks. Unlimited check writing. No fee ATM/Debit card. { 2 } the grapevine | JULY 22, 2009 Now, those living or working on both sides of Vineland can enjoy the full banking services that have made our 175 S. Main Road headquarters Cumberland County’s fastest growing bank. Call 691-1234 to learn more. Or better yet, visit 1234 W. Landis during our Endless Summer Fridays 2. While you’re at our new branch, meet our professional staff and enter to win $1234 in the Capital moneycard grand prize drawing.† All rates are guaranteed through December 31, 2009. Offer may be withdrawn at any time without previous notice. Fees may reduce earnings. *Annual Percentage Yield (APY). Interest rate may vary. Limitations may apply. †You need not open an account to play or win, nor do you need to be present at the time of the drawing to win. Drawing date: Friday, September 4, 2009. All federal, state and local tax liabilities and gratuities are winner’s responsibility. Plus! Spin The Endless Summer Fridays 2 Wheel of Prizes and Win! Opening any new account at either Capital branch during our Endless Summer Fridays 2 gets you a spin of the wheel for the chance to win a beach towel, hibachi, cooler bag, or camp chair. Our Focus Is You. 175 S. Main Road & 1234 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland, NJ • 856.690.1234 Member FDIC High Efficiency Heating and Cooling and Water Heating Equipment Eligible for up to $1500 in Federal Tax Credits and up to $400 in Rebates Another Fantastic Finish Vineland’s Chris Gottwald successfully completed the 2009 Race Across America and was the first American to cross the finish line. He biked 3,021 miles in an unbelievable 10 days, 12 hours, and 46 minutes. Congratulations to Chris and his crew on a 4th-place Photo: Ed Hilt overall finish. Mayor Welcomes New Officers Three women and 28 men graduated from the Gloucester County Police Academy last Thursday. The following day, the eight Cumberland County graduates who are now part of the Vineland Police Department were greeted at City Hall by Mayor Robert Romano, who welcomed them and their families to a brief celebration in his office. Pictured from left: Brian M. Armstrong, Heather June Connelly, Timothy Dominick DeLouise, Christopher W. Fixler, Matthew J. Laielli, Johnathan N. Ramos, Michael James Wallace and Ryan John Watkins. Serving Vineland for over 100 years! 691-1950 State Lic. # 12089 Pets on Parade Winners With a crowded field of 22 entries, the winners have been announced in the second annual “Pets on Parade,” which took place on Saturday, July 11, as part of Vineland’s weekly downtown Fresh and Specialty Foods Market, sponsored by the Vineland Downtown Improvement District (VDID)/Main Street Vineland and Sun National Bank. “This is one of many ways we are bringing family-friendly events to Landis Avenue, and, in the process, making the Market refreshing and interesting each week,” said event organizer Donata Dalesandro. Michelle Boudreau of the Cumberland County SPCA emceed the event and SPCA staff members were among those judging the contest. The winners are: Most Interesting Pet: Maitias, an Irish wolf hound owned by Pat Selby of Vineland, pictured with Boudreau top left. Best Dressed Pet: Maxie, a Dachshund owned by Vincent Smith of Vineland Best Pet Trick: Rayna, a Siberian Husky owned by Marsha Little of Vineland Ugliest/Oddest-Looking Pet: Puddin’, a Pug owned by Donald Murray of Vineland, pictured, top right. Most Original Float or Wagon: Shaggy Teddy Bear, a puppy poodle owned by Patty Conners of Vineland, pictured, bottom left. Most Original Costume with a Patriotic Theme: Boomer, a mixed-breed dog owned by Timmy Bass of Millville, pictured bottom right. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the grapevine { 3 } SEND US YOUR FACES — IT’S FREE! Get your photos published in The Grapevine… birthdays, engagements, weddings, anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them to The Grapevine, 3660 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08360 or via e-mail: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com. FREE PICKUP & DELIVERY • FREE PICKUP & DELIVERY • FREE PICKUP & DELIVERY • FREE PICKUP & DELIVERY FREE PICKUP & DELIVERY • FREE PICKUP & DELIVERY • FREE PICKUP & DELIVERY • FREE PICKUP & DELIVERY AND FROM VINEL 11 MILES ONLY OUR PRIC BEFORE YO ES U BUY! COMPARE Largest Inventory of Dodge, Chevy & GMC Trucks in South Jersey 2006 HYUNDAI ELANTRA $ PER MONTH 2005 FORD FOCUS $ PER MONTH 2007 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER $ PER MONTH 2003 GMC SONOMA $ PER MONTH 2005 KIA SEDONA LX $ PER MONTH 104 112 122 179 149 used, 4 dr, 4 cyl., p/assist, auto, am/fm stereo, air, tilt, cruise, p/windows, rear def., tinted glass, p/locks, 69,124 miles, STK# Y89230A, VIN# 6U223033, Down Pymt., $2000 plus T&T, PPM $104.00 x 72 mos. 7.9 APR, Deferred Pymts $7,488.00 $ 7,995 $9,995 WAS used, 4 cyl., auto, p/disc, air, cruise, p/windows, p/ locks, 45,252 miles, STK# Y79065, VIN# 5W155061, Down Pymt., $2000 plus T&T, PPM $112.00 x 72 mos. 7.9 APR, Deferred Pymts $7,392 $ 7,995 $8,995 WAS used, 4 cyl., p/assist, auto, p/disp., air, tilt, keyless, delay, cruise, p/windows, CD, rear def., tinted glass, p/locks, 33,073 miles, STK# Y99027, VIN# 7T583711, Down Pymt., $2000 plus T&T, PPM $122.00 x 72 mos. 7.9 APR, Deferred Pymts $8,784 WAS $ used, p/u, 4 cyl., p/assist, auto, p/disp., air, tilt, keyless, delay, cruise, p/win, CD, rear def., tinted glass, p/locks, ONE OWNER NEW CAR TRADER, 54,576 miles, STK#CV9117A, VIN# 38256477, Down Pymt., $2000 plus T&T, PPM $179 x 72 mos. 8.9 APR, Deferred Pymts $9,666 used, van, 4 cyl., p/s, auto, p/b, air,tilt, cruise, CD, rear def., tinted glass, p/locks, 56,904 miles, STK# CR9042A, VIN# 56677652, Down Pymt., $2000 plus T&T, PPM $149 x 66 mos. 7.9 APR, Deferred Pymts $9834 8,995 $10,995 $ 9,995 $ $10,995 WAS $ 9,995 $10,995 WAS 2006 FORD ESCAPE $ PER MONTH 2006 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER XL $ PER MONTH 2004 JEEP LIBERTY RENEGADE $ PER MONTH 2005 CHEVROLET MONTE CARLO LT PER MONTH 2004 CHEVROLET SILVERADO EXT CAB $ PER MONTH 192 192 224 245 303 used, 6 cyl., p/assist, auto, air, tilt, cruise, alloy whls., CD, rear def., tinted glass, p/locks, 53,572 miles, STK# Y99033, VIN# 6KD33995, Down Pymt., $2000 plus T&T, PPM $192 x 72 mos. 7.9 APR, Deferred Pymts $13,824 $ 12,995 $ $13,995 WAS used, 6 cyl., p/assist, auto, p/disp., am/fm/CD, air, tilt, keyless, p/windows, rear def., tinted glass, p/locks, p/antenna, 50,979 miles, STK# CR9064A, VIN# 66148487, Down Pymt., $2000 plus T&T, PPM $192 x 72 mos. 7.9 APR, Deferred Pymts $13,824 WAS $ used, 4×4, 6 cyl., p/assist, auto, am/fm/CD, p/trunk, rear def., tinted glass, leather int.,, 83,947 miles, STK# J9003A, VIN# 4W239263, Down Pymt., $2000 plus T&T, PPM $224 x 72 mos. 7.9 APR, Deferred Pymts $14,784 used, 2 dr., 6 cyl., p/assist, auto, p/disp., air, tilt, p/seats, keyless, cruise, p/windows, CD, rear def., tinted glass, p/locks, 62,424 miles, STK# 499090, VIN# 59196131, Down Pymt., $2000 plus T&T, PPM $245.00 x 66 mos. 7.9 APR, Deferred Pymts $16,038 12,995 $15,995 $ 13,995 $ $15,995 WAS $ 14,995 $ $15,995 WAS used, p/u, 8 cyl., p/assist, auto, p/disp., air,tilt, cruise, p/windows, CD, rear def., tinted glass, p/locks, cloth int., alloy whls., 51,142 miles, STK# SM9054A, VIN# 4131685, Down Pymt., $2000 plus T&T, PPM $303 x 60 mos. 7.9 APR, Deferred Pymts $18,180 WA $ 16,995 $17,995 S 2009 CHEVROLET IMPALA PER MONTH 2006 VW JETTA $ PER MONTH 2008 NITRO SXT 2006 CADILLAC 2008 MINI COOPER 272 279 PER MONTH 272 PER MONTH 297 $ PER MONTH 314 used, 6 cyl., p/s, auto, p/b, p/disp, air, tilt, delay, cruise p/windows, cloth int., CD, rear def., tinted glass, p/ locks, 13,035 miles, STK# Y99052, VIN# 91133345, Down Pymt., $2000 plus T&T, PPM $272.00 x 72 mos. 6.99 APR, Deferred Pymts $19,584 WAS $ 17,995 $19,995 air, tilt, p/seats, delay, cruise, p/windows, cellular phone, alloy whls., CD, rear def., tinted glass, p/ locks, p/ antenna, 44,346 miles, TK# 499101, VIN# 6M719498, Down Pymt., $2000 plus T&T, PPM $279 x 72 mos. 7.9 APR, Deferred Pymts $20,088 WAS $ used, wagon, 4×4, 6 cyl., p/s, auto, 4wd, p/b air,tilt, cruise, CD, rear def., tinted glass, p/lks am/fm/CD, keyless, delay, p/win, cloth int., 34,616 miles, STK# Y99102, VIN# 8W165687, Down Pymt., $2000 plus T&T, PPM $272 x 72 mos. 6.99 APR, Deferred Pymts $19,584 used, 6 cyl., p/s, auto, p/disp, air, am/fm/CD, tilt, p/sts, keyless, p/win, cruise, CD, rear def., tinted gl, p/lks, ABS, 34,007 miles, STK# Y99079, VIN# 601434449, Down Pymt., $2000 plus T&T, PPM $297 x 72 mos. 7.9 APR, Deferred Pymts $21,384 17,995 $18,995 $ 15,995 $17,995 WAS $ 18,995 $19,995 WAS used, 2 dr., 4 cyl., p/assist, tilt, bucket seats, p/ windows, alloy whls., CD, tinted glass, p/locks, lether int., sunroof, 33,680 miles, STK# Y99072, VIN# 7TL79428, Down Pymt., $2000 plus T&T, PPM $314 x 72 mos. 7.9 APR, Deferred Pymts $22,808 WAS $ 19,995 $21,995 { 4 } the grapevine | JULY 22, 2009 To qualified buyers: See dealer for complete details on select models. Prices include all rebates & dealer incentives. Prices include all costs except tax, tags & licensing fees. Not responsible for typographical errors. www.bobnovick.com WE SERVICE 808 N. Pearl St. (Rt. 77), Bridgeton, NJ • (856) 451-0095 I Gleanings { DEBORAH A. EIN, MANAGING EDITOR } Twin Landing Monday was the 40th anniversary of the first moon landing…and my boys’ 10th birthdays. O n July 20, 1969, Apollo 11 landed on the moon and the human race accomplished its single greatest technological achievement. Never before had a human being set foot on another celestial body, until that night when two spacemen stood on the moon and saw Earth in the heavens. Neil Armstrong’s one small step and mankind’s giant leap did not go unheralded by this science enthusiast. My fifth-grade studies had piqued my interest in America’s space program, and I would not let drooping eyelids steal this historic moment. I stayed up way past my bedtime for this landmark event that I would someday tell to my kids and grandkids—that I had witnessed, as it occurred, the first moon landing and man’s first walk on the moon, as reported by the legendary Walter Cronkite. Time travel 30 years out to July 20, 1999: Little did I know that in the wee hours of that morning, my own spaceboys, identical twins, would land on the face of Planet Earth. Several months before that, after the home pregnancy test turned up positive, I was off to my midwife. This was the same midwife who during my first pregnancy had compared a baby in the womb to an astronaut floating about in a spaceship. No gravity, just floating, bouncing off the walls. This time, she suspected two astro-babies and sent me for an ultrasound. And yes, there were two, but also a possible problem. The docs thought the babies might be monoamniotic. floating around in the same amniotic sac (which causes twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome), with a risk of one or both babies being lost during pregnancy or at birth. Were my babies bouncing off their own walls or bouncing off each other in the same compartment of the space shuttle? Mission Control was reminded how dangerous child- birth can be even in these times of great technological advances. The next ultrasound would tell the story. Indeed, the next month’s ultrasound showed the line, that most beautiful line, that meant the babies were in their own sacs. Now we could tell family and friends, tell the whole world that I was pregnant with twins. We told the soon-to-be big sister first and let her proclaim that we were “going to have babies.” The rest of the pregnancy was uneventful. A later ultrasound showed they were boys, and they continued to grow inside the command module. My little spacemen were soon in tight quarters, with no room to float or bounce. With the countdown two days before my due date, I went to the hospital Monday morning to have my weekly ultrasound and stress test. The technicians estimated that the babies weighed about six pounds each. The stress test showed no contractions, and the doctors debated what to do. They scheduled me for Thursday if nothing had happened by then. I don’t remember what I had for dinner that night, except for the broccoli. A halfhour later, I had stomach pains. Mission Control decided to wait and see if the pain started feeling more like a contraction. My first labor had been long, and I didn’t want to get to the hospital too soon. Within the hour, however, we were off to Newcomb Hospital. Labor was quick. Once I got past the denial, I delivered two babies in about onetenth the time it took to have their sister. I stayed up way past my bedtime to deliver them between 2 and 2:30 in the morning. They were born naturally (no drugs, no epidural) about four hours after we arrived at the hospital, one boy, then 12 minutes later, his identical twin. In the recovery room, a voice came over the intercom. “Baby Boy A weighs 7 lbs., 10 oz.” My jaw dropped as I hardly had time to process the thought that this must be the larger baby. “Baby Boy B is 8 pounds,” the voice from outer space continued. Recovery room? Ha! Ever since the boys exited Spaceship Mom, they have rocked our world. They and their sister have grown to be best buddies, fiercest rivals, and everything else brothers and sisters are to each other. As for the space shuttle, she’s become more of a land rover, shuttling all three offspring here and there. Houston, come in Houston: The twins have landed. I FRESH This Week’s Feature FO ODS MARKET m– (Opposite Vineland Post O ce) & Downtown Eco Day SPECIALT Y WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Downtown Eco Day Cumberland County Improvement Authority will demonstrate a Composting Unit FREE Eco Bags–Visit Our Market Vendors and Get a Free Bag (while supplies last) Art Projects for the Kids from Recycled Materials Every Week — Jersey Fresh Produce Plus Market Runs ru Aug. 15 WIC & Senior Coupons Accepted VINELAND TROLLEY VINELAND TROLLEY the grapevine { 5 } RIDE THE TROLLEY TO AND FROM THE MARKET FREE! Runs Landis Ave – Kidston Towers to WalMart This event is sponsored in part by VDID/Vineland Main Street. This ad has been paid for with funds approved for such use by the New Jersey Urban Enterprise Zone Authority. PET CARE Garoppo Feed & Pet Supply Pet Friendly Selection & Owner Friendly Prices! {Sherry Munyan} W hat do you look for in a pet supply store, or any store for that matter? It’s something that is getting harder and harder to find these days and it’s frustrating. I often leave stores, especially big chain stores in a huff because (a) I can’t find anyone to wait on me, or (b) I get some store worker who gives me the deer-in-the-headlights look when I ask them a question. What we are missing in this highly technically over-challenged I’m-too-busy to-eat -dinner–at-a-restaurant–without-answering-my-cell-phone society is Customer Service! Imagine this for a moment…staff members who care about their customers and know what they are talking about when it comes to their products and services. Refreshing thought, isn’t it! Well do I have a great store to share with you! Garoppo Feed & Pet Supply is a family owned and operated business located at 1200 Harding Highway (Rt. 40) in Newfield, NJ. The store opened in 2001 and offers hundreds of products for your pets, livestock, small animals, wild birds, horses, cattle, and much more. “We knew this would be a good area to offer animal products and services,” says owner Pat Garoppo. Customers love the selection and most importantly they love the exceptional customer service and product knowledge of all the staff members. Let’s not forget the prices. The store attracts a wide range of customers from all over southern New Jersey. “We have developed some wonderful relationships through the years with our customers” Garoppo adds. Garoppos Feed & Pet carries an extensive line of specialty pet foods including natural and holistic varieties. They also offer hay, bedding, oats and supplies for your horses. They are proud to be a Purina Feed Dealer and offer a full line of premium feed including Legends and Triple Crown. In addition, they carry chicken and goat feed and a complete variety of many different feeds for your farm animals and cattle. We can’t forget the wild birds and at Garoppos they are fully stocked from black oil sunflower seed and other value blends of wild birdseed to ultra premium wild bird selections. Feeders and suet cakes by the case are also available. You can also pick up toys and accessories for your dog or cat as well as grooming supplies and vitamin supplements. They also carry koi and pond food. For the hunting enthusiasts, Garoppos carries a variety of deer feeds and supplements and seed plots. So the next time you are in need of anything for your pet, livestock, or small animals, stop in and see “Molly,” the resident doggie, and the courteous and knowledgeable Garoppo staff. Check out the selection and prices—you will be glad you did! Garoppos Feed & Pet, 1200 Harding Hwy. (Rt.40) Newfield, NJ (856) 697-4444, Monday – Friday 7 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Saturday – 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday – 9 a.m.-1 p.m. GAROPPO Feed & Pet Supplies We Carry All Natural Pet Food! • Horse • Pig • Pond Fish • Shavings • Poultry • Cattle • Rabbit • Woody Pet • Goat • Sheep • Dog • Cat • Game Bird • Hay/Straw • Wild & Domestic Bird Compare our Nutro Prices with any of the Competition Check Out The Savings at Garoppos! Large Breed Adult Chicken & Rice (35lb Bag) 10%OFF $2.00 OFF 10%OFF Green Dog Natural Products Black Oil Sunflower Seed (50lb. bag) All ZuPreem Small Animals Products Lamb & Rice or Large Breed Lamb & Rice (35lb Bag) Lamb & Rice Small Bites (35lb Bag) $39.99 Senior Formula (30lb Bag) { 6 } the grapevine | JULY 22, 2009 $42.99 Large Breed Weight Management (35lb Bag) $42.99 With this coupon. One coupon per customer. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. Exp. 8/31/09 With this coupon. One coupon per customer. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. Exp. 8/31/09 With this coupon. One coupon per customer. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. Exp. 8/31/09 Nutro Max Cat Adult Chicken Flavor 16lb. $38.99 $39.99 $22.99 MON.-FRI. 7AM-5:30PM • SAT 7AM-5PM • SUN. 9AM-1PM 1200 Harding Highway (Rt. 40), Newfield, NJ 08344 856-697-4444 • High levels of omega-6 linoleic acid & zinc for healthy skin and shiny coat • No chicken heads, feet, or intestines • Advanced antioxidants for a healthy immune system • Natural sources of Glucosamine & Chondroitin to help promote healthy joints • High-quality fats, proteins & whole grains that help provide natural vitality & energy NATURAL CHOICE® Dog Food Contains: Bud’s Pet Home Care Excerpted from Pet Sitters International magazine Bud and Eloise Sulzman have been pet-sitting since 1987. They have experienced many unusual things in this line of work and often “go above and beyond the call of duty.” As a pet owner, you know how important a pet sitter can be to your companion animals, but sometimes pet sitters are the most important people in a pet owner’s life, too. In August 2005, Bud Sulzman received a call to take care of a golden retriever named Kallie, whose owner, K.A., was taken to the hospital. For the next few months, Sulzman visited Kallie at home and K.A. in the hospital. He was visiting Kallie twice a day nad began paying K.A.’s energy bills from his business account to keep the house running and Kallie comfortable. K.A. died in November without a will, and Bud made arrangements for her funeral and burial. He was able to contact K.A.’s uncle and an aunt in Canada. Coordinating all decisions with the uncle, Sulzman was appointed to serve as the administrator for the estate. He and his wife also cared for Kallie, who stayed at the house until April 2006. The house was sold in June and Kallie found a new home with the Sulzmans. By the end of 2006, Sulzman had submitted all the necessary state and ALOTTA LUV ANIMAL LODGE In & Out Runs Boarding • Grooming • Training federal income tax forms for a tax waiver on the estate. When the audit is complete, the remaining estate funds can be distributed. Sulzman will receive a commission for all of his work as estate administrator. The remainder will go to K.A.’s aunt and uncle. The entire process was something he never anticipated when he took the assignment as Kallie’s pet sitter. But because of his dedication and commitment to his clients—both human and canine—he stepped into a new role and rose to the challenge. Pet sitting requires more than just animal care, as Bud Sulzman can testify. We provide trustworthy, reliable Pet Sitting for any pet! Over 30 years of Experience!!! All Critters Sitting Service Large Outdoor Exercise Area Air Conditioned & Heated Kennels Full Service Master Grooming (large dogs accepted) www.alottaluv.com Mon.-Fri. 9 am – 6 pm Sat. – 9 am – 4 pm Sun. 9 am – 11 am & 3 pm – 6 pm We truly “care” for your pet! allcritterssitting@yahoo.com www.allcritterssitting.vpweb.com (856) 313-2172 856-696-4965 2981 N. Delsea Dr. Vineland, NJ 08360 While you’re away or at work, leave your home & your pet in the capable care of Bud’s Pet Home Care, LLC Bud Sulzman • Care For Your Pets • Check Our Your House Daily • Take In Your Mail • Water Your Plants Guaranteed To Contain Any Dog The Most Versatile Underground Fence Made Money Back Guarantee Lifetime Equipment Warranty Service & Install Any System Vet Recommended Indoor/Outdoor Systems Locally Owned & Operated Year Round Installation Low Price Guarantee By: Dog Guard Out of Sight Fencing of NJ Visit Our Do-It-Yourself Pet Wash Top Quality Pet Supplies H appy At “Since 1987” MARK POLLARD, OWNER-OPERATOR 696-8290 www.dogguardnj.com FREE ESTIMATES 856-691-6461 Hydrosurge Therapeutic Bathing System Shedless Treatment Oral Hygiene • All Breeds of Dogs & Cats Safe Natural Flea Dips • No Tranquilizers Oatmeal Baths All Natural Premium Shampoos & Conditioners Excellent Caring Grooming Staff Gentle Professional Dog & Cat Grooming e! Hom I’m S o WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Luxurious Spa Treatments Aromatherapy, Paw & Pad Treatment, Blueberry Vanilla Facial & Vitamin Conditioner To advertise in our next Pet Care Services Section Best of the Best 8 of 9 years Professional Dog Training Behavior Problems Humanely Solved Innovative Positive Training Techniques Private Instruction, followed by unlimited group instruction — August 19 — call The Grapevine today! Helping Pets Live Better Lives Vet Recommended the grapevine { 7 } 825-9400 Rt. 47 S. Millville minutes from Rt.55 Member NDGAA Graduate of VIP Grooming Academy Tues-Sat 8-5 Wed 10-7 856-457-7815 I COMMUNITY CALENDAR HAPPENINGS THURSDAY, JULY 23 Children’s Pageant/Youth Day. Landis Park. Part of Puerto Rican Festival events. Pageant is 1 p.m. TUESDAY, AUGUST 4 National Night Out. Pagliughi Park, 2245 E. Magnolia Rd. An annual event designed to heighten crime prevention, and build support and participation in local anti-crime programs. 5-9 p.m. SATURDAY, JULY 25 Young Marines Car Wash. Sparkle Kleen, 2611 S. Main Rd. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sparkle Kleen will donate $2 for each vehicle to the Young Marines. Schimmel, zumba, karate. BBQ sandwiches for sale. Crafts, including chair caning demos. 10 a.m-6 p.m. Free. 451 – 5623. GOLF, SPORTS, ETC. SATURDAY, JULY 25 Fresh and Specialty Foods Market/Eco Day. 700 block of Landis Ave. 8 a.m.-noon. p.m. Vendors will sell fresh fruits and vegetables, crafts. Trolley will shuttle between Kidston Towers and Walmart, providing free transportation for anyone going to the Market. 794-8653. SATURDAY, JULY 25 FRIDAY, JULY 24 Out to Lunch. Cohanzick Zoo, Bridgeton. Bring a bagged lunch and enjoy free children’s entertainment: Special presentation by the Cohanzick Zoo. Noon. THURSDAY, JULY 23 Amputees Across America. HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital, 1237 W. Sherman Ave. A welcome recption will be held in honor of the cyclists who are riding in bicycle relays across the country (started in California on May 27) and visiting hospitals to increase public awareness of amputees as people with active lifestyles. 4 p.m. Nature Scavenger Hunt. Parvin State Park, 701 Almond Rd, Pittsgrove. 4 p.m. 358-8616. SATURDAY, JULY 25 Community Day Fun Festival. The Margaret Winchester Enrichment Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired, 168 Sunny Slope Dr., Bridgeton. Childrens’ acivities including yoga demos with Linda SATURDAY, JULY 25 Puerto Rican Festival. Parade down Landis Avenue at 1 p.m. and acivities to follow at Landis Park. SATURDAY, JULY 25 Luau and Pig Roast. The Capri Swim Club, Juliana Dr. between Main Rd. and Valley Ave. The menu will include roast pig and a selection of foods, snacks and beverages. 5-10 p.m. Tickets $25 per couple or $15 per person and may be purchased at the pool concession stand or from any board member. Attendees may also bring their own beverages. FEDUP-4U WILL HOLD ITS FIRST annual Pink Carpet Gala, on August 30 at St. Anthony’s Hall on Wheat Road. The event will benefit the South Jersey Healthcare Foundation, Susan G. Komen race for the Cure. Central South New Jersey affiliate and Fedup-4u. It will be a night filled with celebration, dancing, African-American food, Italian dishes, a live band playing ‘80s and new music, award ceremony, special guest speakers, Gospel singers, poetry and a dedication to the late Michael Jackson (come join in on the thriller dance) Call James Cooper at 364-8103 for tickets. Sponsorship packages are available starting at $50. P.S.—Wear some pink. prizes. Trophy presentation will be at 2:45 p.m. at the Glasstown Plaza on the corner of High and Sassafras Streets. Judges will award over 50 trophies, including two Best of Show. In case of rain, the show will be held Saturday, August 15. For car registration, call John at 825-3047. For event information, call Earl Sherrick at 825-2600. SATURDAY, JULY 25 VHS Select Choir Reunion. Home of Kathi (Testa) Epifanio. Spouses and significant others are welcome, as well as members of the choir 1974-1994. Hosted by Kathi Epifanio and Michael Testa. Drinks and hors d’oeuvres will be served. 4-9 p.m. A $20 donation is requested to cover costs. RSVP by calling 691-1920 or visiting VHS Select Choir page on Facebook. SATURDAY, AUGUST 1 Joshua Moren Memorial Slo-Pitch Softball Tournament. Fiocchi Field, 1755 Galli Dr. Fee per team $150, Home Run Derby $10 per player. Team registration deadline 7/28, game day check-in 8 a.m. rmg0004@auburn.edu for details about tourney and sponsorship opportunities. KOUNTRY THYME will resume its monthly open houses on Sunday, August 9, at Pizza Queen (Main and Magnolia) from noon to 4 p.m. Be sure to look for specials and prize giveaways. REGISTRATIONS FOR ihealthy Family, a nutrition education program for caregivers concerned about how to feed nutritious meals to their children, are now being accepted. South Jersey Healthcare is partnering with the Bottino ShopRite’s of Upper Deerfield and Delsea Drive to provide this community program. The ihealthy Family Program is designed to educate parents and community members about the growing problem of childhood obesity, basic nutrition, portion control and how to read food labels. The ShopRite of Upper Deerfield and of Delsea Drive will host a weekly class and provide food demonstrations by a ShopRite chef, store tours, and samples of different foods. ShopRite also donates weekly coupons, food give-aways, and prizes for participants. The program is free and open to the community. Classes meet for two hours once a week for five weeks. Class sizes are limited to 15 people, however classes are always forming. To register, call Debbie Erlandson, R.N., Childhood Obesity Coordinator, at 575-4868. Information about these classes is also available at the ShopRite courtesy counter. SUNDAY, JULY 26 Lasagna Dinner. St. Augustine Prep, 611 Cedar Ave., Richland. Eat in or take out. All proceeds benefit The Dream Foundation. Noon-5 p.m. $10 per person, $5 children (10 & under). Tickets available at the door. CHURCH NEWS Faith Tabernacle Holy Church 1665 North Avenue, Port Norris, is having a special service on Sunday July 26, at 3:30 p.m. Guest is Pastor James Clemmons of True Praise Ministry COGIC, Hammonton. Call 455-3880. Christ Community Church, 201 Salem Avenue, Newfield, will hold its Vacation Bible School July 27-31, from 6 to 9 p.m. Call 697-3005 to register for Crocodile Dock. New Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, 414 N. Seventh Street, will have its Annual Missionary Service on Sunday, July 26, at 3:30 p.m, with guest preacher Minister Paula Webb-Cheeks. Also, the Youth Choir at the church is hosting a Friday Night Live Concert on July 31 at 7 p.m. Call 691-1349. THE VINELAND HISTORICAL and Antiquarian Society held its annual reorganization meeting. Dr. Dane Barse, Mr. Charles J. Girard, Esq. and Dr. John P. Gruccio were re-elected to three-year terms on the Board of Trustees. The following officers were appointed to oneyear terms: Mr. Frank Amari, Jr., Esq., President; Dr. Dane Barse, Vice President; Mr. Robert J. Wilhelm, Secretary; Rev. Richard Shenton, Treasurer. SUNDAY, JULY 26 Hot Summer Nights Car Cruise. Bennigan’s, West Landis Ave. South Jersey Cruisers Association Car Club hosts. The MILLVILLE’S POPULAR DOWNTOWN CAR SHOW featuring antique and classic cars is set for Saturday, August 8 in the Glasstown Arts District. High Street will be closed from Main Street to Broad Street to accommodate the hundreds of cars on display. The Greater Millville Chamber of Commerce and the Garden State 50s Auto Club will host the event. Cars made before 1981 are eligible to participate, as well as special-interest and modern collectibles of any age. Dash plaques and T-shirts will be given to the first 250 cars registered. All vehicles pre-registered before August 1 will be eligible for one of four $50 cash { 8 } the grapevine | JULY 22, 2009 cruise is open to all years of Americanmade cars that are muscle cars, street rods, cruisers, classics and rat rods. 4-8 p.m. No fees, spectators welcome. 8253047 or thesouthjerseycruisers.com TUESDAY, JULY 28 City Council Meeting. Council Chambers, City Hall, Seventh and Wood sts. 7:30 p.m. Children are invited to participate in a Young Readers (ages 4-12) Summer Reading Club. It is held at Trinity Episcopal Church, 8th and Wood Streets, Vineland on Mondays, 4-6 p.m. It features: Reading enrichment, music lessons, healthy snacks—all free! To enroll, phone 691-7243. THROUGH JULY 27 Midget Football/Cheerleading Signups. Third St. and Chestnut Ave. 67:30 p.m. on Friday, July 24. Saturday registration 9 a.m.-noon on July 25. 974-3645. WEEKLY THROUGH OCTOBER 6 Senior Golf Association Events. Various courses throughout southern New Jersey. Annual membership $20. July 28 (Westwood). Aug. 4 (White Oaks), Aug. 11 (Patriots Glen), Aug. 18 (off), Aug. 28 (TBA). Call to join or for additional information, 691-4098. BARBARA COOK RUNRIDE-WALK FOR CANCER The 2nd Annual Barbara Cook RunRide-Walk for Cancer, this Saturday, July 25, at New Jersey Motorsports Park, will benefit the Lance Armstrong and South Jersey Healthcare Foundations by bicycle or through running events. The event also offers some less strenuous ways to participate—a BBQ reception and silent auction. The dinner and silent auction are just part of the day’s activities, beginning with 8 a.m. 62-, 31- and 8-mile bicycle rides that start on the Lightning circuit and travel local roads. Following a full day of Championship Cup Series (CCS) motorcycle racing, runs of 5K and 10K will start at 6 p.m. The 10K-course will wind throughout the 500-acre park. One and two-mile fun walks and an additional eight-mile bike ride will be a part of the evening session of activities. The BBQ reception is open to all for a cost of $25, and will include BBQ chicken, pulled pork sandwiches, hot dogs, corn on the cob, fruit and fresh vegetables, and beverages. The Snake Brothers will provide music and entertainment throughout the evening. Participants registered in the run, ride or walk are invited to the BBQ for just an additional $10. At the reception, a number of donated items will be part of a silent auction. Highlights include: a Patrick Dempseyautographed race car panel from the Dempsey Racing Mazda RX-8 driven during the Rolex 24 At Daytona and tickets to Philadelphia Phillies games, including seats in the Hall of Fame Club. The event will end with a candlelight walk, with participants walking in honor of cancer survivors or in memory of loved ones. The Barbara Cook Run-Ride-Walk for Cancer was named for Millville resident and community leader Barbara Cook, who died of pancreatic cancer in 2008 after a courageous fight. She was well known for her philanthropy, fitness resolve, community involvement, county and local board contributions, effervescent personality and beaming smile. She was, along with her husband Marty, an avid race fan and co-owner of Quality Lincoln-Mercury-Hyundai, the “official rental car of New Jersey Motorsports Park.” For Every Woman’s Imaging Needs, We’re Here For You When your physician orders an ultrasound or DEXA scan, South Jersey Healthcare has five area locations to serve you. And now each location features digital mammography for a faster and more accurate diagnosis. But that’s not all we offer. With overlapping services, no matter what type of imaging your doctor requests—CT, MRI, fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, interventional radiology, or just a general x-ray—our state-of-the-art technology and the region’s largest and most experienced radiology group will accurately report the results to your doctor in a timely manner. So when you need a digital mammogram, DEXA scan, or any other radiology services, look to South Jersey Healthcare. We’re here for you. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Call our appointment line: 1-866-SJH-APPT www.SJHealthcare.net the grapevine { 9 } SJH Regional Medical Center • SJH Elmer Hospital • SJH Bridgeton Imaging SJH Millville Imaging • SJH Hammonton Imaging St. Padre Pio Continued from page 1 “It was my grandfather, Marco Smaniotto, his brother, Peter [Pietro], his brother-in-law, Bartolo Smaniotto and Dionsio Dallago” who got together to discuss the idea of building a church, Joe Smaniotto said. Before Our Lady of Pompeii Church was built, all the Catholics in that area traveled by foot or buggy to St. Mary’s to go to Mass. It was a distance of at least two miles. In the summer, it might not have been that bad a trip, but it could be grueling in the winter. At Mass on July 12, Saporito told the congregation that it simply wasn’t true that Our Lady of Pompeii Church was built because of conflict between the Italians at St. Mary’s and the Italians who wanted a parish on their end of the community. That is just “nonsense,” the priest said. And Joe Smaniotto couldn’t agree more. It was his grandfather, Marco, who donated the land for the church. “It was a matter of distance,” he said. “You hear lots of stories, but it was just too far [to travel] and, I think, they wanted their own parish, too.” At 100 years old, Mary Galante, stood Before Our Lady of Pompeii Church was built, all the Catholics in that area traveled by foot or buggy to St. Mary’s to go to Mass. collected from the faithful. The bishop appointed Rev. Edward C. Griffin to look into this matter of constructing a new church. On August 3, 1908, the actual construction began, and on July 5, 1909, the church was finally completed and was blessed and dedicated to Our Lady of the Rosary of Pompeii. From that point on, the church began to grow in congregants and expand its physical plant. Among the first efforts of the first pastor, Father Agnello Santagnello, was the construction of a small four-room rectory, paid for and built by the parishioners. Out of his own pocket, Santagnello paid $150 for one acre of land to be used for a cemetery. This purchase took place on August 29, 1909, making the cemetery almost as old as the church. In the proclamation presented by as she was applauded for being the church’s oldest parishioner. But it’s Catherine Flaim, who will turn 97 in November, who has the distinction of being the church’s longest-registered parishioner. She was unable to attend the celebration because of health reasons, but said in a telephone interview: “I’ve been a member all my life.” She received all her sacraments, raised her family in Our Lady of Pompeii Church and continues to hold great affection for it. “It was just something about the way we grew up in the church,” she said, agreeing that it was always a warm and welcoming place. According to church history, the four farmers elected a committee to approach Bishop James A. McFaul, in Trenton, and ask for his permission to start collecting money toward a new church. Recounting the story at Mass, Saporito said: “I think the bishop looked at them and said, ‘Yeah, right.’ He told them, ‘You get the money,’ all the time saying to himself, ‘They’re only farmers; they’ll never get the money.’ Boy, was he wrong.” Within three years, $1,417.96 had been Come see what happens when rock star and teenage heartthrob Conrad Birdie gets drafted, the nation’s teenagers go haywire and Conrad’s songwriter, Albert, faces unemployment! Plenty of laughs and songs, including Put On A Happy Face, Lot Of Livin’ To Do, and the parents’ lament What’s The Matter with Kids Today?, have made this classic Broadway show a memorable musical. Directed by Broadway veteran and CCC favorite Deborah Bradshaw. { 10 } the grapevine | JULY 22, 2009 Mortgage rates are now the lowest in decades! Newfield National Bank offers various mortgage options along with knowledgeable professionals for a stress-free experience. Dial 1-800-690-3440 extension 1107 or 1108 to talk to your hometown mortgage professional. Friday, July 24th at 8:00 Saturday, July 25th at 2:00 th Saturday, July 25 at 8:00 Sunday, July 26th at 3:00 $12 for Adults, $8 for 55 & over, $8 for under 18. This event is RESERVED SEATING Call (856) 692-8499 or stop by for tickets! Tuesday,Thursday, Friday 10 – 2 & Wednesday 10 – 7 Cumberland County College Fine & Performing Arts Center Member FDIC Mortgage Center 12 North West Blvd., Newfield NJ 08344 1-800-690-3440 x1107 or 1108 www.newfieldbank.com Romano on behalf of the city, he recounted some other key points in the history of the church. The construction of the Our Lady of Lourdes Grotto in 1938, which became a pilgrimage destination for many faithful in and out-ofstate; Mount Calvary, the outdoor stations, in 1946, the social hall in 1958 and the new church building in 1968. The congregation grew from 89 families in 1910 to 497 in 2002. In presenting the city proclamation to Saportio, Romano said, Our Lady of Pompeii “continues to be one of the leading churches” in the city and “this proclamation is a testament to the high esteem” in which this church is held in the City of Vineland I The committee that organized the 100th Anniversary of the first Mass at Our Lady of Pompeii Church, from left: Monsignor John Clarke, Joan Richmond, Father Peter Saporito, Laurie LaTorre, Linda Tieman and Father Gerald Anthony. 1853 Vine Rd. Vineland 691-4848 Fax: 856-691-2294 marcaccimeats@verizon.net Specials For July 22-25 EBT AVERAGE (3-3.5 LBS) CHICKEN FRESH HAMS AVERAGE (20-25 LB) WHOLE LEAN BEEF CUBES .99 ¢ lb. .99 1 ¢ $ 69 lb. 2 lb. T BONE STEAKS $ 99 $ 59 $ 99 FRESH CUT Come in and check out our great selections and prices on all your Bar B Q Meats! 5 BONE BREAKFAST IN SAUSAGE PORK LINKS LOIN lb. lb. WHOLE FRESH lb. 1 Salon Fabrojae’ Tuesday, August 4th 12:00 – 4:00 pm Join Us At For A Book Signing DR. JOHN MAINIERO Everything’s Okay by Alesia Shute (former owner of Sweetwater Casino) Everything’s Okay is a triumphant and endearing story of survival after being diagnosed with cancer at the age of 7. Alesia’s story details not only her recovery, but also her struggles through school, boys, marriage, and pregnancy with some hilarious tales of business to boot. www.everythingsokaybook.com Affordable CHIROPRACTIC CARE WE ACCEPT ALL HEALTH INSURANCES NO INSURANCE NEEDED! NO REFERRAL NEEDED! WALK-INS WELCOME. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Purchase the Book & Receive a $15 Gift Certificate to Salon Fabrojae! All of the proceeds from the sale of the book will go to the grapevine { 11 } AND WELLNESS CENTER 691-5900 1420 S. Lincoln Ave. • Vineland, NJ 08360 www.doctormainiero.com c o n c e p t s a lo n Statue of Liberty Continued from page 1 this year, that he would be working to bolster that symbolic icon. “When I told my parents, my mom cried,” Popeskic says. “It was an honor to work on it.” As a fabricator/installer at Southern New Jersey Steel Company, the Glendora resident was sent to work in the Statue last month. According to company owner Hugh McCaffrey, Southern New Jersey Steel “was contacted by the general contractor for the Life and Safety Improvements within the Statue of Liberty project to supply additional technical manpower to support his steel subcontractor in order to meet the pending July Fourth deadline,” when there was to be a dedication and celebration at Liberty Island. “We were able to supply him with three shop fabricators who had the technical expertise to work in his subcontractor’s fabrication facility in northern New Jersey,” says McCaffrey. “Our men were able to supplement the subcontractor’s crew by helping operate the rail form- Anton Popeskic, left, and Carlo Gentiletti worked at the base of the Statue of Liberty last month. ing/bending equipment along with providing the proper welding and polishing for the stainless steel railings that were being installed to the crown of the statue.” According to the National Park Service website, the tragedy of September 11, 2001 resulted in the closure of Liberty Island. The island re-opened after 100 days, but the Statue remained closed until August 3, 2004. Until July 4, 2009, the pedestal level Statue Stats • The Statue of Liberty was a gift from the people of France in recognition of the friendship established between the two countries during the American Revolution. • Artist Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi, known for large-scale work, was commissioned to design the sculpture. Bartholdi recruited French engineer Alexandre Gustave Eiffel to build a skeleton for his statue. • Eiffel designed a massive iron pylon and secondary skeletal framework that allows the Statue’s copper skin to move independently—yet stand upright. This flexibility is needed to allow the Statue to sway in the sometimes violent harbor winds. • The 25 windows in the crown symbolize gemstones and heaven’s rays shining over the world. • The seven rays of the crown represent the seven seas and continents of the world. • Lady Liberty’s face is said to be modeled after the sculptor’s mother. • The Statue gets struck by lightning many times each year. • The Statue of Liberty was dedicated in 1886, designated as a National Monument in 1924 and restored for its centennial on July 4, 1986. • The Statue’s original torch was the first part constructed in 1876. In 1984 it was replaced by a new copper torch covered in 24K gold leaf that is lighted by floodlight at night. The original torch is currently located in the lobby of the monument. Access to the torch has been closed since 1916. Source: National Park Service was the highest point visitors could access. “The project was very difficult to fabricate,” says McCaffrey, “because of the tight twisting conditions that had to be achieved to fit people properly into the narrow space. There are not many steel fabricators who have this expertise and we felt privileged that we were the company they contacted to help them.” Anthony Bertonazzi, Stan Murray and Daryl Gould are the three workers who worked at the northern New Jersey Fabricators facility. Bertonazzi, from East Vineland, is from a farm family that traces its American roots back a few generations. He worked for a week and a half last month in the northern New Jersey shop, agrees that building and welding the handrails was difficult work, due to “the pitch and radius of the stairs. There was nothing typical about it,” he says. “It was very tight, to get everything to fit.” McCaffrey says: “We also provided two field personnel to help cut and install a new hatch opening in the existing base of the statue for entry. This work was also very difficult since you had to try to achieve this work without penetrating the original framework of the Statue. There was a federal inspector who monitored every move of this process to ensure that { 12 } the grapevine | JULY 22, 2009 west40autodetailing.vpweb.com Auto Detailing & Headlight Restora on WEST 40 Curves Works. So you can get more out of your summer. At Curves, our 30-minute circuit works every major muscle group and you can burn up to 500 calories. All with a trainer to teach and motivate. JOIN NOW, REST OF SUMMER ON US* * Offer based on first visit enrollment, minimum 12 mo.c.d. program. Discount applies to monthly dues. Service Fee paid at time of enrollment. New members only. not valid with any other offer. Valid only at participating locations through 08/29/09. © 2009 Curves International, Inc. (856) 305-2884 curves.com OVER 10,000 LOCATIONS WORLDWIDE 2205 S Delsea Dr St 6 Franklinville, NJ 08322 856-694-2141 597-3 Shiloh Pike Bridgeton, NJ 08302 856-453-4700 this was completed properly.” Popsekic performed that work in the Statue. He defined his work as more “meticulous” than it was difficult, as he worked two nighttime shifts “at the feet of the Statue.” Carlo Gentiletti, a former co-owner of Southern New Jersey Steel, was by Popsekic’s side, providing field supervision. In 1953 at age 13, he emigrated to America from Italy. “It’s the American dream,” Gentiletti says, to have come to the States as a teenager, settle in Vineland and become a business owner, then to have that business entrusted to do important work on a landmark such as the Statue of Liberty. I Bring a friend and share the fun $ After $100 mail-in rebate 49 Only 99 Buy one, get one FREE! ® BlackBerry Curve 8330 smartphone BlackBerry Curve™8330 smartphone Buy one BlackBerry Curve 8330 smartphone for only $49.99 after $100 Buy one BlackBerry ® Curve™ 8330 smartphone for only $49.99 after $100 v mail-in rebate and get second one FREE after $100 mail-in rebate and mail-in rebate and get a second one FREE after $100 mail-in rebate and $49.99 in-store rebate. $49.99 in-store rebate. Requires new line of service and two-year agreement and BlackBerry Requires new line of service and two-year agreement and a BlackBerry ® data plan. Handset pricing varies by Sprint Authorized Rep. and may be subject to Handset pricing varies by Sprint Authorized Rep. and may be subject to add’l req. See store for details. See store for details. If You Go… Planning ahead is essential to making the most of your visit to the Statue of Liberty. Here is information you’ll need to prepare for and plan your visit. • Ticket Reservation System: Reserve tickets to the pedestal, crown and Liberty Island from Statue Cruises. Choose which visit fits your schedule and interests, then call 1-877-LADY-TIX or book tickets online at www.statue cruises.com. • Be aware that the climb to the crown is a strenuous 354 steps in a cramped enclosed area with high temperatures. The steps are 19 inches wide, are shallow and taper at one end. Head clearance is 6 feet 2 inches. Children must be at least 4 feet tall. • Visitors to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island must pass through security screening (similar to airport security) before boarding the ferry system and entering the monument. There can be wait times at these screening areas. • Access to the crown is limited to 10 people at a time. • The Statue will be open for the next two years, then closed for “work…that will improve safety and security permanently,” according to the U.S. Department of the Interior. • Get all your questions answered at http://www.nps.gov/stli/planyourvisit • • • • • • • • • Personal Corporate Email Personal & Corporate Email Text Instant Messaging Text & Instant Messaging Internet Web Access Internet Web Access Built-in GPS Built-in GPS Camera & Video Recorder Camera Video Recorder Bluetooth Capabilities Bluetooth ® Capabilities Sprint TV Sprint TV ® & Music Premier Media Player Media Playe – Video & Audio Player Organizer – Calendar, Task & Notes Organizer C $ 69 99 /per month Everything Data 450 Unlimited Texting, Picture & Video Unlimited Data Service Unlimited Direct Connect Email & Web Surfing GPS Navigation 450 Anytime Minutes Free Mobile to Mobile Unlimited Night & Weekend Starting at 7pm Nationwide Long Distance & No Roaming Vineland Vineland 622 E. 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Up to $200 early termination fee/line applies. Phone Offer: Offer ends 9/7/09. While supplies last. Taxes and services charges May require up to a $36 activation fee/line, credit approval & deposit. Up to $200 early termination fee/line applies. Phone Offer: Offer ends 9/7/09. While supplies last. Taxes and services charges excluded. No cash back. Requires activation at the time of purchase. Data plan required on all active BlackBerry handsets. Voice & data may be purchased separately. Calls made without a voice plan: excluded. No cash back. Requires activation at the time of purchase. Data plan required on all active BlackBerry handsets. Voice data may be purchased separately. Calls made without voice plan: airtime (0.20/min.) plus long distance ($0.20/min.). Mail-in Rebate: Requires purchase by 9/7/09 & activation by 9/21/09. Line must be active 30 consecutive days. Allow 10 to 14 weeks for rebate. Simply airtime (0.20/min.) plus long distance ($0.20/min.). Mail-in Rebate: Requires purchase by 9/7/09 activation by 9/21/09. Line must be active 30 consecutive days. Allow 10 to 14 weeks for rebate. Simply Everything Plan: Offer ends 9/7/09. Premium content/downloads (games, ringers, songs, certain channels, etc.) are add’l charge. Text to 3rd parties to participate in promotions or other may result in Everything Plan: Offer ends 9/7/09. Premium content/downloads (games, ringers, songs, certain channels, etc.) are add’l charge. Text to 3rd parties to participate in promotions or other may result in f add’l charges. Sprint Music Premier includes select radio channels and access to $0.99 song downloads. Sprint TV Premier includes select channels. See sprint.com/tvguide for channel information. add’l charges. Sprint Music Premier includes select radio channels and access to $0.99 song downloads. Sprint TV Premier includes select channels. See sprint.com/tvguide for channel information. 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WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the grapevine { 13 } Landscaping • Lawn Cutting • Fertilizing Garden Center • Mushroom Compost Mulch • Top Soil • Fill Dirt • Stone Irrigation Repairs & Installation • Pool Sand Snow Removal • Winter Salt in Bulk Home Garden and Volunteers Help Prepare Club’s Community Garden The Boys & Girls Club of Vineland was able to kick-off Phase One of its Community Garden (Project GROW) recently with the help of a number of volunteers. The Community Garden is an effort by the Club and community groups to provide a place where people can grow flowers, vegetables and herbs all in a “community” spirit. Thanks to the City of Vineland, the Club will be able to turn an eyesore of a vacant lot next to the Carl Arthur Recreation Center into a viable gardening space. This project is a great way to get both children and adults involved in beautifying the neighborhood community while working with nature. Funding for the Community Garden was provided by Cumberland County Improvement Authority and The Home Depot. Pictured in bottom photo are community garden volunteers, from left: Karen Bush (Progresso Quality Foods), Sue McKenna (4-H Club), Boys & Girls Club board member John Asselta (Progresso Quality Foods), Joe Flannery (Master Gardeners), Lisa Giberson (Rich Foods), Boys & Girls Club board member Mayra Delivery Available United Lawn L.L.C. 41 S. Wade Blvd. Millville, NJ 08332 856-327-3212 • Fax: 856-293-9588 • Kitchens • Bathrooms • Flooring • Ceramic Tile • Carpets Check Out Our New Location 571 N.E. Blvd. Vineland, NJ Your Dream Kitchen Can Be A ordable! 856-692-0050 Cannot be combined with any other o er or specials Exp: 8/22/09 10% OFF ANY PURCHASE { 14 } the grapevine | JULY 22, 2009 CRABTREE’S LANDSCAPING And Turf Management Beautifying the outside since 1989 Serving Vineland, Millville & Bridgeton Areas COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL OVER 2 0 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE! Total Landscape Renovations In-ground Irrigation Systems Sodding, Mulching, Hydroseeding Waterfalls & ponds 856.875.0774 Think Green at Eco Day Discover educational and fun ways for people of all ages to be friendly to the environment and to “think green” at Eco Day, part of the Fresh and Specialty Foods Market in downtown Vineland this Saturday, July 25. See a composting unit be demonstrated by the Cumberland County Improvement Authority. Kids can participate in art projects using recycled materials. Get a free Eco Bag from the market vendors, while supplies last. “With the big push on now to use green technology and to be environmentally friendly, we want to show how easy and fun it can be,” said Stephen Wilson, chairperson of the Vineland Downtown Improvement District (VDID)/Main Street Vineland’s Green Landis Subcommittee. “There will be something at Eco Day for the whole family.” The Fresh and Specialty Foods Market, sponsored by VDID/Main Street Vineland and Sun National Bank, runs from 8 a.m. to noon each Saturday through August 15. Vendors sell fresh fruits and vegetables and various crafters and other exhibitors will be on hand. You can also cast your vote, every week of the Market, in the Little Miss & Mister Cherry Tomato photo contest. The winner will be crowned at the International Food & Cultural Festival on Saturday, August 22, and will ride in the Holiday Parade on November 28. All the proceeds will go toward downtown revitalization. The trolley will shuttle between Kidston Towers and Walmart, providing free transportation for anyone going to the Market. For more information on this and all VDID/Main Street Vineland events, call the VDID/Main Street Vineland office at 794-8653 or visit the organization’s website at www.mainstreetvineland.org. 10th ANNUAL POND TOUR How to Hire a Lawn Care Company Source: Rutgers Extension Services. Nicholas Polanin, Somerset County Agricultural Agent; Pedro Perdomo, Morris County Agricultural Agent; William T. Hlubik, Middlesex County Agricultural Agent; and Martha Maletta, Hunterdon County Horticultural Consultant Homeowners have increasingly turned to lawn maintenance companies to provide lawn mowing, fertilizing, and pest control services. Because there are so many companies listed in the phonebook, this factsheet is intended to help inform consumers on the best strategies in choosing a knowledgeable and professional lawn care company. Perez (Rich Foods), Viola Carson (Rutgers Extension-Master Gardeners), Terry Everwine (Rich Foods), and Club member Hazel Negron. Club members and brothers Tony and Justin Valerio also helped with placing the first of several durable plastic gardening beds for the garden and plan to make it a regular project. Photos by Chris Volker Dougherty’s is your pond specialist. Save the Date July 25, 2009 Continued on next page All Annuals, Patio Planters & Hanging Baskets Summer Sale PONDS ON PARADE! See the most unique ponds in South Jersey Dougherty’ Home & Garden s Showplace Tour We Have Everything You Need To Beautify Your Backyard! EVERY THURSDAY IN JULY Mandevillas on Sale Plus w/Coupon take additional $4.00 OFF $5.00 OFF exp. 07/26/09 Reg. Price Saturday, July 25, 2009 $20.00 per person or $30 per couple All proceeds benefit the ARC of Glouceser County WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Receive 25% Off Your Entire purchase! (IN-STOCK ONLY) EXCLUDING SALES & SPECIALS Rose of Sharon Trees $ Growers Of Quality Plants For All Your Gardening Needs • Time: 9am-3pm Open house format • Maps available at start of tour • Lunch courtesy of our sponsors 20.00 (WHILE SUPPLIES LAST) EXCLUDING SALES & SPECIALS MONDAY TO FRIDAY 9am – 5pm SATURDAY 9am – 3pm • Gift Cards Available • SEPERS RETAIL CENTER 1114 W. Weymouth Road Newfield, NJ 08344 Hanging Baskets • Bedding Plants • Garden Decorations • Flowering Shrubs • Soils • Mulches, and much more! 470 N. Union Rd. East Vineland (between Oak Rd. & Landis Ave.) Mon. – Sat. 8am-6pm Sun. 9am-5pm Wide Selection Of Old Time Favorites & The Newest Varieties 20% off Any Plant Purchase Call now to register at 694-1216 Grown & Sold Here the grapevine { 15 } 856-696-4220 All Major Credit Cards Accepted 856-691-7881 www.cmgrowers.com Cannot be combined with any other coupon. (Before Taxes) Must present coupon. of $25.00 or more. exp. 07/26/09 3086 DELSEA DRIVEFRANKLINVILLE, NJ 08322 856-694-1216 www.doughertygardens.com Home Garden and BRICK 1 BLOCK 1 PAVERS 1 SAND STONE 1 CEMENT 1 LIME 1 MULCH 3.5% H SALES TAX MULCAL SPEBCIn Mulch d ro w SINCE 1950 Continued from preceding page INVESTING TIME BEFORE MONEY Once it is determined that a lawn care service is needed, you must establish what kind of lawn is desired. The “perfect lawn” and even the “near perfect lawn” require higher inputs of fertilizer, water, and pesticides. These “high-input” lawns can sometimes pose unnecessary environmental risks. Are you willing to compromise “perfect” for a nice lawn with a weed or two? Will you accept the potential for some insect damage for fewer pesticide applications? It helps to become an educated consumer. Learning the basics of lawn care before beginning the company selection process will provide you with adequate information to talk knowledgeably with lawn service professionals. Most aspects of residential lawn care are covered by a series of Rutgers Cooperative Research & Extension fact sheets that have been written with the “do-it-yourself” homeowner in mind. In addition to covering what to do, they explain the reasoning behind the components of lawn care. MATCHING SERVICES TO YOUR NEEDS Learning about the various aspects of lawn maintenance—soil testing, fertilizing, liming, seeding, dethatching, weed and other pest control—can help determine which lawn care services will be required from contractors. Some people may only desire lawn mowing or fertilizing and liming, while others may need a more complete service that includes pest control, core aeration, dethatching, and seeding. Determine what your expectations are for your lawn and its care, and identify a company that can match their services to your needs. To hire a lawn care service, develop a short list of companies that provide the services desired. Ask relatives, friends, and neighbors for referrals. Then set up appointments to discuss your needs and find out how the company can meet them. A company representative should visit the site to assess needs. The more extensive the number of services to be contracted, the more extensive the interview needs to be and the more questions that need to be asked. Consider the following questions and topics: GENERAL READY MIXED CONCRETE Precious Stones • Does the service company recognize that all lawns are not the same and have different requirements based on sun/shade, soil texture, and grasses grown? For example, maintenance of a zoysia lawn is different than mainte- 856-692-8650 08360 1969 South East Avenue • Vineland, NJ { 16 } the grapevine | JULY 22, 2009 redded Triple Sh .00 cu. yd $20 d ed Black Mulch ed Triple Shr 0 cu. yd $28.0 $12.00 a ton Top Soil The McGowan family was at the Crape Myrtle seminar at Dougherty’s Nursery in Franklinville last week, having read about it in The Grapevine a few days beforehand. Here are the McGowans (John McGowan, Nathaniel, Anna Lise, Celina, and Max, who is deaf, signing fish) with their favorite dark purple Crape Myrtle. Marita McGowan of Vineland, who sent in the photo, said, “We had a great time, learned a lot about our favorite summer flowering tree and enjoyed the smoothies and pretzels.” Turn Your Dreams Into Reality! Turn Your Dreams Into Reality! Largest Selection of Stone & Mulch in South Jersey! We Carry a Full Line of E.P. Henry Products • Riverock – Various Sizes • Driveway Stone PICK & DEL UP • Screened Top Soil IVERY • Mulch – Various Varieties Homeowners Spring Special! G AROPPO STONE & GARDEN CENTER IN BUSINESS OVER 35 YEARS! REFILL YOUR PROPANE HERE! 10% OFF Your EP HENRY PURCHASE! One coupon per customer. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. Exp. 8/15/09 1200 Harding Highway (Rt. 40), Newfield • www.garoppos.com • (856) 697-4444 nance of a bluegrass or tall fescue lawn. • Does the company offer exactly the same program to all clients? • Does it offer the option of a reduced fertilizer or pesticide-free program? • Does the company offer both liquid and granular formulations for needed pest control or fertilizer applications? FERTILITY yourself, will the company provide written guidance on practices such as watering and mowing? • Many lawn problems can be complex and difficult to solve. How does the company handle a persistent problem? Does the company offer any guarantees? RESEEDING, OVERSEEDING, AND RENOVATION • Does the service suggest or require a soil test for pH (acidity) and nutrient levels initially, then every three or four years? Limestone is often a necessary input, and needed amounts can’t be known without first performing a pH test. Soil testing is also the only way to determine phosphorus and potassium levels (fertilizer components) and the appropriate fertilizer analysis needed. • How is the fertilizer program determined? Nitrogen application rates should be based on maintenance practices such as irrigation, clipping removal, grass species, and site conditions. • When does the company apply fertilizer? Research has shown that cool-season lawns benefit from a fertilizer program that provides most of the required nitrogen in late summer and fall. • Is a limited fertilizer program offered for shaded lawns or low maintenance lawns or a summer-only fertilizer program offered for zoysia lawns? PEST CONTROL • What steps does the company recommend in improving a lawn? Does the company offer renovation and/or seeding services? • Does the lawn care company take time to diagnose the overall situation? For example, insects and disease can cause thinning of lawns and may need to be controlled with the use of pesticides. However, the thinning may also be due to poor light quality that can be alleviated with the use of a shade tolerant grass species. Maintenance of a zoysia lawn is different than maintenance of a bluegrass or tall fescue lawn. • Does the company use high quality, pest resistant cultivars appropriate to the growing conditions whenever seeding or reseeding a lawn? • Will the company recommend the use of alternative groundcovers in areas where the shade is too dense for an adequate lawn or where a slope is too severe for mowing and maintenance? • If you are reseeding the lawn, will the company work with you and alter its weed control practices so that the young grass isn’t damaged or killed? In addition to lawn care practices, you should also ask questions about the business in general: • How is the control program—for weeds, insects, or diseases—determined? Is it based on the particular situation of each lawn or is it a generic program that applies pesticides whether or not there is a problem, such as on a calendarbased schedule? • Are spot treatments for pests offered, or are applications always made to the entire lawn? • What resources does the company have or use for problem diagnosis? • Is an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) approach used that assesses problems in the context of all aspects of the lawn’s care? Does a qualified representative monitor the lawn for problems? • If you are doing some maintenance —How long have they been in business? —What are the management and staff qualifications or areas of expertise? —For pesticide applicator services, is the business registered with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) as an applicator business? —Is the company insured? Documentation can be requested. —Will they provide customer references for recent work? —Do they participate in professional organizations? —Are they a NJ Certified IPM Provider? Have their employees received training in Integrated Pest Management? Does the management check employee work? If the lawn care company will be applying pesticides for insect, disease, or weed control they must by law have a valid NJ Pesticide Applicator Business License, employ Licensed Applicators or Registered Operators, and provide the consumer with a written notification or copy of: • Proposed date(s) of application. • Brand name(s) of the pesticide(s) to be used and, if available, the common chemical name of the active ingredients. • The label instructions that relate to the customer or general public safety. • A Consumer Information Sheet that includes the name, address, and telephone number of the applicator business, telephone numbers of the NJ Department of Environmental Protection, National Pesticide Hotline (Oregon), and the NJ Poison Information and Education System. Hiring a Lawn Care Company Once a company has been selected, a written agreement that fully describes the services, materials to be supplied, and the costs and payment schedule should be decided. The agreement should include timing of services where relevant. If additional services or materials are needed during the life of the contract, there should be a written statement regarding customer approval for additional services and charges. I Scotti Brothers Roofing & Siding Quality 1st Since 1986 • “FREE” Power Washing with complete roof system • “FREE” Garage Door with new vinyl siding Tom’s Cell: (856) 498-4841 John’s Cell: (609) 381-4289 FREE ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED www.ScottiBrosInc.com LOSE 9 lbs. in 9 days! Reduce Impurities From the Body & Lose Weight rough Nutritional Cleansing! WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Why Detox? Have you ever asked yourself these questions? • Why am I always tired? • Why don’t I have energy? • Why do I crave sweets? • Why can’t I lose weight? • Why do I feel depressed? • Why am I always hungry? Getting Divorced? Bonnie L. Laube, Esq. Greenblatt & Laube, PC Divorce, Separation, Custody, Child Support, Parenting Time, Alimony, Asset Distribution, Emancipation, Domestic Violence Certi?ed by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Civil Trial Attorney 9+ Acres Available To Plant or Farm Call Mehmet, (856) 691-4848 ATTEND A FREE on 5 Secrets to PERMANENT WEIGHT LOSS Tuesday, July 28th at 7 p.m. Cyber Spot on 610 East Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08360 Seating is limited to the ?rst 20 callers! Make your reservation today! COMMUNITY WORKSHOP Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. the grapevine { 17 } 856-691-0424 • email: bll@greenblattlaube.com 200 North Eighth Street • PO Box 883 • Vineland, NJ 08362 All major credit cards accepted CALL (856) 691-1313 I Culinary Adventures { STEPHEN WILSON | PHOTOS: JILL McCLENNEN } Pageant Wagon Productions 5th Anniversary Old Fashioned Melodrama Summer Family Theatre presents or “The Villain Vaudevillian” by Kathryn Ross with The Pageant Wagon Players SHOWSTOPPERS AT STARR’S THEATRICAL EMPORIUM Feasting on Seafood Whether you dine at the Seafood Festival or more intimately with close friends, seafood in summer is always the right choice. s I sit here listening to the band play on the stage set up on Landis Avenue for the 2nd annual Seafood Festival, my belly is full of crabcake sandwich, clams Italiano, and tuna tacos. Yum. It happened last year, too. There are so many delicious options, and I didn’t get to try everything. It’s so nice to see all these people downtown as well, eating and drinking and having a good time. As I walked by the booth that housed Dad’s Seafood (their crabs looked awesome), I was reminded of a dinner that I had a few weeks ago. Jill and I and the rest of the Sweet Life crew (and friends) were down at the Jersey Shore, and we had a big feast. It took much planning, as any good feast does, and the planning started several days beforehand, when I made a menu, then a prep list, Grilled squash complements the seafood. July 30-31, August 1, 2009 Eves. @ 7:00pm – Saturday Matinee @1:30pm At the Calvary Chapel Playhouse – 930 N. Main Road, Vineland (just south of Oak) All Singing – All Dancing – All Comedy & Chaos! Plus Clementine’s “Just Desserts Bar”! Tickets: $10 Adults, $7 Senior Citizens, $5 Children under 12 • Group Rates Available Call 856 205-9334 for tickets and information A Sponsored in part by: Vineland Downtown Improvement District/Main Street, Calvary Chapel Vineland, Colonial Bank, FSB, Newfield National Bank, The Sweet Life Bakery, Quality Printing, Cumberland Christian School, The Sweet Tooth, Sweetpea’s Children’s Consignment Shoppe, Auctions by Mesiano, LLC, and the Robert S. Greenberg Law Office. Experience The Difference RESTAURANT • LOUNGE • BAKERY ! NOW OPEN Gourmet Lunches & Dinners Take Outs & Package Goods SERVING THE FOOD YOU LOVE IN A VERY DIFFERENT WAY. Milmay Tavern has Sunday Breakfast Buffet 8am-2pm • Starting July 26th Serving Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner “foodFood • Better Prices with flavor” Better DUNGENESS CRAB { 18 } the grapevine | JULY 22, 2009 Take Out Available SPECIAL $9.95 Tuckahoe Road & Millville-Mays Landing Road, Milmay N.J. Chuck Boone Band Saturday, July 25 Monday-Friday 3-6pm Reduced Drinks Appetizers Join Us For Happy Hour Try Our Fabulous Cakes And Treats From Our 3513 Delsea Drive • Vineland • 856-765-5977 • Fax 856-825-0707 Major Credit Cards Accepted • Gift Certificates Available Hours: 10 am – 2 am Mon.-Fri. • 8 am-2 pm Sat. & Sun. Bakery (609)476-3611 Open 6 days 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Closed Monday a shopping list, and a list of all the equipment I’d need to bring with me to use in an unfamiliar kitchen. Henry suggested a seafood feast and I thought that seemed appropriate for the shore. I don’t usually cook seafood, but I know that the place to go for seafood is Dad’s on Delsea Drive. Since it was going to be the Fourth of July weekend, I stopped in a few days beforehand to see what would be available for pick-up on the Fourth. Crabs were something we would have to have, so I knew that I’d want a few dozen. Unfortunately, I was told that they had been having some problems with their crab purveyor, and there was no guarantee that crabs would be in on the Fourth. So I ordered some other goodies—clams, mussels, scallops, shrimp—and planned to pick up more of them if the crabs weren’t in. Luckily, the crabs arrived for the Fourth, so I picked up several dozen freshly cleaned crabs from Dad’s that morning. Into the cooler they went, along with the other seafood, and we were off to the shore. Brittany and I delivered two wedding cakes before we made it to Ocean City, and Jill arrived from a baby shower about an hour after we did. Everyone else was swim- ming, but I had food on my mind. Jill and I got started on dinner, and the hungry swimmers filtered into the kitchen soon after. The evening began with Prosecco, an Italian sparkling wine. Glasses were poured, and we toasted to good health, good friends and good food. The clams and mussels were rinsed and set aside, as were the blue crabs. Deanne had bought fresh tuna steaks, so Henry dressed the fleshy pink steaks in soy sauce, olive and sesame oils, and black pepper and then fired up the grill outside. Bamboo skewers were soaked in water (to prevent burning on the grill), and then stabbed with alternating scallops and shrimp. A quick drizzle of olive oil and salt and pepper and they were ready for the grill as well. Same went for the bread that I had baked—big chewy, crusty, slightly sour loaves that we cut into thick slices. Jill was in charge of preparing the focal point of the meal, the blue crabs and pasta, and she did it wonderfully. A bunch of fresh parsley went into a blender, along with copious amounts of olive oil. Several heads of fresh garlic that I had harvested from my garden were added, as was salt and pepper, a little Adobo seasoning and just a little Old Bay (not like Maryland-style, where all you Best Pizza in Town taste is Old Bay). Everything got a quick pulse in the blender, enough to puree it all together, and then went into a large hot stockpot where the oil cooked the seasonings and filled the kitchen with a heavenly aroma. A few bottles of beer went into the pot, and then the mussels and clams. Jill knew they wouldn’t take long, and we were very hungry, so the shellfish became appetizers and disappeared quickly. The crabs went into the pot next and they went from a bright pink color to a cool shade of blue. Spaghetti that had been boiling to al dente in another pot was simultaneously done. At this point, Henry was finishing up the grill duties…fresh sliced squash, the bread, shrimp and scallop skewers, tuna steaks. The other guests had already set the table and opened another bottle of wine. Pitchers of water were put on the table, as was a side salad that had been made, and we were ready to eat. We sat out on the porch and toasted to a good, fresh meal. It was splendid how we all came together to prepare such a feast and how everything came together so well. The food was marvelous. Eating outside as day turned to evening, and sharing such a wonderful meal with such great company was even better. Enough memories of meals gone by, though. The seafood festival is in full swing and there’s a lot of work to be done before the night is through. Tomorrow I can think about seafood meals to come. I Stephen Wilson along with his wife Jill McClennen owns The Sweet Life Bakery. You may contact him via e-mail at thesweetlifebakery@verizon.net. $ Vineland’s neighborhood bakery, where everything is made from scratch and quality counts. Pizza • Subs • Strombolis • Steaks Salads • Dinners YOUR ORDER OF $10 OR MORE With This Coupon Cannot be combined with any other offers Exp. 8/22/09 2 00 OFF WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Route 40 & 47 Malaga, NJ 08328 • 856-694-4474 a 6th street between Landis and Elmer in Downtown Vineland 856-692-5353 www.thesweetlifebakery.com Try our award-winning Chocolate Chip Cookies the best in South Jersey, according to the most recent SJ Magazine annual readers’ poll Graduations, Reunions, BBQ’s, Dinner Parties, Engagements, Weddings, Bar/Bat Mitzvahs, Birthday, Retirement, Teen Parties, Christenings, Showers, Etc. No job too big or small We can accomodate any multi ethnic cuisine including asian, spanish, italian you name it we can make it the grapevine { 19 } over 14 years experience vegan and gluten free 856-692-7473 • Cell 609-247-8341 • Fax 856-692-7664 EATING OUT From fine dining to lunch spots to bakeries, the area has choices to satisfy any appetite. Call for hours. Amato’s Restaurant, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 692-5756. Veal, chicken, seafood, and pasta specialties for dinner. Open for lunch, too. Closed Sundays. Andrea Trattoria, 1833 Harding Hwy., Newfield, 697-8400. Chef/owner Andrea Covino serves up Italian specialties in an atmosphere of fine dining. Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave, Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food served tapas style, specialty martinis, catering, private parties. Extensive wine list. Live music Friday nights. Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-0909. This breakfast and lunch spot offers a menu of sandwiches named for colleges near and far. Bain’s Deli, 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. Come in for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Daily specials include coffee of the day. Barbera’s Chocolates on Occasion, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 690-9998. Homemade chocolates and candies, custom gift baskets. Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees, desserts, drink specials. Take-out, too. Happy Hour buffet Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. NFL flat-screen TVs. Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy., Vineland, 697-5500. Steaks, veal, chicken dishes. Meet friends at the bar. Open daily for lunch and dinner. Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 205-0012. The “Gutbuster” a 21-oz. burger, pizza, salads, wings, subs, dinners. Bojo’s Ale House, 222 N. High St., Millville, 327-8011. All food is homemade, including the potato chips. Casa Dori II, Brewster Rd. and Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 794-1888. Authentic Italian, lunch and dinner; catering available. Continental Room at the Ramada Inn, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 6963800. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Open to hotel guests and the public. Crust N Krumbs Bakery, Main and Magnolia rds., 690-1200. Cakes, pies, cookies, breads, and doughnuts. Custom wedding cakes, too. Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call for lunch and dinner specials. Soft ice cream and cakes year-round. Mon.-Sat 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 696-1900. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Takeout, too. Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. Open 24 hours. Kids eat free Tues. & Sat. Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave., Vineland, 691-5511. Family time-honored recipes, fresh ingredients. Donkey’s Place, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland, 690-1777. One-of-a-kind cheesesteaks made on large, fresh poppyseed rolls. Dreamz Cafe, 2184 Union Lake Crossing, Millville, 765-5029. Panini, sandwiches, salads, soups. Also, gelato, Italian coffee, desserts, smoothies, and frappuccino. Esposito’s Maplewood III, 200 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks, seafood and pasta dishes at this Italian restaurant. Eric’s, 98 S. West Ave., Vineland, 2059800. Greek and American cuisine. Pizza, too. Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. & Tuckahoe Rd., Vineland, 691-6080. Italian cuisine and dinner buffets to savor. Family-owned. Fresh Restaurant, 1405 Mays Landing Rd., Millville, 327-3435. Jumbo lump crabcakes, Black Angus burgers. Wed. is pasta night. Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli, 527 S. Brewster Rd.., 697-3509. Name says it all. Daily specials, catering. Closed Sunday. General Custard’s Last Stand, 2578 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 696-2992. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner served Tues.-Sat. Gina’s Ristorante, 110 N. High St., Millville, 825-4241. Italian cuisine, lunch and dinner, BYOB, nothing over $20. Giorgio’s Restaurant 363 E. Wheat Rd., Buena, 697-2900. Serving lunch and dinner daily. Italian cuisine, pizza. Giovanni’s Italian-American Deli. 1102 N. East Ave., Vineland, 692-0459. Pizza, Italian subs, all your lunch favorites. The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf Course, 4049 Italia Rd., Vineland, 6915558. Restaurant and lounge open to the public for lunch Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Jake’s. 611 Taylor Rd., Franklinville, 6945700. Italian-American, served lakeside. Lunch, dinner, happy hour, Sunday brunch. Joe’s Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-8860. Barbecue and Kosher chickens, homemade sides, catering for all occasions. Kawa Thai & Sushi, 2196 N. Second St. (Rt. 47), Millville, 825-9939. Thai and Japanese cuisine. BYOB. Landicini’s Family Restaurant & Pizzeria Landis and Lincoln aves., Vineland, 6913099. Italian cuisine, gourmet pizza salads. Open for lunch and dinner. Larry’s II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-9001. Three meals daily. Sunday breakfast buffet, early-bird dinners. Library V Restaurant, 206 Rt. 54, Buena, 697-9696. Renowned for prime rib, steaks, seafood, salad bar. Closed Mon. and Tues. La Locanda Pizzeria & Ristorante, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 794-3332. Pasta, veal, chicken. Lunch and dinner. Closed Sunday. Lucia’s Ristorante, 785 W. Sherman Ave., Vineland, 692-0300. Italian fine dining and regional cooking. Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 563-0030. ItalianAmerican cuisine, seafood and veal. Open daily for lunch and dinner, Sunday breakfast buffet. Manny & Vic’s, 1687 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 696-3100. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Manny’s Pizza, 426 N. High St., Millville, 327-5081. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Martino’s Trattoria & Pizzeria, 2614 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 692-4448. Brick oven pizza, risotto, polenta. Three meals daily. Merighi’s Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. Banquet/wedding facility as well as intimate restaurant. Nicky G. Fridays 9 p.m.–midnight. Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s Head rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet lunches and dinners in a casual setting. Moe’s Southwest Grill, 2188 N. 2nd St., Millville, 825-3525. Tex-Mex, burritos, catering. MVP Bar, 408 Wheat Road, Vineland, 697-9825. Full bar menu, live entertainment, drink specials. Neptune Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge, 1554 South Delsea Drive, Vineland, 692-2800. American cuisine, array of cocktails. Next Oar, 127 N. High St., Millville, 2931360. Weekly menu, made-to-order dishes. Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek cuisine—lamb dishes and salads. Paperwaiter Restaurant & Pub, 1111 Village Dr., Millville, 825-4000. A special place for all your special occasions. Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland, 6940500. Breakfast, lunch, dinner specials; convenient drive-thru, mini-meal specials. Pete’s Pizza, 20 W. Park Ave., Vineland, 205-9998. Pizza (including whole wheat), subs, wings. Open daily 11 a.m10 p.m. The Rail, 1252 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-1440. Bar and restaurant with daily drink specials and lunch specials. Richland House, 1303 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-5700. Eclectic dinners and casual lunch fare. Closed Mondays. Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville, 327-8878. Authentic Vietnamese—noodle soups, curry, hotpot, Buddhist vegetarian. Serene Custard, NW Blvd. and Garden Rd., Vineland, 692-1104. Pulled pork, hot dogs, homemade ice cream, party cakes. South Vineland Tavern, 2350 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-7888. Breakfast, lunch, dinner daily. Seafood and prime rib. Steakhouse at Centerton Country Club, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3325. Lunch and dinner. Steaks, reserve wines, upscale casual. Stewart’s Root Beer, 585 Delsea Dr., Vineland, 696-8062. Burgers, hot dogs, fries, floats and shakes. Sweet Life Bakery, 601 East Landis Ave., Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood bakery. Homemade pastries, cakes, coffee. Tony Sopranos, 107 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 405-0200. Pizza, Mexican Southwest fare, Atkins-friendly salads. Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs, chicken, fish, steaks. Always clams, eat in or take out service. Villa Filomena, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena Vista, 697-7107. Dinner combos, grilled meats, fish. Lunch and dinner daily. Wheat Road Cold Cuts, 302 Wheat Rd., Vineland, 697-0320. Deli and catering. Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-8899. Dinners, grilled sandwiches, wings in eight flavors. Willmott’s Pizza. 12 S. Seventh St., Vineland, 696-1525. Hand-tossed pizzas, stromboli, breakfast pizza. Offering Takeout or eat in service. Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville, 3270909. Continental cuisine and spirits served in a casually upscale setting. Ye Olde Centerton Inn, 1136 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3201. American classics served in a building right out of a Rockwell painting. { 20 } the grapevine | JULY 22, 2009 I Recipe Corner { LISA ANN DiNUNZIO } Recipe Swap Muffins are great for breakfast or a mid-day snack. reetings! Whether it’s blueberry, cranberry, lemon, apple cinnamon, banana nut, carrot, pineapple, pumpkin spice or corn, I would choose a homemade muffin any day over the store-bought variety. They are moister, healthier and simply easy to make. Muffins are great for breakfast or a mid-day snack, Just add some bran, wheat germ or flaxseed flakes to your favorite recipe for added fiber and whole grain goodness. You can easily replace milk with soy milk, too, and they taste just as good! I truly am a muffin fanatic, and just thinking about them makes me want to go in the kitchen and stir up a batch right now! This recipe and story was submitted by Alberta Forest, who writes, “I usually In a bowl, combine flour, cornmeal, dry milk powder, sugar, baking powder, salt and baking soda. Add water, butter and eggs, stir until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into 24 greased muffin cups. Bake at 425° for 13-15 minutes. As always, Bon Appetit. I Lisa Ann is the author of Seasoned With Love, Treasured Recipes and Lisa Ann’s Seasoned With Love II. Send recipes for publication to lapd1991@aol.com or to The Grapevine, 3660 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08361. G serve these muffins for a special weekend breakfast along with an egg and cheese casserole. My 5-year-old daughter loves helping me mix all the ingredients in the bowl, and then I spoon them into the muffin cups. We love the warm muffins spread with butter or jam.” Corn Muffins 2 cups all-purpose flour 2 cups yellow cornmeal 1 cup dry milk powder 1/4 cup sugar 2 tbs. baking powder 1 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. baking soda 2 – 2/3 cups water 1/2 cup butter, melted 2 eggs, beaten Since 1957 Custard Strawberry Ice Cream Pies $6.95 9 Non-Fat Sugar Free Flavors Daily 25 Hand Dip Flavors Flavor Burst • Banana Splits Sundaes • Milkshakes • Volcanoes Hotdog & Soda $1.98 • Small Cones $2.20 Low Carb Soft Serve • Water Ice Come Sit Under Our Gazebo Whet Vineland’s Appetite. Get your restaurant noticed by advertising on these dining pages in Help Us In Our Fight Against Cancer WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Open 7 Days • Noon-10pm • 692-2748 1231 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland The Grapevine. Every residence in Vineland receives July 25th, 2009 by participating in and supporting our benefit It’s a full day of events • • • • • 1 and 2-mile fun walks 5K and 10K runs 62, 31 and 8-mile rides Cycling & Sports Expo BBQ Reception featuring the Snake Brothers Band • Auctions and raffles • Awards and prizes The Grapevine… There’s no better way to draw customers into your establishment! Dungeness Crabs Every Wednesday Comes with pasta red or white, salad, garlic bread the grapevine { 21 } $ 4940 Landis Ave• Vineland, NJ 08360 19 99 . Call today for advertising information: 856-457-7815 (856) 691-8051 For more details or to register online: www.njmp.com/RunRideWalk I Entertainment JULY 30, 31, AND AUGUST 1 The Villain Vaudevillian. Calvary Chapel Playhouse, 930 N. Main Rd., Vineland. 7 p.m. and a Saturday matinee at 1:30 p.m. $10, children under 12 $5, senior citizens $7. Tickets may be purchased at the door. 2059334. Hilarity ensues onstage with the Pageant Wagon Players as they celebrate their 5th Annual Melodrama Summer Family Theatre production. Writer/ director Kathryn Ross set the story in a vaudeville theatre of the 1880s when variety stage shows began an effort to appeal to family audiences. The formerly popular bawdy theatres closed in droves as the entertainment industry established a new moral high ground and became the seedbed for the beloved vaudeville. Vaudeville was usurped in popularity by the movie industry in the 1920s and 1930s. Striking dramatic poses during a recent rehearsal is the cast from left top, comedian, David Lord of Goshen, villains, Liz Diaz and Jon-Mark Grussenmeyer of Vineland, frenzied stage manager and music director, Hannah Bradham of Millville, and Jacob Havens of Pittsgrove, song and dance diva Diana Hoffman of Millville, and in the foreground, Bethany Finn and Tim Grussenmeyer, both of Vineland, as heroes Sarah and Tony Starr. Not pictured are Veronica Diaz of Vineland, and pianist Jacob Havens, Pittsgrove. SALUTE TO VAUDEVILLE, SUMMER CONCERTS, OPEN AUDITIONS, NIGHTLIFE, AND HANGAR 84 ROCK SHOWS. THURSDAY, JULY 23 Karaoke Night. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. 7 p.m. $3. JULY 23, 24, AND 25 Nightlife at Villa Filomena. Villa Filomena Ristorante & Lounge, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena, 697-7107. Thurs.: Ladies Night, Fri.: Live music, Sat.: Italian Accordian. JULY 23, 24, AND 25 Nightlife at Bojo’s. 222 N. High St., Millville, 327-8011. Thurs: Ladies Nite with Charlie. Fri: Jonas Brothers Celebration. Sat: Singalong. Sun: Nascar/Baseball. JULY 23, 24, AND 25 Nunsense. Little Theatre, Sherman Ave., Vineland. Cumberland Players presents its summer musical. Cast comprised of local talent. 8 p.m. Tickets $15. 692-5626. FRIDAY, JULY 24 Norman Taylor + Lili Anel. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. 7 p.m. FRIDAY, JULY 24 Tom Moran/Ant Farm. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. 5 p.m./ 7 p.m. Start Fresh Today! Credit Card Debt • Medical Bills Utility Bills • Surcharges And Even Some Income Taxes Stop Wage Executions Reduce Car Payments Free Office Visit-Start Fresh Financially! Want to wipe out your debt? WIPE OUT: WEDNESDAY, JULY 22 John Lolli. Michael Debbi Park, Cedar Ave., Richland. 7 p.m. rain or shine. Free concert. JULY 22, 23, 24, 25, AND 28 Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Wednesday: ’70s and ’80s Throwback Night (frozen drink specials) 8 p.m.midnight, Thursday.: Karaoke with DJ Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday: Blue Moon Dance Party, $3 Blue Moon drafts, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Saturday: Latin Dance Party, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Tuesday: Country Western Dance Party (beer and shot specials), 8 p.m.-midnight. FRIDAY, JULY 24 Thrash and Burn. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland. 9:30 p.m. $10-$12. (frontgatetickets.com). JULY 24 AND 25 Nightlife at Old Oar House. Old Oar House Brewery, 123 N. High St., Millville, 293- AT THE CASINOS HEADLINERS, COMEDY ACTS, AND MORE Tickets: 1-800-736-1420; www.ticketmaster.com unless otherwise noted. STOP SHERIFF SALE COMEDY & MORE Comedy Club at Borgata. Borgata Music Box: three comedians daily, 9 p.m. (except during headliner engagements) 1-800-298-4200. Comedy Stop at the Trop. Three comics nightly. Sun.-Thurs., 9 p.m., $23; Fri., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $23; Sat., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $28. Order tickets by phone at the Comedy Stop Box Office: 1-877-FUNNYAC or 609-348-0920. www.comedystop.com. Fame. Tropicana. Monday and Thursday 8 p.m., Tuesday and Wednesday 3:30 and 8 p.m., Sunday 7 p.m. Yesterday: A Tribute to the Beatles. Tropicana. Liverpool Club Theater in North Tower. Wed.–Sun., 8:30 p.m., $25. THROUGH JULY 26 Beatlemania Now. Bally’s. Wed, Fri, Sun. 8 p.m.; Saturday 8 and 10:30 p.m. $25. BANKRUPTCY IS YOUR LEGAL BAILOUT! Listen to Seymour Wasserstrum Esq. Live on the Radio Every Thursday Night From 8-9 pm on 92.1 FM { 22 } the grapevine | JULY 22, 2009 Helping people wipe out their bills – since 1973 205 Landis Ave., Vineland www.wipeoutyourbillstoday.com $100 OFF w/this ad – CR We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for Bankruptcy Code. THROUGH AUGUST 9 A Bronx Tale. Harrah’s. Tues.-Thurs. 8 p.m., Fri.-Sun. 9 pm. $65, $55, $40. HEADLINERS FRIDAY, JULY 24 The Roots. Borgata. 10 p.m. $49.50. 1-800-298-4200. Hell’s Bells. Hilton. 9 p.m. $15. Mike Epps. Showboat House of Blues. 9 p.m., $69.50, $59.50, $45, $40, $35. THROUGH SEPTEMBER 5 Hypno-Sterical. Trump Marina. Thurs, and Fri. 9 p.m., Sat. 10 p.m. $22.50. Seymour Wasserstrum, Esq. THROUGH SEPTEMBER 6 Carnival of Wonders. Trump Plaza. 8 p.m. Tues., Wed., Thurs., Sat.; 9 p.m. Fri.; 3 and 7 p.m. Sun. $25. SEYMOUR WASSERSTRUM Esq. -Bankruptcy Attorney- SATURDAY, JULY 25 Daniel Tosh. Borgata. 9 p.m. $35. 1800-298-4200. THROUGH SEPTEMBER 6 Cirque Dreams Pandemonia. Taj Mahal. 8 p.m. Wed., Thurs;, 9 p.m. Fri.; 3:30 and 8 p.m. Sat. and Sun. $35 and $25. 856-696-8300 1200. Fri.: Broken Strings, 9 p.m. Sat.: Retrospect, 9 p.m., SATURDAY, JULY 25 Open Mic . Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. Hosted by South Jersey Songwriters. 7 p.m. Varicose • SUNDAY, JULY 26 In High Gear. Bridgeton Riverfront Park, Bridgeton. 7 p.m. Free concert. 453-1675. JULY 26 AND 27 Open Auditions for The Mousetrap. Cumberland Players, Sherman Ave. and the Blvd., Vineland. Director is looking for men and women ages mid 20s to 60s. 7:30 p.m. Callbacks Monday 8 p.m. www.cumberlandplayers.com. Veins • Featured on ? and WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | MONDAY, JULY 27 Buddy Gale Big Band. Giampetro Park Enrico Serra Band Shell, E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 7 p.m. Free concert. Reach Out To The Most Qualified Specialist Minimally Invasive Insurance covered 30 min. Office Treatment Free Vein Screening Call to schedule an appointment MONDAY, JULY 27 Kill Paradise. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland. 6 p.m. $12-$15. (frontgatetickets.com). TUESDAY, JULY 28 Bill Newman and Doctors of Rhythm. Joe Dale Pavilion at Bruno Melini Park, 616 Central Ave., Minotola. 7-9 p.m. All are welcome; bring your own chair. Free concert. WEDNESDAY, JULY 29 The 4 J’s Band Michael Debbi Park, Cedar Ave., Richland. This Band plays all the standards, Sinatra tunes and a variety from the 40’s to the 70’s, plus some newer tunes. 7 p.m. rain or shine. Seating available or bring a lawn chair. Free concert. Charles L. Dietzek, D.O., FACOS Raymond S. Wojtalik, M.D., FACS Voorhees • Sewell • Vineland THURSDAY, JULY 30 Don’t Call Me Francis. Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave., Hammonton, 609-7049797. 9 p.m. Tickets $10. 856.309.VEIN (8346) Specializing in spider and varicose vein treatment THROUGH JULY 30 Picturing America. Vineland Public Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland. Selected works of art spanning several centuries, all by American painters, sculptors, photographers, and architects. 2950 College Dr., Suite 2B, Vineland • www.VeinVascular.com THROUGH JULY 30 The Beauty of Life. Vineland Public Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 794-4244. Original art by Carmen Perez in acrylics, graphite and mixed media. Born and raised in Puerto Rico, Perez is an owner of La Bella Art Gallery. Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. Do You Think You Can’t Afford A Vacation? FRIDAY, AUGUST 7 Cumberlads. Cumberland Mall. Men’s a capella chorus under the direction of Gene Tubertini. 7 p.m. You can with us! Don’t just dream it… now you can travel the world Featuring 5 Cruises & 25 Vacations or Use Us For Single Vacation Bookings! Call Now & Ask About Our Lifetime Package! www.TvTravelPackage.com/HA8467 the grapevine { 23 } THROUGH AUGUST 10 Tara Jacoby Art Exhibit. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. Her work ranges from ink drawings, watercolor paintings, digital media and oil paintings. Getaway Lifetime Vacations, LLC • Hiberto Andular • (856) 979-8467 I Historical Vineland EXCELLENT QUALITY not { VINCE FARINACCIO } This Week, 40 Years Ago The triumph of putting a man on the moon was short-lived in Vineland. or centuries, the moon was a mysterious object hovering brightly in the night sky, flaunting its cyclical phases before an awestruck earthbound audience. The Earth’s satellite has found a place within our literature, our culture and our imagination and has come to represent a range of symbols from the unconscious mind to an agricultural barometer. It is associated with water through its control of the tides. Forty years ago, however, man took a giant step toward demythologizing the moon.. On July 20, 1969, the United States placed man on the moon only days before Vineland experienced fierce rainstorms that severely flooded the area. These two events shared the main headlines that week in Vineland’s Times Journal, one capturing a globally historic moment, the other recording a catastrophic local event. Looking at this particular week from a vantage point of 40 years later reveals a lifestyle now sadly unfamiliar to today’s comparatively cluttered existence. Families gathered around either a black-andwhite or a color television set, one per household, to witness the defining moments of the Apollo 11 mission carried by three major networks. Rules of bedtime were dispensed with as children were permitted to stay up late to watch this historic occasion. And by the next day, opinions abounded and were collected and reported by the local press that evening. From fervent praise to outright dismissal, proffered hope to unabashed cynicism, and solemn replies to glib reactions, myriad responses recorded by the Times Journal reflected the nation’s outlook at Neil Armstrong’s first step onto the lunar dust. Some of those interviewed by the newspaper, particularly children, marveled at the accomplishment of sending man to the moon. Others found promise for mankind or national pride in the achievement. Yet some individuals were critical of the venture, citing concerns like our planet’s poverty-stricken areas as a priority over space travel. EXCESSIVE COST All Cartridge World ink and toner cartridges are built to the highest standards and will save you money. Buying big name brands just guarantees you’ll pay a lot more. F Magnolia Court Shopping Center Vineland, NJ 08360 856-692-0372 1370 S. Main Rd. Main Road Organics Market Mail Room ©2008 Cartridge World. All rights reserved. The most significant portion of the article, however, centers on residents of the Memorial Home. Some of these veterans served in the early days of man’s involvement with flight, which was only 66 years old at the time of the moon landing. What we take for granted today with air travel in our post-Concord existence was, in 1969, entering its adulthood with space travel. The Times Journal described a Memorial Home vet who had served as an airfield mechanic in the 1920s and watched the moon landing from a front-row seat in the facility’s recreation room. Unlike the tragedies that defined 1968, the moon landing brought citizens together for a victory. But the triumph was short-lived in Vineland as residents, their watchful gaze still aimed skyward on July 23, were engulfed in torrential rains that left streets like the Southeast Boulevard submerged in four to five feet of water. Less than a week later, a four-hour downpour brought five inches of rain. Civil Defense crews were dispatched to pump out basements and roads. Cumberland County requested disaster-area status, due to the $2 to $5 million estimated loss in farm crops. While scientists studied moon rocks retrieved by the astronauts, Vineland was bailing out. For some, the moon landing and local flooding might be interwoven in memory. But that spell cast by the Earth’s satellite 40 years ago still remains—not in the scientific discoveries or the charts and diagrams or even in the news reports. It’s in the same spot where Walt Whitman found enchantment some 100 years ago when he wrote: I wandered off myself In the mystical moist night air, and from time to time, Looked up in perfect silence… I Magnolia Rd www.cartridgeworldusa.com/Store305 only at South Jersey’s Premier Car Wash Just $850 YES! Voted #1 “Best of Best” 2008 VINTAGE VINELAND Miss Ocean City 1923 Do you know her name or her connection to Vineland? Over the years, the Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society has acquired many old-time images. Kate Harbold, at the Society, is busy cataloging the photos from Vineland’s rich past, but she needs the help of The Grapevine readers in identifying the people and places captured on film so long ago. If you know something about this photo, contact Harbold at the Society. The mission of the VHAS is to acquire, maintain, and preserve Vineland’s history. The Society was founded in 1864, just three years after the establishment of the town of Vineland. It is the second oldest historical society in New Jersey, second only to the New Jersey Historical Society. The VHAS consists of a museum, library, and archives, open to the public on Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m., same hours Tuesday through Friday for research. It is located at 108 South Seventh Street, Vineland (691-1111). D + Tax Can get my car clean INSIDE & OUT??? { 24 } the grapevine | JULY 22, 2009 EVER Guaranteed! Windows included with this ad. Best Wash 2004 HD Heritage Softail Black, new tires. Exc. mech. cond. 17,300 mi. $10,800 OBO “How To Quickly Get Rid Of Neck Pain Without Surgery Or Medication!” Or, Get This Amazing FREE VIDEO & REPORT By Going Here Now: www.Vinelandpainrelief.com/7 FREE VIDEO & Report Reveals A Little-Known Neck Pain Removal Secret That Quickly Eliminates Neck Pain Without Drugs Or Surgery! Grab The FREE VIDEO & REPORT Now! Just Call our Toll-Free 24 Hour FREE Recorded Message at 1-888-989-1578 ! 2611 S. Main Rd. Vineland, NJ 08360 (Between Grant & Sherman) GV 609-929-2150 18 -H o l e C o u r s e H a n d i c a p – A c c e ss i b l e Totally Tobacco y Tobacco (1) Round of Golf for a Group of 4, FREE Hot Dog or Nachos & (1) FREE Soda – Only $25.00 Hot Dogs• Chili/Cheese • Nachos • Sausage • Sodas & Soft Pretzels Indoor & Patio Seating Gift Certificates Available Wednesday N ig h t S p e c i a l 5pm- close Fund Raising Opportunities for your school or organization Senior Citizen Rates • Visa & Mastercard Accepted $5.00 until 5PM • $6.00 5PM to Close B i r th d a y P a r t y P a c k a g e s 73 Landis Ave. Upper Deerfield Twp. Located next to Rita’s Water Ice Totally Tobacco WILLIAMS Check out our EXPANDED selection of Cigars, Pipes and Tobacco 856-453-PUTT (7888) www.landislinks.com Hours: 11 am-10pm Daily Video Games Ask About Our Private Lounge to Relax, Enjoy a Smoke… 137 S. Delsea Dr · Vineland · 856.692.8034 Beautiful Smiles, Made Affordable OUR SERVICES MILLVILLE FAMILY DENTAL Union Lake Crossing Shopping Center 2144 N. 2nd St., Millville WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | NEW PATIENT WELCOMING PACKAGE $ 80 (reg. $230.) Includes oral exam, full mouth series of x-rays, cleaning & polishing, oral cancer screening, periodontal (gums) evaluation. With coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Emergency Walk-Ins Welcome • Same-Day Denture Repair • • • • • • • • • • • Cleaning & X-Rays Porcelain Veneers Cosmetic Dentistry Periodontal Therapy (Gum Treatment) Full Mouth Reconstruction Implant Rehabilitation Root Canals (One Visit) Full & Partial Dentures Bleaching White Fillings Crowns & Bridges 856-825-2111 Open 7 Days a Week. Day & Evening Hours Proud Member Of The Allied Dental Practices Of NJ Personalized Dentistry SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO OUR SENIOR CITIZENS the grapevine { 25 } Se Habla Español E D W A R D P O L L E R , D D S • G L E N N P R A G E R , D D S • TO D D P R A G E R , D D S • D A N I E L D I C E S A R E , D M D I Downtown Vineland { TODD NOON, EXEC. DIR., VDID/MAIN STREET } Victory Mini-Park The small space with much significance was rededicated last Friday. arge landmarks are important, but we also should remember the small spots set aside to honor or memorialize certain events or persons. You may walk or ride by these little places without giving them a second thought. You take them for granted until the time comes to freshen them up with a new look and then you realize again the significance these spots hold. A case in point is the Victory Mini-Park, located at the clock tower in front of Bain’s Deli at 636 E. Landis Avenue. It is not a mini-park with trees and fountains but is a spot originally dedicated in the early 1990s in recognition of the troops who served in Operation Desert Storm. A plaque was placed there at the time. L The new plaque, replicating the orginal. In recognition of the importance of that mini-park—and in recognition of the wear and tear of time and the elements—the Victory Mini-Park was rededicated last Friday in a small ceremony. On hand for the ceremony were two city leaders who took part in the original dedication—Former Mayor Harry Curley (the mayor at the time of the original dedication) and City Councilman Douglas Albrecht (the VDID Executive Director at that time). A letter by Congressman Frank LoBiondo—who was at the original dedication as an Assemblyman but could not attend the rededication ceremony—was read by Mayor Robert Romano, who reminded everyone that while Operation Desert Storm is over, the need to remain vigilant is still great. A new plaque, replicating the original, has been set in its place. So, the next time you go into Bain’s, or when you are in the area, stop and think about the significance of that little spot in our downtown and what made it all possible. *** Learn some easy and fun ways to be friendly to the environment at Eco Day this Saturday at the weekly Fresh and Specialty Foods Market on the 700 block of Landis Avenue. See the Home & Garden section of this paper for details. Also, I want to thank everyone who worked so hard on the Vineland Seafood Festival last weekend. These events come together through the teamwork of a dedicated group of volun- Victory Mini-Park Ceremony last Friday. From left: Sam Klein, VDID/Main Street Vineland Maintenance; Diane Sacco, VDID/Main Street Vineland Board of Directors ViceChairperson; Mayor Robert Romano; Gary Galloway, VDID Board Chairperson; Harry Curley; Douglas Albrecht; Todd Noon. teers, with help and cooperation from various City departments. I appreciate the contributions made by everyone. For more information on VDID/Main Street Vineland’s “endless summer” of events and activities, call the office at 7948653 or visit www.mainstreetvineland.org. The Grapevine’s Crossword Puzzle { 26 } the grapevine | JULY 22, 2009 ACROSS 1. O.J. prosecutor C. ____en 5. Confronted 10. Rectangular groove in wood 14. 6th Jewish month 15. French spelling of Chad 16. Piercefield fire tower Mt. 17. Wm. ____: Buffalo Bill 18. 2 person board game 19. “Stir Crazy” actor Wilder 20. “Stuart Little” author White 21. Shock therapy 22. B__ Watch: TV show 23. Perceived 27. Long deep cuts 30. Before 31. Midway between E and SE 32. Pats lightly 35. French scholar Ernest 38. Apprehends 42. Plural of 33 down 43. Chimney corner: _____nook 44. Swiss river 45. 3rd or 4th Islamic month 46. Bargains 47. Snare 48. The sheltered side 50. Tokyo 52. Groups of 12 54. Island dress 57. Expresses surprise 58. 60. 61. 64. 66. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. Arrived extinct Exclamation of surprise Ferryboat Watchman Plasters Winglike structures ____zzle: enchant De Mille (dancer) Game cubes ____ 500, car race Th_____: Scottish symbol Computer systems with common storage Solution to last week’s puzzle DOWN 1. Cyprinids 2. Sun-dried brick 3. Radioactivity unit 4. Not producing milk 5. Supervises interstate commerce 6. Sustained dull pain 7. Personal drafts come out of it 8. The countries of Asia 9. Tooth caregiver 10. U.N. Sec. Gen. Hammarskjold 11. They ___ 12. Mother of Perseus 13. Does as told 24. Stalkless leaves 25. Trauma center 26. Bemocks 27. Origins 28. Equally 29. Obama’s prior office 32. Women’s genealogical society 33. Turkish leader’s title 34. Bao___: monkeybread tree 36. Point midway between NE and E 37. Everyone 39. Alt. spelling of 44 across 40. Women’s undergarment 41. Calendar month 49. 1/2 an em 51. A city prosecutor 52. Abu __, United Arab Emirates capital 53. Wine barrels are this 55. Civil rights group 56. Indian butters 58. Decagrams 59. Cain and __ 62. “Kookie” Byrnes 63. Negative 64. Type of radish: ___kon 65. Point midway between S and SE 66. Dentist’s group 67. Container cover O REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS The following transactions of $1,000 or more were filed with Cumberland County in the month of June 2009 (transactions may have occurred in an earlier month). Names listed may, in some cases, be those of buyers’ or sellers’ representatives. BRIDGETON 94 N Burlington Rd., Sherwood at Twin Oaks LLC to Roberta Evans on 6/9/09 for $169,900 32 Elmer St., Sec. of Housing & Urban Development (by Atty.) to Sonia Christophe on 6/10/09 for $32,500 341 Atlantic St., Kenneth Williams to Susan Magee on 6/10/09 for $50,000 79 American Ave., Thomas R Pepitone (Exec.) to Myrma Segarra on 6/10/09 for $105,000 162 N Laurel St., Rebecca Thompson-Albert to ORP Properties LLC on 6/11/09 for $82,500 29 Cedarbrook Ave., Anthony J Viola to John Comparri on 6/11/09 for $150,000 164 N Laurel St., Robert C Thompson to IIH Properties LLC on 6/15/09 for $82,500 COMMERCIAL TWP 1448 Spring Garden, Sec. of Housing & Urban Development (by Atty.) to George W Fisher on 6/8/09 for $31,550 7419 John St., Charlene Domanski to Nicholas Levari on 6/15/09 for $15,000 DOWNE TWP 554 Haleyville Rd., Mabel V Downey to Keith A Hannah on 6/10/09 for $95,000 LAWRENCE TWP 552 Newport Rd., Catherine Burris to Christopher Puff on 6/11/09 for $192,000 Norris Ave., Terry Dowdy to Protege Development LLC on 6/15/09 for $32,500 MILLVILLE 2610 Cedar St., Wil Mar Egg Farm to Beatrice Loetell on 6/8/09 for $40,000 2 Natalie Ln., Pleasant Property Investments LLC to Rebecca L Bruno on 6/9/09 for $203,372 113 Twilight Rd., Mary E Simmons (by Atty.) to Lawrence A Brown, Sr. on 6/10/09 for $55,000 1705 Coventry Way, Sec. of Housing & Urban Development (by Atty.) to 1705 Coventry Way LLC on 6/10/09 for $81,966 1004 Louis Dr., Louis J Hunter to Patricia A Morgan on 6/10/09 for $152,400 25 Hayes Ave., Michael Kavanagh to Richard Donn on 6/10/09 for $315,000 1407 Hance Bridge Rd., Christopher L Morgan to Jason Motter on 6/12/09 for $177,000 509 Mulberry St., Edgar Flores to Edward Cugini on 6/15/09 for $95,000 UPPER DEERFIELD 71 Sentry Dr., John Gruppioni to Anthony J Viola on 6/11/09 for $230,000 43 Husted Station Rd., Thomas A Brown to Massimo Dionisi on 6/15/09 for $240,000 VINELAND 1082 E Chestnut Ave., Sandra Lee Meyer (Trust, Atty.) to B&C Processing Management LLC on 6/8/09 for $132,500 1338 Sherwood Dr., Marian Stasiuk (by Atty.) to Nataliya Lyuppa on 6/8/09 for $170,000 251 Deborah Ct., Keith Petrosky to Anthony Campana, Jr. on 6/8/09 for $186,500 465 Sheridan Ave., Eduardo Zyska to Rhonal J Calcano on 6/8/09 for $220,000 2602 Medina St., Hovnanian K at Vineland LLC to Douglas A Peters on 6/8/09 for $303,000 2232 Franklin Dr., John Scotti to Mod-Con Inc. on 6/9/09 for $70,000 1748 Kay Terr., Harry F Clouser to Tammy Gadberry on 6/10/09 for $165,000 405 W Oxford St., Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. (by Atty.) to Nathan Vazquez on 6/11/09 for $99,300 2139 E Chestnut Ave., Terrace East Real Estate Assoc. LP (by Gen. Ptr.) to Angel E Sanabria on 6/11/09 for $134,900 1789 Tomahawk Ct., NVR Inc. (DBA) to Shahbaz Sotrah on 6/11/09 for $230,000 1800 Tomahawk Ct., NVR Inc. (DBA) to Jason S Sharer on 6/11/09 for $249,990 3718 Nathan Ln., NVR Inc. (DBA) to Tara Lyn Todd on 6/11/09 for $250,610 1254 Lori Ln., Bruce Evans (Atty.) to Steven Levari on 6/12/09 for $62,500 1589 S Delsea Dr., Cesare Coslop, III to Peter Russell Varesio on 6/12/09 for $140,000 Offers you all you would expect in apartment living and more, “a place to call home” 5 Large Floor Plans One & Two Bedroom Apartments and Three Bedroom Townhomes Features: • Washer & dryer in all apartments • Individual heat & central air • Spacious rooms & generous closets • Wall-to-wall carpeting • Pool & playground (856) 696-1929 1301 S. Lincoln Ave. Vineland, NJ www.oakvalleyapartments.com WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the grapevine { 27 } Our Family of Doctors Healthy Teeth & Gums For A Lifetime • Same Day Caps & Crowns • Full Time Orthodontic Staff Orthodontic License #5738 • Locally Owned & Operated • Payment Options to Make Dentistry Affordable • A Children’s Dental Specialist Pediatric License #5864 • Zoom Whitening • Dental Implant & Gum Specialist Periodontal License #4086 • Evening & Weekend Appointments Available lity Dental Care Qua Today’s Cosmetic & Family Dentistry Main Road • Vineland (Next to Acme & Blockbuster) Must present coupon. Exp. 8/15/09 Back to the Beach SPECIAL ? Join us today a new patient for only $ REGULARLY A $184 VALUE! 1.00 This includes Comprehensive Oral Exam, X-Rays and Cancer Screening. When you mention this ad (856) 691-0290 TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS www.quality-dentalcare.com (856) 451-8041 (Across from Walmart) Bridgeton

Posted on July 20th, 2009 by by Mike

July 15, 2009

INSIDE H O M E & GA R D E N • A H AVAT H AC H I M • S M O OT H I ES • N U N S E N S E VOLUME 2 | ISSUE 23 | JULY 15, 2009 CONNECTING YOU { JANET NIEDOSIK } T O V I N E L A N D . W E E K L Y. Visit us online www.grapevinenewspaper.com Youth Power Center Created Mayor’s Youth Council motto: My voice will shape the future. {LEE BURKE} ifteen teenagers were appointed as members of the first City of Vineland Mayor’s Youth Council. Mayor Robert Romano administered their official oath of office as part of an inauguration ceremony on Wednesday evening, July 1, on the steps of City Hall. The city’s first female Youth Mayor is Sacha Louise Borrero. Council officers are Anastasiya Novatorskaya, council president; Lauren Bergamo, chief of staff; Ivonna Dumanyan, secretary; Jacob Gonzalez, treasurer; James Riendeau, special projects director; and Christine Palmer; communication & technology director. Continued on page 12 F The forecast for the 2nd Annual Seafood Festival is sunny, sandy—and scrumptious. Story on page 10. Youth Council members surround Senior City Planner Stephen Hawk during a recent tour of City Hall. 2009 Model Clearance Is On NOW! Buy with Confidence Buy from Se Habla Español Rossi HONDA 2008 President’s Award Winner & 2008 Council of Excellence Winner 1517 SOUTH DELSEA DRIVE, VINELAND NJ 856-692-1700 • www.rossihonda.com Visit Us At www.rossihonda.com 18 -H o l e C o u r s e H a n d i c a p – A c c e ss i b l e Wednesday Night Video Games J u l y Sp e c ia l (1) Round of Golf for a Group of 4, FREE Hot Dog or Nachos & (1) FREE Soda – Only $25.00 Hot Dogs• Chili/Cheese • Nachos • Sausage • Sodas & Soft Pretzels Indoor & Patio Seating Gift Certificates Available Fund Raising Opportunities for your school or organization Senior Citizen Rates • Visa & Mastercard Accepted Located next to Rita’s Water Ice B i r th d a y P a r t y P a c k a g e s $5.00 until 5PM • $6.00 5PM to Close 73 Landis Ave. Upper Deerfield Twp. Hours: 11 am-10pm Daily 856-453-PUTT (7888) www.landislinks.com 5pm- close Let us take you from dream to reality. Get your FREE 2009 Hardscaping Project Guide! © 2009 EP Henry Sales Tax { 2 } the grapevine | JULY 15, 2009 3. 5% Enjoy the lasting charm of a new walkway, garden wall, patio, driveway or pool deck. As an EP Henry Authorized Hardscaping Contractor®, we are dedicated to providing superb craftsmanship and professionalism, while your LOCATION TO SERVE YOU 4019 South Main Rd. Vineland, NJ 08360 local EP Henry Authorized Hardscaping Distributor® provides the largest available selection of styles, textures and colors. It’s a relationship that brings you beautiful results! Trust us to help you with everything from design to installation. Add charming elegance – and increased value – to your home. And, with project financing and a Lifetime Guarantee, no one welcomes you home like EP Henry. Vineland Showroom 856.825.9002 Fax: 856.825.0024 Visit Our Website At: tricitykitchens.com 691-4040 www.recumminesinc.com 67 CHESTNUT AVENUE VINELAND, NJ 08360 { CONTENTS } 1 Sand, Sun, Seafood The 2nd Annual Seafood Festival in downtown Vineland promises to be a signature summer event. JANET NIEDOSIK I Editor’s Letter Cumberland County Gears Up For November Gubernatorial Election It may be only mid-July, but the November gubernatorial election is top-of-mind for many political junkies in Vineland and the surrounding area. The race for New Jersey’s next governor is also a big priority for both Democrats and Republicans nationwide. President Obama is scheduled to join Governor Jon Corzine in attending a rally tomorrow (Thursday, July 16) at the PNC Arts Center in Holmdel. The Cumberland County Democratic Organization plans to be well represented at the rally and held a press conference last week to announce that a caravan of local supporters of Obama and Corzine will be heading up for the rally that day. The Democrats have chartered several buses and at least one will pick up supporters at Cumberland County Democratic headquarters at 9 a.m. tomorrow. Democratic headquarters is located in the old Five Points restaurant site at the intersection of Landis Avenue and Delsea Drive. According to Cumberland County Democratic Freeholder Chairman Lou Magazzu, all were invited, especially those who worked for and supported President Obama during his Presidential campaign last year. Within days of the annoucement, the seating capacity on the available buses was reached and registration for the rally had to be closed. For their part, the Republicans are bringing out their big national guns on the campaign trail, too. And Republican candidate Chris Christie returned to Vineland for at least the third time in the past 18 months on Monday during a campaign stop at Larry’s II with National GOP Chairman Michael Steele in tow. The pair attended the gathering at the local eatery while stumping for Christie in three southern New Jersey towns on Monday and their appearance here also lent support to local Republican candidates up for election in November: Assembly candidates Michael Donohue and John McCann, incumbent County Clerk Gloria Noto, and Freeholder candidates Rick Tonetta, Tom Sheppard and Sam Fiocchi. Christie, who served as U.S. Attorney for the District of New Jersey from 2002 through 2008, currently leads Corzine in the polls. But the election is just shy of four months away, and in political terms, four months is practically an eternity—anything can happen in four months. Especially when one considers Corzine’s propensity to inject large sums of his own personal fortune into his own campaign coffers. Of course, having a popular and newly elected President campaigning for Corzine would seem to be a big plus, too. But again, four months can be a mighty long time in politics. This New Jersey race is one of only two gubernatorial elections this year (the other is in Virginia) and it will be closely watched as it may be an early signal of the country’s political leanings in the year ahead. MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher Left to right: Republican Freeholder candidate Thomas Sheppard, National GOP Chairman Michael Steele, County Clerk Gloria Noto, Gubernatorial candidate Chris Christie, and freeholder candidates Sam Fiocchi and Rick Tonetta. 1 Youth Power Center The Mayor’s Youth Council gears up to learn and take action. LEE BURKE High Efficiency Heating and Cooling and Water Heating Equipment Eligible for up to $1500 in Federal Tax Credits and up to $400 in Rebates 4, 6 5 Faces in the News Ahoy, Mateys This Saturday, the Avenue transforms to everything seashore, even pirates. TODD NOON 7 The Fair Summer celebrations are a defining part of our childhood. DEBORAH A. EIN Serving Vineland for over 100 years! 8 Community Calendar 14-17 HOME & GARDEN 18 DINING: Dune Restaurant A trip to the beach is finished off with dinner in Margate. STEPHEN WILSON 691-1950 State Lic. # 12089 20 Recipe Corner Smoothies are a favorite this time of year. LISA DINUNZIO 22 24 Entertainment More Early Churches By 1900, Vineland welcomed a wide cross-section of faiths. VINCE FARINACCIO 24 25 26 Vintage Vineland Crossword REAL ESTATE With A Bang! WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Summer Off Start Your { STAFF } MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor LORI GOUDIE Art Director GAIL EPIFANIO Controller JACK EPIFANIO Distribution SHERRY MUNYAN Advertising Executive MARIE HALPIN-GALLO Advertising Executive PATTY ALI Graphic Designer MARYANNE BERTRAND Advertising Assistant $ When You Purchase A Color or Perm Incumbent freeholder candidates Nelson Thompson and Louis Magazzu flank freeholder candidate Wade Sjogren (center), at a press conference announcing a local caravan that will head to tomorrow’s rally for Gov. Corzine, which features an appearance by President Obama. GIFT CERTIFICATE Get your Loved One A Gift Certificate Today 5.00 FREE HOURS Receive a exp. 07/21/09 The Grapevine 3660 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361 PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816 EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2009. All rights reserved. the grapevine { 3 } Mon. – Wed. 9-5pm, Thurs. & Fri. 9-7pm Sat. 8:30-3pm & Sun., 9-1 pm WALK-INS WELCOME! NO APPOINTMENTS NECESSARY 5006 E. Landis Ave.Vineland (856) 691-2202 I Faces in the News Advance Seals Compete at Princeton The YMCA of Vineland Seals started a new year-round advance group under the direction of Coach Mike Johnson. In their first long course (50 meter pool) meet, the team did very well. Victoria Moorhouse won the 15 & Over 50 freestyle with a YMCA Long Course National qualifying time. Robbie Moorhouse, Caitlin Potter, and CJ Tarquinio all competed in the three-day meet. Anyone interested in swimming with the Advance Group should contact Coach Johnson or Coach DeMatte at the YMCA (691-0030). Robbie Moorhouse, CJ Tarquinio, and Victoria Moorhouse on the football field at Princeton University after their swims. Capital Bank Opens West Landis Avenue Branch Capital Bank of New Jersey, the Vineland-based community bank owned by hundreds of local stockholders, on Monday opened its new branch office located at 1234 W. Landis Avenue. Dominic J. Romano, Chairman of the Board, said “We are expanding our footprint to make our bank more convenient to our existing and new customers on the west side of Vineland. This organic growth allows us to increase our customer base, increase our assets and build a franchise value for our stockholders.” Shannon Money-Kennedy, the manager of the new branch, commented “My staff and I are eager to deliver the same great Capital Bank service on this side of town as customers have come to expect at our main office.” In addition to Money-Kennedy, the staff of the new branch includes Magalle (Maggie) Rivas, Jodie Soto, Elisave (Liz) Wallace, Daniel Peretti, and Christine Ruiz. Holding the ribbon, from left: Paige Desiere, Executive Director, Vineland Chamber of Commerce; Robert DeSanto, President, Vineland Chamber of Commerce; William J. Hallissey, Vice Chairman, Capital Bank of New Jersey Board of Directors; Shannon Money-Kennedy; Romano; James Lelli, Executive Director, City of Vineland, Department of Economic Development; Doug Albrecht, Vineland City Council; David J. Hanrahan, President/CEO, Capital Bank of New Jersey; Daniel Kuhar, Director, Capital Bank of New Jersey Board of Directors. Boy scouts from Vineland’s Troop 10, raise the flag for the first time at Capital Bank’s newest branch. Common Folk Vineland High School grads Robert John Carpenter, Carli Anne Cherwien and John Nicholas Bertonazzi have a lot in common. They are all honor students, they each were the recipients of college and/or national scholarships, and they were each born to sisters from the same family. While these first cousins shared many classes at Vineland High School, come September, they will follow very different career paths. Bertonazzi, son of Anita (Lopergolo) and John Bertonazzi, will attend Camden County College to pursue a degree in fire sciences. Bertonazzi has completed the necessary training and will soon become a volunteer firefighter and hopes to carry on a family tradition and pursue a farming career. Cherwien, daughter of Lisa (Lopergolo) and Lou Tramontana, Jr., and Doug and Stacy Cherwien, will be attending the University of Southern California, where she was recruited to join the woman’s rowing team and where she’ll study biochemistry. Carpenter, son of Terry (Lopergolo) and Bob Carpenter, will attend Rowan School of Engineering, where he will major in electrical and computer engineering. Top photo, from left: Robert Carpenter, Carli Cherwien and John Bertonazzi at Vineland High School’s merit ceremonies in June where they were each named as recipients of a college scholarship. { 4 } the grapevine | JULY 15, 2009 Student Athletes Head to NCAA Colleges 2009 Vineland High School Senior Student Athletes who have signed national letters of intent to participate in NCAA Athletics. Seated from left: Leanne Miller (Softball) Goldey Beacom College, Maritza Jimenez (Softball) Robert Morris University, Carli Cherwien (Womens Crew) University of Southern California, Dana Mosley (Womens Crew) Rutgers, Sarah Bernhardt (Womens Swimming) Millersville University, Dana Parks (Softball) St. Joseph University. Standing: Marcus Ware (Basketball) Monmouth University, Macieg Grudzien (Mens Crew) Temple University, Giovanni Finazzo (Mens Crew) LaSalle University, Andrew Anastor (Football) Northeastern University. Bottom photo: The graduates long before their school days with (from left) Carpenter, Bertonazzi and Cherwien as infants. More Faces in the News on page 6 SEND US YOUR FACES — IT’S FREE! Get your photos published in The Grapevine… birthdays, engagements, weddings, anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them the address listed on p. 3. I Downtown Vineland { TODD NOON, EXEC. DIR., VDID/MAIN STREET } Ahoy, Mateys! Keeping the Avenue afloat is more fun with seafood, sand, and pirates. f you love the sea—whether you hang around the beach on a blanket having a great time, or whether your kids love to dream of the sea and pirates and treasure—this weekend is for you right on Landis Avenue! Enjoy the sun, sand, and seafood in downtown Vineland at the Second Annual Vineland Seafood Festival this Saturday (Sunday being the rain date) from 3 to 9 p.m. on the 600 block of Landis Avenue. The whole block will become a “bash at the beach” with plenty of mouthwatering seafood dishes from Vineland’s finest restaurants and fresh food vendors. There will also be live music. Even though seafood will be the main attraction at the event, many vendors will be on hand offering a wide range of other delicious foods. I The lineup of participating restaurants and vendors includes Dad’s Seafood, Flipper’s Ice Cream/Water Ice, Giuseppe’s Ristorante, Greenview Inn, Landicini’s Family Restaurant, Marciano’s Restaurant, Merighi’s Savoy Inn, North Italy Club, S.R. Riley’s, and Taste of the Island. Back this year will be the incredible manmade beach right on the Avenue where you will be able to dance to live music provided by the steel drum band Trinidad North. Good Tymes Band will perform pop music of the ’50s through the ’80s, and Double Helix will perform classic rock and blues. Event organizer Dale Elbeuf and a great group of volunteers have been working hard to make sure that this year’s festival is bigger and better than the first—with great seafood and just the right ambiance. Admission is free, other than the price of the food and merchandise. Take-outs will be available. So you won’t have to go to leave town to enjoy the seashore. Save time and gasoline and enjoy it right here. But that’s not all, mateys! Get warmed up for the Seafood Festival by bringing your kids downtown that morning and have them live out their seafaring fantasies at the Pirates Treasure Hunt, part of the weekly Fresh and Specialty Foods Market on the 700 block of Landis Avenue. Youngsters 12 years and under can pretend that they’re Captain Kidd, Black Bart, or Blackbeard and discover the secrets of the hidden treasures that lie along Landis Avenue during the Treasure Hunt, which will start at 10 a.m. Registration will take place up to the date of the event. Call the VDID/Main Street Vineland office for more information. Also, you can cast your vote every week of the Market, in the Little Miss & Mister Cherry Tomato photo contest. The winner will be crowned at the International Food & Cultural Festival on Saturday, August 22 and will ride in the Holiday Parade on November 28. All the proceeds will go toward the great cause of downtown revitalization. Presented by VDID/Main Street Vineland and sponsored again by Sun National Bank, the Market runs each Saturday until August 15, on the 700 block of Landis Avenue from 8 a.m. to noon. *** Remember that for all our downtown events, support your downtown merchants and businesses. If you can stop into any of them during the events, do so. If you do not have an opportunity during that time, make a point of coming back at a later time to stop in. The businesses, and we at VDID/Main Street Vineland, will greatly appreciate your support and patronage. I For more information VDID/Main Street Vineland’s “endless summer” of events and activities, call the office at 794-8653 or visit www.mainstreetvineland.org. FRESH FO ODS MARKET m– (Opposite Vineland Post O ce) & Pirate’s Treasure Hunt SPECIALT Y WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | This Week’s Feature Pirate’s Treasure Hunt Children are invited to visit the Market and receive their own Loot Bag to fill with Pirate Treasures hidden along the Avenue Treasure Hunt begins at 10 a.m. Every Week — Jersey Fresh Produce Plus Market Runs ru Aug. 15 WIC & Senior Coupons Accepted VINELAND TROLLEY VINELAND TROLLEY the grapevine { 5 } RIDE THE TROLLEY TO AND FROM THE MARKET FREE! Runs Landis Ave – Kidston Towers to WalMart This event is sponsored in part by VDID/Vineland Main Street. This ad has been paid for with funds approved for such use by the New Jersey Urban Enterprise Zone Authority. I Faces in the News Balicki Named Confidential Assistant to the Warden Cumberland County Board of Chosen Freeholders has named Bob Balicki of Millville as Confidential Assistant to the Warden. The current warden, Glenn Saunders, has announced he will retire at year’s end. Saunders is out on health-related leave, so Balicki will help smooth the transition to a new warden. “I find the staff very capable and dedicated to their work. I have a lot of ideas that include incorporating mental health and education programs for the inmate population,” said Balicki. Balicki began a long career in corrections that extended over 36 years, beginning with the New Jersey National Guard and culminating with his retirement in 1998. He went on to be appointed by then NJ Gov. James McGreevey as Assistant Commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Corrections. For the past five years, Balicki has served as Director of Corrections in Gloucester County, including supervising the Juvenile Detention Center, the county jail and a female offenders unit. Balicki serves as a member of the school-based Management Team for the Millville School District and as a member of the Millville Board of Education. Triantos Earns CVA Designation Vineland accountant Wayne H. Triantos, has successfully completed the certification process with the National Association of Certified Valuation Analysts (NACVA) to earn his designation of Certified Valuation Analyst (CVA). Requirements to earn the Certified Valuation Analyst designation include being a licensed Certified Public Accountant, completing NACVA’s training and educational program, as well as successfully completing the association’s comprehensive examination. Triantos is a partner in the Vineland firm Triantos and Delp. He is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, New Jersey Society of Certified Public Accountants, National Association of Certified Valuation Analysts, American College of Forensic Examiners and the Vineland Chamber of Commerce. Triantos serves on numerous boards of non-profit organizations as well. A Caterpillar of Her Own Children at Notre Dame Regional School Summer Camp enjoyed a morning of painting ceramic caterpillars. Debbie Legg, owner of Evergreen Manor Ceramics, visited the camp to teach the children the joy of making their own creation. Seven-year-old Megan Pankok of Salem was surprised to see how beautiful her project turned out and how everyone’s was different! Notre Dame offers camp for students 2 through 14 at the Landisville Campus. For information, call 697-3456 ext. 112. 1853 Vine Rd. Vineland 691-4848 Fax: 856-691-2294 marcaccimeats@verizon.net Specials For July 15-18 EBT CHICKEN PICNIC DRUMSTICKS FRESH FRESH FRESH AVERAGE (8-10 LB) PORK SPARE DELMONICO RIBS STEAKS lb. lb. .89¢ $189 $699 .89 ¢ lb. lb. { 6 } the grapevine | JULY 15, 2009 PORK PORK CHOPS CHOPS CENTER CUT FRESH END-CUT FRESH VEAL SWEET OR CUTLETS HOT ITALIAN SAUSAGE OUR OWN $ 99 $ 49 $ 99 $ 89 Let us help you with your Bar-B-Q needs!!! Come in and check out our great selections and prices. We also would like to thank all our Customers and our new friends for coming out to our Bar B Q and making it a huge success! 1 lb. 1 lb. 6 lb. 1 lb. I Gleanings { DEBORAH A. EIN, MANAGING EDITOR } The Fair It’s the beginning of summer celebrations. he big event of summer when I was a kid was “The Fair.” Still held every August in Atlantic County, it was what we looked forward to all summer. Growing up on a farm four miles out of town (Mays Landing), we (my sister, brother, cousins, and I) rarely saw classmates all summer. So the fair allowed us to reconnect with friends as well as let loose on the rides. My sister was in a 4-H sewing club, so we watched her model what she had made that year. And there were the animals… and the cotton candy…and well, what else? Looking back, it’s not entirely easy to figure out the attraction. Until last Wednesday, when I took my kids to Cumberland County’s version of “The Fair.” My kids are a tough crowd, so I had low expectations going in, but from the moment we arrived to catch a glimpse of T the watermelon-eating contest to when we left after watching the fireworks in the parking lot, they were captivated. Watching them dart from the House of Mirrors to the bumper cars to the Tornado or back to a favorite ride over and over again brought all the excitement flooding back. My 9-year-olds teased the giant robot, Tabor, hammed it up with the clown, did all sorts of things I thought they were too embarrassed or too old to do. The animals were also a big draw—two barns full of horses; another barn with cows, pigs, sheep, and goats; and another with caged rabbits and chickens. Where else do kids get to see pets other than the ordinary dog or house cat? We watched racing potbellied pigs, chickens hatching, horses getting new shoes…. And there’s still nearly a full summer slate of celebrations to come. Many of the planned festivities celebrate the diversity of cultures we have in Vineland and surrounding areas. Take a look at the Community Calendar and you’ll see that within the next week, there’s the Puerto Rican Festival, a Russian Festival, and a Latina block party. In Hammonton this week, there’s the Feast of Mt. Carmel. The Cultural and Heritage San Juan Festival is on August 1. The cover story this week focuses on this Saturday’s Seafood Festival, and on August 22, VDID/Main Street Vineland stages the International Festival, where people of all cultures come together and learn, while literally “feeding” off each other. A couple of weeks ago, we printed a story about stay-cations, and the festivals are another opportunity to vacation while staying in the neighborhood. If you opt to do this, you are putting your “tourist” dollars right back into your own town. Is it time to plan your next vacation? I The OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Top Banana DIV. OF ZUKERMAN FOODS Wholesale Outlet Wheat Road & Delsea Drive, Vineland • 641-0815 HOURS: Mon. – Thurs. 9-6:30; Friday 9-6; Sat. 9-6; Sun. 11-5 Sale 7/15/09 to 7/20/09 Major Credit Cards Accepted NOW ACCEPTING E.B.T. CARDS!!! EGGS & MILK LOW PRICE ALWAYS! Ready to pick up. Easy shop by Phone or Fax 641-0813 Corn LETTUCE Sweet 2.00 Blueberries 5 FOR 2 for 1.50 $ ICEBERG JERSEY FRESH JERSEY FRESH $ SORRENTO WHOLE MILK RICOTTA $3.29 ROSENBERGER’S BING CHERRIES $ CALIFORNIA $ 2 for 3.00 WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | CALIF. RIPE BLACK PLUMBS 1.99 lb. ZUCCHINI 59¢ Lb. CRYSTAL GEYSER PURE SPRING MILK WHOLE – 2% – 1% SQUASH WATER 2 Lb. for $ $ the grapevine { 7 } GALLONS 2.89 $ 1.00 3.88 CASE 24/16.9 OZ. SHOP SMART • SAVE SMART • EAT SMART I COMMUNITY CALENDAR HAPPENINGS THURSDAY, JULY 16 Feast of Mt. Carmel Procession. St. Joseph Church, Third St., Hammonton. Masses in morning, procession at 2 p.m. Carnival through the rest of the week. Bring a bagged lunch and enjoy magic by Ken Northridge. Noon. Free. FRIDAY, JULY 17 Chicks Committed to a Cure Bake Sale. Jamal’s Chicken, 201 N. High St., Millville. Breast Cancer 3-Day team is raising money for the 60-mile walk in October..6-9 p.m. THURSDAY, JULY 16 Heart and Lung Support Group. SJH Regional Medical Center, Sherman Ave. (4th Floor Conference Room). Topic is “Cardiac By-pass Surgery (aka – CABG): What you want to know after 10 years.” 12:30-1:30 p.m. 641-7535. SATURDAY, JULY 18 Fresh and Specialty Foods Market/Pirate’s Treasure Hunt. 700 block of Landis Ave. 8 a.m.-noon. p.m. Vendors sell fresh fruits and vegetables, crafters and other exhibitors, too. Trolley will shuttle between Kidston Towers and Walmart, providing free transportation for anyone going to the Market. 794-8653. SATURDAY, JULY 18 British Car Owners’ Ice Cream Social. Five Points Custard, Landis Ave. and Tuckahoe Rd., East Vineland. British car enthusiasts and their motorcars— Austin Healeys, Jaguars, MGs, Sunbeams, Triumphs, etc—will gather for this free, non-judged evening car event. www.bmcsnj.org. FRIDAY, JULY 17 Out to Lunch. Cohanzick Zoo, Bridgeton. THE YOUNG MARINES will be hosting a car wash to raise funds for future events! Saturday, July 25, from 10 a.m. til 4 p.m. at Sparkle Kleen (2611 S. Main Rd.) Sparkle Kleen will donate $2 for each vehicle, so come out to help support the young marines! JULY 19 THROUGH 26 marks a week of Puerto Rican Festival events. • Sunday: Flag raising at City Hall, 1 p.m. • Monday: Flag raising at Millville City Hall noon, at Bridgeton Court House 5 p.m., Religious Day at Landis Park • Tuesday: Disabled and Senior Day at Landis Park • Latin Woman Day at Landis Park • Children Pageant at 1 p.m. and Youth Day • Friday: Folkloric Day at Landis Park • Saturday: Parade down Landis Avenue at 1 p.m. and acivities to follow at Landis Park. NATIONAL NIGHT OUT is set for Tuesday, August 4, from 5 to 9 p.m. at Pagliughi Park (2245 E. Magnolia Rd.). National Night Out is an annual event designed to strengthen communities by encouraging neighborhoods to engage in stronger relationships with each other and with their local law enforcement partners. The goal is to heighten crime-prevention awareness, build support and participation in local anticrime programs, and most importantly, send a message that our neighborhoods are organized and fighting back. FORMER MEMBERS OF THE VHS SELECT CHOIR (1974-1994), under the direction of Dr. Gerald Luongo and Michael Testa, are invited to attend a reunion on Saturday, July 25, from 4 to 9 p.m. at the home of Kathi (Testa) Epifanio in Vineland. Spouses and significant others are welcome as well. The event will be hosted by Kathi Epifanio and Michael Testa. Drinks and hors d’oeuvres will be served. A $20 donation is requested to cover the event’s costs. Attendees can RSVP by calling 691-1920, e-mailing kmtebud@hotmail.com or visiting the VHS Select Choir page on Facebook.com. Former Select Choir members are encouraged to bring old photos, memories and, of course, your voices! There will be singing! SATURDAY, JULY 18 Seafood Festival. 700 block of Landis Ave. 3 p.m. 794-8653. SATURDAY, JULY 18 Indoor Flea Market. Trinity Episcopal Church, Eighth and Wood sts. 8 a.m-2 p.m. (Spaces $15. Bring your own table To reserve a space, call 691-1589.) only at South Jersey’s Premier Car Wash Just $850 YES! Voted #1 “Best of Best” 2008 SUNDAY, JULY 19 1st Annual Russian Festival. Holy Trinity Russian Orthodox Church at 2221 West Landis Ave. Sample the stroganoff, vareniki and shashlik, pielmeni, pirozhki and golubtsi, kvas sweet ale and Russian beer (also hot dogs, barbecue chicken, sausage and peppers). An appearance by a Russian Balalaika Orchestra accompanied by folk dancers. 1 p.m. Free Admission. Visit www.holytrinitychurch.us + Tax Can get my car clean INSIDE & OUT??? THE BAY-ATLANTIC SYMPHONY has been awarded a $50,000 grant from the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation. In awarding this grant, the Dodge Foundation praised the Symphony’s established partnerships which it said “has made the Bay-Atlantic Symphony an entertainment necessity for music-lovers throughout South Jersey.” The partnerships noted include a new relationship with the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa, as well as strong partnerships with the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Cumberland County College, Cape May Music Festival, and the Avalon Free Public Library. The news of the grant illuminates the positive developments and progress the Symphony has made, including the adultbased education programs, spanning three counties, with the recent expansion of the popular music lecture series to include a summer series in Margate and Millville. For more information on the Symphony, call 451-1169 or visit www.bayatlanticsymphony.org.. SUNDAY, JULY 19 Hermandad Latina Block Party. 410 Montrose St. Free food, beverages, and entertainment. 364-0247. SUNDAY, JULY 19 Weekly Dance. North Italy Club Hall, East Ave. and Virano Ln. County chapter of the Single Parents Society holds the dances for people age 50 and up, married or single. Live band performs music for waltz, rhumba, swing, foxtrot, line dances, and more. 7:30-10:30 p.m. $7 members, $9 non-members 697-1814. { 8 } the grapevine | JULY 15, 2009 EVER Guaranteed! Windows included with this ad. Best Wash MONDAY, JULY 20 NAMI Monthly Meeting. Chestnut Assembly of God, 2554 E. Chestnut Ave. County Chapter of National Alliance on Mental Illness meets. 7-9 p.m. 691-9234. SAVE THE DATE: On Sunday. September 27, the St. Padre Pio Festival will be held 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., to include a procession, Mass, devotion, blessings with relics and Italian Festival. Call 691-7526 or visit pppnj.org for more information. 2611 S. Main Rd. Vineland, NJ 08360 (Between Grant & Sherman) GV TUESDAY, JULY 21 Family Fun Night. Purple Penguin Ice Cream, 1008 Harding Hwy., Newfield. THURSDAY, JULY 23 CHURCH NEWS Children are invited to participate in |our Young Readers (ages 4-12) Summer Reading Club. It is held at Trinity Episcopal Church, 8th and Wood Streets, Vineland on Mondays, from 4-6 p.m. It features: Reading enrichment, Music lessons, Healthy snacks – and best of all it’s free of charge! To enroll, please phone 856-691-7243. New Bethel African Methodist Church, 414 N. Seventh Street, will hold its Vacation Bible School August 3-7, from 6 to 8 p.m. Adults and children are invited to come and take part in the various lessons and craft making throughout the week. Amputees Across America. HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital, 1237 W. Sherman Ave. A welcome recption will be held in honor of the cyclists who are riding in bicycle relays across the country (started in California on May 27) and visiting hospitals to increase public awareness of amputees as people with active lifestyles. 4 p.m. LOSE 9 lbs. in 9 days! SATURDAY, JULY 25 Barbara Cook Run-Ride-Walk for Cancer. New Jersey Motorsports Park, Millville. This year’s event will feature new bike routes including 62-mile (Metric Century) and 31-mile rides, plus an 8-mile fun ride for family riders. A post-event barbeque fundraiser will include raffles and auctions. Longer cycling events begin 8 a.m., other registrations 4:30 p.m., events at 6 p.m. Visit www.ACTIVE.com. Reduce Impurities From the Body & Lose Weight rough Nutritional Cleansing! Why Detox? Have you ever asked yourself these questions? • Why am I always tired? • Why don’t I have energy? • Why do I crave sweets? • Why can’t I lose weight? • Why do I feel depressed? • Why am I always hungry? Benefits Janvier Fire Co.. Family fun, good food. Bring a chair/blanket. 6:30 p.m. 697-4731. SATURDAY, AUGUST 1 Joshua Moren Memorial SloPitch Softball Tournament. Fiocchi Field, 1755 Galli Dr. Fee per team $150, Home Run Derby $10 per player. Team registration /28, game day check-in 8 a.m. deadline 7 rmg0004@auburn.edu for details about tourney and sponsorship opportunities. GOLF, SPORTS, ETC. THURSDAY, JULY 16 Chamber of Commerce Golf Classic. Buena Vista Golf Club, Rt. 40 and Country Club Lane, Buena. $150 per player (includes lunch, dinner, practice range, green and cart fees). $20, lunch only. $40, dinner only. 11 a.m. registration and picnic lunch. Noon shotgun start. Four-person scramble format. For pre-registration or sponsorship information, call 691-7400 or visit www.vinelandchamber.org/events. ATTEND A FREE on 5 Secrets to PERMANENT WEIGHT LOSS Tuesday, July 28th at 7 p.m. Cyber Spot on 610 East Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08360 Seating is limited to the ?rst 20 callers! Make your reservation today! COMMUNITY WORKSHOP CALL (856) 691-1313 Register today for summer classes Professional & Community Education @ Enjoy learning the computer in a relaxed environment with caring instructors. In just two weeks, you will have a solid foundation while learning and having fun. Prerequisites: Working knowledge of PC. Classes will be held on Mondays & Wednesdays in the Academic Building in room A-25 Bike Night at Motorsports Park The AMA Pro Road Racing National Guard American Superbike championship makes its New Jersey Motorsports Park debut over Labor Day weekend. Motorsports fans can get a free sneak peek of the fastest two-wheelers in North America when New Jersey Motorsports Park hosts the stars and bikes of AMA Road Racing for two days of testing, July 21 and 22. Following the testing on Tuesday, July 21, New Jersey Motorsports Park will host a bike night through 9 p.m. in the Thunderbolt Raceway paddock. The evening gathering, still free of charge, will include music and available food and beverage. Star riders from the AMA Pro American Superbike and Daytona SportBike will be on hand for autographs and photos. The AMA American Superbike and Daytona SportBike testing on Tuesday and Wednesday on the 2.25-mile Thunderbolt Raceway is just the beginning of nearly a week of motorcycle activity at New Jersey Motorsports Park. The Championship Cup Series Mid-Atlantic Regional Championship Series featuring the Michelin Pro Series concludes the week on the 1.9-mile Lightning circuit with a weekend of racing, July 24-26. New Jersey Motorsports Park will offer tickets to the AMA Superbike Championship, rounds 19 and 20 of 20 for the premier classes, at a 15% discount for those attending the test days and bike night. The AMA Superbike Championship, September 4-6 at New Jersey Motorsports Park, is the season finale for both the American Superbike and Daytona SportBike classes. The doubleheader weekend will see races on both Saturday and Sunday for each class. For more information on tickets, including the all-inclusive Superbike Club and Sportbike Club ticket packages, visit www.njmp.com or call the New Jersey Motorsports Park Premium Guest Services Department at 1-856-327-7217. Admission to the CCS races July 24-26 on Lightning Raceway is available for $15 a day at the gate. Children 12 and under are admitted free to all events at New Jersey Motorsports Park. Perfect for busy adults! WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Introductory MS Office Computer Classes •Intro to MS Access •Intro to MS Excel Mondays & Wednesdays • Aug. 3-Aug. 12 • 5-7 pm • $119 Mondays & Wednesdays, Aug. 3-Aug. 12 • 7:30-9:30 pm • $119 Mondays & Wednesdays, Aug. 17-Aug. 26 • 5-7 pm • $119 Mondays & Wednesdays, Aug. 17-Aug. 26 • 7:30-9:30 pm • $119 •Intro to MS PowerPoint •Intro to Quickbooks Call the registrar at 856/691-8600, ext. 345 the grapevine { 9 } or visit the Professional & Community Education office located in the lower level of the Academic Building. www.cccnj.edu/businesscommunity Seafood Fest Continued from page 1 o hear Todd Noon tell it, when Dale Elbeuf suggested that Vineland host a seafood festival on Landis Avenue, the members of Vineland Downtown Improvement District (VDID)/Main Street Vineland were, to say the least, “skeptical, very skeptical.” “That’s true,” said Elbeuf, superintendent of Vineland’s Recreation Department. “But you really should have seen them when I said I wanted to build a beach on the Avenue. You would have thought I had sprouted another head!” Noon, Executive Director of VDID/Main Street Vineland, said: “We just didn’t know if a seafood festival was something that would go over well in Vineland. After all, we have no real connection with the sea or the ocean.” But Elbeuf was looking at it from a somewhat different perspective. Last year, he said, the economy was “tough.” The price of gas was hovering around $4 a gallon. “A lot of people couldn’t afford to go to the shore. So I thought it would be a great idea to bring the beach to Vineland, with lots of wonderful seafood, other food vendors, entertainment. I thought it would make for a great family outing.” T Rob Buono, chef at Eastlyn Golf Course’s Greenview Inn, served yellowfin tuna tacos at last year’s Seafood Festival. Photo: Jill McClennen. TO ALL VINELAND RESIDENTS LOOSE GRASS CLIPPINGS can not be placed at the curb or in the street at any time. All grass clippings must be bagged or in a container. According to our trash regulations for proper pick up of grass it states: Grass Clippings-must be placed in plastic bags, or trash containers, but not mixed with leaves or other debris. Bags or containers must not weight more than 40 lbs! Placing grass loose at the curb or roadway presents many problems such as odor, mosquitoes, and washing into and clogging the storm water drains. { 10 } the grapevine | JULY 15, 2009 NOTICE Turns out, Elbeuf was right on the mark. Vineland’s first seafood festival was a huge success. Somewhere between 3,500 and 4,000 people poured onto Landis Avenue. All of the seafood vendors sold out last year, Elbeuf said. Those returning this Saturday for the Second Annual Vineland Seafood Festival are coming with more food. Participating restaurants will include Dad’s Seafood, Greenview Inn, Landicini’s Family Restaurant, Marciano’s Restaurant, Merighi’s Savoy Inn, North Italy Club, S.R. Riley’s, Taste of the Island and Giuseppe’s Ristorante. “We’re doubling what we brought last year,” said Sandy Riley, owner of SJ Riley’s in Bridgeton. Her menu will be much the same as last year. Grilled crabcake sandwiches and/or spinach salad (with dried cranberries, blue cheese crumbles and walnuts with a homemade balsamic vinaigrette) topped with a grilled crabcake for a price of $10. She’s also adding U-peel shrimp to the menu. “You know I have to tell you, though, the whole event was so wonderful,” she added. “There were kids playing on the beach, people eating, listening to the music, dancing. Everybody just seemed to have a really good time.” That, in fact, is what Elbeuf really wanted to happen and hopes to recreate this year. A native of Vineland, he grew up in the city when “The Avenue” was the place to go. “My parents had a florist shop on Chestnut Avenue for 49 years,” he said. We would walk up to [Landis] Avenue where they had sidewalk sales. We shopped on the Avenue. When I got older, we cruised the Avenue. I went through all the phases on the Avenue, when it was a thriving entity. And that’s what the VDID/Main Street Vineland, all of us, would like to see it return to.” While seafood is the main attraction at the event, to be held from 3 to 9 p.m. in the 600 block of Landis Avenue, many vendors will provide a wide range of other taste treats such as hot dogs, cheesesteaks, sausage and peppers, and steamed corn (offered by the Vineland Fire Department, in addition to cold watermelon for sale). And not to forget about those whose sweet tooth needs filling, Flipper’s Ice Cream/Water Ice from Millville and Vineland’s Sweet Life Bakery will be among those ready to satisfy those cravings. Steven Wilson, who owns The Sweet Life along with his wife, Jill McClennen, will again be offering crab-shaped short- Do t Downtown Vineland Seafood Festival Downtown Vineland Seafood Festival land land ood Festiv estiv v Saturday, Saturday, July 18 8 3-9 pm 39 600 Block Landis Avenue Block Landis Avenue s Join f Join us for a Seafood Extravaganza! Seafood Extravaganza! ag ganza! Incredi Incredible Man-Made Beach ible Man-Made Beach Live Music Live Music The New Jersey Storm Water regulations states we can not place any yard waste closer than 10 feet from any storm drain or inlet. Placement of such yard waste at the curb or along the street at any other time in any othe manner is a violation For more information on this and other curbside collection programs go to our website at: www.vinelandcity.org/recycle.html Cl Classic Rock by Double Helix Classic Rock by Double He elix Food Vendors I l d Food Vendors Include: d FREE – PARK & RIDE: Trolley run from Walmart to Kidston PARK Trolley runs from Walmart to Kidston ns Towers. Pick up on Wood or Elmer in Festival Area. Towers. Pick Wood mer Festival Area. This event sponsored part by VDID/Vineland Main Street. This This event is sponsored in part by VDID/Vineland Main Street. This ad has been paid for and for approved for Urban Enterprise Zone Authority. with funds approved for such use by the New Jersey Urban Enterprise Zone Authority. by bread cookies (in keeping with the event’s theme) among other goodies. The Police Athletic League will be selling Virgin Margaritas. A beer garden will be set up. Proof of age will be required and in order to enjoy a beer or two, one will have to drink it within the confines of the beer garden. It’s against the law to walk the streets with an open container of beer in hand, Elbeuf said. Thirty-five tons of sand will be dropped on the Avenue to make the “beach.” “We took a little criticism for that last year, but people should know that this is what is called bar sand, it’s a little more coarse than regular sand. The city has it stockpiled in case there is some sort of hazardous spill or something like that. We don’t go out and buy it and truck it in for the day,” Elbeuf said. Live entertainment, provided by the steel drum band Trinidad North, the Good Tymes Band (performing pop music of the ’50s through the ’80s), and Double Helix (performing classic rock/blues), will take the stage on this incredible manmade beach, where festival goers are more than welcome to dance to the music, or bring a lawn chair and just sit and relax. There will be continuous music throughout the six-hour event. While Elbeuf will take the credit for the seafood festival/beach bash idea, he is the first to acknowledge that the event is not a one-man show: “This could never work, first of all, without the cooperation of the city’s Police Chief [Timothy] Codispoti, fire Chief [Robert] Pagnini and Emergency Services department Chief Al Lincks and their departments. The public works department, of course, is invaluable. Then there are the hundreds of dedicated volunteers, good friends, the mayor’s office, the vendors, John Wilhelm, who handled the music—I know I am going to forget to mention someone— but it’s important to thank everyone connected with it, because without them we couldn’t pull it off.” Noon said bringing people to Landis Avenue to have a great time is a goal of the VDID/Main Street Vineland. The idea is The Seafood Festival in downtown Vineland is like a day at the beach, as these kids found out last year. Thirty-five tons of sand will be dropped on Landis Avenue to create this year’s inland “beach.” Sea Fest Facts Who: Vineland Downtown Improvement District/Main Street, Vineland (794-8653) presents: What: Where: When: Vineland’s Second Annual Seafood Festival 600 block of Landis Avenue Saturday, July 18, 3 to 9 p.m. (Rain date is Sunday, July 19, same time) Why: Good food, good fun, good music on the “beach” ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Admission is free, other than the price of the food and merchandise. Take-outs will be available. SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS Bring your own beach chair. to make downtown Vineland a popular summertime destination. “We want to build on [the festival’s] success” so that downtown Vineland becomes “a destination for food, entertainment, and culture,” he said. I Totally Tobacco y Tobacco Totally Tobacco WILLIA MS Check out our EXPANDED selection of Cigars, Pipes and Tobacco WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Ask About Our Private Lounge to Relax, Enjoy a Smoke… Richard Monteleone Salon Fabrojae proudly welcomes to our staff! the grapevine { 11 } 137 S. Delsea Dr · Vineland · 856.692.8034 c o n c e p t s a lo n Youth Council Continued from page 1 Other members of the council are Diane Severino, Quina Pugh, Jennifer Mercado, Roberto Cortez, Ashley Cuff, Tyquan McIntosh, Tiffany Ballin, and Dillon Nash. All together there are nine females and six males, many of whom are bilingual, reflecting what could be the face of future politics in Vineland. The VMYC will promote public awareness of the strengths and abilities of our youth while actively involving them on youth policy issues and events. The mission of the council is to communicate the needs, problems, and issues affecting our youth regardless of race, gender, or socioeconomic level. The VMYC wants to provide Vineland students in grades 9-12 (attending public, private or homeschooled) the opportunity to develop leadership and citizenship skills while learning about their city government. On Thursday morning, July 2, the students gathered in the Mayor’s conference room to learn about practical hometownfirst “empowerment civics.” Renee Koubiadis, South Jersey Coordinator, for Youth Mayor Sacha Louise Borrero with, from left, Assemblyman Nelson Albano; Ann Romano, Staff Advisor to the Youth Council; Vineland Mayor Robert Romano; Senator Jeff Van Drew; and Assemblyman Matt Milam. Below: The 15 members of the newly created Vineland Mayor’s Youth Council gathered on the steps of City Hall to take the Oath of Office. the Citizens’ Campaign, presented a course on pathways to community service. The Citizens’ Campaign teaches a “noblame approach” to gaining leadership positions within a community’s local government; and by using a non-partisan effort. The VMYC learned about the four “Power Centers”: Mayor and governing body, Planning Board, School Board, and political parties. The students then learned how to address them in a respectful and informed way by knowing their individual rights. Koubiadis reviewed the Open Public Records Act (OPRA) on how to request government records (budgets, master plan information, list of vacancies on various appointed boards or commissions, etc.) from the City Clerk. She also stated the Citizens’ Campaign successfully lobbied the New Jersey state legislature to enact the “Citizen Service Act,” which will require municipalities to maintain an upto-date comprehensive directory of all existing boards and commissions, member names and their terms, existing vacancies as well as the appointing authority and process of appointments. The second part of course dealt with effective ways to “persuade your local officials” by understanding your right to speak in accord with the Open Public Meetings Act, also referred to as the Sunshine Law, and using that right to effectively propose a new policy or law. The Sunshine Law allows every citizen the right to: 1) respond to proposed ordinances, development proposals, budgets, etc. 2) comment on a specific proposal to any of the local government power centers and 3) make his/her own proposal at both agenda and regular meetings of the governing body. Additional Citizens’ Campaign “tips” included : • Know the rules for citizen input. You can speak at both agenda and regular meetings. • Arrive early to “campaign” for your issue. Introduce yourself to the governing body and let them know you are going to speak to your issue. • Pitch your issue during the public comment portion. • Show respect to get respect offering a constructive solution. • Get a specific commitment by asking what action will be taken and when. • Follow up. Don’t expect officials to always follow through. • Get to know your City Clerk and his/her role in local government. INTRODUCING NEW { 12 } the grapevine | JULY 15, 2009 Gluten Free Pizza & Pasta Wheat Free • Gluten Free • No WBRO • All Natural We use only the finest all-natural ingredients to bring high quality, wheat-free/gluten-free pizza, pasta and pierogi to your table. It is with confidence that we can say “Our wheat-free and gluten-free foods are just as good as the ‘real’ thing.” 310 Wheat Road, Vineland PH: FAX: RETAIL STORE OPEN Mon. – Fri. 7am – 5:30pm Sat. 9am – 3pm 856-697-3400 856-697-1757 www.contespasta.com contespasta@comcast.net After the presentation, members of the council demonstrated a keen awareness of issues directly affecting them, such as the Small Learning Communities and school security issues at Vineland High School. Others with driving privileges noted a number of poor road conditions and dangerous intersections in the city. Also of interest to them was the new “Citizens Journalism” course to be offered soon by the Citizens’ Campaign promoting balanced and well- researched reporting in local media. Following the Citizens’ Campaign course presentation, Steve Hawk, Senior Planner, conducted a tour of City Hall for the VMYC with details of each department’s location and responsibilities. Thursday evening, council members met with the Vineland Downtown Improvement District (VDID) promotions committee, chaired by Marie Landicini-Wood, to learn about planned events in Center City. Discussion included the International Food & Cultural Festival on Saturday, August 22, and plans for the VMYC to hold its first Youth Festival in conjunction with the VDID event. The Youth Council is scheduled to meet on Monday, July 27 at 6 p.m. in City Hall. More information on the Youth Council can be obtained by visiting www.vinelandcity.org and clicking on the Mayor’s office or calling Mimi Bernard, Mayor’s office, at 794-4011. Ms. Ann Romano, Staff Advisor to the Council, may be contacted at 696-0788 Information on the Citizens’ Campaign and its free membership and free online courses is available at www.jointhecampaign or by calling (732) 548-9798. I Lee Burke is a Vineland resident and Cumberland County Chairman for the Citizens’ Campaign. He may be contacted at lee.burke@att.net Bring a friend and share the fun $ After $100 mail-in rebate 49 Only 99 Buy one, get one FREE! ® BlackBerry Curve 8330 smartphone BlackBerry Curve™8330 smartphone Buy one BlackBerry Curve 8330 smartphone for only $49.99 after $100 Buy one BlackBerry ® Curve™ 8330 smartphone for only $49.99 after $100 v mail-in rebate and get second one FREE after $100 mail-in rebate and mail-in rebate and get a second one FREE after $100 mail-in rebate and $49.99 in-store rebate. $49.99 in-store rebate. Requires new line of service and two-year agreement and BlackBerry Requires new line of service and two-year agreement and a BlackBerry ® data plan. Handset pricing varies by Sprint Authorized Rep. and may be subject to Handset pricing varies by Sprint Authorized Rep. and may be subject to add’l req. See store for details. See store for details. • • • • • • • • • Personal Corporate Email Personal & Corporate Email Text Instant Messaging Text & Instant Messaging Internet Web Access Internet Web Access Built-in GPS Built-in GPS Camera & Video Recorder Camera Video Recorder Bluetooth Capabilities Bluetooth ® Capabilities Sprint TV Sprint TV ® & Music Premier Media Player Media Playe – Video & Audio Player Organizer – Calendar, Task & Notes Organizer C $ 69 99 /per month Everything Data 450 Unlimited Texting, Picture & Video Unlimited Data Service Unlimited Direct Connect Email & Web Surfing GPS Navigation 450 Anytime Minutes Free Mobile to Mobile Unlimited Night & Weekend Starting at 7pm Nationwide Long Distance & No Roaming Vineland Vineland 622 E. Landis Avenue 622 E. Landis Avenue Vineland Vineland 533 N. East Avenue 533 N. East Avenue 2639 S. Main Road 2639 S. 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Sprint and the logo are trademarks of Sprint. ©Research In Motion, the RIM logo, BlackBerry, the BlackBerry logo and SureType are registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and may be pending or registered in other countries – these and other marks of Research In Motion Limited are BlackBerry logo and SureType are registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and may be pending or registered in other countries these and other marks of Research In Motion Limited are used with permission. Other marks are the property of their respective owners. used with permission. Other marks are the property of their respective owners. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Christmas in July Sale (Thru July 31st) ATTENTION GRADUATES Protect Your Certificate For Years to Come! ON SALE NOW (REGULAR PRICE $24 NOW ONLY $12) (excludes craft kits & sale items) 15% off 856-697-2639 • 1 178 Karin St. Vineland, NJ 08360 (excludes already discounted items & Gymboree) 30% off Summer Clothing Gymboree Summer Clothing the grapevine { 13 } 20% off (excluding Melissa & Doug) 20% Toys WWW.CHAMPIONAWARDS.US Summer Hours: Closed Sun/Mon. Tues-Thur. 10-5 * Fri. 10-6 * Sat. 10-4 2757 S. Main Rd., Vineland * 856-213-6739 The luxury of natural stone, without the expense. Sales Tax 3 . 5% Get your FREE 2009 Hardscaping Project Guide! © 2009 EP Henry Home Garden and Mole Management in Turf and Gardens Source: Rutgers Extension Services Albrecht M. Koppenhofer, Ph.D., Extension Specialist in Turfgrass Entomology Moles are burrowing mammals that can cause problems in turf areas and garden plots while foraging for earthworms or insects in the soil. There are several mole species in North America, but this article is primarily based on biology and control of the eastern mole (Scalopus quaticus), which causes most of the mole-related damage in the eastern United States. The star-nosed mole (Condylura cristata) is also found in New Jersey and surrounding areas but rarely causes damage due to its preference for moist soil near water. DESCRIPTION: Moles belong to the family Talpidae in the order Insectivora (insect-eaters) and are thus related to shrews and hedgehogs. Eastern moles have a pointed snout with sharp, pointed teeth, small eyes, small ears concealed in the fur, a short, nearly hairless tail, and a velvety fur that varies from brownish to grayish with silver highlights. The large front feet with webbed toes and stout digging claws move laterally. Fully grown eastern moles measure 5 to 8 inches (13 to 20 cm.) in length. The star-nosed mole can readily be identified by the fleshy tentacle-like projections on the tip of its nose. LIFE HISTORY AND HABITS: Eastern With Devonstone 16 Yorktowne P lace Wanted th e look and f eel of stone ® by EP Henry, you can capture the distinctive look of limestone, slate and bluestone at an attractive price. These cast stone pavers are created through a sophisticated process which replicates natural stone textures, shapes and colors. Devonstone is complemented by EP Henry’s wide range of Hardscaping™ products. Create a beautiful patio and then add an outdoor kitchen or fireplace, walkway or wall.With over 105 years of experience, help finding the perfect contractor, project financing and a Lifetime Guarantee, no one welcomes you home like EP Henry. Visit your EP Henry Authorized Hardscaping Distributor® for contractor referrals and to see the latest styles, textures and colors. 1969 South East Ave (Between Grant & Elmer Rd.) Vineland, NJ 08360 Call Mark for Details: 856-692-8650 Mon.-Fri. 7-5 • Sat. 7-12 the little shop Store Closing Sale Large selection of christening out ts & gi s Special rack of christening at 50% OFF Mole Biology/Ecology SYMPTOMS: Moles push up unsightly mounds or ridges as they borrow through the soil in search of food. The tunneling activity dislodges plants and damages roots, and the mounds provide a medium for weed seed germination. While moles are often blamed for the destruction of bulbs, seeds, and garden plants, this damage is usually caused by various species of mice and voles that may inhabit or use mole tunnels. Moles rarely consume plant material. 20% OFF Don’t just dream it… now you can travel the world! Featuring 5 Cruises & 25 Vacations or Use Us For Single Vacation Bookings! Call Now & Ask About Our Lifetime Package! www.TvTravelPackage.com/HA8467 All clothing, shoes and barretts 50-60% OFF (excluding Christening) 20% OFF All other merchandise Open til September 30th, 2009 • Call us for special appt. hours Getaway Lifetime Vacations, LLC (856) 979-8467 • Hilberto Andujar HOURS Tue.-Fri. 11-5 Sat. 11-4 137 North High Street, Millville (parking behind Old Oar House) moles are found in pastures, meadows, woodlands, as well as lawns, cemeteries, parks, and golf courses. Their diet consists mainly of earthworms, white grubs, crickets, and other invertebrates that live in the soil. Rarely do they consume plant matter like a few weed seeds. They can consume 70 to 100 percent of their own body weight per day. Therefore, an acre of turf generally supports only 2 to 3 moles simultaneously. Moles construct extensive burrow systems that consist of interconnected tunnels (runways) of two types: surface runways and deep runways. Certain runways of both types, but more commonly deep runways, are used as main avenues of travel; these main runways may be shared by several { 14 } the grapevine | JULY 15, 2009 CRABTREE’S LANDSCAPING And Turf Management Beautifying the outside since 1989 Serving Vineland, Millville & Bridgeton Areas COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL OVER 2 0 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE! Total Landscape Renovations In-ground Irrigation Systems Sodding, Mulching, Hydroseeding Waterfalls & ponds 856.875.0774 moles if their tunnel systems connect. Surface runways appear as raised ridges running through turf areas. Moles are capable of extending surface run- ways at a rate of 100 feet (30 meters) per day. Surface runways may be used daily as main runways, but more commonly they are used as feeding burrows that are infrequently used or abandoned soon after being dug. Generally, few or no mounds are produced due to surface tunneling. Surface tunneling is greatest in spring and fall or after warm rains. During winter or dry summer periods moles move into deeper burrows because food becomes scarce near the surface. Deep runways, which are usually main runways, are located 3 to 12 inches (30 to 45 cm) below the surface. They are used for daily travel between the nest and the surface runways. The only evidence for deep runways may be the molehills, volcano-like mounds of soil that the moles push up through short vertical tunnels when excavating deep runways. Deep runways are often constructed along the edge of sidewalks, driveways, fencerows, or other man-made borders, or around the woody perimeter of a yard. Den and nest cavities, slight enlargements (6 inches = 15 cm. diameter) of the tunnels lined with vegetation, are built 12 to 18 inches below the surface and connect to main runways. They are located either in protected areas underneath boulders, trees, stumps, and fencerows, or randomly within 10th ANNUAL POND TOUR If you have unsightly mounds or ridges popping up in your lawn or garden, there’s a good chance it’s caused by the burrowing of the eastern mole (Scalopus quaticus), which can be controlled by using a trap, like the plunger-style trap shown above. the tunnel system in open field areas. Moles live alone except during the short breeding period in late winter. A single litter of three to five hairless young is born six weeks later in the nest chamber. The young grow quickly and leave the nest to fend for themselves after only six weeks. Sexual maturity is reached the following year. The natural life span of moles is three to four years. Control by trapping BASICS: Trapping is the most effective success is knowledge of mole habits, patience, and persistence. Because lawns support only low numbers of moles and moles have a low reproductive rate, it is practical to eliminate them by trapping. Because the burrow system of a particular mole may extend over more than one lawn and/or the burrow systems of several moles may interconnect, neighbors may need to cooperate for successful control. Also be aware that turf areas surrounded by woodlots, pastures, or weedy fields may be rein- Dougherty’s is your pond specialist. Save the Date July 25, 2009 method for controlling moles. The key to Continued on next page All Annuals, Patio Planters & Hanging Baskets Summer Sale PONDS ON PARADE! See the most unique ponds in South Jersey Dougherty’ Home & Garden s Showplace Tour We Have Everything You Need To Beautify Your Backyard! EVERY THURSDAY IN JULY Mandevillas on Sale Plus w/Coupon take additional $4.00 OFF $5.00 OFF exp. 07/26/09 Reg. Price Saturday, July 25, 2009 $20.00 per person or $30 per couple All proceeds benefit the ARC of Glouceser County WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Receive 25% Off Your Entire purchase! (IN-STOCK ONLY) EXCLUDING SALES & SPECIALS Growers Of Quality Plants For All Your Gardening Needs • Time: 9am-3pm Open house format • Maps available at start of tour • Lunch courtesy of our sponsors All Ornamental Grasses 30% OFF (WHILE SUPPLIES LAST) EXCLUDING SALES & SPECIALS MONDAY TO FRIDAY 9am – 5pm SATURDAY 9am – 3pm • Gift Cards Available • SEPERS RETAIL CENTER 1114 W. Weymouth Road Newfield, NJ 08344 Hanging Baskets • Bedding Plants • Garden Decorations • Flowering Shrubs • Soils • Mulches, and much more! 470 N. Union Rd. East Vineland (between Oak Rd. & Landis Ave.) Mon. – Sat. 8am-6pm Sun. 9am-5pm Wide Selection Of Old Time Favorites & The Newest Varieties 20% off Any Plant Purchase Call now to register at 694-1216 Grown & Sold Here the grapevine { 15 } 856-696-4220 All Major Credit Cards Accepted 856-691-7881 www.cmgrowers.com Cannot be combined with any other coupon. (Before Taxes) Must present coupon. of $25.00 or more. exp. 07/26/09 3086 DELSEA DRIVEFRANKLINVILLE, NJ 08322 856-694-1216 www.doughertygardens.com Continued from preceding page Varicose • Veins • Featured on ? and fested continually because those areas can support large mole populations. The design of mole traps is based on the moles’ habit of quickly repairing damaged runways. However, moles have an uncanny ability to detect and spring improperly set traps. If a mole encounters a foreign object in its runway, it will burrow around it. But if the trap is carefully concealed by soil blocking the runway, the mole will try to reopen the blockage. Avoid disturbing the burrow excessively when setting a trap. WHEN AND WHERE TO TRAP: Spring Reach Out To The Most Qualified Specialist Minimally Invasive Insurance covered 30 min. Office Treatment Free Vein Screening Call to schedule an appointment Charles L. Dietzek, D.O., FACOS Raymond S. Wojtalik, M.D., FACS Voorhees • Sewell • Vineland 856.309.VEIN (8346) Specializing in spider and varicose vein treatment 2950 College Dr., Suite 2B, Vineland • www.VeinVascular.com and fall, when the moles are active near the soil surface, is the best time for trapping. Trapping in early spring will help prevent much of the damage, and it will also eliminate any pregnant females. For successful trapping it is essential to locate the main surface runways. Main runways are usually the ones that: (1) follow a more or less straight course for some distance, (2) connect two mounds or runway systems, (3) follow fence rows, concrete paths, or other manmade borders, or (4) run along the perimeter of lawns or fields. Because nests are usually located along the edge of areas, such as hedgerows or fence rows, border trapping at the places where runways enter the yard, field, or garden often provide good results, too. To confirm if runways are active, tamp down a small section or poke small holes into them at several locations throughout the system. Mark the location and check if the moles repair them. If the damage in a given location is repaired within one or two days, place a trap near that spot. Unless mole activity is very light, multiple traps (three to five per acre = seven to 12 per hectare) will provide better and faster control. Ideally, traps should be set in each of the main runway areas. How to trap: Among the several types of traps available, the Victor® harpoon- or plunger-type mole trap is probably the easiest to use, and is readily available from most hardware and garden stores, or from distributors. The trap uses sharp spikes to skewer the mole as it passes underneath. { 16 } the grapevine | JULY 15, 2009 Home Garden and To properly set a harpoon trap on a surface runway, carefully follow this procedure: 1. Measure the depth of the tunnel. If the bottom of the tunnel is deeper than the length of the spikes, remove a layer of soil so that the spikes will reach the bottom. 2. Using the side of your hand, lightly compress a section about 1 inche (2.5 cm.) wide of the ridge so that the tunnel is compressed to about half of its original diameter. 3. Center the traps (with safety catch in place) over the runway, and push the supporting legs into the soil until the trigger pan just touches the flattened area. Be sure the supporting legs do not cut into the tunnel below. 4. In hard soil, it may be helpful to form guide holes by raising and lowering the spears into the ground a few times. While doing this, hold the trap firmly in place to prevent the trap legs from riding up and down. 5. Set the trap and leave it, making sure not to step on any other portion of the runway system. 6. A plastic pail can be placed over the trap to discourage kids or pets from tampering with it. 7. Check the trap daily. If it fails to capture a mole within three to four days, move it to a different part of the main runway system. 8. After all the moles have been trapped, collapse and fill in all visible tunnels to discourage other moles from taking residence. Two other types of traps are more difficult to use because they require partial excavation of a section of burrow. But they are less conspicuous to passers-by than the harpoon trap. The scissor-jaw trap and the choker (-loop) trap use spring-loaded scissor arms and loops, respectively, to capture moles. To place traps, excavate a section of the burrow, replace soil loosely, set traps in the loosely replaced soil so that the choker trap’s loops encircle the burrow (at least 1 inch below the original passage) or the scissor trap’s jaws straddle the burrow. Do not use motor oil or WD40 to lubricate traps. Remove rust and dirt with a wire brush, and lightly lubricate with mineral oil only. insert the blade of a shovel behind the mole to prevent if from retreating in the open tunnel. The mole can be killed with a pitchfork or a hard stomp directly on top of it. Or it can be scooped out, placed in a pail, and released in a woodlot or weedy field somewhere distant. Moles can also be live-trapped with pitfall traps. Bury an empty 3-lb. coffee can (or similar container) in the ground so that the top edge is level with the bottom of the mole tunnel. Then carefully cover the exposed can and tunnel with a board. The mole will get trapped in the can and can be disposed of in an appropriate area. MOLE BARRIERS: Installation of a mole Any occasional success is at best temporary. Fumigation is relatively expensive and the benefits rarely justify the costs. Poison baits: Poison peanuts or other baits are ineffective because moles eat insects and earthworms. The baits may be hazardous to pets or wildlife that dig up and consume them. REPELLENTS: It is doubtful that the socalled mole plant, Euphorbia lathyris, or castor bean plant repels moles. The plant is poisonous to children, and can easily become a weed. Castor oil and castor oil based products (e.g. Mole-Med®) are supposed to reduce mole activity when thoroughly watered into the lawn (at least 1 inch of irrigation). But no scientific research has shown consistent results and these products also can cause environmental contamination. HOME REMEDIES: Placing chewing gum in the burrows has no effect; moles don’t eat chewing gum. Flooding tunnels or directing automobile exhaust down the burrows is useless. Putting broken glass, razor blades, rose branches, bleach, diesel fuel, gasoline, lye, sheep dip, or human hair down the burrows pose greater hazards to the environment than to the moles. Frightening devices such as mole wheels (spinning daisies), vibrating windmills, and whistling bottles are ineffective. I barrier should be considered when garden plots, seed beds, nurseries, or well-manicured turf areas are surrounded by large tracts of woods or weedy fields containing large mole populations. Barriers can be constructed from 3-feet (91.5 cm.) width of galvanized hardware cloth or aluminum sheathing. The barrier should be buried to a dept of 2 inches (61 cm,) (1.5 inches in hard ground) with 6 inches (15 cm.) left exposed above the ground, and 3 inches (7.5 cm) at the bottom bent outward to discourage moles from digging under. Mole barriers offer long-term protection but may be impractical in larger areas unless the problem is persistent and the damage justifies the time and expense of installation. REDUCING INVERTEBRATE PREY: In Additional Approaches to Mole Control DIRECT REMOVAL: On days when moles general, grub control will not provide much long-term relief from moles because moles feed on earthworms and other soil invertebrates as well. Any potential benefits would not be evident for several weeks because the moles will be even more active trying to find food. If they indeed move out of the treated site, they will not move far and can reinvade the site even several years later after having reproduced. POISON GASES: Cartridge, tablet, or pellet-type fumigants generally don’t penetrate through the moles’ extensive runway system, or the fumigant is lost through the top of the surface runways. Scotti Brothers Roofing & Siding Quality 1st Since 1986 • “FREE” Power Washing with complete roof system • “FREE” Garage Door with new vinyl siding WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | can be expected to be active near the surface, flatten small sections of active runways and mark them with a thin wire flag placed on top of the compressed tunnel. When a flag is moving, sneak up and Getting Divorced? Bonnie L. Laube, Esq. Greenblatt & Laube, PC Divorce, Separation, Custody, Child Support, Parenting Time, Alimony, Asset Distribution, Emancipation, Domestic Violence Certi?ed by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Civil Trial Attorney Tom’s Cell: (856) 498-4841 John’s Cell: (609) 381-4289 FREE ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED the grapevine { 17 } 856-691-0424 • email: bll@greenblattlaube.com 200 North Eighth Street • PO Box 883 • Vineland, NJ 08362 All major credit cards accepted www.ScottiBrosInc.com I Culinary Adventures { STEPHEN WILSON | PHOTOS: JILL McCLENNEN } Dune Restaurant When at the beach, a seafood haven such as Dune Restaurant is a “shore” bet. T he Sweet Life crew was in Ocean City for July 4th, so we decided to spend our tip jar funds on a dinner out. Dune Restaurant in Margate was recommended to us, and we arrived after an afternoon on the beach. Mason jars with sand in the bottom and a tea candle inside illuminated our table. Since Dune is a BYOB, our wine was opened and poured. I had two bottles of Bellview with me—Nana’s Wine and Chardonnay. I assumed that we’d be having seafood, so I’d selected two white wines for the evening. The first items on the menu were raw oysters, so I suggested we start with some Cape May Salts. As they were local, they were likely to be fresh off the boat. They arrived on the half shell and on a deep dish of ice. Two little metal dishes sat next to the oysters, one with fresh grated horseradish, and one with a dark vinegary mignonette. I slid my mini fork under the oyster to make sure it was separated from the shell and put a dab of horseradish and a drizzle of the vinegar sauce on the mollusk. As I slid the oyster in my mouth, it tasted of the sea and of the dressings that I had added—wonderful. The appetizers soon arrived. Cracked wheat salad, corn and crabmeat soup, grilled octopus, ceviche with lime/cilantro sorbet, and a bowl of mussels cooked in a champagne broth and served with French fries. The mussels were cooked in a broth made from pancetta (crispy bacon-like pieces of pork), shallots, chervil (an herb), champagne and perhaps a bit of olive oil. The side of crispy fries added a nice contrast in textures and flavors. This dish was something you’d see in a French bistro, and was perfect after a day at the beach. The grilled octopus was stellar as well. It was simply done, nothing fancy, but was prepared very skillfully. The octopus was a perfect texture—not an easy thing to achieve—and was dramatically presented with curly purple tentacles, tiny French green beans, arugula, and halved red grape tomatoes. A lemony dressing lightened and piqued the flavors of the components, and we all swooned over this dish. The entrées were equally as good—skate with herb gnocchi and hazelnut butter; Arctic char with spring onions, baby carrots, and an English pea puree; scallop risotto with yellow corn, peas, and grape tomatoes Left to right: Octopus, anyone? The Dune Restaurant in Margate serves up a grilled octopus appetizer. Brittany orders the free-range chicken, which is served with fingerling potatoes and crispy prosciutto. The caramel bread pudding is topped off with crème fraiche ice cream. K NEW PHILADELPHIA WATER ICE & GELATI’S and Deeks Deli Crunchi Creme & Flavors Flavor Burst Sundaes Milkshakes Banana Splits Sugar Free Ice Cream Ice Cream Cakes Year Round $ { 18 } the grapevine | JULY 15, 2009 2.00 OFF CREATE YOUR OWN SALAD: With Chicken, Grilled Chicken, or Crispy Chicken Exp: 7/31/09 Cheesesteak Sandwich $ Toppings are lettuce, tomato, carrots, cucumbers, black olives, sliced eggs, croutons, onions, bacon bits, pepperoncini OFF 2.00 Exp: 7/31/09 Butter Pecan • Strawberry Moose Tracks • Cherry Vanilla Chocolate & Vanilla Hotdog & Soda Small Cones $1.99 $2.00 Ice Cream Hours: Open 7 Days 11am-10pm Deli Hours: 9-9 Mon.-Sat. Catering 7 Days a Week • Main & Magnolia Rds. 691-5438 enriched with mascarpone cheese; a freerange chicken thigh and leg with fingerling potatoes and crispy prosciutto; and lamb with a blackberry glaze and purple sweet potato puree. We finished up with a caramel bread pudding with crème fraiche ice cream, as well as cups of hot La Colombe coffee. The bread pudding was hot, sticky, and a good sweet finish to the meal. The coffee perked us up enough to walk off the meal on the Ocean City boardwalk. The atmosphere was perfect—it was the sentimental shore theme—and the food was spot on. But to top it all off, the service was flawless. The waitstaff was attentive, but not overbearing. The owner walked around in sandals (Only at the Shore!), checking on tables, running dishes, and taking care of all the little details. If you’re at the Shore this summer, I recommend you let the staff at Dune Restaurant (609-487-7450, www.dunerestaurant.com) take care of you. I Stephen Wilson along with his wife Jill McClennen owns The Sweet Life Bakery. You may contact him via e-mail at thesweetlifebakery@verizon.net. EATING OUT From fine dining to lunch spots to bakeries, the area has choices to satisfy any appetite. Call for hours. Amato’s Restaurant, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 692-5756. Veal, chicken, seafood, and pasta specialties for dinner. Open for lunch, too. Closed Sundays. Andrea Trattoria, 1833 Harding Hwy., Newfield, 697-8400. Chef/owner Andrea Covino serves up Italian specialties in an atmosphere of fine dining. Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave, Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food served tapas style, specialty martinis, catering, private parties. Extensive wine list. Live music Friday nights. Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-0909. This breakfast and lunch spot offers a menu of sandwiches named for colleges near and far. Bain’s Deli, 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 5631400. Come in for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Daily specials include coffee of the day. Barbera’s Chocolates on Occasion, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 690-9998. Homemade chocolates and candies, custom gift baskets. Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees, desserts, drink specials. Take-out, too. Happy Hour buffet Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. NFL flat-screen TVs. Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy., Vineland, 6975500. Steaks, veal, chicken dishes. Meet friends at the bar. Open daily for lunch and dinner. Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 205-0012. The “Gutbuster” a 21-oz. burger, pizza, salads, wings, subs, dinners. Bojo’s Ale House, 222 N. High St., Millville, 327-8011. All food is homemade, including the potato chips. Casa Dori II, Brewster Rd. and Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 794-1888. Authentic Italian, lunch and dinner; catering available. Continental Room at the Ramada Inn, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 696-3800. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Open to hotel guests and the public. Crust N Krumbs Bakery, Main and Magnolia rds., 690-1200. Cakes, pies, cookies, breads, and doughnuts. Custom wedding cakes, too. Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call for lunch and dinner specials. Soft ice cream and cakes yearround. Mon.-Sat 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 6961900. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Take-out, too. Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. Open 24 hours. Kids eat free Tues. and Sat. Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave., Vineland, 691-5511. Family time-honored recipes, fresh ingredients. Donkey’s Place, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland, 6901777. One-of-a-kind cheesesteaks made on large, fresh poppyseed rolls. Dreamz Cafe, 2184 Union Lake Crossing, Millville, 765-5029. Panini, sandwiches, salads, soups. Also, gelato, Italian coffee, desserts, smoothies, and frappuccino. Esposito’s Maplewood III, 200 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks, seafood and pasta dishes at this Italian restaurant. Eric’s, 98 S. West Ave., Vineland, 205-9800. Greek and American cuisine. Pizza, too. Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. & Tuckahoe Rd., Vineland, 691-6080. Italian cuisine and dinner buffets to savor. Family-owned. Fresh Restaurant, 1405 Mays Landing Rd., Millville, 327-3435. Jumbo lump crabcakes, Black Angus burgers. Wed. is pasta night. Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli, 527 S. Brewster Rd.., 697-3509. Name says it all. Daily specials, catering. Closed Sunday. General Custard’s Last Stand, 2578 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 696-2992. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner served Tues.-Sat. Gina’s Ristorante, 110 N. High St., Millville, 825-4241. Italian cuisine, lunch and dinner, BYOB, nothing over $20. Giorgio’s Restaurant 363 E. Wheat Rd., Buena, 697-2900. Serving lunch and dinner daily. Italian cuisine, pizza. Giovanni’s Italian-American Deli. 1102 N. East Ave., Vineland, 692-0459. Pizza, Italian subs, all your lunch favorites. The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf Course, 4049 Italia Rd., Vineland, 691-5558. Restaurant and lounge open to the public for lunch Mon.Fri. 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Continued on next page Vineland’s neighborhood bakery, where everything is made from scratch and quality counts. -Lets Do LunchSEAFOOD HOUSE Pick One Appetizer to Share • Chicken Tender • Clam Strips • Bacon Cheddar Skins • Onion Rings • Mozzarella Sticks • Fried Zucchini Marciano’s Meal Deal 2 for $20 WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Super Seven Lunch Specials Choose from our Light & Summery Lunch Specials a 6th street between Landis and Elmer in Downtown Vineland From $6.99 Creole Shrimp Salad…………….$6.99 Beer Battered White Fish Fillet…………$6.99 Chicken Soprano…………………$6.99 Salmon a la Cucina ……………..$6.99 Petite Broiled Crabcake………..$8.99 Seafood Newburg…………………$8.99 Steak Au Poivre…………………..$8.99 • Cheesesteak Salad • Bacon Cheeseburger • Chicken Caesar Salad • Riblet Basket • Green Giant • Steak Quesadilla • Popcorn Shrimp • Garden Chicken Alfredo • Chicken Parmigiana Baked Zita w/Meatball & Choice of (2) Entrees: 856-692-5353 www.thesweetlifebakery.com Sunday Breakfast Buffet 8 am-1pm $2 OFF with this coupon Monday – Friday 3 pm – 6 pm & Saturday & Sunday 12 pm – 5 pm the grapevine { 19 } 1554 S. Delsea Drive, Vineland 856-692-2800 856-563-0030 947 North Delsea Dr. Vineland, NJ 08360 EATING OUT Continued from previous page Jake’s. 611 Taylor Rd., Franklinville, 6945700. Italian-American, served lakeside. Lunch, dinner, happy hour, Sunday brunch. Joe’s Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-8860. Barbecue and Kosher chickens, homemade sides, catering for all occasions. Kawa Thai & Sushi, 2196 N. Second St. (Rt. 47), Millville, 825-9939. Thai and Japanese cuisine. BYOB. Landicini’s Family Restaurant & Pizzeria Landis and Lincoln aves., Vineland, 691-3099. Italian cuisine, gourmet pizza salads. Open for lunch and dinner. Larry’s II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-9001. Three meals daily. Sunday breakfast buffet, early-bird dinners. Library V Restaurant, 206 Rt. 54, Buena, 697-9696. Renowned for prime rib, steaks, seafood, salad bar. Closed Mon. and Tues. La Locanda Pizzeria & Ristorante, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 794-3332. Pasta, veal, chicken. Lunch and dinner. Closed Sunday. Lucia’s Ristorante, 785 W. Sherman Ave., Vineland, 692-0300. Italian fine dining and regional cooking. Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 563-0030. Italian-American cuisine, seafood and veal. Open daily for lunch and dinner, Sunday breakfast buffet. Manny & Vic’s, 1687 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 696-3100. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Manny’s Pizza, 426 N. High St., Millville, 3275081. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Martino’s Trattoria & Pizzeria, 2614 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 692-4448. Brick oven pizza, risotto, polenta. Three meals daily. Merighi’s Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. Banquet/wedding facility as well as intimate restaurant. Nicky G. Fridays 9 p.m.–midnight. Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s Head rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet lunches and dinners in a casual setting. Moe’s Southwest Grill, 2188 N. 2nd St., Millville, 825-3525. Tex-Mex, burritos, catering. MVP Bar, 408 Wheat Road, Vineland, 6979825. Full bar menu, live entertainment, drink specials. Neptune Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge, 1554 South Delsea Drive, Vineland, 6922800. American cuisine, array of cocktails. Next Oar, 127 N. High St., Millville, 293-1360. Weekly menu, made-to-order dishes. Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek cuisine—lamb dishes and salads. Paperwaiter Restaurant & Pub, 1111 Village Dr., Millville, 825-4000. A special place for all your special occasions. Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland, 6940500. Breakfast, lunch, dinner specials; convenient drive-thru, mini-meal specials. Pete’s Pizza, 20 W. Park Ave., Vineland, 2059998. Pizza (including whole wheat), subs, wings. Open daily 11 a.m-10 p.m. The Rail, 1252 Harding Hwy., Richland, 6971440. Bar and restaurant with daily drink specials and lunch specials. Richland House, 1303 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-5700. Eclectic dinners and casual lunch fare. Closed Mondays. Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville, 3278878. Authentic Vietnamese—noodle soups, curry, hotpot, Buddhist vegetarian. Serene Custard, NW Blvd. and Garden Rd., Vineland, 692-1104. Pulled pork, hot dogs, homemade ice cream, party cakes. South Vineland Tavern, 2350 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-7888. Breakfast, lunch, dinner daily. Seafood and prime rib. Steakhouse at Centerton Country Club, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3325. Lunch and dinner. Steaks, reserve wines, upscale casual. Stewart’s Root Beer, 585 Delsea Dr., Vineland, 696-8062. Burgers, hot dogs, fries, floats and shakes. Sweet Life Bakery, 601 East Landis Ave., Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood bakery. Homemade pastries, cakes, coffee. Tony Sopranos, 107 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 405-0200. Pizza, Mexican Southwest fare, Atkins-friendly salads. Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs, chicken, fish, steaks. Always clams, eat in or take out service. Villa Filomena, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena Vista, 697-7107. Dinner combos, grilled meats, fish. Lunch and dinner daily. Wheat Road Cold Cuts, 302 Wheat Rd., Vineland, 697-0320. Deli and catering. Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-8899. Dinners, grilled sandwiches, wings in eight flavors. Willmott’s Pizza. 12 S. Seventh St., Vineland, 696-1525. Hand-tossed pizzas, stromboli, breakfast pizza. Offering Take-out or eat in service. Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville, 3270909. Continental cuisine and spirits served in a casually upscale setting. Ye Olde Centerton Inn, 1136 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3201. American classics served in a building right out of a Rockwell painting. I Recipe Corner { LISA ANN DiNUNZIO } Recipe Swap Two recipes for smoothies that will satisfy your summer thirst. reetings! When I received these two recipes, I thought of my sister, Laura. She is always whipping up fruit smoothies; she even makes up several batches sometimes to share with my parents, and my husband and me. She uses many different fruits and blends them until they’re smooth and very frothy. I hope you give these recipes a “whirl,” and also experiment with your own favorite fruits to come up with healthy, cool and refreshing beverages. The recipes and story were submitted by Valerie Roman who writes, “I love creating refreshing drinks and smoothies using fresh fruit. These recipes are two of my family’s favorites. We are constantly experimenting with different ingredients to come up with new smoothies. We thought you might want to give our two favorites (at the moment) a try.” G Ultimate Tropical Smoothie 1 cup mango, peeled and diced 1 banana, peeled and cut in half 1 cup fresh pineapple, diced 1 cup mango sorbet or ice cream 1/2 cup coconut milk or milk of choice 1 tbs. sugar 1/2 cup ice cubes Place ingredients into a blender and mix on low speed, continue blending, gradually increasing the speed, until the mixture is smooth. Pour into glasses and garnish with a pineapple slice on the rim of each glass, if desired. As always, Bon Appetit. I Lisa Ann is the author of Seasoned With Love, Treasured Recipes and Lisa Ann’s Seasoned With Love II. Send recipes for publication to lapd1991@aol.com or to The Grapevine, 3660 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08361. Watermelon Refresher 4 cups watermelon, seeded and chopped 3/4 cup water 1/4 cup sugar 1 1/2 cups ice cubes Place ingredients into a blender and mix on low speed until well blended. Pour into glasses, and garnish with a mint sprig, if desired. Mention This Ad { 20 } the grapevine | JULY 15, 2009 and Receive 10% OFF Graduations, Reunions, BBQ’s, Dinner Parties, Engagements, Weddings, Bar/Bat Mitzvahs, Birthday, Retirement, Teen Parties, Christenings, Showers, Etc. No job too big or small We can accomodate any multi ethnic cuisine including asian, spanish, italian you name it we can make it 11 am – 2 pm Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday For The Month of July • With $15 or more purchase over 14 years experience vegan and gluten free WEEKLY LUNCH SPECIALS Weekdays 11am – 2pm 856-692-7473 • Cell 609-247-8341 • Fax 856-692-7664 Newly Renovated & Open For the Summer The Best Sushi Bar in Cumberland County Beer Garden BYOB Breakfast & Lunch Thursday – Saturday 5-8 Monday – Saturday 8-3 Daily Specials OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Monday Trivia 8:30-10:30 World Tavern Poker 6:30 & 9:30, 2 games Tuesday $1.00 Tacos Wednesday Karaoke 9-12 Thursday DJ 9-12 Ouside Raw Bar (clams, oysters & U Peels) Friday & Saturdays Live Entertainment Sunday Kids Eat Free Ages 10 & below – 1 kids meal/Adult Check out our under $15.00 Comfort Menu 856-293-1200 123 North High St. Millville, NJ Dinner Chinese & Japanese Cuisine Offering a new dinner menu for 2009 Always Fresh, Never Over-priced The Looking Glass Cafe is Millville Arts Districts’ Original and Longest Running Casual Dining Establishment Catering On- and Off-Premises Available for Your Special Event 16 N. High St. Millville NJ 08332 Coming Soon Hibachi Japanese Steak House • Catering • Banquet Facilities/Wedding Reception • Eat In/Take Out & Delivery We deliver min. $25-$30 Hours: Open 7 Days A Week M-Th: 11am-10pm Fri & Sat: 11am-11pm Sunday: 12 noon-10pm 856-327-1666 (856) 765-1818 Fax: (856) 765-0588 WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | 101 E Main St. Millville, NJ 08332 Gypsy Smokehouse Tues.- Sun. 11am-7pm Closed Monday Served with celery & Blue cheese BBQ, Honey Mustard, Mild (Spicy) Medium (Hot), Hot (Very Hot), Insane (Need we explain) Beef Brisket, Pulled Pork, Pulled Chicken, Smoked Sausage Served S.O.S. (Sauce On Side) All Platters include sandwich, cornbread & 2 sides BBQ Extended Hours on Fridays & Weekends All Summer Long! 19 E. Oak Street Millville, NJ Phone: 856-327-1000 Fax: 856-327-1009 WINGS 10/15/20/25 Pieces Seasoned & Smoked until they are fall off the bone tender! Served Wet (Sauced), Dry (No Sauce) and S.O.S. All Platters include sandwich, cornbread & 2 sides Half Rack or Full Rack RIBS the grapevine { 21 } ! ”      Open ’Til 9:00 Every Friday MyArtMyMillville.com I Entertainment JULY 17, 18, 19, 23, 24, AND 25 Nunsense. Little LOCAL TALENT ON STAGE, THIRD FRIDAY IN MILLVILLE, A WINE TASTING, SUMMER CONCERTS, AND HANGAR 84 ROCK SHOWS. Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday: Blue Moon Dance Party, $3 Blue Moon drafts, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Saturday: Latin Dance Party, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Tuesday: Country Western Dance Party (beer and shot specials), 8 p.m.-midnight. Photo: Megan Kleefeld. Theatre, Sherman Ave., Vineland. Cumberland Players has announced the cast and production team for their summer musical. Cast is comprised of local talent. Director is Kristen Lazos of Alloway. July 17, 18, 23, 24, & 25 at 8 p.m., July 19 at 2 p.m. Tickets $15. www.cumberlandplaye rs.com, or by calling 692-5626. THURSDAY, JULY 16 80’s Cover Night. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. 7 p.m. JULY 16, 17, AND 18 Nightlife at Villa Filomena. Villa Filomena Ristorante & Lounge, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena, 697-7107. Thurs.: Ladies Night, Fri.: Live music, Sat.: Italian Accordian. JULY 16, 17, AND 18 Nightlife at Bojo’s. 222 N. High St., Millville, 327-8011. Thurs: Ladies Nite with Charlie. Fri: Kids Don’t Bounce. Sat: Singalong. Sun: Nascar/Baseball. WEDNESDAY, JULY 15 Stephen Jerzak. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland. Also, The Higher, Runner Runner. 6 p.m. $12-$15. (frontgatetickets.com). WEDNESDAY, JULY 15 The Right Coast, Honor Bright, Yearling, No Outlet, Clock Strikes 12, The Bottom Line. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. 7 p.m. $10. WEDNESDAY, JULY 15 The Gene Boney Band. Michael Debbi Park, Cedar Ave., Richland. Big Band music, Billy Joel, ballads, waltz’s, jitterbug and upbeat music.. 7 p.m. rain or shine. Seating available or bring a lawn chair. Free concert. PRO COMPUTER SERVICE.COM Your Personal IT Resource FRIDAY, JULY 17 Book Signing. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. Kelly Varesio, local author of Insperatus, a vampire novel. 6 p.m. JULY 15, 16, 17, 18, AND 21 Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Wednesday: ’70s and ’80s Throwback Night (frozen drink specials) 8 p.m.midnight, Thursday.: Karaoke with DJ AT THE CASINOS HEADLINERS, COMEDY ACTS, AND MORE Tickets: 1-800-736-1420; www.ticketmaster.com unless otherwise noted. Loverboy. Hilton. 8 p.m. $30. Robin Thicke. Showboat House of Blues. 9 p.m., $35, $30. Drake Bell. Tropicana. 8 p.m. $35- $65. We Can Help Your Business Run More Efficiently and Cut Your Expenses! Business Solutions • Hardware and Software Support • Network Design • Advanced Windows Server Support (2003/2008) • Domain Setup and Hosting • Windows XP, ME, 2000, 98 & 95 Support • Legacy DOS applications • Security Solutions • Help Desk Outsourcing • On-Site Training • Hardware/Software Sales • Microsoft Certified Partner { 22 } the grapevine | JULY 15, 2009 THROUGH JULY 26 Beatlemania Now. Bally’s. Wed, Fri, Sun. 8 p.m.; Saturday 8 and 10:30 p.m. $25. THROUGH AUGUST 9 A Bronx Tale. Harrah’s. Tuesday through Thursday 8 p.m., Friday through Sunday 9 pm. $65, $55, $40. HEADLINERS THURSDAY, JULY 16 Nas and Damian Jr. Gong Marley. Showboat House of Blues. 9 p.m., $39.50. COMEDY & MORE Comedy Club at Borgata. Borgata Music Box: three comedians daily, 9 p.m. (except during headliner engagements) 1-800-298-4200. Comedy Stop at the Trop. Three comedians nightly. Sun.-Thurs., 9 p.m., $23; Fri., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $23; Sat., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $28. Order tickets by phone at the Comedy Stop Box Office: 1-877-FUNNYAC or 609-348-0920. Visit www.comedystop.com. Fame. Tropicana. Monday and Thursday 8 p.m., Tuesday and Wednesday 3:30 and 8 p.m., Sunday 7 p.m. Yesterday: A Tribute to the Beatles. Tropicana. Liverpool Club Theater in North Tower. Wed.–Sun., 8:30 p.m., $25. THROUGH SEPTEMBER 5 Hypno-Sterical. Trump Marina. Thursday and Friday 9 p.m., Saturday 10 p.m. $22.50. FRIDAY, JULY 17 Love Train: The Sound Of Philadelphia, starring The O’Jays. Borgata. 8 p.m. $85, $65, $50. 1-800-298-4200. Paul Potts. Borgata. 9 p.m. $39.50. 1-800-298-4200. Spread Eagle. Hilton. 9 p.m. $15. THROUGH SEPTEMBER 6 Carnival of Wonders. Trump Plaza. 8 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday, 9 p.m. Friday, 3 and 7 p.m. Sunday. $25. Residential Services • Spyware/Virus Removal • Backup Systems • Training • Wireless Networking • File/Printer Sharing • Upgrades LOWEST CORPORATE RATES IN SOUTH JERSEY Contact Mark at 856-596-4446 x3208 One Comar Place Buena, NJ 08310 SATURDAY, JULY 18 Stone Temple Pilots. 8 p.m. $135, $95. 1-800-298-4200. Dave Attell. Borgata. 9 p.m. $45, $35. 1800-298-4200. THROUGH SEPTEMBER 6 Cirque Dreams Pandemonia. Taj Mahal. 8 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday, 9 p.m. Friday, 3:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. $35 and $25. www.procomputerservice.com 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. 7 p.m. FREE SUMMER CONCERTS AT GIAMPETRO PARK Enjoy these free concerts all summer long, as well as dancing on the adjacent dance floor. Held Monday evenings at 7 p.m at the Enrico Serra Band Shell. If raining, the concert will be held at Memorial School Auditorium, Main Road and Chestnut Avenue. • July 20: Ross Ippolito Combo • July 27: Buddy Gale Big Band • August 3: Greg Albert Duo • August 10: Corky Gale’s Combo • August 17: Doctors of Rhythm • August 24: Gene Boney Band • August 31: Frank Marone Combo • September 7: Bud Cavallo Duo Special arrangement for persons with disabilities can be made if requested in advance. Contact the Business Administrator’s Office at 7944000 ext. 4144. Transportation arrangements for seniors and/or disabled should be made through CATS (6917799) at least 48 hours ahead of time. SATURDAY, JULY 18 DJ Kenny Crawford. Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave., Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Music starts at 10 p.m. SATURDAY, JULY 18 Hopscotch Injury, The Other Car (and more). Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. 7 p.m. $8. Start Fresh Today! Credit Card Debt • Medical Bills Utility Bills • Surcharges And Even Some Income Taxes Stop Wage Executions Reduce Car Payments Free Office Visit-Start Fresh Financially! Want to wipe out your debt? WIPE OUT: SUNDAY, JULY 19 Poetry on High. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. Host Rita Lyman 2-5 p.m. STOP SHERIFF SALE MONDAY, JULY 20 Emarosa. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland. 9:30 p.m. $13-$15. (frontgatetickets.com). BANKRUPTCY IS YOUR LEGAL BAILOUT! Listen to Seymour Wasserstrum Esq. Live on the Radio Every Thursday Night From 8-9 pm on 92.1 FM Helping people wipe out their bills – since 1973 205 Landis Ave., Vineland www.wipeoutyourbillstoday.com $100 OFF w/this ad – CR We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for Bankruptcy Code. TUESDAY, JULY 21 Buddy Gale Orchestra. Joe Dale Pavilion at Bruno Melini Park, 616 Central Ave., Minotola. 7-9 p.m. All are welcome; bring your own chair. Free concert. Seymour Wasserstrum, Esq. SUNDAY NIGHT BRIDGETON RIVERFRONT CONCERTS Summer is back and with it comes the Sunday Night Concert Serie, hosted by the Bridgeton Recreation Department at the Bridgeton Riverfront 7-8:30 pm. (rain dates August 23 and 30) • July 19: Irv and Friends • July 26: In High Gear • August 2: Brown Street Chowder • August 9: Bud Cavallo Duo • August 16: Doctor of Rhythm CATS bus service will be available to Bridgeton Senior Citizens for this event by calling 691-7799, no later than the Thursday before the concert. For concert cancellations due to weather, call 453-1675. WEDNESDAY, JULY 22 John Lolli. Michael Debbi Park, Cedar Ave., Richland. Music from the 1940s to the present. 7 p.m. rain or shine. Seating available or bring a lawn chair. Free concert. SEYMOUR WASSERSTRUM Esq. -Bankruptcy Attorney- WEDNESDAY, JULY 22 Wine Tasting Event. Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave., Hammonton, 609-704-9797. t 6:30pm. Call to book your reservation. 856-696-8300 THURSDAY, JULY 30 Don’t Call Me Francis. Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave., Hammonton, 609-7049797. 9 p.m. Tickets $10. THROUGH JULY 30 Picturing America. Vineland Public Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland. Selected works of art spanning several centuries, all by American painters, sculptors, photographers, and architects. FRIDAY, JULY 17 Matt Roach. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. 5 p.m/7 p.m. JULY 17, 18, AND 19 Nightlife at Old Oar House. Old Oar House Brewery, 123 N. High St., Millville, 2931200. Fri.: Danny Eyer Band, 9 p.m. Sat.: Joe Kozak & Terry Smith, 9 p.m., Mon.: Trivia Night 8:30-10:30 p.m. THROUGH JULY 30 The Beauty of Life. Vineland Public Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 794-4244. Original art by Carmen Perez in acrylics, graphite and mixed media. Perez was born and raised in Puerto Rico and has been a resident of Vineland for 20 years. She is one of the owners of La Bella Art Gallery and Gift Shop. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | SATURDAY, JULY 18 Dan Godbey and Friends. Bogart’s Books, THE MOUSETRAP AUDITIONS CUMBERLAND PLAYERS will hold open auditions for its fall production of The Mousetrap by Agatha Christie. Director John Weiner is looking for men and women ages mid 20s to 60s to cast in this “who-done-it” murder mystery. Auditions will be held at Cumberland Players (Sherman Avenue and the Boulevard, Vineland) on Sunday, July 26, and Monday, July 27. Doors will open both evenings at 7 p.m., with auditions to begin at 7:30 p.m. Callbacks will be on Monday at 8 p.m. Auditions will be cold readings from the script of “TheMousetrap” Show dates for this production will be October 9, 10, 15, 16 and 17 at 8 p.m. and October 11 at 2 p.m., so be sure you are available for all these dates before auditioning. www.cumberlandplayers.com or vpproduction@cumberlandplayers.com. the grapevine { 23 } I Historical Vineland { VINCE FARINACCIO } More Early Churches By the close of the 19th century, a wide range of faiths was represented in Vineland. fter Vineland’s Episcopalian, Presbyterian and Methodist churches were established by 1864, the next 33 years brought mostly new denominations and places of worship to the town in accordance with Vineland founder Charles K. Landis’s vision that churches of various religions were essential. According to the Vineland Historical Magazine, the First Baptists formally organized June 15, 1865, and soon began holding services at Union Hall. Two years later, they broke ground for their own building on Landis Avenue near East Avenue. On November 26, 1865, the first meeting of what became the First Congregational Unitarian Society was held. A.G. Warner, in Vineland and Vinelanders, describes this group’s goal as providing its members with “a church organization that shall conduce to their spiritual growth and that shall be in harmony with their views of the princi- A ple taught by Christ, to provide a Sunday School…and to promote among men the growth of that practical Christianity taught in the Old and New Testaments.” On the last day of 1865, a Sunday School and Bible class were established, and by April 5, 1866, services were conducted in Mechanics Prior to Landis’ founding of Vineland, Lewis Collins and Zachariah Murray established a church that became the basis for the African-American sects of Mount Pisgah U.A.M.E and the New Bethel A.M E. According to the Vineland 1961 Centennial Program, services were conducted in a Prior to Landis’ founding of Vineland, Lewis Collins and Zachariah Murray established a church that became the basis for the African-American sects of Mount Pisgah U.A.M.E and the New Bethel A.M E. Hall. By 1869, work began on a 400-capacity stone structure that was designated as the denomination’s new home. In 1868, the Christ Episcopal Church took up residence at the South Vineland Railroad depot. Two years later, it occupied its own building on the southeast corner of the Boulevard. Buena Vista Township log cabin. The Mount Pisgah Church received a home in Vineland when it was deeded land on Plum Street in 1880. The New Bethel Church was constructed on Seventh Street in 1874. According to B. F. Ladd’s History of Vineland, that structure was destroyed by a fire in April 1878. The facility was insured for $1,150 and the money was immediately applied to rebuilding the church. The origins of this area’s Pilgrim Congregational Church date back to 1871 when a group of 24 gathered at Temperance Hall for the purpose of organizing. By 1874, the denomination was soon housed in what Ladd calls “a neat well finished building” at Seventh and Elmer streets. The Italian immigration to Vineland began in 1873, according to Ladd’s chronicle. Most of these newcomers settled in the East Vineland area and continued the farming that they left behind in their native country. The Centennial Program article reports that religious services for this predominantly Catholic group were held in the rail station in the center of Vineland and were conducted by a priest from Millville’s Fathers of Mercy. By 1874, however, a Catholic church was warranted and construction began on a stone structure on Eighth Street. On Christmas Day of that year, Sacred Heart Church officially opened its doors. Twelve years later, a second Catholic parish, St. Mary’s, was established with a church in the center of the farming community in East Vineland. The Wesley Methodist Society was The Grapevine’s Crossword Puzzle { 24 } the grapevine | JULY 15, 2009 ACROSS 1. Speedometer rate 4. Important game player 7. Sheep’s cry 10. Scorch 12. Large So. Am. rodents 14. Taxis 15. Free from danger 16. 3rd rock 17. Cain and ____ 18. Gazes 20. President’s service 22. Crow’s call 23. Comic Harvey ___man 24. “Socrate” composer 26. Not prone 29. Of she 30. Cleans teeth 35. Cheer 36. Sealed metal container 37. ___s: SE Asian country 38. Impose regulations on 44. Electronic data processing 45. Eyelid infections 46. Ridgeline 48. Boxer Mohammed 49. Pen point 50. Break from a union 53. Tendons 56. Japanese beverage 57. Master of ceremonies 59. 3rd Islamic month 61. Comportment 62. Fathers 63. Three performers 64. Tally 65. 2000 pounds 66. European money DOWN 1. Manuscripts (abbr.) 2. Snow and sugar snap 3. Tool handle 4. Netherlands river 5. Outdated TV player 6. Taps 7. Pig movie 8. Assist in wrongdoing 9. Sign language 11. Respond to 12. Young football league 13. Israeli money 14. Library study cubicle 19. Foray 21. Mine wagon 24. Backsides 25. Buddhist saint 27. British scholar John Solution to last week’s puzzle 28. 18th hebrew letter 29. Time units (abbr.) 31. Company that rings receipts 32. Small amount 33. Black tropical Am. cuckoo 34. Dipping morsel 39. A B vitamin 40. ____te: remove 41. Digressions 42. Clowns 43. Emerald Isle 47. Siskel and _____, critics 50. Aforementioned 51. Supplemented with difficulty 52. Utter sounds 53. Visualized 54. Manufactured article 55. Invests in little enterprises 56. Senior military officer 58. Actor Hume ___nyn 60. Informal debt instrument VINTAGE VINELAND established here in the early 1880s, and according to Ladd, was originally housed at Seventh and Grape streets in a brick church that was dedicated on January 23, 1881. The group moved to a new building on Elmer Street 10 years later. The Centennial Program article mentions that some surviving records from this period indicate that a German Methodist Church also existed here at one time, its location somewhere on Grape Street. The German Methodists rented out its facilities to the West Baptists, a group organized in 1895 and comprised of members of the First Baptists from the west side of town who wanted a church closer to their area. The West Baptists eventually established a home of their own on Landis Avenue. Founded in 1897 on Plum Street, Ahavath Achim was not only the oldest synagogue in Vineland, according to the Centennial Program article; it was the first orthodox synagogue in southern New Jersey. With the addition of Ahavath Achim, Vineland closed out the 19th century with a wide range of faiths represented and an abundance of places of worship, a situation that would continue to grow throughout the next hundred years. I Who Is She? Maybe a great-great aunt on your mother’s side? Over the years, the Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society has acquired many old-time images. Kate Harbold, at the Society, is busy cataloging the photos from Vineland’s rich past, but she needs the help of The Grapevine readers in identifying the people and places captured on film so long ago. If you know something about this portrait, we ask that you contact either Harbold at the Society or use the contact information on page 4 to inform us. The mission of the VHAS is to acquire, maintain, and preserve Vineland’s history. The Society was founded in 1864, just three years after the establishment of the town of Vineland. It is the second oldest historical society in New Jersey, second only to the New Jersey Historical Society. The VHAS consists of a museum, library, and archives, open to the public on Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m., same hours Tuesday through Friday for research. It is located at 108 South Seventh Street, Vineland (691-1111). Beautiful Smiles, Made Affordable OUR SERVICES MILLVILLE FAMILY DENTAL Union Lake Crossing Shopping Center 2144 N. 2nd St., Millville WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | NEW PATIENT WELCOMING PACKAGE $ 80 (reg. $230.) Includes oral exam, full mouth series of x-rays, cleaning & polishing, oral cancer screening, periodontal (gums) evaluation. With coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Emergency Walk-Ins Welcome • Same-Day Denture Repair • • • • • • • • • • • Cleaning & X-Rays Porcelain Veneers Cosmetic Dentistry Periodontal Therapy (Gum Treatment) Full Mouth Reconstruction Implant Rehabilitation Root Canals (One Visit) Full & Partial Dentures Bleaching White Fillings Crowns & Bridges 856-825-2111 Open 7 Days a Week. Day & Evening Hours Proud Member Of The Allied Dental Practices Of NJ Personalized Dentistry SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO OUR SENIOR CITIZENS the grapevine { 25 } Se Habla Español E D W A R D P O L L E R , D D S • G L E N N P R A G E R , D D S • TO D D P R A G E R , D D S • D A N I E L D I C E S A R E , D M D REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS The following transactions of $1,000 or more were filed with Cumberland County in the month of June 2009 (transactions may have occurred in an earlier month). Names listed may, in some cases, be those of buyers’ or sellers’ representatives. HOPEWELL TWP 2 Manor Ln., Patti Lynn Bump (Adm., CTA) to Joseph L Lopez on 6/2/09 for $149,000 LAWRENCE TWP 5688 Harris Ave., John L Caselli, Sr. to Big Oak Investments LLC on 6/1/09 for $130,000 897 Lummstown Rd., Wells Fargo Bank Trust (by Atty.) to Steve Levick on 6/3/09 for $125,000 MILLVILLE 1605 Hance Bridge Rd., Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. (by Atty.) to Samuel Siniavski on 6/1/09 for $215,000 2025 W Main St., Fedora Fidiaj (Est. by Exec.) to Walter J Robinson on 6/2/09 for $166,000 1454 Pleasant Dr., Rochelle Musto to Matthew Bonavich on 6/3/09 for $225,000 10 McNeal St., Christine B Moore to Heritage Tile Inc. on 6/4/09 for $1,500 119 Twilight Rd., Harry Hannah to Lawrence A Brown, Sr. on 6/4/09 for $3,000 443 S 2nd St., Shore Management Co. of Delaware Valley Inc. to Melyssa A Watts on 6/4/09 for $56,000 118 Rieck Ave., Ricky F Garrison to Kevin Cain on 6/4/09 for $61,000 1126 W Main St., Tina L Bonavich to Daniel J McLaughlin on 6/4/09 for $139,000 454 Lance Ct., SCIP 09-04 LLC to Mathew Goranson on 6/4/09 for $190,000 1726 E Main St., Ladora A Saul to State of New Jersey Dept. of Transportation on 6/5/09 for $20,000 101 N 3rd St., Mark E Catlett to Thomas T Archer on 6/5/09 for $50,000 125 & 127 N 3rd St., Lawrence Raymond Duski to Janet Mendez on 6/5/09 for $93,000 307 Carmel Rd., Charles Northam to Gary A Brown on 6/5/09 for $115,000 BRIDGETON 228 Baltimore Ave., Jimmy L Lane to Angel Cosme on 6/1/09 for $23,000 35 S Pine St., Beneficial New Jersey Inc. to Lance W Hayes on 6/2/09 for $16,900 47 Edwards Ave., Federal National Mortgage Assoc. to Blaise Menzoni on 6/2/09 for $65,000 4 & 12 Parker St., City of Bridgeton to Saul Rosa on 6/5/09 for $1,000 COMMERCIAL TWP 547 Doe Place, James H Stiles, III to Richard Quinn on 6/4/09 for $68,000 2400 Market St., Robert Silvert to Walter Whitaker on 6/5/09 for $124,900 DEERFIELD TWP 458 Morton Ave., Frank S Manno to F&S Realty Associates LLC on 6/2/09 for $475,000 Cedar & Pine St., Bryan D Gallagher to Destiny R Washington on 6/4/09 for $30,000 538 Big Oak Rd., Adalberto Munoz to Capital 1031 Exchange Co. FBO & C on 6/5/09 for $148,000 FAIRFIELD TWP 97 Beach Rd., Stephen G Crane, Jr. Trust to Stephen G Crane, Jr. on 6/1/09 for $30,000 Bridgeton-Millville, Affordable Housing Development LLC to Jaynet Peterson on 6/2/09 for $181,890 11 Holly Way, Beth F Wasserman to Henry J Miller, Jr. on 6/2/09 for $235,000 8 Rogers Dr., United States Department of Agriculture to Clarence L Braxton on 6/5/09 for $109,000 16 Back Neck Rd., Jama P Morgan to Margarita Lopez on 6/5/09 for $176,000 With rates at historic lows, now is a great time to buy a new home or consider refinancing your existing mortgage. For unparalleled service, great rates and a variety of financing options, call Blaise R. Menzoni. FHA • VA • Conventional Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. Get amazing results from your advertising campaign in The Grapevine. Get the benefit of our distribution to every residence in Vineland (approx. 22,250)! Ride the wave of excitement as The Grapevine’s debut has excited our town’s citizens. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call { 26 } the grapevine | JULY 15, 2009 Blaise Menzoni LOAN OFFICER Gateway Funding DMS, LP Office 856.692.9494 Fax 856.691.3687 Cell 856.297.7087 1 17 E. Landis Ave • Suite C • Vineland, NJ 08360 1 Licensed by NJ department of Banking and Insurance 856-457-7815 or E-MAIL: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. Opening Doors to Home Ownership 101 Crescent Blvd., Barbara A Ernst to Thomas Hamblin on 6/5/09 for $167,500 UPPER DEERFIELD 1 Laura Ct., Signature Homes at Upper Deerfield LLC to Edward J Geletka on 6/2/09 for $372,000 VINELAND 1681 N Valley Rd., John Caselli, Sr. Trust to John L Caselli, Sr. on 6/1/09 for $120,000 2298 Delmar Ave., Beazer Homes Corp. to Lonell Zimmerman on 6/1/09 for $292,556 31 Arcadia Place, Vincent M Greenfield to Mod-Con Inc. on 6/2/09 for $28,000 2430 Old Farm Dr., Tradition Homes at Vineland LLC to NVR Inc. on 6/2/09 for $77,500 2460 Old Farm Dr., Tradition Homes at Vineland LLC to NVR Inc. on 6/2/09 for $77,500 1964 E Oak Rd., John Kenneth Carlson to Justine J Myerson on 6/2/09 for $125,500 203 Doren Terr., Hector Montano (by Atty.) to Anna M Rosado on 6/2/09 for $130,500 914 E Park Ave., Lawrence Richard Jones (Exec.) to Sheron Johnson on 6/2/09 for $139,000 1310 E Walnut Rd., Carol Presgraves to Victor Burrus on 6/2/09 for $151,000 909 Becker Dr., Adajean Puff to Steven L Holt on 6/2/09 for $225,000 1168 Livia Ln., Landmark Development No. 4 LLC to Dale E Reese, Sr. on 6/2/09 for $242,650 1820 Ferrari Dr., Ironwood Building Co. to Richard B Holman on 6/2/09 for $384,000 755 Fox Ln., Ali Ozdemir to Bahtiyar Ozdemir on 6/3/09 for $77,500 1590 S Main Rd., John A Kaspar. Jr. (Exec.) to Adam Kaspar on 6/3/09 for $150,000 593 S Main Rd., Manuel C Dijamco, III to George Bahamonde on 6/3/09 for $205,000 279 N Lincoln Ave., Joseph Ruggeri to Charles E Meeker on 6/4/09 for $147,500 2573 Mart Ave., Patricia M Smith (Exec.) to Gianfranco Guercio on 6/4/09 for $164,000 558 Mayfair St., Shahbaz Sotrah to Alberto Hernandez on 6/4/09 for $170,000 2703 Medina St., Hovnanian K at Vineland LLC to Nelson Flores on 6/4/09 for $275,000 702 W Weymouth Rd., Rhonda L DeWinne (Pers. Rep.) to Arthur Mendini, Sr. on 6/5/09 for $166,000 705 Westmont Ln., Adam J Herron to Quintino Gomez on 6/5/09 for $168,000 736 Broadway, RPJ Properties LLC to Marvin Walker, Jr. on 6/5/09 for $170,000 1103 E Almond St., Bridget M McManus (Fka) to Christian Gomez Velazquez on 6/5/09 for $176,900 1358 Venezia Ave., Ryan Joseph Ploch to Jana M Dandrea on 6/5/09 for $250,000 Homes with Immediate Occupancy 2 PLUS ACRES This 4 Bedroom 2-story Bungalow has been completely remodeled and is ready to move into. Kitchen has a center island with all new appliances. This quiet setting home comes with 2 plus Acres. Call today for your personal tour. Vineland LIKE BRAND NEW This 3 Bedroom rancher is like brand new. Large eat-in Kitchen, 2 full Baths, Basement nice and high with Family room, sits on almost 2 Acres. Home seems small but is very deceiving. Vineland INGROUND POOL This home speaks for itself. All Brick home. Two Bedrooms on first floor & 2 Bedrooms on second floor with 1/2 Bath. Gorgeous wood floors in LR, FR, DR. The Kitchen is completely remodeled with a huge granite top island. Basement is finished. Fenced-in back yard has a wonderful in-ground pool for perfect entertainment. MOTIVATED SELLERS ! Vineland FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Worldwide Convenience • Personal Attention Savings Home Equity Checking VISA Credit Cards Auto Loans VISA Check Cards Personal Loans Online Banking 4 LARGE BEDROOMS WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Plus Much More! “Serving Members for Over 70 Years” 37 West Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08360 This is one spectacular home. 4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths. Wood floors in Dining Room, tile floors in eat-in Kitchen, and Hallway. Laundry on first floor. Above ground pool is less than one year old. Concrete pad, covered with large awning off the Kitchen patio door, excellent for entertaining. 9′ garage doors. Call Listing Agent for more details! Vineland Call Me Today 856-696-0767 Also serving members at: 28A Cornwell Dr. Bridgeton, NJ 08302 (609) 501-2340 CARMEN MINGUELA Realtor / Associate Bilingual Circle of Excellence, 2003 thru 2008 the grapevine { 27 } 856-453-9094 www.cumcofcu.org Graham Realty • 1101 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08360 Business (856) 606-0696 ext 107 Fax: (856) 691-3020 CMINGUELA@AOL.COM Clifford Graham broker of record CALL VISIT PLAY 1234 All Summer Long At Our New West Landis Avenue Branch Now, those living or working on both sides of Vineland can enjoy the full banking services that have made our 175 S. Main Road headquarters Cumberland County’s fastest growing bank. Call 691-1234 to learn more. Or better yet, visit 1234 W. Landis during our Endless Summer Fridays 2. While you’re at our new branch, meet our professional staff and enter to win $1234 in the Capital moneycard grand prize drawing.† NEW BRANCH NOW OPEN At 1234 West Landis Avenue Next to the Wal-Mart Supercenter 2.02% APY* NOW Checking Account No minimum balance or monthly fees. Free logo checks. Unlimited check writing. No fee ATM/Debit card. Lobby Hours Both Locations: Monday – Wednesday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM Thursday & Friday: 8:30 AM – 6:00 PM Saturday: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM Drive-Thru Hours Both Locations: Monday – Thursday: 8:00 AM – 6:00 PM Friday: 8:00 AM – 7:00 PM Saturday: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM Or Anytime at CapitalBankNJ.com Plus! Spin The Endless Summer Fridays 2 Wheel of Prizes and Win! Opening any new account at either Capital branch during our Endless Summer Fridays 2 gets you a spin of the wheel for the chance to win a beach towel, hibachi, cooler bag, or camp chair. Se Habla Español All rates are guaranteed through December 31, 2009. Offer may be withdrawn at any time without previous notice. Fees may reduce earnings. *Annual Percentage Yield (APY). Interest rate may vary. Limitations may apply. †You need not open an account to play or win, nor do you need to be present at the time of the drawing to win. Drawing date: Friday, September 4, 2009. All federal, state and local tax liabilities and gratuities are winner’s responsibility. Our Focus Is You. 175 S. Main Road & 1234 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland, NJ • 856.690.1234 Member FDIC

Posted on July 14th, 2009 by by Mike

July 8, 2009

INSIDE CO U N T Y FA I R • P R I N C I PA L’S L I ST • F I R ST C H U RC H ES • Z U CC H I N I VOLUME 2 | ISSUE 22 | JULY 8, 2009 CONNECTING YOU { ED HILT | PHOTOS: PATTY ALI } T O V I N E L A N D . W E E K L Y. Visit us online www.grapevinenewspaper.com Cooking Up Some Summer Fun Alyssa Lopez is spending her summer as an Ellison Explorer. The new camp at Ellison offers eight weeks of nonstop fun for children ages 3 to 13. Campers visited Philly Pretzel Factory in Millville, where they tried their hand at making soft pretzels. Another field trip took them to Clorinda’s Catering in Vineland, where Clorinda Blasse taught the kids how to plan a meal and then set them to work making meatballs, sauce and pasta. The region offers freshwater and saltwater options to old salts as well as beginners fishing for thrills, solitude. ack Bondi, his tackle box within reach beside him, cast his line from the shore and waited as the bobber rested on the relatively calm water at Union Lake in Millville. Five minutes became 10 minutes. Ten turned into 15. Nothing. Except for the occasional nudge from a gentle breeze, the bobber stayed as still as a statue. “Got to be patient if you’re going to fish,” said Bondi, sitting on a bucket with a Phillies cap pulled down over his head. J Then the bobber started to dip and dance before it vanished underwater for an instant. Bondi tugged on the line, reeled a sunfish onto shore, gave it a quick glance and tossed it back. “This is a nice lake for fishing,” said Bondi, a 68-year-old Millville resident, as he cast another line. “Got panfish, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass. It’s a good place. And it’s nice and quiet. I like that. I’ll come down here a couple times a week. More, if my wife has work around the house planned for me.” From freshwater to saltwalter, from the Maurice River to the Delaware Bay, avid fishermen will tell you that Cumberland County has much to offer. “Cumberland County is a great place for any fisherman,” said Cumberland County Surrogate Doug Rainear, a saltwater fisherman who helped start the county-sponsored Delaware Bay Fishing Tournament. “We have saltwaContinued on page 26 Owner of THE LITTLE GYM Rich Rodriguez Trusts Us To Help The Little Gym Grow Big And Strong.              COMING SOON! NEW CAPITAL BANK BRANCH Our Focus Is You. 175 S. Main Road, Vineland, NJ • 856.690.1234 Se Habla Español CapitalBankNJ.com { 2 } the grapevine | JULY 8, 2009 JUNIPER VILLAGE OFFERS ASSISTED LIVING AND A SEPARATE SECURED COMMUNITY FOR INDIVIDUALS IN NEED OF DEMENTIA CARE A S S I S T E D L I V I N G A N D W E L L S P R I N G M E M O RY CA R E AT W I L L I A M S TOW N Nurturing the spirit of life 1640 South Black Horse Pike Williamstown, NJ 08094 www.junipercommunities.com SM 856.740.4444 I Faces in the News Disanti Makes Dean’s List Janine Nicole Disanti, daughter of Dennis and Terri Disanti of Pittsgrove, has completed her freshman year at Salem Community College where she is attending under the NJ Stars Program. Janine made the Dean’s List for both the first and second semesters. The 2008 graduate of Schalick High School is majoring in Biology and hopes to become an optometrist. Humanity® – “Richard Baum Lifetime Achievement Award” on behalf of the Cumberland County Board of Realtors at the recent 20th Anniversary Celebration Dinner Dance held at the Savoy Inn. With the support of the membership of the Cumberland County Board of Realtors, more than $4,000 was raised this year to support Habitat for Humanity’s local programs. In addition to being a resource to area realtors, the members also raise money and donations for a variety of community service organizations. Salas Accepts Habitat Award Pollard Earns Doctorate in Pharmacy Craig Pollard, son of Mark Pollard and Nancy Ciarlante Pollard, was awarded a Doctorate in Pharmacy degree from the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy at Rutgers University during a ceremony held on May 22. He has accepted a position as a pharmacist with CVS in Honolulu, Hawaii. Elaine Salas, Community Affairs Chair for The Cumberland County Board of Realtors® accepted the Habitat for Pictured, from left: Alvina Baum, Secretary of Cumberland County Habitat, Victoria Lods, Cumberland County Habitat for Humanity Executive Director, Elaine Salas, Community Affairs Chair of Cumberland County Board of Realtors. Rotary Installs New Leadership The Rotary Club of Vineland recently celebrated the beginning of a new year of service by inducting its 2009-2010 President, Mr. Ted Lane, during the club’s annual Installation Dinner. The event was attended by Immediate Past District Governor, Ralph Owen who assisted with the installation of Lane, as well as six officers and eight Board Members. As part of the ceremony, Lane and Immediate Past President, Elizabeth Frank, accepted the Membership Development and Extension Award from Rotary International for achieving the highest member retention rate in District 7640 during 2008-2009. Lane and Frank also accepted a Presidential Citation from Rotary International in recognition of the club’s efforts to reduce child mortality and “Make Dreams Real” for children worldwide. Lane will serve for one year along with the new slate of officers and board members: Linda Foster, President-Elect; Keith Petrosky, Vice President; Gail Marino, Secretary; Bonnie Laube, Treasurer; Dave Schad, Charities Treasurer; and Elizabeth Frank, Immediate Past President. The club’s 2009-2010 Board of Directors includes: Hope Brolis, Club Administration; Ronald McMahon, International Service; Mike Cyter, Foundation; Joseph Delgado, Community Service; George Steinbronn, Membership; Mary Jane Kinkade, Public Relations; William Plick, Finemaster; and Bruce Middleton, Sergeant-at-Arms. In the photo: Immediate Past President, Elizabeth Frank passes the gavel to Ted Lane, the newly inducted President of the Rotary Club of Vineland. First Nephrology Symposium at SJH South Jersey Healthcare recently hosted its first Nephrology Symposium at Cumberland County College. Dozens of local physicians and health care professionals attended the event, which featured presentations from experts in the treatment of kidney disease. Nephrologists diagnose causes and levels of kidney failure, and prescribe appropriate treatment such as medication, diet changes, or dialysis.Several regional and national experts spoke at the symposium, including Gerald Appel, MD, Director of Clinical Nephrology at Columbia University; Larry Krevolin, DO, Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine at Hahnemann University Hospital; and Steven Fishbane, MD, Chief of the Division of Nephrology at Winthrop University Hospital. Speakers from South Jersey Healthcare included Jack Shields, MD, Director of SJH Medical Education; Kevin Barber, DO, SJH Nephrology Symposium Chairman; and Michael Yoslov, DO, SJH Nephrology Symposium Co-chairman. Pictured, from left: Jean Mathew, MD; Michael Yoslov, DO, SJH Nephrology Symposium co-chair; Larry Krevolin, DO – Speaker; Kevin Barber, MD, SJH Nephrology Symposium co-chair; Steven Fishbane, MD – Speaker; Gerald Herskowits, MD; Arshi Quadeer, MD. More Faces in the News on page 5 SEND US YOUR FACES — IT’S FREE! Get your photos published in The Grapevine… birthdays, engagements, weddings, anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them the address listed on p. 4. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the grapevine { 3 } I Editor’s Letter From Our Computers to Your Mailbox I never thought of the publishing business as being particularly sexy. But apparently some of our readers have found it to be at least mildly interesting to learn about the process of publishing a hometown newspaper. I have found myself answering questions on several recent occasions about how The Grapevine gets from our computer screens to your mailbox, so I thought you might like to read about what we do each week to bring your town’s news into your home. Much of the editorial content is planned several weeks, and in some cases, months before we publish it in the current edition. This is especially the case with our cover and feature stories. Many times we (my Managing Editor, Deborah Ein, and myself ) will write the features in-house, but more often than not, we will assign these features to one of the freelance writers with whom we work closely on a regular basis. These freelance writers are not staff members on The Grapevine’s payroll, but rather independent contractors who work on the stories on their own time and write the stories in their own homes or offices and submit them to us via e-mail. Meanwhile, as we develop our editorial content each week, our advertising sales executives are pounding the pavement to drum up ads for each issue. By Friday afternoon, we add up the total number of ads booked for the following Wednesday’s issue to determine how many pages we will be publishing that week. We try very hard to make sure we maintain a 50-50 ratio of ad-to-editorial space in each week’s issue, or at least get as close as possible to that ratio. As we prepared to publish the issue you’re reading now, we had roughly 16 pages of ads, so we decided to publish 32 pages. The page counts must always be an increment of four, thus The Grapevine will usually be 28, 32, 36 or 40 pages. On Saturday morning, I usually create a file on my computer that we call the “dummy” file (pictured). It is a document that can be printed on a standard letter-sized piece of paper and it shows what ads and what editorial content goes on each page. I e-mail this file to my staff so that they can make sure the ads are the correct sizes and configurations and that the editorial will fit in the space I’ve allotted, etc. Once she receives the dummy, my Art Director, Lori Goudie, will create the layout files for the issue using a computer program called Quark Xpress. Lori is an independent contractor, just as our freelance writers are, and she does her work for The Grapevine from her home office. She prepares these layout files over the weekend, and she’ll place all the ads and design the pages by flowing in all the copy and photos she’s received from Deb up until that point. By Monday morning, Lori has sent us all of the page layout files (again, via e-mail) and Deb and I work all day Monday in our office at Lincoln and Landis avenues to make final edits, place the remaining copy and photos and write headlines, captions and various blurbs you see throughout the paper. At the same time, my salespeople Sherry Munyan and Marie Gallo, are hard at work getting final approvals for the last few ads on Monday. Once all the editorial and ad content for each page is complete, Lori creates PDF files of all of our pages and sends them over the Internet (FTP) to our printer in Bellmawr, NJ. We do NOT own a printing press. The last files are usually sent to the printer on Monday night by 10 p.m. at the latest and The Grapevine is printed overnight. On Tuesday, your address is printed on the cover of your copy of the newspaper at the printer and 22,350 copies are trucked to the bulk mail center of the U.S. Postal Service on Almond Road where the bundles are prepared for your mail carrier to distribute to your mailbox on Wednesday. The pace of producing a weekly newspaper is pretty hectic, but for most of us who work in this business, it’s a stimulating and gratifying line of work. { CONTENTS } 1 Fishing Catches On Getting hooked on the sport is easy with so many options in the Cumberland region. ED HILT 3, 5 6 7 Faces in the News Crossword Old Becomes New Packrat behavior thrives on this kind of thinking. DEBORAH A. EIN High Efficiency Heating and Cooling and Water Heating Equipment Eligible for up to $1500 in Federal Tax Credits and up to $400 in Rebates 8 Early Churches The town founder offered incentives to all denominations. VINCE FARINACCIO 8 10 12 14 Vintage Vineland In Our Schools Entertainment Green Landis The Avenue just became friendlier, environmentally speaking. TODD NOON Serving Vineland for over 100 years! 691-1950 State Lic. # 12089 18-21 HOME & GARDEN 22 DINING: Squash, Squash Everywhere Here’s one garden variety that inspires so many delicious, nutritious dishes. STEPHEN WILSON 25 Recipe Corner Strawberry shortcake for chocolate lovers. LISA DINUNZIO 28 30 Community Calendar REAL ESTATE With A Bang! Receive a Summer Off Start Your { STAFF } MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor LORI GOUDIE Art Director GAIL EPIFANIO Controller JACK EPIFANIO Distribution SHERRY MUNYAN Advertising Executive MARIE HALPIN-GALLO Advertising Executive PATTY ALI Graphic Designer MARYANNE BERTRAND Advertising Assistant $ { 4 } the grapevine | JULY 8, 2009 When You Purchase A Color or Perm GIFT CERTIFICATE Get your Loved One A Gift Certificate Today 5.00 FREE HOURS exp. 07/14/09 The Grapevine 3660 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361 PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816 EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2009. All rights reserved. Mon. – Wed. 9-5pm, Thurs. & Fri. 9-7pm Sat. 8:30-3pm & Sun., 9-1 pm WALK-INS WELCOME! NO APPOINTMENTS NECESSARY 5006 E. Landis Ave.Vineland (856) 691-2202 MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher I Faces in the News Kicks 4 Kids MVPs The Vineland U10 Strikers travel soccer team recently traveled to Hershey, Pennsylvania, to compete in the Kicks 4 Kids Soccer Tournament. All the girls did an outstanding job. Devin Fisher, Madison Hagerty and Jasine Grevious were awarded the most valuable player medals for an outstanding job as judged by the opposing team. Great job girls!! Christmas in July Sale (Sale dates July 1-31) (excludes craft kits & sale items) 15% off (excludes already discounted items & Gymboree) 30% off Summer Clothing Gymboree Summer Clothing 20% off (excluding Melissa & Doug) 20% Toys Summer Hours: Closed Sun/Mon. Tues-Thur. 10-5 * Fri. 10-6 * Sat. 10-4 2757 S. Main Rd., Vineland * 856-213-6739 Customer Appreciation Day Brings Out a Hungry Crowd Marcacci Meats held their Customer Appreciation Day last Friday. They served up free hot dogs, hamburgers, drinks, and had a pig roast. More than 500 customers turned out to celebrate Fourth ofJuly and to enjoy the festivities. Marcacci Meats has been in business for more than 40 years, providing everything needed in fresh meats. They are located at 1853 Vine Road in Vineland. WILLIAM S Totally Tobacco (Formerly Williams Liquors) WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Tripoli Scores Hole-in-One On June 5, Notre Dame Regional School held its Third Annual Golf Tournament at Running Deer Golf Course in Pittsgrove. The weather was beautiful for the 120 golfers to experience an outstanding day of golf. The day proved even better for one skilled golfer. Brian Tripoli of Richland scored a Hole In One on the 13th hole. The Hole was sponsored by Dondero’s Jewelry of Vineland. Dr. Mary Alimenti, Principal at Notre Dame congratulated Tripoli and awarded him a $5,000 Gift Certificate to use at Dondero’s. Thur., July 9 4 pm -7 pm Special Deals and Spectacular Giveaways from DREW ESTATE More Faces in the News on page 3 SEND US YOUR FACES — IT’S FREE! Get your photos published in The Grapevine… birthdays, engagements, weddings, anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them the address listed on p. 4. Expanded selection of cigars, pipes and tobacco Join our Private Lounge to relax,enjoy a smoke…and so much more the grapevine { 5 } 137 S. Delsea Dr · Vineland · 856.692.8034 The Grapevine’s Crossword Puzzle ACROSS 1. _____s: sunflower state 6. Taro roots 11. John Voight’s daughter 14. Women’s undergarment 15. Islamic commanders 16. Tooth caregiver 18. Undermined & fallen 21. Monounsaturated fatty acid 23. _____y and the Beast 25. Spanish nap 26. Greek porticos 28. Modernized 29. Reproached severely 31. Careless 34. One point S of due E 35. Cleopatra’s killer 36. The Copacabana for one 39. Tropical fruits 40. Wise men 44. A self-centered person 45. An exact counterpart 47. European sole genus 48. Shallow water 50. Yes vote 51. Archaic spoke 56. Ultrahigh frequency 57. “Charade” actress 62. Polite address to a woman 63. Directions (Scottish) DOWN 1. Jacks in the deck 2. Silver 3. Point midway between N and E 4. Patty Hearst’s captors 5. Point a weapon 6. Pinna 7. Disc jockeys 8. Execute or perform 9. Atomic number 13 10. Parry 11. United ____ Emirates 12. Atomic #28 13. Copyread 14. Prior to year 1 17. A large quantity 19. Take in solid food 20. A pair of singers 21. Strongyl_____sis: nematode disease 22. Pencil carbons 24. Follows sigma 25. A fashionable hotel 27. Eyeglasses 28. Brown bears 30. Abbr. for oil Solution to last week’s puzzle container 31. Floor covering 32. Texas team member 33. Bantu tribe 36. 4th largest Japanese city 37. Vietnamese offensive 38. ___boo: Panda food 39. Steeply edged tableland 41. Auto fuel 42. ___ical: moral 43. Abrasive cleanings 46. Bakker’s downfall 49. Low frequency 51. A very large body of water 52. British statesman (1584-1643) John 53. Exclamation of surprise 54. I___: Swedish store 55. Indicates near 58. Algerian dinar 59. Rural delivery 60. Atomic #35 61. Western state 1853 Vine Rd. Vineland 691-4848 Fax: 856-691-2294 marcaccimeats@verizon.net Specials For July 8-11 EBT FRESH CHICKEN FRESH LEGS HAM 89¢ { 6 } the grapevine | JULY 8, 2009 AVERAGE (20-25 LB) BEEF RIBS $ 29 lb. lb. 99¢ FRESH lb. 2 COUNTRY OUR HATFIELD FAMOUS GROUND STYLE HOT DOGS RIBS BACON BEEF 3 LB BOX (10 LB. BAG) $18.90 $ 69 $ 49 $ 59 lb. lb. FRESH Let us help you with your Bar-B-Q needs!!! Come in and check out our great selections and prices. Richard Monteleone Salon Fabrojae proudly welcomes 1 5 2 to our staff! c o n c e p t s a lo n I Gleanings { DEBORAH A. EIN, MANAGING EDITOR } Old Becomes New For a while, my favorite items to collect were rocking chairs and sofas. ur first house was built somewhere around the 1840s. On our first look, we were captivated by its many unique features, such as original hardwood floors, a clawfoot tub, the cozy front porch, a second stairway leading to the kitchen, and the large unfinished walk-up attic with so many possibilities. Even before we bought the house, my husband and I were enthralled with antique anything—furniture, houses, décor. But the house just gave us so much more room to store the antiques we had already collected…and to acquire a few more. We browsed antique shops, went to estate auctions, and collected some of our own family heirlooms. Weeks before closing on the house, we found a 10-piece Art Deco bedroom set that we bought and stored in our tiny apartment. Soon after we moved in, I signed up for O an evening upholstery course at the county technical school. My goal was to learn how to re-upholster a worn sofa that I had gotten from my great aunt. But because we needed a portable project for class, I found an old tufted swivel chair in a neighbor’s trash and gave it new life. It turned out quite nicely and was a favorite for situating between rooms so that you could turn in either direction. It finally landed in the nursery, where I could turn from one crib to the other as I rocked each of my twin boys—sometimes at the same time—in the middle of the night. After that, it wound up in the trash for good (I think!). Meanwhile, I worked on the sofa at home, and the following year, I took the upholstery class again, this time working on the equally worn chair that matched the sofa. These three projects convinced me not to tackle my grandmother’s old sofa. Its original upholstery was in better shape, and I wanted to remember it as it was in her lifetime and my childhood memories. Whenever my husband teased me about collecting sofas and rocking chairs, I had the ready answer that it is less expensive and takes less room than collecting…let’s say, cars. You really can’t appreciate packrat behavior until you have kids…. And it really hits home when you’re about to move. But you really can’t appreciate packrat behavior until you have kids. In addition to all your own stuff, you then have their toys, clothes, etc. And it really hits home when you’re about to move. There was a year when I moved three times, but all of those moves put together seemed easier than when we moved our family of five across town a few years ago. And here’s the tough part: We moved from pre-Victorian to a house built in 1969. Suddenly, my several rockers and two antique sofas really were stuck in a different century. A couple of the rockers were consigned at a local antiques shop along with the Art Deco bedroom set. We furnished the new house with two modern couches. My grandmother’s sofa ended up in our bedroom. The one I had upholstered spent the first year or two out in the garage, before I found a spot for it in the paneled, cavelike family room. Now it’s time to renovate the family room. As I pondered what to do with Aunt Toni’s sofa, my daughter started rehearsing for her next play, which is Bugsy Malone. Hmmm…throw a couple of lace doilies over the armrests and…voila. So I’ve donated the sofa as a stage prop. And come September, as I watch the play, the davenport will have found its place in the 1920s era yet again. Just like old times, minus the gunfights. I Build your business Do t Downtown Vineland Seafood Festiv Downtown Vineland Seafood Festival land land ood Festival estiv v Saturday, Saturday, July 18 8 3-9 pm 39 600 Block Landis Avenue Block Landis Avenue s Join for Seafood Extravaganza! Join us f a Seafood Extravaganza! ag ganza! with a great banking relationship We, at Newfield National Bank, understand your market and our officers are available with great products and services to help you build your business. Call 1-800-690-3440 for a confidential consultation. • Free Business Checking • Free Online Business Banking • Business Credit Cards • Merchant Banking Program • Flexible Commercial Loans • ACH Processing Service • Online Cash Management • Real-time Internet Access WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Incredi Incredible Man-Made Beach ible Man-Made Beach Live Music Live Music Classic Rock by Double Helix Cl Classic Rock by Double He elix Food Vendors l d Food Vendors Include: d the grapevine { 7 } FREE – PARK & RIDE: Trolley run from Walmart to Kidston PARK Trolley runs from Walmart to Kidston ns Towers. Pick Towers. Pick up on Wood or Elm in Festival Area. Wood Elmer Festival Area. mer This event sponsored part by VDID/Vinela Main Street. This This event is sponsored in part by VDID/Vineland Main Street. This ad has been paid for and for with funds approved for such use by the New Jersey Urban Enterprise Zone Authority. Urban Enterprise Zone Authority. approved for by 1-800-690-3440 • www.newfieldbank.com Member FDIC I Historical Vineland { VINCE FARINACCIO } Early Churches Landis offered land free of charge to each of the denominations and promised a bell to the first building to be constructed with a steeple. n explaining his vision for Vineland, town founder Charles K. Landis was very clear about what would constitute a successful municipality. “In order to secure its success,” he wrote, “establish therein the best of schools, and different industries, and the churches of different denominations.” He referred to these necessities as “essential to the prosperity of mankind.” While Landis gave equal attention to these three areas, his desire to achieve a municipality filled with an abundance of religions and places of worship may have received the most of his generosity. A. G. Warner’s Vineland and Vinelanders notes that one of the earliest buildings constructed in the town was one owned by Landis and referred to by Warner as the School House and more commonly as the Grove School House in later years. Built in December 1862, it was located at Eighth Street and Landis Avenue and served, as its name suggested, as a school as well as a public meeting place. It also housed religious services by Presbyterian, Episcopal and Methodist congregations on Sundays by dividing the day between the three groups and also accommodating their meetings throughout the week. The School House provided each denomination a place to worship until it was able to settle into a building of its own. The Vineland Centennial Program of 1961, in its overview of churches in the city, states that records indicated “the various sects would follow each other in rapid succession the entire Sabbath day and evening” at the School House. In 1863, Landis began the process of filling his town with churches by providing land free of charge to each of the denominations and promising a bell to the first building to be constructed with a steeple. Warner writes that on August 8, 1863, the Episcopal Society, which had been founded and organized here as a mission, held an organizational meeting. By August 19, it was decided Trinity Church would be the name of the parish. With a congregation that reportedly included Landis as one of its first members, the Trinity Episcopal Church was deeded land at Fourth and Elmer streets I { 8 } the grapevine | JULY 8, 2009 in September 1863. The cornerstone was laid November 4 and when construction was completed shortly afterward, Vineland had its first official place of worship. When the structure was enlarged in 1865, a steeple was added and the church received the bell Landis had promised. This building survived until July 16, 1871 when, according to B. F. Ladd’s History of Vineland, one of the worst storms ever witnessed in southern New Jersey struck this area that Sunday afternoon. The tempest caused the collapse of the church’s steeple, which fell onto the roof, destroying the entire building. A new home in the form of a stone structure at Eighth and Wood streets replaced it in 1873. The Presbyterian Church, first formed in the School House on June 14, 1863, was officially organized July 7, 1863. There were 29 members in the initial congregation when it was given the lot on Landis Avenue near Eighth Street that later became the site of the Post Office. A frame for the church was completed before the conclusion of 1864 and the construction of the wood building was finished the following year. The church seated a total of 300 people, which is what the Presbyterian congregation numbered by 1869. Warner reports that 12 men and women met on April 12, 1863, in order to “further the Methodist movement in Vineland.” They voted on June 2, 1863, to construct their own church. On June 26, 1864, the cornerstone was laid for a building at Landis Avenue and Seventh Street. The structure was completed before the end of 1864 and, according to Warner, was used for approximately three years. It was destroyed by a fire and was replaced by a new facility that seated 500 people. The Centennial Program article reports that, by 1868, South Vineland Methodists did not attend services at Landis Avenue and Seventh Street. Instead, they chose to meet “in a oneroom frame building” located on Sherman Avenue near the Boulevard. Today, this facility, in somewhat modified form, exists as the Little Theatre or Cumberland Players Theatre. I Next Week: The Next Wave of Churches VINTAGE VINELAND Who Is He? Maybe a great-great uncle on your mother’s side? Over the years, the Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society has acquired many old-time images. Kate Harbold, at the Society, is busy cataloging the photos from Vineland’s rich past, but she needs the help of The Grapevine readers in identifying the people and places captured on film so long ago. If you know something about this portrait, we ask that you contact either Harbold at the Society or use the contact information on page 4 to inform us. The mission of the VHAS is to acquire, maintain, and preserve Vineland’s history. The Society was founded in 1864, just three years after the establishment of the town of Vineland. It is the second oldest historical society in New Jersey, second only to the New Jersey Historical Society. The VHAS consists of a museum, library, and archives, open to the public on Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m., same hours Tuesday through Friday for research. It is located at 108 South Seventh Street, Vineland (691-1111). For Every Woman’s Imaging Needs, We’re Here For You When your physician orders an ultrasound or DEXA scan, South Jersey Healthcare has five area locations to serve you. And now each location features digital mammography for a faster and more accurate diagnosis. But that’s not all we offer. With overlapping services, no matter what type of imaging your doctor requests—CT, MRI, fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, interventional radiology, or just a general x-ray—our state-of-the-art technology and the region’s largest and most experienced radiology group will accurately report the results to your doctor in a timely manner. So when you need a digital mammogram, DEXA scan, or any other radiology services, look to South Jersey Healthcare. We’re here for you. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Call our appointment line: 1-866-SJH-APPT www.SJHealthcare.net the grapevine { 9 } SJH Regional Medical Center • SJH Elmer Hospital • SJH Bridgeton Imaging SJH Millville Imaging • SJH Hammonton Imaging Eat Lunch with Your Family! Come and enjoy your lunch hour where you are treated like family. Take advantage of our daily lunch specials, cool climate and friendly atmosphere. You’ll feel right at home. I In Our Schools Sean Freeman, Jacee Jacobs-Lundy, Melanie Milam, and Joelle Nunziato. Marie D. Durand Elementary School GRADE 3: Marc Bennett, Josef Garcia, Casey Medina, Gisellyn Miranda, Kiana Oliveras, Darlene Sanchez, and Lourdes Vicente. GRADE 4: Bruno Costanzo, Jairo Flores, Vanessa Grullon, Jayda Hamlet, Harvey James, Veronica Ochoa, and Mariah Rosa. GRADE 5: Zeltora Chaney, Jessica ChavezLopez, Niyah Cosme, Chelsea Devera, Ciana Dickinson, Bailey Digh, Mercedes Gonzalez, Robert Greene, Charles Johnson, Jaclyn Kell, Jacob Kell, Tyla Morgan, Eden Newton, and Kayla Speyerer. Pauline J. Petway Elementary School GRADE 3: Amy Antonio, Xavier Bolton, Zachary Costanzo, Nikohl Dotti, Meghan Finley, Rosa Lasalandra, Jacob Lopez, Julie Markizon, Joseph Mattiucci, Emily Morton, Taylor Parrish, Estefania Segura, and Tiara Tyler. GRADE 4: Arianna Baptiste, Lauren Dewoody, Devin Fisher, Graceline Galan, Jacqueline Gomez, Garen Green, Shannon Hennessy, Therese Lobiondo, Isabel Lubin, Billie Mattioli, Madison Montana, Dillon Murray, Anita Novatorskaya, Jason Ochs, Vanessa Ortiz, Mariya Ostapenko, Lillian Rivas, Kaylee Ruiz, Victoria Snow, and Victoria Udoetuk. GRADE 5: Alberto Alvarez, Ryan Banks, Kelsey Dematte, Matthew Digiorgio, Bradley Durand, Brennan Finley, Zarina Fresolone, Berenice Garcia, Jasine Grevious, Gregory Hughes, Emmalynn King, Garrett Loper, Eugene Mainiero, Iamka Martinez, Grace Martino, Devon Mattie III, Dana Rosado, Brittney Soler, and Queena Wang. Solve E. D’Ippolito Elementary School GRADE 3: Mia Arbona, Angelina Bartolozzi, Korie Hague, Rebecca Piccione, Aidan Rivera, Rayannia Robinson, Myahna Smith, Delyaris Torres, and Cristina Velazquez. GRADE 4: Princess Cortes, Robert Dickenson, Fanaisa Diggs, Kayla Durling, Alexa Flores, Nicholas Grotti, Anthony Jones, Devon Pritchett, Stephanie Raively, Victoria Santiago, Shelby Sheridan, Ian Simek, Giovanni Vecchione, and Dante’ Wilmore. GRADE 5: Rahimenur Akisler, Joesph Bakley, Joshua Flores-Yeoman, Desiree Galafa, Leslie Haserick, Elisa Hernandez, Moises Hernandez, Zabrina Hernandez, Kobe Hicks, Christopher McConnell, Darwin Peralta, Destiny Perez, Collin Ramsey, Travis Riland, Adam Rullan, Taija Smallwood, Emma Stratoti, Dan Tollinchi, Raul Torres, and Kassandra Treston. Landis Middle School GRADE 6: Angelica Charriez, Jennifer Class, Hernan Cruz, Cameron Daniels, Rachel Garcia, Rhiannon Gilliam, Valkyrie Leach, William Lunsford, Carlos Motoa, Eliza Pabon, Adrienne Ruberti, Steven Tobolski, and Danea-Gaye Wint. GRADE 7: Sabrina Gonzalez, Margarita Gordeyeva, Nicholas Mayo, Stephen McKeon, Brenna Mohan, Angelina Predit, Vineland Public Schools 4th Quarter Principal’s List Dane Barse Elementary School GRADE 3: Dajanae Farmer, Calah Gonzalez, Christina Naigle, and Alexandria Rodriguez. GRADE 4: Tori Brown, Daulton Clark, Kayleigh Cooke, Daniel Cruz, Ryan Knipe, Vincenzo Pontari, Lexi Rodriguez, Latasia Watkins, and Tatiana Woods. GRADE 5: Avisail Bermudez, Alejandro Carrasco, Taylor Clarke, Ibette Cruz-Lopez, Ombria Kent, Erik Leon, Stephanie Lopez, Edgar Ramirez-Santiago, Givannia Rivera, John Saint-Jean, Samantha Santos, Nin Thompson El, and Chelsea Vasquez. Dr. William Mennies Elementary School GRADE 3: Isaac Acosta, Savannah Brown, Emilie Carini, Lilly Castellini, Xavier Castro, Keelynn Evans, Trista Lamkin, Samantha Likanchuk, Jordan Ross, and Allison Turner. GRADE 4: Elias Agostini, Maylonie Barcene, Sydnie Bennett, Yevgeniy Groshev, Travis Harrell, Michael Irvine, Rachel Jones, Hannah Joyce, Michal Miller, Stephanie Palma, Dakota Pladeck, Ashley Priore, Megha Velugula, and Lea Westergaard. GRADE 5: Kourtney Arena, Taryn Bles, Jasmine Garcia, Zackery Kerestesy, Dimitri Raimonde, Zachary Ross, Kaitlyn Schreiber, Sera Snyder, and Crystal Sotiropoulos. Gloria M. Sabater Elementary School GRADE 3: Jacob Alicea, Daqawn Hadley, Kyle Leon, Gabriel Menz, and Tiana Nieves. GRADE 4: Hailey Bruno, Genesis Cyr, Erika Forrest, Yasmine Leon, Josue Lopez, David Miletta, Chelsea Murphy, Mya Oglesby, Deandre Parker, John Rodriguez, Samantha Rodriguez, Angel Torres, and Felix Torres. GRADE 5: Nicholas Betancourt, Angelica Filippi-Field, Sarah Filippi-Field, Chad Menz, Patrick Montalvo, Mitchell Nieves, Karrina Quiles, Tristan Rhubart, Jeremy Wozunk, and John Wynder. John H. Winslow Elementary School GRADE 3: Koyekinami Abali, Myles Ashitey, Alexis Beyer, Mario Conde, Sarah Crowell, Madison Gabrielle, Elika Imanaga, Antony Jordan, Dominick McLaughlin, Carolyn Melchiore, Charles Myers, Savan Patel, Izaiah Plaza, Kassandra Ramos, Natalia Smith, and Douglas Stasuk. GRADE 4: Brianna Acosta, Dejae Govan, Asia Grant, Amanda Hullihen, Mia Powell, Belveline Rodriguez, Haley Rossi, Ryan Schischkin, Marielis Soto, Alexa Strittmatter, Isabel Vega, and Kristina Zemanik. GRADE 5: Juliette Ciro, Tiffani Hernandez, Edwin Maestre Jr, Justin Malme, Alan Patel, Bela Patel, Kathryn Slusarczyk, and Eric Stratton. Johnstone Elementary School GRADE 3: Angelica Beneat, Jared Dewinne, Edwin Garcia, Zachary Harris, Jared Hoffman, Kayla Johnson, Nicole Martinez, Aubrey Messore, Luis Ortiz, Ariel Reina, Rafael Rodriguez, and Noah Sansalone. GRADE 4: Thomas Burgess, Emily Caignon, Frank Digiorgio, Tara Marrongelli, Alexi Paraskevas, Stephany Romero, Natalia Stochmal, and Frances Vera. GRADE 5: McKenzie Bond, Samuel Burkett, Now Open on Sundays! 12 – 7 pm Phone ahead and save time! (856) 205-0012 (we’ll save you a seat) 1383 S. Main Road • Vineland, N • (856) 205-0012 Fax: (856) 205-0047 J The Vineland Water Utility is presently in a Stage II – Mandatory odd/even Water Restrictions, by a State issued Administrative Consent Order. The Order is in effect until further notice. Stage II is mandatory odd/even outside use per odd/even street address. Enforcement is as follows: 1 st Violation: Warning 2nd Violation: Warning 3rd Violation: $100 Fine 4th Violation: $250 Fine 5th Violation: Water Service will be shut off until Emergency is over There are exceptions for some new sod & seeding, as well as commercial use. Please refer to Ordinance No. 2008-63. Thank you for your cooperation. John A. Snidenbach, CPWM Superintendent Water Utility PUBLIC NOTICE WATER RESTRICTIONS City of Vineland WATER UTILITY 330 E. Walnut Road Vineland, New Jersey 08360 • (856) 794-4056 FAX (856) 794-6181 John A. Snidenbach, Superintendent SO WHAT ARE YOU DOING SCHOOLS OUT! THIS SUMMER? SUPER SUMMER SESSION $89 Includes FREE Uniform (Youth and Adult Tang Soo Do Programs only – Little Tigers is excluded) July 14, 2009 – September 5, 2009 Join our 8 Week Super Summer Session and Keep your Mind and Body in Shape! Our Tang Soo Do program will exercise your mind and body while you learn this Traditional Korean Martial Art. { 10 } the grapevine | JULY 8, 2009 better students at school. Check our website to see how Tang Soo Do will help your child do better in school. (www.vinelandmartialarts.com) START TRAINING NOW and Enjoy all of the Benefits that Tang Soo Do has to offer. PARENTS: Enroll your children in our Super Summer Session and help them to be Little Tigers Special – July & Aug • Free Uniform with 1st months tuition. Tai Chi Classes – Sundays 9:00AM Master C. Vertolli – Yi’s Karate of Vineland 2008 International Martial Arts Association Instructor of the Year 856-405-0008 Lincoln Plaza • 3722 E. Landis Avenue Suite G • Vineland, NJ 08361 www.vinelandmartialarts.com and Rosalyn Rivera. GRADE 8: Helen Cardoso, Brianna Carini, Luis Cruz, Maria Cruz-Wilson, Cristal Diaz, Abigail Dooley, Brandon Emonds, Calvin Stiles, Darren Tomasso, Daniela Villaman, and Danielle Weissman. Rossi Middle School GRADE 6: Kyle Castellini, Alexandra Conserva, Shyheme Days, Angela Doulis, Jenna Garrett, Kerensa Loadholt, Bryanna Luciano, Mia Massaro, Joseph O’Rourke, Lindsay Olita, Nirnay Patel, Gabrielle Rafael, Haley Schmeelk, Tara Selleck, Anthony Sierra, Victoria Smith, Sydney Starn, Tessa Strittmatter, Elizabeth Turner, and Zachary Watson. GRADE 7: Tyler Adams, Arielle Aponte, Desiree Aponte, Sarah Bennett, Morgan Blanchard, Rebecca Darr, Sarah Dietz, Jade Fanzo, Mollie Fisher, Ta’shay Henderson, Christine Hughes, Dean Maffei, Anna Marie Mainiero, John Malatesta, Rachel Mongelluzzo, Oleksandra Ostapenko, Evan Portadin, Veronica Sitaylo, Rachel Smith, Evelyn Soto, Anna Ternova, Rebecca Watson, and Josephine Zambrana. GRADE 8: Johnathon Colon, Wendy Marie Delouise, Toure Douglas, Olivia Gentilini, Zhen Holmes, Sydney Irion, Richard Marchese, Saadiqa Smart, and Jacob Villafane. Thomas W. Wallace Jr. Middle School GRADE 6: Grace Carpenter, Kaitlynn Conrow, Kelsi Frank-Noble, Autumn Gonzalez, Brittany Hawk, Kelly Hullihen, Rachael Lustina, Shelby Money, Katie Perry, Cassidy Piccone, and Andrew Redman. GRADE 7: Jacqueline Askins, Gabriela Candelario, Taylor Devonshire, Kathryn Faul, James Hague, Brandon Jones, Julie Kim, Melissa Laurencio, Sage Medina, Frankie Ruiz, and Eric Stratoti. GRADE 8: Synclaire Arthur, Alyssa Compa, Kanitra Goldsborough, Emile Langton, Dianette Meza, and Marlyne Rosa. Veterans Memorial Middle School GRADE 6: Megan Beres, Carolyn Cruz-Lovera, Morgan Dewinne, Camille Dubois, Samuel Echevarria, Nina English, Cody Geisser, Joseph Marrongelli, Dasia Murphy, Emily Scanlon, Julian Thompson, and Emily Watts. GRADE 7: Liliya Bondarenko, Andreanna Burman, Melissa D’Ottavio, Adina Luciano, Leishla Perez, Briana Peters, Veronica Quinones, Naomi Rivera, Jonathan Roig, Taras Romanchuk, and Emily Shellhamer. GRADE 8: Leilani Bishop, Elizabeth Ann Campbell, Andrea Ferrari, Rafal Klepacki, Janice Martinez, Janet Matias, Ajay Puri, Steffen Rodriguez, and Nadya Sotnychuk. GRADE 9: Maira Martinez GRADE 10: Eladio Scott GRADE 12: Daniel Rhodes Vineland High School GRADE 9: Diyebhar Abali, Dawn Adams, Danna Amaro, Allison Beres, Nikolai Berezin, Jessica Bertonazzi, Morgan Bishop, Sigfredo Boneta, Nicole Bryant, Danielle Bushek, Toni Campanella, Kenneth Carpenter, Andrew Castellini, Matthew Castorina, Carmen Chen, Jin ya Chen, Larissa Ciancaglini, Luis Cintron, Annalisa Ciro, Celia Class, Willie Cox, David Cruz, Marco Cruz, Jose Cumba, Lauren D’Ottavio, Joseph Dafcik, Amanda Dolson, Stephanie Druziako, Ivonna Dumanyan, David Figueroa, Charles Fiore, Jessica Flitcraft, Maria Flores, Maria Francisci, Morgan Gaines-Hunt, Melissa Garcia, Kelsi Garrett, Amanda Garrison, Josue Gomez, Chelsea Gonzalez, Crysta Gonzalez, Constance Guaracini, Nyeisha Harper, William Harris, Kirk Herman, George Hernandez, Ting Holmes, Jonathan Howard, Sarah Jannarone, Ana Jimenez, Maria Jimenez, Andrew Johnson, Robin Juan, Paige Kaspar, Ramanpreet Kaur, Alexis Leon, Kendra Lewis, Cindy Lopez, Julia Lopez, Jessica Lucena, Bradley Marcus, Sydney Marcus, Juliana Martine, Dean Mason, Nicholas Mason, Alyssa Maurice, Matthew McGill, Kendall Mehaffey, Stephanie Metcalf, Emily Montagna, McKenzie Montana, Linda Morales, Kayshen Morel, Ardena Moses, Tonia Okuboyejo, Kevin Owoo, Sajana Patel, Summer Pepitone, Blake Pescatore, Kirk Pierce, Dominick Pontari, Pavel Predit, Allen Quinones, Rebecca Redman, Aiden Rodriguez, Maria Rodriguez, Anna Sakhno, Scott Schneider, Shawn Shaikh, Rachel Simone, Sean Slusarczyk, Emily Smith, Jasmine Strickland, Victoria Tretheway, Brandon Velez, Maryann Wallace, Mishalean Willingham, and Matthew Wolfe. GRADE 10: Hanna Anderson, Savannah Austin, Fatimah Bangura, Alison Barton, Savanna Bassett, Jenese Bennett, Matthew Bermudez, Natalie Bermudez, Matthew Bowen, Socrates Caba, Chelsea Campanella, Melissa Carabrese, Lauren Carastro, Cassandra Clifford, Angela Coccagna, Lishai Crear, Shavonne Davis, Matthew Degand, Naya Dickerson, Emily Dooley, Earl Drew, Joshua Edgar, Chelsea Ellingsworth, Marina Ernst, Richard Fernandez, William Flores, Erica Garcia, Rebecca Garcia, Drew Garrett, Amanda Gillespie, Michael Goldstein, Lindsay Gotthold, Christina Hernandez, Jennyfer Hernandez, Crystal Holt, Randle Irion, Shanice Irurita, Athena Isihos, Sherman Jones, Baljit Kaur, Gurneet Kaur, Sarah Koering, Alexandra Lee, McKenzie Lillia, Nyesha Lindsey, Gabrielle Madison, Dana Maffei, Courtney Magee, Randolph Mayo, Sanjay Menghani, Jade Metzger, Jenny Morcelo, Vanessa Moreno, Anastasiya Novatorskaya, Crystal O’Conner, Katherine Oliveri, Mayra Perez Cruz, Jessica Perez, Melany Perez, Leanna Petrillo, Michael Deon, Melanie Diaz, Vadim Drozd, Jonathon Dzindzio, Amanda Escobar, Ariana Escobar, Alyssa Esquilin, Christian Garcia, Sophia Garrahan, Nicola Gilmore, Thomas Glatfelter, Diana Glavnik, Shanice Glover, Kathleen Gluszak, Charles Graff, Kyle Griffin, Natacha Guzman, Seedekie Harris, Shakerra Hayes, Blake Hetherington, Brittany Hostler, Bethany Johnson, Katie Leonelli, Sara Leonelli, Alberto Lopez, Edgar Lopez, Kenneth Lopez, Gabrielle Joyce Conrow, President of the Cumberland County Lovisone, Chelsea Marcacci, Board of Realtors, recently presented a challenge to Devon Marek, Maria Mrs. Martine’s class at Petway Elementary School. Martinez, Tabatha Martinez, “The theme of the poster contest was, Fair Housing Samantha Mason, Yessenia For All,” said Conrow. The students were called upon Matus, Melanie McCormick, to draw what Fair Housing meant to them. The State Rosa Melillo, Ryan Molina, will choose 12 posters statewide to be a month of the Lindsey Monahan, Caroline year in the 2010 NJAR Fair Housing Calendar. Montagna, Jessica Moratelli, Barbara Moroz, Amanda Musso, Angela Muzzarelli, Priest, Amanda Reuben, David Rivera, Ashton Nelson, Maria Ocampo, Brandon Robert Romano, Dustin Rowe, Bethany Olaya, Amber Opromollo, Amanda Parks, Ruccolo, Zachary Saoner, Amanda Scharuda, Justin Petronglo, Riley Phillips, Omarie Cori Rose Schroer, Jade Segers, Ashley Quiles, Samuel Ratcliff, James Riendeau, Serrano, Diane Severino, Sean Smith, Ryan Grizel Rivera, Joshua Rivera, Melanie Steinbronn, Alexis Taylor, Nicolai Thompson, Rivera, Sindi Rivera, Tamyra Roberts, David Toddish, Gina Trivellini, Elvira Jennifer Rodriguez, Zuleika Rodriguez, Usmanova, Victoria Vita, Felicia Williams, Ashlee Rowe, Rebecca Sheridan, Chelsea and Alexandra Yeager. Shiloh, Navpreet Singh, Natasha Sotnychuk, Jarrett Stith, RobertTonetta, GRADE 11: Manuel Aguilar, Luis Alvarez, Eliza Torres, Craig Traina, Brad Valentine, Ashley Andrews, Kevin Bauman, Yekaterina Dyanne Valverde, Jenna Vargo, Melissa Beletskaya, Angel Beltran, Samuel Benfer, Vernacchio, Latanya Watts, Brandi Williams, Jessica Bertoldi, Scott Bertoldi, Abigail and Anna Yurchak. Bertonazzi, Scott Bishop, Corinne Boesz, Sacha Borrero, Daniel Bradbury, Lorena GRADE 12: Justin Acosta, Josue Adorno, Brown, Rosica Brown, Brian Browne, Jeffrey Hannah Ahrens, Jelissa Alvarez, Andrew Bryson, Ivelies Burgos, Kelsey Burns, Anastor, Jessica Andreoli, Kaitlynn Arena, Kristina Capriotti, Angelica Caraballo, Kerry Kristin Arocho, Maria Berezin, Taylor Berger, Cerana, Craig Chammings, Lauren Sarah Bernhardt, Alexandra Bossi, Ashlee Cleveland, Noah Cook, Kasey Cornish, Brown, Sylvia Brown, Vaunique Brown, Alexandria Coulter, Oscar Cruz, Crystal Rebecca Burgos, Kaitlin Burns, Courtney Cuevas, Nigely Cuevas, William Cunningham, Cannon, Christopher Castellini, Carla Kellie Debellis, Deanna Denelsbeck, Anthony Catrambone, Carli Cherwien, Chelsea Clay, Petway Students Enter Calendar Contest Keep Them Reading Your child can win a free MP3 player—and improve his/her reading skills at home this summer—with the same great technology program VPS has been using all year long: KidBiz3000/TeenBiz3000. KidBiz (for elementary school) and TeenBiz (for middle and high school) are unique because they deliver stories and assignments to students at his/her individual reading level. The stories are about current news events, so kids learn about important world and national happenings, while improving their literacy skills. And the fact that they are written at your child’s reading level means he/she can make steady progress in reading over the summer. VPS students used this program this year in school. Achieve3000 will be giving away one MP3 player in every state. The individual student who completes more activities than anyone else in each state will win a brand new MP3 player. Here’s how your child can participate: 1) Log on to www.kidbiz3000.com or www.teenbiz3000.com with the username and password your child received in school. 2) Have your child follow these five easy steps: Step 1: Check e-mail. Step 2: Click the link in the e-mail to read that day’s news article (Or Summer Fun article for students using the Summer Solution program). Step 3: Do the Activity. Step 4: Finish the Thought Question. Step 5: Vote in the Poll. From July 1 to August 1, encourage your child to log on often and to complete as many multiple choice news activities (or multiple choice Summer Fun activities for Summer Solutions users) as he/she can. After August 1, Achieve3000 will select one student winner in every state. (Note that your child must complete at least five activities with a score of 65 percent or higher to win. If more than one student is in first place, a winner will be randomly selected from those two.) Alicea Clendaniel, Alicia Clendaniel, Jeremy Clifford, Paul Cohen, Amanda Creech, Lauren Daplyn, Katlin Davis, Chelsea Derby, Jomarie Diaz, Peter Doulis, Victoria Druziako, Vanessa Dwyer, Jessica Dzindzio, Jose Fernandez, Vincent Filippi, Alexis Giannini, Jose Gonzalez, Amirah Gould, Dominique Greer, Yazkalee Guzman, Andrea Handy, Laura Heller, Cecilia Hernandez, Juan Hernandez, Pak Ho, Brittany Jessie, Maritza Jimenez, Kendra Jones, Emanuel Juarez, Asli Karakaya, Sheyda Karvar, Samuel Kaslon, Laura Kaspar, Dakota Kielbasa, David King, Michael Lathberry, Maia Lods, Frankie Lopez, Francesca Mainiero, Carlos Mercado, Leanne Miller, Sean Miller, Inna Nechay, Michael Oliva, Jordan Ortiz-Wolff, Danielle Owens, Chasite’ Palmer, Dana Parks, Abhijit Parmar, Mandeep Parmar, Reema Patel, Scott Pedersen, Krystal Pettek, Jordon PritchettAnderson, Sonal Puri, Herminio Quinones, Rebecca Redel, Brizehida Reyes, Miguel Ribot, Gina Ridolfo, Christal Rodriguez, Kayry Segarra, Rabia Shaikh, Christopher Stenger, Leonel Thomas, Brandon Tomasso, Kevin Truong, Maria Vastano, Vincent Vita, Brigid Wallace, Christina Watts, and Meghan Wolfe. Dr. George Cunningham Alternative School GRADE 10: Amanda Ellis WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the grapevine { 11 } I Entertainment VINELAND BANDS COME HOME, SECOND FRIDAY ART AND MUSIC, KARAOKE, SUMMER CONCERTS, AND HANGAR 84 ROCK. 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Saturday: Latin Dance Party, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Tuesday: Country Western Dance Party (beer and shot specials), 8 p.m.-midnight. THURSDAY, JULY 9 Romantic Spanish Music. Vineland Public Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland. Program features the vocals of Calixto Negron with Benny Munoz on the guitar. CDs by both performers will be on sale after the program. 6-7:30 p.m. Free, but seating is on a first-come, firstserved basis. 794-4244. THURSDAY, JULY 9 Karaoke Night. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. 7 p.m. $3. JULY 9, 10, AND 11 Nightlife at Villa Filomena. Villa Filomena Ristorante & Lounge, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena, 697-7107. Thurs.: Ladies Night, Fri.: Live music, Sat.: Italian Accordian. FRIDAY, JULY 10 Vineland Homecoming of Drop Dead Sexy (pictured) and Eleven Eleven. Merighi’s Savoy Inn, Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Advance tickets $10, at the door $15. Buy tickets online at www.savoyinn.com. JULY 9, 10, AND 11 Nightlife at Bojo’s. 222 N. High St., Millville, 327-8011. Thurs: Ladies Nite with Charlie. Fri: TBA. Sat: Singalong. Sun: Nascar/Baseball. Start Fresh Today! Credit Card Debt • Medical Bills Utility Bills • Surcharges And Even Some Income Taxes Stop Wage Executions Reduce Car Payments Free Office Visit-Start Fresh Financially! Want to wipe out your debt? WIPE OUT: JULY 8, 9, 10, 11, AND 14 Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Wednesday: ’70s and ’80s Throwback Night (frozen drink specials) 8 p.m.midnight, Thursday.: Karaoke with DJ Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday: Blue Moon Dance Party, $3 Blue Moon drafts, FRIDAY, JULY 10 Dreams of Dahmer. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland. 6 p.m. $10. (frontgatetickets.com). AT THE CASINOS HEADLINERS, COMEDY ACTS, AND MORE STOP SHERIFF SALE Tickets: 1-800-736-1420; www.ticketmaster.com unless otherwise noted. Jet. Borgata. 9 p.m. $29.50. 1-800-298-4200. Billy Squier. Hilton. 8 p.m. $45. The Cult. Showboat House of Blues. 9 p.m., $40, $30. Andrew Dice Clay. Tropicana. 9 p.m. $35-$55. Bob Weir and Rat Dog. Trump Taj Mahal. 7 p.m. $49.50 & $39.50. BANKRUPTCY IS YOUR LEGAL BAILOUT! Listen to Seymour Wasserstrum Esq. Live on the Radio Every Thursday Night From 8-9 pm on 92.1 FM { 12 } the grapevine | JULY 8, 2009 Helping people wipe out their bills – since 1973 205 Landis Ave., Vineland www.wipeoutyourbillstoday.com $100 OFF w/this ad – CR We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for Bankruptcy Code. $23; Sat., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $28. Order tickets by phone at the Comedy Stop Box Office: 1-877FUNNY-AC or 609-348-0920. Visit www.comedystop.com. Fame. Tropicana. Monday and Thursday 8 p.m., Tuesday and Wednesday 3:30 and 8 p.m., Sunday 7 p.m. Yesterday: A Tribute to the Beatles. Tropicana. Liverpool Club Theater in North Tower. Wed.–Sun., 8:30 p.m., $25. THROUGH JULY 26 Beatlemania Now. Bally’s. Wed, Fri, Sun. 8 p.m.; Saturday 8 and 10:30 p.m. $25. THROUGH AUGUST 9 A Bronx Tale. Harrah’s. Tuesday through Thursday 8 p.m., Friday through Sunday 9 pm. $65, $55, $40. HEADLINERS FRIDAY, JULY 10 Two Funny Philly Guys. Borgata. 7 p.m. $25. 1-800-298-4200. Dark Star Orchestra. Hilton. 9 p.m. $25. Reel Big Fish. Showboat House of Blues. 7 p.m., $25, $20. JULY 10 AND 11 An Evening With Tony Bennett. Caesars. Friday 10 p.m., Sat 9 p.m. $150, $125, $85, $70. SATURDAY, JULY 11 J. Geils Band. Borgata. 8 p.m. $65. Seymour Wasserstrum, Esq. COMEDY & MORE Comedy Club at Borgata. Borgata Music Box: three comedians daily, 9 p.m. (except during headliner engagements) 1-800-298-4200. Comedy Stop at the Trop. Three comedians nightly. Sun.-Thurs., 9 p.m., $23; Fri., 9 and 11:15 p.m., WASSERSTRUM Esq. -Bankruptcy Attorney- SEYMOUR 856-696-8300 FREE SUMMER CONCERTS AT GIAMPETRO PARK Enjoy these free concerts all summer long, as well as dancing on the adjacent dance floor. Held Monday evenings at 7 p.m at the Enrico Serra Band Shell. If raining, the concert will be held at Memorial School Auditorium, Main Road and Chestnut Avenue. • July 13: Joe Luisi, One Man Big Band • July 20: Ross Ippolito Combo • July 27: Buddy Gale Big Band • August 3: Greg Albert Duo • August 10: Corky Gale’s Combo • August 17: Doctors of Rhythm • August 24: Gene Boney Band • August 31: Frank Marone Combo • September 7: Bud Cavallo Duo Special arrangement for persons with disabilities can be made if requested in advance. Contact the Business Administrator’s Office at 7944000 ext. 4144. Transportation arrangements for seniors and/or disabled should be made through CATS (6917799) at least 48 hours ahead of time. Pavilion at Bruno Melini Park, 616 Central Ave., Minotola. 7-9 p.m. All are welcome; bring your own chair. Free concert. TUESDAY, JULY 14 Stephen Jerzak. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland. Also, Breathe Electric, Chase Coy. 6 p.m. $12-$15. (frontgatetickets.com). WEDNESDAY, JULY 15 The Gene Boney Band. Michael Debbi Park, Cedar Ave., Richland. Big Band music, Billy Joel, ballads, waltz’s, jitterbug and upbeat music.. 7 p.m. rain or shine. Seating available or bring a lawn chair. Free concert. FRESH FO ODS MARKET m– (Opposite Vineland Post O ce) & Pets on Parade SPECIALT Y Pets on Parade Competition begins at 9:30 a.m. Winners Announced at 11 a.m. Bring Your Pet, Any Pet, All Pets are Welcome!* WEDNESDAY, JULY 15 Stephen Jerzak. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland. Also, The Higher, Runner Runner. 6 p.m. $12-$15. (frontgatetickets.com). Divisions: Most Original Float or Wagon THROUGH JULY 30 Picturing America. Vineland Public Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland. Selected works of art spanning several centuries, all by American painters, sculptors, photographers, and architects. To Register: Call 856-794-8653 or go to MainStreetVineland.org *All pets must be securely leashed or in a carrier. Pet owners are responsible for cleaning-up after their pets. Every Week — Jersey Fresh Produce Plus Market Runs ru Aug. 15 WIC & Senior Coupons Accepted VINELAND TROLLEY VINELAND TROLLEY FRIDAY, JULY 10 Tara Jacoby Art Exhibit. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. Her work ranges from ink drawings, watercolor paintings, digital media and oil paintings. Music for the evening’s festivities will be provided by the local bands Raccoon Fighter, A’s Rage and Wellspring & Honor. 7 p.m. $8 for admission and cheese spread sampling, $15 if also participating in the wine tasting. THROUGH JULY 30 The Beauty of Life. Vineland Public Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 794-4244. Original art by Carmen Perez in acrylics, graphite and mixed media are displayed in the library exhibit cases located on the first floor. Perez was born and raised in Puerto Rico and has been a resident of Vineland for 20 years. She is one of the owners of La Bella Art Gallery and Gift Shop. A self-taught artist, Perez leans toward abstracts and often uses a mother and child in her work. The tree found in most of her work signifies life. RIDE THE TROLLEY TO AND FROM THE MARKET FREE! Runs Landis Ave — Kidston Towers to WalMart This event is sponsored in part by VDID/Vineland Main Street. This ad has been paid for with funds approved for such use by the New Jersey Urban Enterprise Zone Authority. FRIDAY, JULY 10 Hofenakus, Music by Brian London. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. 7 p.m. Scotti Brothers Roofing & Siding Quality 1st Since 1986 • “FREE” Power Washing with complete roof system • “FREE” Garage Door with new vinyl siding WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | FRIDAY, JULY 10 Static Addiction. Good Sports Bar & Grille, 1477 Panther Rd., Vineland, 6929200. Deck Party, 10 p.m-2 a.m. JULY 10, 11, AND 12 Nightlife at Old Oar House. Old Oar House Brewery, 123 N. High St., Millville, 2931200. Fri.: TBA, 9 p.m. Sat.: TBA, 9 p.m., Mon.: Trivia Night 8:30-10:30 p.m. SATURDAY, JULY 11 Dan Barry. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. 7 p.m. SATURDAY, JULY 11 The Groovement, Roades, Elisa Fredricks (and more). Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 5631400. 7 p.m. $8. FRIDAY, JULY 10 Second Friday. Martini Shoes, 615 Landis Ave, Vineland, will be hosting an evening of art, live entertainment and free refreshments on 6-9 p.m. Artists from Falling Leaf Studio will be featured and on hand to greet guests and display their paintings. They include Paula Pagliughi, Carole Ward, Judy Miller, Sue Mounier, Shirley Mazzi and Lynn Martini, whose artwork is pictured above. Tom’s Cell: (856) 498-4841 John’s Cell: (609) 381-4289 FRIDAY, JULY 11 RIP DA MIC Talent Show. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland. 9:30 p.m. $20$25. (frontgatetickets.com). FREE ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED the grapevine { 13 } TUESDAY, JULY 14 Joe Luisi, One Man Big Band. Joe Dale www.ScottiBrosInc.com I Downtown Vineland { TODD NOON, EXEC. DIR., VDID/MAIN STREET } Green Landis More changes along the Avenue include environmentally friendly additions. hose of you who have been in the 700 block of Landis Avenue in recent days might have noticed some changes—some beautiful new outdoor furniture and fixtures adorning the Farmers’ Market alleyway and the surrounding area. This furniture, consisting of six parkstyle benches, six trash-recycling receptacles, and eight bollards for bicycle parking, is made from some recycled materials and was purchased by VDID/Main Street Vineland with a $21,000 grant awarded by the Cumberland County Improvement Authority (CCIA). With the same grant, 45 water-saver hanging flower baskets were purchased and are currently in use along Landis Avenue. This is the result of some very hard T work by the dedicated members of the VDID/Main Street Vineland Design Committee who have formed a Green Landis Subcommittee. The purpose of this subcommittee is to concentrate on environmental issues regarding Landis Avenue including the promotion of recycling, the creation of dedicated bicycle paths in the vicinity of the Avenue, and promoting the use of environmentally friendly products whenever possible. The original grant was written by Kathy Cavallero, VDID/Main Street Vineland Design Committee Chairperson; Stephen Wilson, owner of The Sweet Life Bakery in Vineland, and VDID/Main Street Vineland staff. The crowning moment took place when a formal presentation of the furniture took place on Wednesday, July 1. Representatives from the Design Committee and the CCIA joined in the ceremony at the Farmers’ Market alleyway. “This is indeed a proud moment for us as we take another major step toward From left: Stephen Wilson, Design Committee volunteer; Kathy Cavallero, Committee Chair; Rita Danna, CCIA Programs Coordinator; Dennis DeMatte, Jr., CCIA Recycling Coordinator; Todd Noon, Lee Burke, Committee volunteer; and Diane Amico, Environmental Commission Chair. Now Offering Group Springboard Classes The springboard offers progressive spring resistance to complement the movement of the body for maximum fitness. You will achieve a deeper core engagement than is possible with traditional Pilates mat work. { 14 } the grapevine | JULY 8, 2009 Classes starting soon… Space is limited to 4 per class. Call now to reserve your place. (856) 213-6365 Lincoln Plaza • 3722 E. Landis Ave. Bring a friend and share the fun making Landis Avenue a real showplace and destination,” Cavallero said. *** Make sure to head down to the Fresh and Specialty Foods Market this Saturday for the second annual “Pets on Parade.” Bring your pet—any pet. Prizes will be awarded for Most Interesting Pet, Best Dressed Pet, Best Pet Trick, Ugliest Pet, Most Original Float or Wagon, Most Original Costume with a Patriotic Theme. The competition will begin at 9:30 a.m. and the winners will be announced at 11 a.m. Also, you can cast your vote every week of the Market, in the Little Miss & Mister Cherry Tomato photo contest. The winner will be crowned at the International Food & Cultural Festival on August 22 and will ride in the Holiday Parade on November 28. Leading in the third-week standings: • Little Miss Cherry Tomato (under age 3) 1st place: Ariyana Wright 2nd place: Lilliam Marie Caruso • Little Mister Cherry Tomato (under age 3) 1st place: Chad Anthony Sciore 2nd place: John Edward Caruso • Junior Miss/Mister Cherry Tomato (ages 4-6) (all girl contestants) 1st place: Julie Guzman 2nd place: Kendall Kelly • Senior Miss/Mister Cherry Tomato (ages 7-10) (all girl contestants) Jamiee Guzman (only vote-getter to date) Presented by VDID/Main Street Vineland and sponsored again by Sun National Bank, the Market runs each Saturday until August 15, on the 700 block of Landis Avenue from 8 a.m. to noon. *** You won’t want to miss Landis Avenue’s own “bash at the beach” as the Vineland Seafood Festival returns for a second year—bigger and better than before—on Saturday, July 18 (rain date: Sunday, July 19), from 3 to 9 p.m. The 600 block of Landis Avenue will be full of sun, fun, and seafood dishes from Vineland’s finest restaurants and fresh food vendors, plus live music and much more. Many other vendors will also be here offering a wide range of delicious foods. Admission is free, other than the price of the food and merchandise. Take-outs will be available. For more information VDID/Main Street Vineland’s “endless summer” of events and activities, call the office at 794-8653 or visit the organization’s website— www.mainstreetvineland.org. $ After $100 mail-in rebate 49 Only 99 Buy one, get one FREE! ® BlackBerry Curve 8330 smartphone BlackBerry Curve™8330 smartphone Buy one BlackBerry Curve 8330 smartphone for only $49.99 after $100 Buy one BlackBerry ® Curve™ 8330 smartphone for only $49.99 after $100 v mail-in rebate and get a second one FREE after $100 mail-in rebate and mail-in rebate and get second one FREE after $100 mail-in rebate and $49.99 in-store rebate. $49.99 in-store rebate. Requires new line of service and two-year agreement and BlackBerry Requires new line of service and two-year agreement and a BlackBerry ® data plan. Handset pricing varies by Sprint Authorized Rep. and may be subject to Handset pricing varies by Sprint Authorized Rep. and may be subject to add’l req. See store for details. See store for details. • • • • • • • • • Personal Corporate Email Personal & Corporate Email Text Instant Messaging Text & Instant Messaging Internet Web Access Internet Web Access Built-in GPS Built-in GPS Camera & Video Recorder Camera Video Recorder Bluetooth ® Capabilities Bluetooth Capabilities Sprint TV ® & Music Premier Sprint TV Media Playe Media Player – Video & Audio Player Organizer – Calendar, Task & Notes Organizer C $ 69 99 /per month Everything Data 450 Unlimited Texting, Picture & Video Unlimited Data Service Unlimited Direct Connect Email & Web Surfing GPS Navigation 450 Anytime Minutes Free Mobile to Mobile Unlimited Night & Weekend Starting at 7pm Nationwide Long Distance & No Roaming Vineland Vineland 622 E. Landis Avenue 622 E. Landis Avenue Vineland Vineland 533 N. East Avenue 533 N. East Avenue 2639 S. Main Road 2639 S. Main Road Vineland Vineland Communications Communications 856-563-1771 856-563-0330 856-563-1771 856-563-0330 856-563-0110 856-563-0110 **Monthly charges exclude taxes, Sprint Surcharges [incl. USF charge of up to 11.3% (varies quarterly), Administrative Charge (up to $1.99/line/mo.), Regulatory Charge ($0.20/line/mo.) state/local **Monthly charges exclude taxes, Sprint Surcharges [incl. USF charge of up to 11.3% (varies quarterly), Administrative Charge (up to $1.99/line/mo.), Regulatory Charge ($0.20/line/mo.) & state/local fees by area]. Sprint Surcharges are not taxes or gov’t-required charges and are subject to change. Details: Sprint.com/taxesandfees. fees by area]. Sprint Surcharges are not taxes or gov’t-required charges and are subject to change. Details: Sprint.com/taxesandfees. May require up to $36 activation fee/line, credit approval deposit. Up to $200 early termination fee/line applies. Phone Offer: Offer ends 7/11/09. While supplies last. Taxes and services charges May require up to a $36 activation fee/line, credit approval & deposit. Up to $200 early termination fee/line applies. Phone Offer: Offer ends 7/11/09. While supplies last. Taxes and services charges excluded. No cash back. Requires activation at the time of purchase. Data plan required on all active BlackBerry handsets. Voice & data may be purchased separately. Calls made without a voice plan: excluded. No cash back. Requires activation at the time of purchase. Data plan required on all active BlackBerry handsets. Voice data may be purchased separately. Calls made without voice plan: airtime (0.20/min.) plus long distance ($0.20/min.). Mail-in Rebate: Requires purchase by 7/11/09 & activation by 7/25/09. Line must be active 30 consecutive days. Allow 10 to 14 weeks for rebate. airtime (0.20/min.) plus long distance ($0.20/min.). Mail-in Rebate: Requires purchase by 7/11/09 activation by 7/25/09. Line must be active 30 consecutive days. Allow 10 to 14 weeks for rebate. Simply Everything Plan: Offer ends 7/11/09. Premium content/downloads (games, ringers, songs, certain channels, etc.) are add’l charge. Text to 3rd parties to participate in promotions or other may Simply Everything Plan: Offer ends 7/11/09. Premium content/downloads (games, ringers, songs, certain channels, etc.) are add’l charge. Text to 3rd parties to participate in promotions or other may result in add’l charges. Sprint Music Premier includes select radio channels and access to $0.99 song downloads. Sprint TV Premier includes select channels. See sprint.com/tvguide for channel result in add’l charges. Sprint Music Premier includes select radio channels and access to $0.99 song downloads. Sprint TV Premier includes select channels. See sprint.com/tvguide for channel information. GPS Navigation includes Sprint Navigation for Sprint phones or Telenav GPS Navigator for Nextel phones. GPS reliability varies by environment. International services are not included. Einformation. GPS Navigation includes Sprint Navigation for Sprint phones or Telenav GPS Navigator for Nextel phones. GPS reliability varies by environment. International services are not included. Email includes use of Sprint Mobile Email, Microsoft Direct Push technology via Active Sync™, Versamail, IBM Lotus Notes Traveler® or BlackBerry® Internet Service (BIS). Direct Connect and Group mail includes use of Sprint Mobile Email, Microsoft Direct Push technology via Active Sync™, Versamail, IBM Lotus Notes Traveler® or BlackBerry® Internet Service (BIS). Direct Connect and Group Connect (20 max. participants) allows connection to other Nextel Direct Connect subscribers on the same push-to-talk network platform. Usage limitation: Sprint may terminate service if (1) more than Connect (20 max. participants) allows connection to other Nextel Direct Connect subscribers on the same push-to-talk network platform. Usage limitation: Sprint may terminate service if (1) more than 800 minutes, (2) a majority of minutes or (3) a majority of kilobytes in a given month are used while roaming. Services are not available for use as a modem, in connection with server devices or host 800 minutes, (2) majority of minutes or (3) majority of kilobytes in given month are used while roaming. Services are not available for use as modem, in connection with server devices or host computer applications, other systems that drive continuous heavy traffic or data sessions, or as substitute for frame relay connections. Other Terms: Coverage not available everywhere. Nationwide computer applications, other systems that drive continuous heavy traffic or data sessions, or as substitute for frame relay connections. Other Terms: Coverage not available everywhere. Nationwide Sprint Network reaches over 275 million people. Offers not available in all markets/retail locations or for all phones/networks. Pricing, offer terms, fees & features may vary for existing customers not Sprint Network reaches over 275 million people. Offers not available in all markets/retail locations or for all phones/networks. Pricing, offer terms, fees features may vary for existing customers not eligible for upgrade. Other restrictions apply. See store or Sprint.com for details. ©2009 Sprint. Sprint and the logo are trademarks of Sprint. ©Research In Motion, the RIM logo, BlackBerry, the eligible for upgrade. Other restrictions apply. See store or Sprint.com for details. ©2009 Sprint. Sprint and the logo are trademarks of Sprint. ©Research In Motion, the RIM logo, BlackBerry, the BlackBerry logo and SureType are registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and may be pending or registered in other countries – these and other marks of Research In Motion Limited are BlackBerry logo and SureType are registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and may be pending or registered in other countries these and other marks of Research In Motion Limited are used with permission. Other marks are the property of their respective owners. used with permission. Other marks are the property of their respective owners. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. the grapevine { 15 } $ 5 O a $25 purchase $ purchase with this with this ad Expires Expires 10/15/09 r We Are We Are Quality Shoes. Rea Quality Shoes. Reasonably Priced! t asonably Priced! l Invest in Your Community Bank Locally Celebrating Year Celebrating 75 Years of Service to the ears Service rs Community You Call Home Community You Call Home o Professional Images Nails Images Expert Ori tal Nail Care Expert Oriental Nail Care ient r Frank and Lynn Martini Martini Shoes Frank and Lynn Mart of Martini Shoes tini MARIO J. RUIZ MESA, A.A.I. MARIO J. RUIZ – MESA, A.A.I. U { 16 } the grapevine | JULY 8, 2009 Martini Shoes, at 615 E. Landis Ave., had its birth Martini Shoes, at 615 E. Landis Ave., had its birth when my grandfather, Frank R. Martini, cobbler when my grandfather, Frank R. Martini, a cobbler from Italy, came to this countr y and started to sell from Italy, came to this country and started to sell shoes out of his house. shoes out of his house. Since those humble beginnings, we have Since those humble beginnings, we have a established family tradition of dedication to our established a family tradition of dedication to our cr a cra , experience, and individua lized customer experience, and individualized customer ser vice. service. We’re family shoe store, and we provide full line We’re a family shoe store, and we provide a full line of shoes, snea kers, work boots, and prom footwear, as of shoes, sneakers, work boots, and prom footwear, as well as orthopedic, medical, and diabetic footwear. well as orthopedic, medica l, and diabetic footwear. Art is part of my wife Lynn’s talents and her Art is part of my wife Lynn’s ta lents and her y artwork is also for sale here. artwork is also for sale here. What’s been going on in downtown Vineland is What’s been going on in downtown Vineland is super. It’s great to see Landis Avenue grow again. super. It’s great to see Landis Avenue grow again. I invite you to come see for yourself and join our family invite you to come see for yourself and join our family of dedicated customers. of dedicated customers. Like my grandfather, and my father a er him, I Like my grandfather, and my father er him, am proud to say, “I am Downtown Vineland.” am proud to say, “I am Downtown Vineland.” I founded DeSoto Jewelers, at 651 E. Landis Ave., founded DeSoto Jewelers, at 651 E. Landis Ave., a lmost 20 years ago, bringing with me my bilingual almost 20 years ago, bringing with me my bilingual abilities and the knowledge I gained working in the abilities and the k nowledge gained work ing in the the years, my business has come to be known for the years, my business h s come to be k nown for ha quality service. qualit y ser vice. Whether you want to buy ne jewelry or a watch, Whether you want to buy ne jewelr y or watch, have some jewelry appraised, sell jewelry or an estate have some jewelr y appraised, sell jewelr y or an estate collection, I can help you. I repair and customize collection, can help you. repair and customize jewelry on the premises, set diamonds while you wait, jewelr y on the premises, set diamonds while you wait, and do some minor repairs for you to pick up in a and do some minor repairs for you to pick up in couple of hours. couple of hours. It’s great seeing the positive changes in downtown It’s great seeing the positive changes in downtown Vineland. Like an old, ne watch, Landis Avenue Vineland. Like an old, ne watch, Landis Avenue seems to get better with age. If it’s been a while since seems to get better with age. If it’s been while since you’ve been downtown, I invite you to visit and see you’ve been downtown, invite you to visit and see why I am proud to say, “I am Downtown Vineland.” why am proud to say, “I am Downtown Vineland.” Martin Sh Martini Shoes a ni hoes The Brands You Want Brands You Want r s Jew er Je elers J wellers Jewelers We Buy We Buy Gold & Diamonds uy Diamonds Jewelry Watch Repairs Jewelry & Watch Repairs e While You Wait While You Wait 856-691-5688 856-691-5688 VINELAND VINELAND E D Enjoy th sweete side of life. Enjoy the sweeter side of life. the er FUEL HOUSE FUEL HOUSE U O e Co. Coffe 601 E. Landis Ave. (Behind Wells Fargo) Landis Ave. (Behind Wells Fargo) QUAL Y MUFFLER QUALITY MUFFLE UALIT LIT ER & BRAKE BRAKE R I have been t owner and d broker of Vineland ha been n the owner and brok of Vineland I have ve beethe he owner anbroker er of Vineland and have ser ved as a realtor in Vineland for 26 years. a have served as real in Vineland for 26 years. andnd have served asrealtortor in Vineland for 26 years. Vineland Realis is a commercial real estate rwithith Vinela Realty ty i commerc a l r a l est rm m w Vinelandnd Realty ascommercial irealeestateate rm with Whether you wato to buy properor or rent, any of Whether y want nt to b a property t y or re any of Whether youou want buy uy a property rent,nt, any of my ve sa lespeopor or can give you the personalized m ve salespeople le I can give you the personalized my y ve salespeople or I can give you the personalized service yodeserve.vIf. If you want to meet witus us to ser v you u deser e If y u wa to meet with h to serviceice you deserve. youowant nt to meet with us to do a home evaluation or to go over your needs for dodohomeme evaluation or to go over your needs for a a ho evaluation or to go over your needs for a rental you’re seeking, you can waright ht in and we’ ll ren a l you re seek ing, y can walk lk rig in and we’ll rentaltyou’re ’seeking, youou can walk right in and we’ll be glad to ser ve yoWe’re ’re totalcomputerized ed and be be glad to serve you. We’re totally computerized and glad to serve you. u. We totally ly computeriz and can locathat dream m houforfor you. c locate te that dreahouse se you. can an locate that dream house for you. I’m a lifelong Vinelander with a love fomy y I a lifelo g Vineland r w a lo e r m I’m ’m lifelong nVinelander ewithith love vforfor my ibusinessess here anwhy hy I am prouto tsay,a“I “I am n busin here and d w I a proud d o s y, am in in business here and whyam m proud to say, “I am Downtown Vineland.” Downtown Vinelan Downtown Vineland.”d.” Lamar Uph m Lamar Upham pha Ott Upham Ott Uph m pha WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | DD O N K E Y ’ S P P L A C E O N K E Y ’ S L A C E Den s P. Ingraldi Dennis P. Ingraldi nni Licensed Real Estate Broker Licensed Real Estate Broker any any Create-A-Salad Create-A-Salad with ad with this ad th this Donk ysCheesesteak.co DonkeysCheesesteak.com ke DonkeysCheesesteak.com m $ 00 1 the grapevine { 17 } 856- 690-9482 856-690-9482 Home Garden and Cumberland County Fair is a Part of History Source: www.cumberlandcofair.com The Cumberland County Fair, in one shape or another, has been a popular festivity for nearly 300 years. Last year marked the fair’s 40th year at its Millville location. Over the decades, the fair has seen many changes, but always, it was considered the highlight of a county where life revolved around farming. There have been lapses along the way and it has been held in many different locations, but the Cumberland County Fair has its roots way back in the late 1600s—even before Cumberland was named a county in 1748. “Fairs of Agriculture are useful in more ways than one,” said none other than President Abraham Lincoln. “They bring us together and thereby make us better acquainted and better friends than we otherwise would be.” According to historical records, the first fair in Cumberland County was held in Greenwich on October 16 and 17, 1695. It was held in the Market Square on Ye Greate Street where the tea-burning monument now stands. The fair was actually legitimized by an act of the Colonial Assembly, with spring Check Out Our Gift Shop &! Primitive Shed and fall gatherings planned in Greenwich. The legislation stated that “it shall be lawful for all persons to buy or sell all manner of lawful goods and to be free from arrests on said days,” as well as two days before and two days after. It reportedly was a festive, popular gathering twice a year, where residents would travel for miles on foot or by horseback to exchange news with their neighbors while gathering needed farm supplies. The fair flourished for the next 70 years, until a law passed in 1765 deemed the event “unnecessary.” It was not resurrected until almost 60 years later when the Cumberland County Agriculture Society was formed in 1823 with Dr. William B. Ewing named president and representatives from Stow Creek, Hopewell, Deerfield, Downe and Fairfield. The committee decided to hold the fair that year in November—and it snowed. No matter. A large gathering was said to have attended, with prizes awarded for the greatest amount of vegetables grown in one acre and the best bull, cow and boar. There also was a $5 prize for “the female who shall present before the society the best gown pattern prepared for the loom by herself.” There was also a prize for the best linen diaper. It wasn’t long, however, before interest in the fair again lagged. According to Cushing and Sheppard’s “History of Gloucester, Salem and Cumberland Counties,” published in 1883, the fair didn’t totally disappear. They wrote that the fair’s “influence was not lost, and it did much toward fostering that spirit of enterprise from which the later agricultural prosperity has risen.” Still, 24 years would pass before another fair organization was formed. This one, the Cumberland County Agricultural and Horticultural Society unveiled its first exhibition in September 1854, on a lot now bordered by Commerce, Giles, Lawrence and the south side of Oak streets in Bridgeton. In 1860, the fair moved to a 13-acre lot on Vine Street. The fair changed over the years, but one thing remained constant: Farming and homemaking were at the core. At the 1854 fair, a diploma was offered for best female servant and best Plantsource Garden Center & WildEast Landis Ave. Bird Shop 5103 Vineland, N.J. 08360 ALL PERENNIALS BUY TWO GET ONE FREE!!! Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. Get amazing results from your advertising campaign in The Grapevine. Get the benefit of our distribution to every residence in Vineland (approx. 22,250)! Ride the wave of excitement as The Grapevine’s debut has excited our town’s citizens. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. 856-696-1877 Open Every Day 8am to 6pm (Between Union & Tuckahoe Roads) All Annual Flats Only $7 each 36 plants per tray { 18 } the grapevine | JULY 8, 2009 CRABTREE’S LANDSCAPING And Turf Management Beautifying the outside since 1989 Serving Vineland, Millville & Bridgeton Areas COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL OVER 2 0 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE! Total Landscape Renovations In-ground Irrigation Systems Sodding, Mulching, Hydroseeding Waterfalls & ponds 856.875.0774 farmhand. By the late 1880s, horse racing had become popular at the fair, and the fair was moved to newly built Riverside Driving Park, west of South Avenue. Here, there was not only horse racing but wild west shows, complete with costumed cowboys and Indians. With its popularity growing, the fair left Vine Street for a site on Fayette Street in the early 1890s. The new fair would face a bumpy financial ride. It’s said one year the winners were asked to donate their prizes back to the organization. Still, the fair persevered. It moved to the current site, the county fairgrounds on Carmel Road in Millville in 1968 and is a popular draw today. The fair has become a July tradition for Cumberland County residents. 2009 County Fair Schedule for the Rest of the Week FAIRGROUNDS ADMISSION FEES Kids 1 to 5 admitted Free ~ Ages 6 to 12 $3 Ages 13 and Older $5. Free parking. No alcoholic beverages or coolers permitted. EVERY DAY EVENTS Kountry K-9 Show, Tall Tex the Stilt Walker, Racing Pigs, Eric Dasher’s “Brain Wash” Game Show, Free Hayrides, Free Musical Entertainment, Farm and Garden Exhibits, Food, Pony Rides, Horseshoer Demonstrations, Home and Arts Exhibits. WEDNESDAY JULY 8TH: • KID’S DAY Gates open at 11 a.m. Free admission for kids up to age 12 – First 500 kids will receive a free gift! Kiddy rides only from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. $5 4-10 p.m. wristband for all rides $15 • Fireworks Spectacular at Dusk • Watermelon Eating Contest ages 1 – 12 at 4:30 p.m. (Registration at 3:30) (Trophies Awarded) • Pie Eating Contest for all ages: 5:30pm (Trophies Awarded) • Skillet Toss Contest: 6:30pm (Trophies Awarded) • Midway Stage: The Rubber Soul Band (Beatles Music) 6:30-10:30 p.m. • Hay Rides FREE 4-8 p.m. • 4-H braiding clinic, 1 p.m. in the horse barns. • Dog obedience training, 5 p.m. in the 4-H show tent. • Vaulting demonstration, 8 p.m. in the 4-H horse arena. THURSDAY, JULY 9TH: Gates open at 4 p.m. • 4-H chicken and pork barbecue, 4:30-7:30 p.m. Costs $10. • Midway Stage: Tuesday Mountain Boys (bluegrass), from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Little Memphis (country music), 8:30 to 11 p.m. • Classic Cars: Wheels of Thunder car show on the Midway. • Hay Rides FREE 6-9 p.m. FRIDAY JULY 10TH: Gates open at 11 a.m. • Hay Rides FREE 5-8 p.m. • Midway Stage: Good Tymes Band (oldies, smooth and classic rock) 7 to 10:30 p.m. • 4-H milking challenge, 4 p.m. in the livestock building. • Double Dutch demonstration, 7 p.m. on the 4-H stage. • 4-H Round Robbin, 7:30 p.m. in the livestock building. SATURDAY JULY 11TH: Gates open at 11 a.m. • Midway Stage: Tequila Rose Band (Country) 7-10:30 p.m. • Grand Stand Area: Demolition Derby: 5 p.m. Admission Fee $10. Pit Area Requirements: Must be 18 years of age, have photo ID or valid Driver’s License with photo (ID must include date of birth). Admission fee for Pit Area entry is $15. We Have Everything You Need To Beautify Your Backyard! EVERY THURSDAY Receive 25% Off Your Entire purchase! (IN-STOCK ONLY) EXCLUDING SALES & SPECIALS Largest Assorted Selection of Hydrangeas Beautiful! Regularly priced from $19.99 & Up Now On Sale For Only $9.99!!! (WHILE SUPPLIES LAST) EXCLUDING SALES & SPECIALS Youth Farmstand Program Source: Rutgers Extension Services The Youth Farmstand Program is an interdisciplinary, multi-faceted program designed to support local farmers, increase workforce readiness skills and life skills in at-risk youth and build healthier, stronger communities. Youth-operated farmstands are the cen- MONDAY TO FRIDAY 9am – 5pm SATURDAY 9am – 3pm • Gift Cards Available • SEPERS RETAIL CENTER 1114 W. Weymouth Road Newfield, NJ 08344 856-696-4220 All Major Credit Cards Accepted Continued on next page All Annuals, Patio Planters & Hanging Baskets Precious Stones Summer Sale 3.5% SINCE 1950 SALES TAX READY MIXED CONCRETE Mandevillas on Sale Plus w/Coupon take additional BRICK 1 BLOCK 1 PAVERS 1 SAND STONE 1 CEMENT 1 LIME 1 MULCH Wall Gardenck ry Covent 02 / Blo $3. arden Wall G English / Block $4.00 OFF $5.00 OFF exp. 07/19/09 Reg. Price WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | L SPECIA Growers Of Quality Plants For All Your Gardening Needs 856-692-8650 08360 1969 South East Avenue • Vineland, NJ $3.52ed colors assor t Hanging Baskets • Bedding Plants • Garden Decorations • Flowering Shrubs • Soils • Mulches, and much more! 470 N. Union Rd. East Vineland (between Oak Rd. & Landis Ave.) Mon. – Sat. 8am-6pm Sun. 9am-5pm Wide Selection Of Old Time Favorites & The Newest Varieties 20% off Any Plant Purchase Grown & Sold Here the grapevine { 19 } 856-691-7881 www.cmgrowers.com Cannot be combined with any other coupon. (Before Taxes) Must present coupon. of $25.00 or more. exp. 07/19/09 Home Garden and terpiece of this program. They provide a unifying framework for youth, farmers and communities to achieve success. Each needs the others’ support to grow and prosper, so everyone wins. Who benefits the most? That’s a tough question, because this program increases opportunities for all targeted groups. The following outcomes are expected. Youth will increase: • Workforce readiness skills • Entrepreneurial skills and attitudes • Knowledge of agriculture and food systems components and processes • Awareness of entrepreneurial and employment pathways available in agriculture Local farmers will: • Open new markets • Increase sales via distribution and Jersey Fresh promotion • Identify specialty or “niche” markets within local communities • Have access to pool of “certified” farmstand workers via youth completing program Communities will: • Have access to affordable, high-quality produce in convenient locations • Increase redemption rates of WIC and Senior Farmers Market Vouchers • Expand “work-ready” labor pool • Increase tax base How do Youth Farmstands “work” for youth? The youth farmstands provide a hands-on entrepreneurial experience to youth in the mechanics of owning and operating a small business, based on the premise that experience really is the best teacher. There are three major components: pre-farmstand training, farmstand operations, and weekly supplemental activities and experiences. 1. Youth participate in a weeklong intensive (and fun!) training prior to the farmstand opening. Topics include: • customer service • cash register operation • produce identification • knowledge of Jersey Fresh campaign • WIC and Senior Farmers Market vouchers • making change • marketing • nutrition • weights and measures • farmstand safety • workplace expectations • purchasing and inventory 2. Youth operate the farmstands throughout the summer months for an hourly wage. Participants are primarily responsible for management decisions (purchasing, pricing, display, etc.) and are eligible for a share of any profits at the end of the season. Each farmstand is overseen by an adult supervisor. These individuals are called “instructors” to emphasize their role in the learning process. 3. The supplemental activities and experiences provided youth during the farmstand season include weekly education sessions. Topics include: • agriculture and food systems • career planning • entrepreneurship opportunities • character education • goal-setting and decision-making • resume writing and interviewing Speakers and agriculture-related field trips are also part of the educational experience during the season. How do youth feel about their experiences? Youth participants continue to express strong positive feelings about the program. They enjoy the training, operating the farmstands and the speakers and field trips. Are you achieving your expected outcomes? Yes! We have created several assessment instruments to triangulate results for youth, farmers and communities. TO ALL VINELAND RESIDENTS LOOSE GRASS CLIPPINGS can not be placed at the curb or in the street at any time. All grass clippings must be bagged or in a container. According to our trash regulations for proper pick up of grass it states: Grass Clippings-must be placed in plastic bags, or trash containers, but not mixed with leaves or other debris. Bags or containers must not weight more than 40 lbs! Placing grass loose at the curb or roadway presents many problems such as odor, mosquitoes, and washing into and clogging the storm water drains. { 20 } the grapevine | JULY 8, 2009 NOTICE The New Jersey Storm Water regulations states we can not place any yard waste closer than 10 feet from any storm drain or inlet. Placement of such yard waste at the curb or along the street at any other time in any othe manner is a violation For more information on this and other curbside collection programs go to our website at: www.vinelandcity.org/recycle.html • Youth demonstrate increased workforce readiness skills and attitudes at the close of the selling season. • Youth participants earn a share of the profits based upon stand sales and hours worked. • Suppliers are satisfied with the program, eager to learn how to access local niche markets and looked forward to broadening our relationships. • Over 3,000 customers in economically disadvantaged areas purchase thousands of dollars of Jersey Fresh produce from the Youth Farmstands each year. • Individual sites report that up to 80 percent of their customers were low income and/or elderly. • Community residents report increased access to fresh, quality produce, and that they understood (and felt good about) their contribution toward supporting local farmers and youth workforce readiness training. • The majority of customers who redeem WIC or Senior Farmers Market vouchers reported using vouchers exclusively at the farmstands, and over one-third indicate they had no other accessible outlet for voucher redemption. What’s in the future? The complete integration of the New Jersey Experiment Station, Rutgers Cooperative Research and Extension, and Cook College (Rutgers University) is the most exciting CUMBERLAND COUNTY COOPERATIVE FAIR July 6-11 Cumberland County Fairgrounds, Carmel Rd., Millville Admission $5 / Children $4 Free Parking 4-H & Open Class Exhibits, Farm Machinery, Animal Exhibits, Petting Zoo, Pet Show, Horse Show, Tractor Pull, Amusement Rides, fireworks on the 4th of July and demolition derbies on Monday and Saturday & much more. KIDS DAY on Wednesday, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday Gates Open at 4 p.m.; Wednesday and Saturday, Gates Open at 11 a.m. Cumberland County Fair Association, PO Box 611, Bridgeton, NJ 08302 Phone: (856) 825-3820 serve on-campus student needs for fresh, Jersey-grown items. The market may serve as an ideal opportunity for Cook students in the Farmstand Management course to receive hands-on training. Students completing the course and training will form a pool of eligible “instructors” to supervise the Youth Farmstands across the state. This sounds like a great program! Do I have to live in New Jersey to participate? Absolutely not! We will soon accept applications from groups/organizations interested in piloting the program in other areas. We’ll provide sites with a Youth Farmstand in a Crate start-up kit, which will include operations manuals (program coordinator, instructor and youth), youth and instructor educational materials, assessment instruments, etc. We will partner with Cooperative Extension offices across the U.S. to deliver this multi-faceted program. How can I learn more? If you want to collaborate with us, are interested in piloting the program in your area or simply want to learn more, contact: 3rd Annual Crape Myrtle Festival Saturday, July 18, 2009 11:00am – 2:00 pm component on the drawing board. Development of a “Youth Farmstand Management” course is being explored as a means for undergraduates to learn about farmstand and farmers’ market operations, positive youth development and experiential education. Cook College students are developing a student-operated “Cook Farmer’s Market” to Your local Cooperative Extension county office. For Cumberland County residents, that is located at 291 Morton Avenue in Millville. Phone: 451-2800. I Pretzels & Smoothies Chinese Auction 1:00-2:00 pm Crape Myrtle Seminar “All you ever wanted to know about Crapemyrtle but were afraid to ask!” FREE VE ! SABIG WECOST LESS July 11, 2009 9am-11:30am RAIN OR SHINE and WEDELIVER FORFREE * Cartridge World goes out of its way to help businesses by delivering the ink and toner cartridges you need to your o ce, for less. Why visit a superstore just to pay more? Dixieland Music WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | 30% OFF Crape Myrtle Sat. July 18, 2009 With this coupon, limit one purchase per customer Magnolia Court Shopping Center Vineland, NJ 08360 856-692-0372 1370 S. Main Rd. Main Road Magnolia Rd Mail Room the grapevine { 21 } Organics Market ©2008 Cartridge World. All rights reserved. www.cartridgeworldusa.com/Store305 3086 DELSEA DRIVEFRANKLINVILLE, NJ 08322 856-694-1216 www.doughertygardens.com I Culinary Adventures { STEPHEN WILSON } white onion into thick rings. The baguette was then cut on the bias into inch-thick slices. On a small platter, I drizzled some olive oil, salt and pepper, chopped garlic that I had just dug from the garden, and some oregano and rosemary, also from the garden. I then dredged the zucchini, onions, and bread in this olive oil mixture and set them aside. Finding ways to cook up the prolific veggie, in With a serrated knife, I sliced the ball of soft mozzarella into thin slices, and laid everything from appetizers to side dishes to them out on a small plate with fresh basil desserts, is a delicious challenge. leaves between each one. (I had bought a tomato earlier, but left it at the bakery; that ucchini is a prolific plant, as any the chef at Lucia’s, used the flowers of the would have been perfect with the basil and farmer or gardener knows. They plant as the base of an appetizer. Stuffing mozzarella.) I drizzled the plate with a make enormous sprawling plants squash blossoms with cheese or meat is a touch of olive oil and placed it in the fridge that produce copious amounts of wonderful way to, literally, nip the problem until it was time to eat. fruit. (Botanically speaking, squash is a of too much zucchini in the bud. In my own The sausage went onto the grill first fruit as we eat the seed-bearing part of the garden, I don’t have enough blossoms to with a loud sizzle and puff of smoke. I let it plant.) Using zucchini is one of the great make it worth my while, but to those who do get nice and brown on the bottom, and challenges of the gardener every year, and have plenty of blossoms, stuffing them is a deep grill marks formed where the pork at this point in the season, I’m still tried-and-true method for cooking zucchini. made contact with the hot grate. After flipinspired by all the zucchini that’s around. On Monday, while Jill was at the bakery, chini and basil. While I was out, I got a ping the sausage, I slid the veggies onto the There are many ways to use this veggie, so I prepared dinner for the two of us. It was loaf of bread and some fresh mozzarella. In grill and let everything cook for a bit. This read on for a few ideas. beautiful weather and I wanted to grill, so the fridge, I had some Serra sausage that I was the perfect time to open a beer, and I One way to use zucchini is to cook them that became my starting point. I had had picked up a few days previously. did just that with one of my dad’s delicious before they’re even fruited. You may remem- picked up some fresh white onions at the After firing up the grill, I cut the zucchi- southern Jersey homebrews. ber last week’s article where Murray Levin, farm market that day, as well as some zuc- ni lengthwise into four long slices and the After a few minutes, I flipped the onion Squash, Squash Everywhere Z $ { 22 } the grapevine | JULY 8, 2009 2.00 OFF CREATE YOUR OWN SALAD: With Chicken, Grilled Chicken, or Crispy Chicken Exp: 7/22/09 Cheesesteak Sandwich $ Whet Vineland’s Appetite. Get your restaurant noticed by advertising on these dining pages in The Grapevine. Every residence in Vineland receives The Grapevine… There’s no better way to draw customers into your establishment! Call today for advertising information: 856-457-7815 Toppings are lettuce, tomato, carrots, cucumbers, black olives, sliced eggs, croutons, onions, bacon bits, pepperoncini OFF 2.00 Exp: 7/22/09 EATING OUT All Things Zucchini When zucchini season hits, it’s time to get creative. What do you do with all the zucchini squash in your garden? Send your solutions to thesweetlifebakery@verizon.net or to The Grapevine, 3660 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08361. The author may revisit this topic before squash season is up. rings with a spatula (so they didn’t slide through the bars of the grill), as well as the zucchini. I took the sausage off and let it rest to the side while everything else finished cooking. The bread went on for a quick cook on the hot grill, and after a few minutes on each side, they were done… crispy on the outside, soft inside. Everything was arranged on the same platter that the veggies were marinated in (one less dish to wash!), and the cheese was taken out of the fridge. We opened a bottle of Pinot Gris from our favorite local winery, Bellview, and ate our very casual, very seasonal dinner. The onions were so sweet, it was a tad ridiculous, and the zucchini was tender and flavorful. The grill marks added a nice smokiness to both the veggies, and eaten on top of the olive oil/garlic/herby bread, they were sublime. It’s hard to beat sausage cooked on the grill and the wine was crisp, fruity and perfect with the food while we dined al fresco on the porch. The next day for lunch, I made a quick batch of squash fritters, inspired by Grandmom. Flour, baking powder, salt and pepper, a few local eggs, milk, some chopped onion tops and a grated squash went into a bowl. I tweaked the amount of milk until pancake batter consistency was achieved and spooned silver dollar-sized fritters into a cast iron lined with a little hot oil. In a few minutes, the fritters had puffed and browned and after sitting a few moments were quickly eaten with some black bean salsa I had made, as well as a fresh salad with Romaine that I had picked up at the farm market. So there you have it—three easy ways to use the rabbit of the vegetable world. Eat your share of squash this summer! I Stephen Wilson along with his wife Jill McClennen owns The Sweet Life Bakery. You may contact him via e-mail at thesweetlifebakery@verizon.net. From fine dining to lunch spots to bakeries, the area has choices to satisfy any appetite. Call for hours. Amato’s Restaurant, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 692-5756. Veal, chicken, seafood, and pasta specialties for dinner. Open for lunch, too. Closed Sundays. Andrea Trattoria, 1833 Harding Hwy., Newfield, 697-8400. Chef/owner Andrea Covino serves up Italian specialties in an atmosphere of fine dining. Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave, Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food served tapas style, specialty martinis, catering, private parties. Extensive wine list. Live music Friday nights. Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-0909. This breakfast and lunch spot offers a menu of sandwiches named for colleges near and far. Bain’s Deli, 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. Come in for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Daily specials include coffee of the day. Barbera’s Chocolates on Occasion, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 690-9998. Homemade chocolates and candies, custom gift baskets. Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees, desserts, drink specials. Take-out, too. Happy Hour buffet Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. NFL flat-screen TVs. Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy., Vineland, 697-5500. Steaks, veal, chicken dishes. Meet friends at the bar. Open daily for lunch and dinner. Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 205-0012. The “Gutbuster” a 21-oz. burger, pizza, salads, wings, subs, dinners. Bojo’s Ale House, 222 N. High St., Millville, 327-8011. All food is homemade, including the potato chips. Casa Dori II, Brewster Rd. and Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 794-1888. Authentic Italian, lunch and dinner; catering available. Continued on next page Graduations, Reunions, BBQ’s, Dinner Parties, Engagements, Weddings, Bar/Bat Mitzvahs, Birthday, Retirement, Teen Parties, Christenings, Showers, Etc. No job too big or small We can accomodate any multi ethnic cuisine including asian, spanish, italian you name it we can make it over 14 years experience vegan and gluten free Vineland’s neighborhood bakery, where everything is made from scratch and quality counts. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | 856-692-7473 • Cell 609-247-8341 • Fax 856-692-7664 Eat Lunch with Your Family! Come and enjoy your lunch hour where you are treated like family. Take advantage of our daily lunch specials, cool climate and friendly atmosphere. You’ll feel right at home. a 6th street between Landis and Elmer in Downtown Vineland the grapevine { 23 } Now Open on Sundays! 12 – 7 pm Phone ahead and save time! (856) 205-0012 (we’ll save you a seat) 856-692-5353 www.thesweetlifebakery.com 1383 S. Main Road • Vineland, N • (856) 205-0012 Fax: (856) 205-0047 J EATING OUT Continued from previous page Continental Room at the Ramada Inn, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 696-3800. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Open to hotel guests and the public. Crust N Krumbs Bakery, Main and Magnolia rds., 690-1200. Cakes, pies, cookies, breads, and doughnuts. Custom wedding cakes, too. Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call for lunch and dinner specials. Soft ice cream and cakes year-round. Mon.-Sat 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 696-1900. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Take-out, too. Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. Open 24 hours. Kids eat free Tues. and Sat. Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave., Vineland, 691-5511. Family time-honored recipes, fresh ingredients. Donkey’s Place, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland, 690-1777. One-of-a-kind cheesesteaks made on large, fresh poppyseed rolls. Dreamz Cafe, 2184 Union Lake Crossing, Millville, 765-5029. Panini, sandwiches, salads, soups. Also, gelato, Italian coffee, desserts, smoothies, and frappuccino. Esposito’s Maplewood III, 200 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks, seafood and pasta dishes at this Italian restaurant. Eric’s, 98 S. West Ave., Vineland, 2059800. Greek and American cuisine. Pizza, too. Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. & Tuckahoe Rd., Vineland, 691-6080. Italian cuisine and dinner buffets to savor. Family-owned. Fresh Restaurant, 1405 Mays Landing Rd., Millville, 327-3435. Jumbo lump crabcakes, Black Angus burgers. Wed. is pasta night. Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli, 527 S. Brewster Rd.., 697-3509. Name says it all. Daily specials, catering. Closed Sunday. General Custard’s Last Stand, 2578 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 696-2992. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner served Tues.-Sat. Gina’s Ristorante, 110 N. High St., Millville, 825-4241. Italian cuisine, lunch and dinner, BYOB, nothing over $20. Giorgio’s Restaurant 363 E. Wheat Rd., Buena, 697-2900. Serving lunch and dinner daily. Italian cuisine, pizza. Giovanni’s Italian-American Deli. 1102 N. East Ave., Vineland, 692-0459. Pizza, Italian subs, all your lunch favorites. The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf Course, 4049 Italia Rd., Vineland, 6915558. Restaurant and lounge open to the public for lunch Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.3:30 p.m. Jake’s. 611 Taylor Rd., Franklinville, 694-5700. Italian-American, served lakeside. Lunch, dinner, happy hour, Sunday brunch. Joe’s Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-8860. Barbecue and Kosher chickens, homemade sides, catering for all occasions. Kawa Thai & Sushi, 2196 N. Second St. (Rt. 47), Millville, 825-9939. Thai and Japanese cuisine. BYOB. Landicini’s Family Restaurant & Pizzeria Landis and Lincoln aves., Vineland, 691-3099. Italian cuisine, gourmet pizza salads. Open for lunch and dinner. Larry’s II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-9001. Three meals daily. Sunday breakfast buffet, earlybird dinners. Library V Restaurant, 206 Rt. 54, Buena, 697-9696. Renowned for prime rib, steaks, seafood, salad bar. Closed Mon. and Tues. La Locanda Pizzeria & Ristorante, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 794-3332. Pasta, veal, chicken. Lunch and dinner. Closed Sunday. Lucia’s Ristorante, 785 W. Sherman Ave., Vineland, 692-0300. Italian fine dining and regional cooking. Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 563-0030. ItalianAmerican cuisine, seafood and veal. Open daily for lunch and dinner, Sunday breakfast buffet. Manny & Vic’s, 1687 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 696-3100. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Manny’s Pizza, 426 N. High St., Millville, 327-5081. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Martino’s Trattoria & Pizzeria, 2614 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 692-4448. Brick oven pizza, risotto, polenta. Three meals daily. Merighi’s Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. Banquet/wedding facility as well as intimate restaurant. Nicky G. Fridays 9 p.m.–midnight. Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s Head rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet lunches and dinners in a casual setting. Moe’s Southwest Grill, 2188 N. 2nd St., Mill- ville, 825-3225. Tex-Mex, burritos, catering. MVP Bar, 408 Wheat Road, Vineland, 697-9825. Full bar menu, live entertainment, drink specials. Neptune Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge, 1554 South Delsea Drive, Vineland, 692-2800. American cuisine, array of cocktails. Next Oar, 127 N. High St., Millville, 293-1360. Weekly menu, made-toorder dishes. Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek cuisine—lamb dishes and salads. Paperwaiter Restaurant & Pub, 1111 Village Dr., Millville, 825-4000. A special place for all your special occasions. Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland, 694-0500. Breakfast, lunch, dinner specials; convenient drive-thru, minimeal specials. Pete’s Pizza, 20 W. Park Ave., Vineland, 205-9998. Pizza (including whole wheat), subs, wings. Open daily 11 a.m-10 p.m. The Rail, 1252 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-1440. Bar and restaurant with daily drink specials and lunch specials. Richland House, 1303 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-5700. Eclectic dinners and casual lunch fare. Closed Mondays. Pick One Appetizer to Share • Chicken Tender • Clam Strips • Bacon Cheddar Skins • Onion Rings • Mozzarella Sticks • Fried Zucchini Marciano’s Meal Deal 2 for $20 • Cheesesteak Salad • Bacon Cheeseburger • Chicken Caesar Salad • Riblet Basket • Green Giant • Steak Quesadilla • Popcorn Shrimp • Garden Chicken Alfredo • Chicken Parmigiana Baked Zita w/Meatball & Choice of (2) Entrees: LUNCH BUFFET – $5.99 Pasta, Pizza, Soup, Salad Bar Monday – Friday 3 pm – 6 pm & Saturday & Sunday 12 pm – 5 pm 856-563-0030 947 North Delsea Dr. Vineland, NJ 08360 Since 1957 { 24 } the grapevine | JULY 8, 2009 Coming Next Week Strawberry Ice Cream Pies 9 Non-Fat Sugar Free Flavors Daily 25 Hand Dip Flavors Flavor Burst • Banana Splits Sundaes • Milkshakes • Volcanoes Hotdog & Soda $1.98 • Small Cones $2.20 Low Carb Soft Serve • Water Ice Custard Advertise in The Grapevine. Get incredible results. Call 856-457-7815 today. “How To Quickly Get Rid Of Neck Pain Without Surgery Or Medication!” Or, Get This Amazing FREE VIDEO & REPORT By Going Here Now: www.Vinelandpainrelief.com/7 FREE VIDEO & Report Reveals A Little-Known Neck Pain Removal Secret That Quickly Eliminates Neck Pain Without Drugs Or Surgery! Grab The FREE VIDEO & REPORT Now! Just Call our Toll-Free 24 Hour FREE Recorded Message at 1-888-989-1578 ! Open 7 Days • Noon-10pm • 692-2748 1231 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville, 3278878. Authentic Vietnamese—noodle soups, curry, hotpot, Buddhist vegetarian. Serene Custard, NW Blvd. and Garden Rd., Vineland, 692-1104. Pulled pork, hot dogs, homemade ice cream, party cakes. South Vineland Tavern, 2350 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-7888. Breakfast, lunch, dinner daily. Seafood and prime rib. Steakhouse at Centerton Country Club, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3325. Lunch and dinner. Steaks, reserve wines, upscale casual. Stewart’s Root Beer, 585 Delsea Dr., Vineland, 696-8062. Burgers, hot dogs, fries, floats and shakes. Sweet Life Bakery, 601 East Landis Ave., Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood bakery. Homemade pastries, cakes, coffee. Tony Sopranos, 107 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 405-0200. Pizza, Mexican Southwest fare, Atkins-friendly salads. Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs, chicken, fish, steaks. Always clams, eat in or take out service. Villa Filomena, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena Vista, 697-7107. Dinner combos, grilled meats, fish. Lunch and dinner daily. Wheat Road Cold Cuts, 302 Wheat Rd., Vineland, 697-0320. Deli and catering. Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-8899. Dinners, grilled sandwiches, wings in eight flavors. Willmott’s Pizza. 12 S. Seventh St., Vineland, 696-1525. Hand-tossed pizzas, stromboli, breakfast pizza. Offering Take-out or eat in service. Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville, 327-0909. Continental cuisine and spirits served in a casually upscale setting. Ye Olde Centerton Inn, 1136 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3201. American classics served in a building right out of a Rockwell painting. I Recipe Corner { LISA ANN DiNUNZIO } Recipe Swap Chocolate and strawberries—all in one great recipe. G reetings! Today’s featured recipe calls for one of my favorite ingredients, chocolate! I haven’t met many people who don’t share in my sentiments for this indulgent item. I’m especially fond of dark chocolate because of its healthier properties. Research shows that cocoa beans contain flavonoids that may raise the levels of HDL cholesterol (the good cholesterol), and dark chocolate also has potent antioxidants that help protect cells and promotes heart health. So the next time you’re craving something sweet, grab a piece of dark chocolate (with at least 70 percent cocoa), or try dipping fresh strawberries into melted dark chocolate for double health benefits. But remember, moderation is key to enjoying all sweets, chocolate included! CORRECTION: The recipe published a few weeks back for “Grandma’s Rice Pudding” from Stephanie Baruffi mistakenly called for 3¾ cup rice. Stephanie informs us that her Grandmom gave her the correct amount, which is ¾ cup rice. They wanted to make sure Grapevine readers had the correct measurement. This week’s recipe and story is submitted by Nicole Cortes, who writes: “My family and I love chocolate, and my favorite dessert is strawberry shortcake, so I combined our love for chocolate and shortcake, and serve this recipe several times a year. Needless to say, everyone is happy when I make this dessert!” Chocolate Lovers’ Strawberry Shortcake Brownie mix of your choice, prepared according to package 3 cups fresh strawberries 3 tablespoons sugar 2 pints vanilla ice cream Hershey’s chocolate syrup 1 can whipped cream Once brownies are prepared, set aside and let cool, you can serve them warm, if desired. Reserve six strawberries for garnish; slice remaining berries and place in a bowl. Sprinkle with sugar, mix gently and set bowl aside for 5-10 minutes to allow sugar to dissolve. To assemble brownie shortcakes, place six brownies on a large dessert dish, or one brownie slice on six individual plates. Top each brownie with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. Spoon on strawberries topped with whipped cream and drizzle with syrup. Garnish each shortcake with one whole strawberry. As always, Bon Appetit. I Lisa Ann is the author of Seasoned With Love, Treasured Recipes and Lisa Ann’s Seasoned With Love II. Send recipes for publication to lapd1991@aol.com or to The Grapevine, 3660 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08361. 50%OFF GRAND OPENING DRY CLEANING Miracle Cleaners Miracle Cleaners 20 Years Experience Mon-Fri 8:00 – 6:00 Sat. 8:30 – 5:30 • 856-765-0044 Union Lake Crossing Shopping Center (Facing ShopRite Market) LIMITED TIME OFFER WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | It’s It’s easy to get distracted by today’s o distracted y today’s r headlines… Frank Parrish & Martin Hoag Getting Divorced? Bonnie L. Laube, Esq. Greenblatt & Laube, PC Divorce, Separation, Custody, Child Support, Parenting Time, Alimony, Asset Distribution, Emancipation, Domestic Violence Certi?ed by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Civil Trial Attorney You may You ma want to wait until “better times” to invest. e key to ay times” invest. time es long-ter i estment l long-term investment success has historically been to stay invested rm inv h hi rically b histori ll inv d i ested regardle regardless of what’s happening in the world market. Contact the ess what’s wo mark orld ket. investm professionals Hoag-Parris Financial Management investment professionals at Hoag-Parrish Financial Management ment sh for more information. more r Dial 85 Dial 856-691-1900 for a free consultation that carries absolutely 56-691-1900 tion carries no obligation. You can see us online at www.hoag-parrish.com. obligation. You g www w w.hoag-par rish.com. r the grapevine { 25 } Hoag-Parrish Hoag-Parrish Financial Ma Mangement Fi F nancial M ngement Securities offered through Royal Alliance Associates Inc., a registered broker-dealer. Member urities Royal Inc., , broker-dealer. FINRA/SIPC. Advisory Services FINRA/SIPC. Advisory Ser vices offered through Hoag-Parrish Financial Management, a registered NRA/SIPC Hoag-Parrish P Management, 856-691-0424 • email: bll@greenblattlaube.com 200 North Eighth Street • PO Box 883 • Vineland, NJ 08362 All major credit cards accepted FISHING Continued from page 1 ter fishing in the Delaware Bay, and if you like freshwater fishing, we have some of the best bass fishing you can find in [southern New] Jersey. Union Lake, Sunset Lake and Mary Elmer Lake, just to mention a few, have great freshwater fishing.” Union Lake is arguably the best place in the county for freshwater fishing. At almost Saltwater fishing in the Delaware Bay can bring home supper, such as the cooler full of striper caught by Kevin Carney. 900 acres, it’s the state’s largest Wildlife Management area lake. The New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife stocked the lake with smallmouth bass as sort of an experiment. The results have been encouraging. Very few, if any, freshwater spots in southern New Jersey contain smallmouth bass, and the state’s smallmouth bass initiative at Union Lake has added to the excitement and variety in Cumberland County. On the day Bondi fished from the shore at Union Lake, several boats were out on the water, casting lines looking for large and smallmouth bass. “Union Lake is becoming the favorite spot of a lot of people because of the smallmouth,” said Jeff Shaw Jr., the owner of Blackwater Sports Center on Delsea Drive in Vineland. “The smallmouth bass is not usually found in [southern New] Jersey, and Union Lake has a great population going, and it’s a great fighting fish. If you caught one, you would know why. It’s awesome. It’s a 12-inch fish, but if you caught one, you would think you had a shark on the other end of the line. So Union Lake is really becoming a popular place.” But the good freshwater fishing is not limited to Union Lake. Shaw said there are some top spots close to his business in Vineland. “Within 10 minutes of here, there are 10 places I could send you,” Shaw said. Along with Union Lake in Millville, Giampietro Park in Vineland and Sunset Lake and Mary Elmer Lake in Bridgeton are just some of the freshwater spots available in Cumberland County. “There are plenty of opportunities and accessibility for fishing in Cumberland County,” said Bob Rose, Cumberland County’s Director of Tourism and Recreation. “Fishing has always been a strong component of the county’s recreational program. There are dozens of lakes and streams in the county for freshwater fishing, and we obviously have plenty of opportunities for saltwater fishing in the bay.” The Delaware Bay Fishing Tournament had been an attractive entry on the county tournament schedule. But it was canceled in 2009 for the second consecutive year due to lack of participation. Rose believes the tournament’s downfall can be attributed to the current economic conditions, rising cost of fuel and a lack of certain saltwater species. Rose said tournament officials will meet to discuss the tournament’s future. But even with that setback, saltwater fishing remains popular in Delaware Bay off of Cumberland County. There are other tournaments and opportunities. Good resources for information are www.fortescue.com and Cumberland County’s website www.co.cumberland.nj.us. Darrin Krug, a longtime fisherman from Cedarville who runs a custom rod and repair business, said saltwater fishing can be a tricky proposition for the inexperienced. “Saltwater fishing has its ups and downs,” Krug said. “At any time, fishing for one of those species will be phenomenal, and one of those will not be there. It could last a year, or it could be the season. Overall, if you are good enough to know what to target and where to look you will do very well.” Krug said a good way to have fun for a newcomer to saltwater fishing is to fish with a party boat. There are a number of them that go out of Fortescue and other bay towns. “You get the experience of the captain to take you to a good spot, and they will provide you with the right bait,” Krug said. “The mates will help you any way they can and you don’t even need to bring any equipment. They will provide it. We all know they can’t guarantee fish, but I don’t know of too many other sports or hobbies where a beginner can have such a good chance of success on their first try.” Cliff Higbee, one of the managers at Higbee Marina in Fortescue, said for $50, you can get a spot on a party boat, also known as an open boat, rental of equipment and bait for a seven-hour trip. He said a charter boat, where a group would reserve a boat, might run closer to $60 per person. People also saltwater fish from the shore at Fortescue. “You pick up your bait, head down to the beach, put out your beach umbrella and beach chair, cast your line and have some fun,” said Donna Ludlam, who has worked at Al’s Bait & Tackle in Fortescue for 19 years. “A lot of people do it, and they enjoy it.” Shaw, from Blackwater Sports Center, said getting started in freshwater fishing can be as simple and inexpensive or as complex and expensive as you want to make it. That’s part of the appeal. The freshwater license costs $22.50, and a trout stamp is another $10.50. So that’s $33 to get started. “A hundred dollars can get you a decent rod and reel and plenty of tackle to get you started,” Shaw said. “But the sky is the limit when it comes to how expensive it can be. We carry fishing rods from $8 to $300. Reels are from $20 to $500. We have lures that are $1, and we have $50 lures. There are different budgets and different mindsets. It depends on how much you want to get into it.” Expensive or inexpensive. Freshwater or saltwater. Tournament competitive or once-in-a-while recreational. There are many ways to approach fishing. But just about everyone agrees on one thing. It is a great sport, particularly for families. “It’s a good family activity,” Shaw said. “It’s a good way to get the family together. Everyone can get involved. There is too much with the kids on the computers, in my opinion. This is a way to break away from that and spend quality time with your kids. It’s also a good way to get away from it all. Go out and fish and relieve some stress. Can’t beat it.” I Mon. & Tues. Special { 26 } the grapevine | JULY 8, 2009 $11 haircuts Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. Get amazing results from your advertising campaign in The Grapevine. Get the benefit of our distribution to every residence in Vineland (approx. 22,250)! Ride the wave of excitement as The Grapevine’s debut has excited our town’s citizens. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. Precision Cutting $13 Foil Highlights $55 Perms Start @ $55 FULL SERVICE SALON 696-9890 • 692-8659 GIFT CERTIFICATES • Walk-ins Welcome Separate Men’s Styling Room • No Appts Necessary Mon. Tues. Wed. 9-4:30pm • -35 Years Experience- COLOR & CUT Good Any Day Good Any Day PERMS $ 3o? $ 5o? expires 8/12/09 expires 8/12/09 urs. 9-7pm • Fri. 9-6pm • Sat. 8:30-3pm • Sun. 9-1pm Lincoln & Dante Shopping Center • 1760 S. Lincoln Ave. Varicose • Fabrizio Chiropractic Celebrates Grand Opening Fabrizio Chiropractic, located at 1790 N. Main Road in Vineland, recently celebrated its Grand Opening on Friday, June 19. Many customers, family and friends turned out to enjoy the refreshments and hourly giveaways. Dr. Theresa A. Fabrizio, DC, is a graduate of Penn State University as well as a graduate of the New York Chiropractic College. She offers family chiropractic services and X-rays on the premises, and you can take your films with you. She can be reached at (856) 692-0077. Veins • Featured on ? and WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Reach Out To The Most Qualified Specialist Minimally Invasive Insurance covered 30 min. Office Treatment Free Vein Screening Call to schedule an appointment Charles L. Dietzek, D.O., FACOS Raymond S. Wojtalik, M.D., FACS Voorhees • Sewell • Vineland 856.309.VEIN (8346) Specializing in spider and varicose vein treatment 2950 College Dr., Suite 2B, Vineland • www.VeinVascular.com Do You Think You Can’t Afford A Vacation? You can with us! Don’t just dream it… now you can travel the world Featuring 5 Cruises & 25 Vacations or Use Us For Single Vacation Bookings! Call Now & Ask About Our Lifetime Package! www.TvTravelPackage.com/HA8467 the grapevine { 27 } Getaway Lifetime Vacations, LLC • Hiberto Andular • (856) 979-8467 18 -H o l e C o u r s e H a n d i c a p – A c c e ss i b l e I COMMUNITY CALENDAR HAPPENINGS WEDNESDAY, JULY 8 Planning Board Meeting. Council Chambers, City Hall, Seventh and Wood sts. 7:30 p.m. amusement rides, fireworks on the 4th of July and demolition derbies on Monday and Saturday. Kids Day on Wednesday, Gates open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday at 4 p.m.; Wednesday and Saturday, at 11 a.m. Admission $5, kids $4. Free parking. 825-3820 Wednesday Night Video Games J u l y Sp e c ia l (1) Round of Golf for a Group of 4, FREE Hot Dog or Nachos & (1) FREE Soda – Only $25.00 Hot Dogs• Chili/Cheese • Nachos • Sausage • Sodas & Soft Pretzels Indoor & Patio Seating Gift Certificates Available Fund Raising Opportunities for your school or organization Senior Citizen Rates • Visa & Mastercard Accepted Located next to Rita’s Water Ice B i r th d a y P a r t y P a c k a g e s $5.00 until 5PM • $6.00 5PM to Close JULY 6 THROUGH 11 Cumberland County Fair. Fairgrounds, Carmel Rd., Millville. 4-H & Open Class exhibits, farm machinery, animal exhibits, SATURDAY, JULY 11 Fresh and Specialty Foods Market/Pets on Parade. 700 block of Landis Ave. 8 a.m.-noon. p.m. Vendors 73 Landis Ave. Upper Deerfield Twp. Hours: 11 am-10pm Daily THE COUNTY’S OFFICE ON AGING AND DISABLED has moved its main offices from the County Administration Building to the first floor wing of the County Library at 800 E. Commerce Street in Bridgeton. The public will be able to reach the Office on Aging at the same phone numbers, 453-2220 or 453-2221. The move will enable the Office on Aging to better accommodate its staff and the public it serves. Other departments can be reached as follows: • Care Management—453-2238 Congregate Nutrition Program— 453-2213 • Home Delivered Meals Program— 453-2159 • RSVP (Retired and Senior Volunteer Program)—453-2161 • Office for the Disabled—453-2156 • Division of Homeless—453-2155 • The CATS Bus (Cumberland Area Transit System) phone remains the same, 691-9331. Dispatch Office, 691-7799. 856-453-PUTT (7888) www.landislinks.com 5pm- close kmtebud@hotmail.com or visiting the VHS Select Choir page on Facebook.com. Former Select Choir members are encouraged to bring old photos, memories and, of course, your voices! There will be singing! YMCA’S ANNUAL STRONG KIDS CAMPAIGN provides financial assistance to ensure that no one is turned away from YMCA programs and services because they cannot afford to participate. The community is invited to contribute to this noteworthy annual campaign. “Every dollar contributed to this campaign stays here and goes directly to help people who live locally,” says Ron Rossi, president of the YMCA’s Board of Directors. To date, more than $46,000 has been raised toward this year’s goal of $80,000. In addition to the donations from all 27 Board members, there have been gifts from community leaders, YMCA staff, and the public. To make a donation or for more information, call the YMCA’s executive director, George Steinbronn, Jr. at (856) 691-0030, extension 105. Alternatively, please visit the YMCA at 1159 East Landis Avenue, in Vineland. Pictured: Board members in the YMCA’s huge new Family Fitness Center hold a banner for the annual Strong Kids Campaign. FORMER MEMBERS OF THE VHS SELECT CHOIR (1974-1994), under the direction of Dr. Gerald Luongo and Michael Testa, are invited to attend a reunion on Saturday, July 25, from 4 to 9 p.m. at the home of Kathi (Testa) Epifanio in Vineland. Spouses and significant others are welcome as well. The event will be hosted by Kathi Epifanio and Michael Testa. Drinks and hors d’oeuvres will be served. A $20 donation is requested to cover the event’s costs. Attendees can RSVP by calling 691-1920, e-mailing { 28 } the grapevine | JULY 8, 2009 will sell fresh fruits and vegetables, crafters and other exhibitors, too. Trolley will shuttle between Kidston Towers and Walmart, providing free transportation for anyone going to the Market. 794-8653. TUESDAY, JULY 14 City Council Meeting. Council Chambers, City Hall, Seventh and Wood sts. 7:30 p.m. SATURDAY, JULY 18 Indoor Flea Market. Trinity Episcopal Church, Eighth and Wood sts. 8 a.m-2 p.m. (Spaces $15. Bring your own table To reserve a space, call 691-1589.) BABY PARADE WINNERS The winners of the Second Annual Baby Parade, which took place on June 27, have been announced. They are: • Most Creative Costume (age 2 and under) 1st Place: Omar Smith 2nd Place: Katherine Hoff 3rd Place: Vincenzo, Lily, and J.J. Garton (The Baywatch Babies) • Most Creative Costume (3 to 5) 1st Place: Taeara Woodson 2nd Place: Israel D. Rodriguez 3rd Place: Julie Marie Guzman • Most Giggly (age 2 and under) 1st Place: Katherine Hoff 2nd Place: Omar Smith 3rd Place: Emma and Abby Cavaliero • Most Giggly (age 3 to 5) 1st Place: Taeara Woodson 2nd Place: Julie Marie Guzman 3rd Place: Israel D. Rodriguez • Chubbiest Cheeks (age 2 & under) 1st Place: Emma and Abby Cavaliero 2nd Place: Lexi and Lia Rodriguez 3rd Place: Vincenzo, Lily, and J.J. Garton (The Baywatch Babies) • Chubbiest Cheeks (age 3 to 5) 1st Place: Julie Marie Guzman 2nd Place: Taeara Woodson 3rd Place: Israel D. Rodriguez • Best Overall (age 2 and under) 1st Place: Aiden and Sean Riggins 2nd Place: Vincenzo, Lily, and J.J. Garton (The Baywatch Babies) 3rd Place: Katherine Hoff • Best Overall (age 3 to 5) 1st Place: Taeara Woodson 2nd Place: Julie Marie Guzman 3rd Place: Israel D. Rodriguez SATURDAY, JULY 11 Prostate Cancer Screening. SJH Health Center, 333 Irving Ave., Bridgeton. Learn about PSA testing and prostate cancer screenings. 9 a.m. Free. If you do not have health insurance and would like to attend, RSVP to Christine Gregory at 575-4436. SUNDAY, JULY 19 1st Annual Russian Festival. Holy Trinity Russian Orthodox Church at 2221 West Landis Ave. Sample the stroganoff, vareniki and shashlik, pielmeni, pirozhki and golubtsi, kvas sweet ale and Russian beer (also hot dogs, barbecue chicken, sausage and peppers). An appearance by a Russian Balalaika Orchestra accompanied by folk dancers. 1 p.m. Free Admission. Visit www.holytrinitychurch.us JULY 11 AND 12 Walk in the Vineyard Wine Trail Weekend. Bellview Winery, Atlantic St., Landisville. Special vineyard tours, wine tasting, winery tours, and grape-themed recipes. 11 a.m.-5 p.m, Free admission. 697-7172, www.BellviewWinery.com SUNDAY, JULY 12 Weekly Dance. North Italy Club Hall, East Ave. and Virano Ln. County chapter of the Single Parents Society holds the dances for people age 50 and up, married or single. Live band performs music for waltz, rhumba, swing, foxtrot, line dances, and more. 7:30-10:30 p.m. $7 members, $9 non-members 697-1814. SUNDAY, JULY 19 Hermandad Latina Block Party. 410 Montrose St. Free food, beverages, and entertainment. 364-0247. GOLF, SPORTS, ETC. THROUGH JULY 27 Midget Football/Cheerleading Signups. Third St. and Chestnut Ave. 6-7:30 p.m. on Fridays, July 10, 17 and 24. Saturday registrations 9 a.m.-noon on July 11, 18 and 25. 974-3645. SUNDAY, JULY 12 Recognition Day. Faith Tabernacle, 1665 North Ave., Port Norris. Motivational speaker Is Karen E. Barnett, director of the Bridgeton Municipal Alliance Youth to Youth Program. 3:30 p.m. All are welcome. JULY 13 THROUGH 17 SonRock Kids Camp Vacation Bible School. South Vineland Uunited Methodist Church, corner of Sherman Ave. and Main Rd. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Classes for age 4 to 8th grade, plus an adult class. WEEKLY THROUGH OCTOBER 6 Senior Golf Association Events. Various courses throughout southern New Jersey. Annual membership $20. JULY DATES: July 7 (Centerton), July 14 (off), July 21 (Back Creek), July 28 (Westwood). AUGUST DATES: Aug. 4 (White Oaks), Aug. 11 (Patriots Glen), Aug. 18 (off), Aug. 28 (TBA). Call Paul Doerr to join or for exact dates, entry deadlines, tee times, locations, and additional information, 691-4098. CELEBRATION OF DIVERSITY SATURDAY, AUGUST 1 The Cultural and Heritage San Juan Festival. North Italy Hall, 414 Virano St. 10 a.m.–11 p.m. 6922331 ext. 108. Casa P.R.A.C. Inc. will again host the annual Cultural and Heritage San Juan Festival celebrating the Cultural Diversity of the youth in Cumberland County. All money acquired from this event will aid in the implementation of program necessities that will further support the youth and children in our community while encouraging education. The celebration will incude a DJ and live bands, dancers, vendors, a dance and domino contest, a talent show, a car show, party inflatables, a dunk tank, cartoon characters, karate, puppets and face painting, a clown and magic show, and cash prizes. THURSDAY, JULY 16 FRIDAY, JULY 10 Searching for America’s Best TwoSome. Ron Jaworski’s Running Deer Golf Club, 1111 Parvin Mill Rd., Pittsgrove. Presented by Callaway Golf, a national Amateur 2 Person better ball event. 1 p.m. Tee Times. Fee to members of Ron Jaworski Golf Courses $60, non-members $110. Call Running Deer Pro-Shop 3582000 ext. 18 for details. only at South Jersey’s Premier Car Wash WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Just $850 YES! Voted #1 “Best of Best” 2008 + Tax Can get my car clean INSIDE & OUT??? Chamber of Commerce Golf Classic. Buena Vista Golf Club, Rt. 40 and Country Club Lane, Buena. $150 per player (includes lunch, dinner, practice range, green and cart fees). $20, lunch only. $40, dinner only. 11 a.m. registration and picnic lunch. Noon shotgun start. Four-person scramble format. For pre-registration or sponsorship information, call 691-7400 or visit www.vinelandchamber.org/events. WEEK OF JULY 13 Super Sports Camp. YMCA 1159 East Landis Ave. For ages 9 to 12. A new sport every day in a non-competitive environment. Focus is on developing and improving specific skills and techniques while learning the value of sportsmanship and fair play. Also, a presentation by the Philadelphia Flyers-Phantoms Development Department. 691-0030, ext. 113. or www.ccaymca.org; THURSDAY, JULY 23 Amputees Across America. HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital, 1237 W. Sherman Ave. A welcome recption will be held in honor of the cyclists who are riding in bicycle relays across the country (started in California on May 27) and visiting hospitals to increase public awareness of amputees as people with active lifestyles. 4 p.m. EVER Guaranteed! Windows included with this ad. Best Wash the grapevine { 29 } 2611 S. Main Rd. Vineland, NJ 08360 (Between Grant & Sherman) GV REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS The following transactions of $1,000 or more were filed with Cumberland County in the month of May 2009 (transactions may have occurred in an earlier month). Names listed may, in some cases, be those of buyers’ or sellers’ representatives. BRIDGETON 100 N Elm Ave., John Walters to Tanish C Hogans on 5/11/09 for $140,000 23 Elmer St., Kevin O’Connell to Vincent J Parenti, Sr. on 5/13/09 for $21,500 126 W Park Dr., Shani L Desantis to Michael Bermudez on 5/14/09 for $125,000 45 Burt St., Heather R Sciullo (Fka) to Stephanie E Albano on 5/19/09 for $117,500 102 S Giles St., City of Bridgeton to Gerald Hyman on 5/20/09 for $7,000 301 & 305 S Pine St., City of Bridgeton to Lonell Francis on 5/27/09 for $3,500 32-34 S Laurel St., City of Bridgeton to River Front Cafe LLC on 5/27/09 for $56,000 748 & C N Pearl St., Chapman Ford Lincoln Mercury LLC to Four Wallaces LLC on 5/28/09 for $830,000 COMMERCIAL TWP 1759 Strawberry Ave., Sogima L-A Manager Reo LLC to Christopher Lawrence on 5/27/09 for $8,900 343 Fern Rd., Pro Form Homes LLC to Michael Bonanno on 5/27/09 for $163,000 4701&C Battle Ln., Lawrence H Stang (Ind. Exec.) to Robert S Stang on 5/29/09 for $30,000 DEERFIELD TWP 791 Garton Rd., Daphne L West to Derek Spencer on 5/11/09 for $156,000 569 Morton Ave., Pizzo Rentals LLC to Mona Lisa Real Estate LLC on 5/12/09 for $310,000 Centeron Rd &C., Angelika U Whitson to Gary L Whitson on 5/21/09 for $50,000 DOWNE TWP 52 Husted Ln., S Anne Gilmour to Edward Bart on 5/11/09 for $320,000 234 Landing Rd., Estella Leona Cobb (by Atty.) to Daniel N Cobb on 5/20/09 for $150,000 577-579 Haleyville, William Franklin Garrison, Jr. (Exec.) to Nocon Family LLC on 5/26/09 for $98,000 FAIRFIELD TWP Fairton-Gouldttown, Inez McRae to Roseanna Holden on 5/11/09 for $35,000 HOPEWELL TWP 606 Shiloh Pk., Nehariya Realty LLC to Preet Sharmi LLC on 5/14/09 for $350,000 LAWRENCE TWP Wilson Ave., Barbara J Fultz to Lee Ferretti on 5/27/09 for $3,500 171 Main St., Stanley D Clark (Exec.) to Martin Keoughan on 5/28/09 for $50,000 MAURICE RVR TWP 61 Main St., Sec. of Housing & Urban Development (by Atty.) to Steven Flara on 5/11/09 for $30,000 Railroad Ave., Township of Maurice River to Gary Lee on 5/20/09 for $8,000 111 Middle St., Gary S Martisofski to James Allen on 5/27/09 for $35,000 MILLVILLE 454 Lance Ct., National City Bank to SCIP 09-04 LLC on 5/11/09 for $113,627 Hogbin Rd., Linda Finch (Exec.) to Arthur Kashubski on 5/12/09 for $29,000 558 Columbia Ave., Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. (by Trust Atty.) to Millville Housing Group LLC on 5/12/09 for $65,000 466 S 3rd St., Cindy M Andrews to Mary Jo Morse on 5/12/09 for $106,000 10 N 7th St., Marilyn D Fitzhugh (by Atty.) to B&B Venture Group LLC on 5/13/09 for $87,500 4 Tomasello Dr., Sherwood Forest Homes LLC to Thomas J Nardelli on 5/13/09 for $239,000 DR. JOHN MAINIERO Affordable CHIROPRACTIC CARE WE ACCEPT ALL HEALTH INSURANCES NO INSURANCE NEEDED! NO REFERRAL NEEDED! WALK-INS WELCOME. AND WELLNESS CENTER 691-5900 1420 S. Lincoln Ave. • Vineland, NJ 08360 www.doctormainiero.com Beautiful Smiles, Made Affordable OUR SERVICES MILLVILLE FAMILY DENTAL Union Lake Crossing Shopping Center 2144 N. 2nd St., Millville NEW PATIENT WELCOMING PACKAGE { 30 } the grapevine | JULY 8, 2009 $ 80 (reg. $230.) Includes oral exam, full mouth series of x-rays, cleaning & polishing, oral cancer screening, periodontal (gums) evaluation. With coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Emergency Walk-Ins Welcome • Same-Day Denture Repair • • • • • • • • • • • Cleaning & X-Rays Porcelain Veneers Cosmetic Dentistry Periodontal Therapy (Gum Treatment) Full Mouth Reconstruction Implant Rehabilitation Root Canals (One Visit) Full & Partial Dentures Bleaching White Fillings Crowns & Bridges 856-825-2111 Open 7 Days a Week. Day & Evening Hours Proud Member Of The Allied Dental Practices Of NJ Personalized Dentistry SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO OUR SENIOR CITIZENS Se Habla Español E D W A R D P O L L E R , D D S • G L E N N P R A G E R , D D S • TO D D P R A G E R , D D S • D A N I E L D I C E S A R E , D M D O Cedar St., Olga Kossak (by Atty.) to Warren D Weil on 5/20/09 for $19,000 208 W Main St., Sandra R Lorenzo to R&R Rentals LLC on 5/26/09 for $65,000 420 Cedar Ln., Sidney L Scott to Hugh R Hiles on 5/26/09 for $175,000 508 F St., Cumberland County Sheriff to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. on 5/27/09 for $30,100 1101 Louis Dr., Steve D Kozak (Exec.) to Melissa Murray on 5/27/09 for $155,000 1312 Cedarbrook Ave., Robert Dixon, Jr. (by Atty.) to Russell C Corson, IV on 5/27/09 for $185,000 126 Wharton St., Hovnanian K At Millville II LLC to Roger A Phillips on 5/28/09 for $384,105 STOW CREEK TWP 342 Marlboro Rd., Linda E Runyon to Grant C Sporny on 5/29/09 for $320,000 UPPER DEERFIELD 16 Hilton Ave., Alayne J Strang (Exec.) to Stephanie Parks on 5/13/09 for $95,000 8 Smith Dr., Dorothy Comiski (by Atty.) to Michelle L Zimmerman on 5/15/09 for $169,000 28 Franmar Dr., Mildred Poole to John Randanella, Jr. on 5/28/09 for $99,500 2025 Grant Ave., Maria L McCurdy (Exec.) to Ryan G Schilling on 5/28/09 for $130,000 VINELAND 59 Osborn Ave., Sec. of Housing & Urban Development (by Atty.) to Samuel Cordero on 5/11/09 for $133,995 1867 N Main Rd., Joselito Vega to Sandy Garcia on 5/11/09 for $145,000 2537 S Brookfield St., Scott Fransko to Anthony M Brooks on 5/12/09 for $208,000 3634 Isabel Rd., NVR Inc. (DBA) to Frances M White on 5/12/09 for $229,590 115 Josephs Ct., Redcrest Fields LLC to Scott Fransko on 5/12/09 for $273,000 2281 N Main Rd., Cheryl Gallo to Kenneth Crescitelli on 5/13/09 for $33,333 207 S West Ave., HSBC Bank USA Trust (by Atty.) to Diego Rivera on 5/13/09 for $64,000 2281 N Main Rd., Connie A Crescitelli Doughty (Exec.) to Peter Crescitelli, Jr. on 5/13/09 for $100,000 320 W Grape St., Anastacio Cruz to Urbano Perez-Perez on 5/13/09 for $105,000 1574 Wills Pl., Gloria L Cocchi (Est. by Exec.) to Michael DePalma on 5/13/09 for $166,000 2489 Sanford Dr., Jon L Hollenweger to Christopher Greenfield on 5/13/09 for $168,000 2383 Coronado Dr., Beazer Homes Corp. to Oladeji O Babalola on 5/13/09 for $265,000 858 Foxmoor Dr., Tradition Homes at Vineland LLC to NVR Inc. (DBA) on 5/14/09 for $77,500 2461 Old Farm Dr., Tradition Homes at Vineland LLC to NVR Inc. (DBA) on 5/14/09 for $77,500 2440 Old Farm Dr., Tradition Homes at Vineland LLC to NVR Inc. (DBA) on 5/14/09 for $77,500 30 Arcadia Dr., Wells Fargo Bank Trust (by Atty.) to Hector Acevedo on 5/14/09 for $80,000 1652 James Ct., James F Papiano to Jeffrey Sabla on 5/14/09 for $219,900 N Orchard St., Jan Robert Adams to JV Properties LLC on 5/15/09 for $50,000 2070 W Landis Ave., Hardy Management Co. Inc. to Giordano Real Estate Holdings LLC on 5/18/09 for $1,300,000 2188 N Delsea Dr., Vincent Scapellato to Carol A Ebner on 5/19/09 for $40,000 1214 Livia Ln., Landmark Development No. 4 LLC to Richard L Walsh on 5/19/09 for $186,850 116 W Laurel St., Betty R Russell to Tricia L Kopreski on 5/20/09 for $159,000 1502 Fela Dr., NVR Inc. (DBA) to Jefferey M Butterworth on 5/20/09 for $259,605 2034 Kickapoo Trail, Spring Hollow No. 1 LLC to NVR Inc. (DBA) on 5/21/09 for $78,000 1348 Cherokee Ln., Spring Hollow No. 1 LLC to NVR Inc. (DBA) on 5/21/09 for $78,000 567 Alps Place, Miguel A Roman to Christopher Copestick on 5/22/09 for $130,000 5757 Independence Rd., Laurence J DiBona to Eric R Ford on 5/26/09 for $95,000 205 W Laurel St., John D Lair to Amilcar Soto on 5/26/09 for $124,000 702 Embassy Terr., David R Kotok (Exec.) to Ivan E Perez on 5/26/09 for $125,000 2288 S Orchard Rd., Ryan Giovanelli to Damian Salas on 5/26/09 for $150,000 561 W Wheat Rd., Dale R Parson to Michael E Patterson on 5/26/09 for $182,000 2300 W Landis Ave., Kejzman Realty LLC to NGL Property Management LLC on 5/27/09 for $27,900 710 Embassy Terr., Ramon Rodriguez, Jr. to Jose Melendez on 5/27/09 for $130,000 65 Osborn Ave., Deloris J Colvin-Kinnel to Luis A Torres-Rodriguez on 5/27/09 for $139,000 1189 Woodcrest Dr., Adrian O Vanaman (Exec.) to Patricio Garcia-Martinez on 5/27/09 for $179,000 1750 Tomahawk Ct., NVR Inc. (DBA) to Patricia Hayes on 5/27/09 for $271,765 2216 W Landis Ave., Kejzman Hospitality LLC to NGL Property Management LLC on 5/27/09 for $3,122,100 26 Glenn Terr., Christine Barse (by Atty.) to Aaron Morvay on 5/28/09 for $125,000 1075 Chelseas Way, Daemar & Associates LLC to Tina Pryor on 5/28/09 for $162,000 3560 Jesse Rd., NVR Inc. (DBA) to Scott S Sikora on 5/28/09 for $236,898 66 Holly Hill Terr., Carole M Dallago to Joseph Beltran on 5/29/09 for $159,000 1291 McMahan Dr., Rose M DiFelice to Michael R Anderson on 5/29/09 for $174,000 Debra Villari 856 589-4848 office 609-458-4627 cell Open House 1-4 pm Saturday Directions: Delsea Drive (Route 47) South to Right on West Oak to Left on Swenlin Drive to 1084 Offers you all you would expect in apartment living and more, “a place to call home” 5 Large Floor Plans One & Two Bedroom Apartments and Three Bedroom Townhomes Features: • Washer & dryer in all apartments • Individual heat & central air • Spacious rooms & generous closets • Wall-to-wall carpeting • Pool & playground If an open floorplan is what you’re looking for… search no more – this is it! All bedrooms are on the main level of the home. Parquet flooring throughout. A screened-in porch. One car garage and full unfinished basement. Sellers says bring offer!!!! Location Location!!! great easy access to Rte 55. Great for going to the shore, or to the city. Lots of shopping, and restaurants, right around the corner!!! (856) 696-1929 1301 S. Lincoln Ave. Vineland, NJ www.oakvalleyapartments.com WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the grapevine { 31 } Our Family of Doctors Healthy Teeth & Gums For A Lifetime • Same Day Caps & Crowns • Full Time Orthodontic Staff Orthodontic License #5738 • Locally Owned & Operated • Payment Options to Make Dentistry Affordable • A Children’s Dental Specialist Pediatric License #5864 • Zoom Whitening • Dental Implant & Gum Specialist Periodontal License #4086 • Evening & Weekend Appointments Available lity Dental Care Qua Today’s Cosmetic & Family Dentistry Main Road • Vineland (Next to Acme & Blockbuster) Must present coupon. Exp. 7/31/09 Back to the Beach SPECIAL ? Join us today a new patient for only $ REGULARLY A $184 VALUE! 1.00 This includes Comprehensive Oral Exam, X-Rays and Cancer Screening. When you mention this ad (856) 691-0290 TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS www.quality-dentalcare.com (856) 451-8041 (Across from Walmart) Bridgeton

Posted on July 1st, 2009 by by Mike

July 1, 2009

INSIDE H O M E & GA R D E N • B U RG E R R EC I P ES • 3/5 0 P L A N • FO O D, I N C . VOLUME 2 | ISSUE 21 | JULY 1, 2009 CONNECTING YOU { MICKEY BRANDT } T O V I N E L A N D . W E E K L Y. Visit us online www.grapevinenewspaper.com From marshes to marshmallows, fine glass to fossils, cowboys to cabooses, there’s so much to see in and around Cumberland County that we could only include a partial list of the fun and educational activities available. It may surprise you to know there are so many vacation experiences within a few miles of your home, but there are, so start planning. Here are the outlines of five sample days you can spend on a family “stay-cation” this summer. GLASS, ART, AND FLYING HIGH There is one area attraction where you could truly spend most of a day: WheatonArts in Millville, formerly known as Wheaton Village. The arts and cultural center hosts 60,000 visitors a year. Here’s what you can do there: • Call in advance to arrange a “Make Your Own” experience in paperweights, vases, or beadwork. • Tour the Museum of American Glass, which boasts the finest collection in the country. Be sure to get a “Millie the Mouse” game for your children to use. • Watch a glassblowing demonstration, held at 11 am, 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 pm. The glass studio is the heart of WheatonArts and can’t be missed. • Observe craftspeople at work in the ceramic, flameworking, and woodcarving studios. Continued on page 10 4th of July Fireworks Preceded by 7 p.m. concert Vineland’s Independence Day celebration on Saturday, July 4, will begin with a 7 p.m. concert by the Red, White & Blue Band at the Enrico Serra Band Shell in Giampetro Park. The free concert will be followed by the city’s annual fireworks display, staged from Vineland High School. As of the beginning of the week, the forecast calls for clear skies, but in case of rain, the concert will be held at Veterans Memorial Intermediate School. Another fireworks display is tentatively scheduled for July 8 at the Cumberland County Fairgrounds in Millville, though the funding must first be approved by the Cumberland County Board of Freeholders. Kayakers enjoy the day at Parvin State Park. Owner of THE LITTLE GYM Rich Rodriguez Trusts Us To Help The Little Gym Grow Big And Strong.              COMING SOON! NEW CAPITAL BANK BRANCH Our Focus Is You. 175 S. Main Road, Vineland, NJ • 856.690.1234 Se Habla Español CapitalBankNJ.com TUESDAY All You Can Eat Dinner Buffet 5 pm – 9 pm $13.99 WEDNESDAY All Day – All You Can Eat Crabs & Spaghetti $22.95 with soup or salad $10 Pitchers of Beer! 1 (2) Italian Hoagies $ 7.99 (Take out only – exp: 8/24/09 • With This Coupon GVP) FOR RESERVATIONS OR TAKE-OUT • CALL: 856-697-2900 OR 856-697-2902 2 CHOICE OF ANY TWO OF THE THREE BELOW: Excellent Food At Affordable Prices Restaurant Pizzeria & Lounge EGGPLANT PARMESAN CHICKEN PARMESAN OR SAUSAGE, ONION & PEPPERS $ 6 9.99 Turkey & Tuna Hoagie $ (Take out only – exp: 8/24/09 • With This Coupon GVP) 3 (2) LARGE 16” Cheese Pizzas & (1) 2 Liter Soda $ 4 5 (2) Cheesesteaks 12” Roll $ (1) Famous Grandma’s Pizza Extra Thin Crust $ 16.50 8.99 9.99 8.99 (Take out only – Exp: 8/24/09 With This Coupon GVP) (Take out only – Exp: 8/24/09 With This Coupon GVP) (Take out only – Exp: 8/24/09 With This Coupon GVP) (Take out only – Exp: 8/24/09 With This Coupon GVP) 363 E. Wheat Road • Buena, NJ 08310 HOURS: Sun. thru Thurs. 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. • Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. CHECK OUT OUR NEW DESIGN Miniature Golf Now Open! Now 18 Holes! Adults $6.00 Children 10 & Under $5.00 (price includes $1.50 ball return) Try Our New Award-Winning Chocolate Nutty Fluff Ice Cream! { 2 } the grapevine | JULY 1, 2009 Featuring: Only 8 Frozen Yogurt, No Fat, No Sugar Added sweetened with fructose, for Lactose Intolerance. * 2 Flavors of No Sugar Added, Hand-dipped Ice Cream * Slush * Gelatis * Water Ice *32 Flavors Hand-dipped Ice Cream * Cotton Candy * Ice Cream Cakes * Hot Dogs * Pulled Pork Barbecue Sandwiches & Much More! OPEN JULY 4th 9:30-1:30 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK NEW – Cheesesteak Sliders (You’ve Got To Try Them!) Waterfall Fountain Original Home of the Monster Milkshake All of Our Ice Cream Is Homemade Fresh Daily on the Premises N.W. Blvd. & Garden Rd. Vineland, NJ 856-692-1104 $ 18. Reg $29.99 w/Coupon 99 Expires 7-10-09 $ May not be combined w/other o?ers. Limit One 23.99 Expires 7-10-09 Reg $34.95 w/Coupon { CONTENTS } 1 42 Destinations in 5 Days Fill your summer vacation days with nearby jaunts. MICKEY BRANDT I Editor’s Letter Local Bakery Has The “Best” Cookies There’s only one thing better than being the best and that’s being recognized for being the best. The July cover of SJ Magazine’s Best of SJ issue features a cake specially created by The Sweet Like Bakery in Vineland. Last year, The Sweet Life was honored for having the “Best Muffins” in the magazine’s annual Best of SJ issue. This year, Sweet Life Bakery is being lauded for baking the “Best Chocolate Chip Cookies.” I spoke with SJ Magazine Marianne Aleardi to ask about how the magazine’s editorial staff goes about choosing the businesses and products to include as “Best of SJ,” as well as how the selection process for their cover image works. Regarding the honorees, Aleardi said, “We send out a blast e-mail to everyone we know (hundreds) asking for their suggestions, and our staff works hard to get around and taste everything that’s been nominated. Our staff then chooses the winners. Sweet Life won not only for the taste of their cookies, but also because they come in different sizes (including half or quarter sizes) and we thought that was a very customer friendly perk to offer.” As for the selection of a cover image for their July issue, “We asked four bakeries to bake cakes and only one was chosen,” said Aleardi. She added that all of the bakeries prepared gorgeous cakes for consideration, but some didn’t work well for the magazine cover because they didn’t fit graphically with a headline and other text and graphic elements required for the cover. “Sweet Life’s cake was selected because they were smart enough to include the headline right on the cake and it was [otherwise] a beautiful cake.” This is the ninth year SJ Magazine has produced a Best of SJ issue and the magazine staff always follows up the Best of SJ publication with a party in October where the attendees get to sample the various bests. “We’ve already gotten [Sweet Life Bakery’s Stephen Wilson and Jill McClennen] to agree to bake a replica of the cake for our party in October and we’re really looking forward to it.” As the former editor of Atlantic City Magazine, which presented an annual Best of the Shore issue, I can tell you that “Best of” publications are very popular with readers, but they tend to be quite controversial. In my experience (and I’m sure The Grapevine’s managing editor Deb Ein will agree, since we worked together at Atlantic City Magazine), “Best of” issues were always more trouble than they were worth because you ended up angering more people than you honored. No matter how objective we were and how carefully we tried to make our selection process transparent and scientific, we always got complaints afterwards that our system was somehow “rigged.” Obviously, most of these allegations were made by people who did not win a “best of” category that they thought they should have won. Aleardi explained that SJ Magazine has a ready response for those who are not happy with the results announced in the Best of SJ issue. “They can simply vote for their favorites in our readers’ poll.” The readers’ poll comes out in August and the cutoff for voting (online at www.sjmagazine.net) is July 15. If you’ve got an insatiable sweet tooth, you should do yourself a favor and get your hands on some Sweet Life “Best of SJ” chocolate chip cookies or muffins. Of course, my favorite items to come out of their magic ovens are the brownies. I won’t call them Best of Vineland or use any such hyperbole—thankfully my days of making “Best Of” proclamations are over. Vineland is blessed with at least a half a dozen truly outstanding bakeries, and in my book, as long as you buy from local independent businesses, you are buying and experiencing the best Vineland has to offer. 5 Here Comes the Sun Avoid the temptation to catch up on your suntan. DEBORAH A. EIN 4,6, 24 Faces in the News 7-11 16 HOME & GARDEN Greenest Treatment Plant Landis Sewerage Authority aims to be just that. DENNIS PALMER High Efficiency Heating and Cooling and Water Heating Equipment Eligible for up to $1500 in Federal Tax Credits and up to $400 in Rebates 20 Victory Day Vinelanders raised a large sum of money in War bonds. VINCE FARINACCIO 21 22 26 Vintage Vineland Community Calendar DINING: Meal Planning 101 Our food columnist votes for a simplified food chain. STEPHEN WILSON Serving Vineland for over 100 years! 691-1950 State Lic. # 12089 29 Recipe Corner Tips and recipes for the 4th of July cookout. LISA DINUNZIO 30 32 Entertainment The 3/50 Plan Here’s a way to support the Landis Avenue shops. TODD NOON 32 33 34 Crossword In Our Schools REAL ESTATE: How Much House Can You Afford? With A Bang! WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Summer Off Start Your { STAFF } MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor LORI GOUDIE Art Director GAIL EPIFANIO Controller JACK EPIFANIO Distribution SHERRY MUNYAN Advertising Executive MARIE HALPIN-GALLO Advertising Executive PATTY ALI Graphic Designer MARYANNE BERTRAND Advertising Assistant Eyebrow Wax with Color Get your Loved One A Gift Certificate Today FREE HOURS exp. 07/07/09 The Grapevine 3660 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361 PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816 EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2009. All rights reserved. the grapevine { 3 } Mon. – Wed. 9-5pm, Thurs. & Fri. 9-7pm Sat. 8:30-3pm & Sun., 9-1 pm WALK-INS WELCOME! NO APPOINTMENTS NECESSARY MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher 5006 E. Landis Ave.Vineland (856) 691-2202 I Faces in the News Century Savings Bank Donates to YMCA Century Savings Bank (CSB) recently donated $1,000 to the Cumberland Cape Atlantic YMCA in support of their “Strong Kids” Campaign. The donation will assist in providing children and families accessibility to a wide range of programs that Sun Promotes Cervini Sun National Bank has promoted Vineland resident Aimee Cervini to vice president, Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) officer. She previously served as the assistant vice president, Anti-Money Laundering (AML)/BSA manager. Cervini joined Sun National Bank in 1999 and was integral in the development of the bank’s BSA program and the Enhanced Due Diligence Monitoring (EDD) system. Prior to joining Sun, she was with First Union and CoreStates Banks, also in Vineland. Cervini is a Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialist (CAMS). She is an active member of the New Jersey Bankers Association’s Bank Secrecy Act committee, Association of Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialist and the Global Integrated Funds Transfer System user group. She also is an active member of the local Vineland community, where she is involved with the South Jersey Health Care Auxiliary and the Milanesi School Parent and Teachers Organization. In addition, she participates in fundraising events for the Susan G. Komen for the Cure®, the American Heart Association and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. contribute to their overall health and wellbeing regardless of their ability to pay. “We are committed to ‘Community Banking Plus,’ which means giving back to the neighborhoods and residents we serve,” said Dave Hemple, President and CEO of Century Savings Bank. “As a part of the community, we are dedicated to maintaining a strong YMCA chapter in the Vineland area so that more kids and families can share in the YMCA experience” said Carol Musso, AVP and Branch Manager. Cumberland Cape Atlantic YMCA – accepts check from Century Savings Bank staff. Pictured, from left: Carol Musso, AVP and Branch Manager; Ron Rossi, President of the Cumberland Cape YMCA Board of Directors; George Steinbronn, Jr., Executive Director and CEO of Cumberland Cape Atlantic YMCA; David Hemple, CSB President and CEO and Jayne St. John, AVP and Branch Manager. 9U South Jersey Seminoles Are Champions GVACC Visits Trenton Members of the Greater Vineland Chamber of Commerce Legislative Affairs committee recently visited the State House in Trenton, where they met with 1st District Legislators, Senator Jeff Van Drew, Assemblyman Nelson Albano and Assemblyman Matthew Milam. The group also sat in on an Assembly voting session at which the Chamber was recognized for its 90th Anniversary with a joint legislative resolution presented by Assemblyman Milam. The Greater Vineland Chamber of Commerce works on behalf of members to advance responsible public policy that ensures the business community has the resources, infrastructure, and opportunities to keep the region’s economy strong and growing. The Chamber’s Legislative Affairs committee meets on the first Tuesday of the month at 8:30 a.m to discuss current policy and legislative issues that affect the business community. If you would like to become involved with the Chamber’s Legislative Affairs Committee, call the office at 691-7400. In the photo, from left: Assemblyman Nelson Albano, Kathy Farinaccio, Chamber Executive Director Paige Desiere, Legislative Affairs Chairman Dennis Palmer, Denise Jackson, and Assemblyman Matthew Milam. Baseball is definitely a team sport. This was exactly the case when the 9U South Jersey Seminoles won the Mt. Laurel Summer Slam! The 9U Seminoles made their presence known at Summer Slam tournament with a record of 5-0. This group of young men with the leadership of Head Coach Carlos Rodriguez, Coach Joe DeSimine and Coach Chuck Pinotti played hard-fought games to come out undefeated and on top. Pictured from top left: Coach DeSimine, Coach Pinotti, Guest Coach Juan Del Valle and Head Coach Rodrigez. Center row: Marcos Del Valle, Lou Pinotti, Sam Celebre, Tommy Stratoti, John Alongi, Sam Desimini, and Shawn Vasquez; Bottom: Tito Valentin, Julian DelValle, Jordan Rodriguez, Kyle Garrett, Jared DeWinne and Joshua Hood. For more information about this baseball club including stats and future tournaments visit www.southjerseyseminoles.com. More Faces in the News on pages 6 and 24 Make an impression before they get to the door. { 4 } the grapevine | JULY 1, 2009 Your driveway should be your personalized welcome mat. EP Henry pavers are a beautiful and practical alternative to asphalt or concrete.With a variety of colors, styles and patterns at your disposal, you can add instant curb appeal – and lasting value too! Trust EP Henry to help you create the driveway of your dreams now – then add a walkway, patio, wall or pool deck when you’re ready.With over 105 years of experience, help finding the perfect contractor, project financing and a Lifetime Guarantee, no one welcomes you home like EP Henry. Visit your EP Henry Authorized Hardscaping Distributor® for contractor referrals and to see the latest styles, textures and colors. 3.5% s S al e Tax 56 Hazel Dri ve Looking for low mainte nance beauty t hat lasts www.recumminesinc.com 67 CHESTNUT AVENUE VINELAND, NJ 08360 691-4040 Get your FREE 2009 Hardscaping Project Guide! © 2009 EP Henry I Gleanings { DEBORAH A. EIN, MANAGING EDITOR } Here Comes the Sun We haven’t seen much sunshine lately, but “catching up” on your tan is a bad idea. his must be what it’s like to live in Seattle…or a tropical rainforest. With rain showers or thunderstorms a daily event these past several weeks, the subjects of sun exposure and skin cancer are not much talked about this summer. So far…. When the sun makes its grand debut this summer, we will be applying sunscreens with SPFs of anywhere from 15 to 100. Many women who grew up in the 1960s and 70s, as I did, will remember slathering themselves with baby oil in order to get that golden glow. When I think of that and just the overall sun we got as farm kids, it hardly gives me license to point any fingers. Then again, I recognize that it’s a whole T different world under the sun these days. To be exact, it’s a world of more harmful, unfiltered rays of sunshine. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the ozone layer is thinner than it’s ever been. Scientists predict that ozone depletion will peak in this decade and that the ozone layer will not return to 1979-1980 levels until around 2065. Ozone protects life on Earth by absorbing some of the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays. In the 1980s, scientists discovered that the ozone layer was thinning, which allows more UV radiation to reach the Earth’s surface. Higher UV levels can lead to overexposure of UV radiation and bad health effects, such as skin cancer. Ozone-eating chemicals, such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and pesticides are mostly to blame, scientists agree. Countries around the world have seen the threats created by ozone depletion and agreed to a treaty called the Montreal Protocol. The treaty is helping the global community to stop making and using CFCs, so that nature can work to repair the ozone layer, although it will take most of our children’s lifetimes for that to happen. Meanwhile, the incidence of skin cancer in the United States has reached epidemic proportions. According to the American Cancer Society, one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime, and one American dies every hour from the devastating disease. Melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer, is also one of the fastest growing types of cancer in this country. Many dermatologists believe there may be a link between childhood sunburns and melanoma later in life. Melanoma cases in the United States have more than doubled in the past two decades. Non-melanoma skin cancers are less deadly than melanomas, but if left untreated, can cause serious health problems, and sometimes are fatal. More than 1.2 million Americans develop non-melanoma skin cancers annually while more than 1,900 die from them. There are two primary types of non-melanoma skin cancers—basal cell and squamous cell cancers. These two cancers have a cure rate as high as 95 percent, if detected and treated early. Other health effects of over-exposure to sun are premature aging of the skin, cataracts/other eye damage, and immune system suppression. No one is suggesting that you and your kids stay indoors the first half of this century, but understanding the risks and taking a few sensible precautions will help you enjoy the outdoors while lowering your chances of sun-related health problems later in life. Make sure to seek shade whenever possible, wear a hat, cover up, wear 99-100% UV-blocking sunglasses, and use sunscreen. Or you can, choose to stay out of the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., limiting your outdoor activities to the early morning or evening hours. Learn about some common misconceptions regarding UV exposure (through car windows, in tanning beds, etc.) by going to the American Cancer Society website and taking the Sun-Safety Quiz. I We reserve the right to limit quantities while quantities last. Not responsible for typographical errors. Products and prices may not be available. All prices do not include sales tax. Prices in this ad are set by Brewster Fine Wines & Liquor. FREE PICK UP & DELIVERY SERVICE •FREE PICK UP & DELIVERY SERVICE Come Check Out Our Value Center & Summer-Seasonal & Operated Section Family Owned 690 S. Brewster Road. Vineland, NJ 08361 • 856-690-1188 GIN RUM & TEQUILA Sale Runs June 24- July 5 Brewster Fine Wines & Liquors FREE PICK UP & DELIVERY SERVICE •FREE PICK UP & DELIVERY SERVICE SUMMER MAINTENANCE SPECIAL A GREAT VALUE!! 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COUPON MUST BE PRESENTED AT TIME OF SERVICE SERVICE HOURS PARTS HOURS CHAMPAGNE & SPARKLING WINES MARTINI & ROSSI ASTI 750 ML $1 1.09 BANFI ROSA REGALE 750 ML $16.99 NEW CLASSIC & RASPBERRY 1.75L $19.10 PARTY DRINKS/COOLERS SEAGRAMS COOLERS ASSORTED 4PKS $3.99 CAPTAIN MORGAN LONG ISLAND ICED TEA SOUTHERN COMFORT KORBEL BRUT & EXTRA DRY NEW HURRICANE & SWEET TEA 1.75L $18.09 750 ML $10.29 1/2 KEG SPECIALS FREIXENET CORDON NEGRO COORS LIGHT $55.99 750 ML $8.09 KEYSTONE LT $34.99 BEER We Service: Se Habla Español 1.75 LT $18.09 ARBOR MIST 1.5 L $5.69 750 ML $3.49 BUD LIGHT LIME 2/12 NR $19.99 SAM ADAMS SUMMER STYLES 2/12 NR $26.99 BUD LIGHT LIME 18 PACK COOLER PACK $15.99 MILLER CHILL 2/12 NR $19.99 LONG TRAIL SURVIVAL PACK 2/12 NR $24.99 FLYING IN-HEAT WHEAT 4/6 NR $25.99 Contact our service advisors Tony or Frank for an appointment today 808 N. Pearl St. (Rt. 77), Bridgeton, NJ • (856) 451-0095 I Faces in the News The Thunder on the Avenue, Inc. Committee recently presented checks totaling $12,000 to the University of Penn Cancer Research Center and the Lung Cancer Alliance at Landicini’s Restaurant. The donations were the proceeds of the Thunder on the Avenue Poker Run, was held May 30 in Vineland. Accepting the check from Steve Cardana, Event Coordinator, is Kathryn Sedan from the U of Penn and accepting the check from Rusty Hughes, Poker Run Coordinator, is Debbie Haugen for the Lung Cancer Alliance. Landicini’s Restaurant was proud to host the dinner. Congratulations To Christina Rose Castagnoli (left) and Amanda Renee Rivera on their June 24 ballet recital. Also, Happy Birthday wishes to Christina who turned 10 on June 13. Christina and Amanda are cousins who enjoy spending time together. Christina will be entering her sixth year of ballet classes and Amanda her second year, this September. Both are dedicated in all they do and we are so proud of them! Love, From All Your Family More Faces in the News on pages 4 and 24 SEND US YOUR FACES — IT’S FREE! Get your photos published in The Grapevine… birthdays, engagements, weddings, anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them the address listed on p. 3. PRO COMPUTER SERVICE.COM Your Personal IT Resource NOW ENROLLING 18 -H o l e Co u r s e Han dica p-Ac cess ible We Can Help Your Business Run More Efficiently and Cut Your Expenses! Business Solutions • Hardware and Software Support • Network Design • Advanced Windows Server Support (2003/2008) • Domain Setup and Hosting • Windows XP, ME, 2000, 98 & 95 Support • Legacy DOS applications • Security Solutions • Help Desk Outsourcing • On-Site Training • Hardware/Software Sales • Microsoft Certified Partner { 6 } the grapevine | JULY 1, 2009 Now Enrolling For Summer Classes And Camp The lessons your child learns at The Little Gym will fill you both with pride: How to reach higher. How to listen better. How to tackle challenges with confidence and a smile. Call to schedule a free introductory class. Learn more at TheLittleGym.com Bi r t h d a y Pa r t y P a c k a g e s Gi ft Cert ifi cat es Availab le $5.00 until 5PM • $6.00 5PM to Close Fund Raising Opportunities for your school or organization Residential Services • Spyware/Virus Removal • Backup Systems • Training • Wireless Networking • File/Printer Sharing • Upgrades Book Your Awesome Birthday Bash Today! LOWEST CORPORATE RATES IN SOUTH JERSEY Contact Mark at 856-596-4446 x3208 One Comar Place Buena, NJ 08310 Group of 4 includes a round of golf, hotdog or nachos and (1) soda for $25 73 Landis Ave. Upper Deerfield Twp. Located next to Rita’s Water Ice July 1 – July 29 (5 pm – Close) Wednesday N ig h t S p ec i a l www.procomputerservice.com The Little Gym of Millville, NJ www.tlgmillvillenj.com 856-765-5634 856-453-PUTT (7888) www.landislinks.com Hours: 11 am-10pm Daily Home Garden and Diagnosing and Controlling Phytophthora in Home Gardens Source: Rutgers Extension. Andy Wyenandt, Ph.D., Extension Specialist in Vegetable Pathology and Peter Nitzsche, Morris County Agricultural Agent Phytophthora blight (Phytophthora spp.) is an important soil-borne fungal disease in the home garden. Phytophthora blight can infect tomato, pepper, eggplant, and cucurbit (pumpkin, squash) crops causing root, stem, and fruit rot. Losses to Phytophthora blight in the home garden can be serious if not controlled properly with proper cultural practices and crop rotations. Phytophthora blight is caused by the fungus, Phytophthora capsici, and is an oomycete, which are commonly referred to as the water molds. Free water and moisture are essential for the development of Phytophthora blight. Excessive water in the form of rainfall or overhead irrigation can lead to Phytophthora blight problems in the home garden. Poorly drained soils, in which water is allowed to puddle on the soil surface can also lead to serious Phytophthora problems. Phytophthora blight can develop under a wide range of temperatures with rainfall and humidity playing an important part in its development. Infections in the home garden begin as root infections that develop into crown rot and stem infections causing plants to become wilted. Wilted plants eventually die as the fungus spreads to other susceptible hosts via root-to-root contact and by inoculum (ie. spores), which develop on the surface of crown and stem lesions. Spores can be spread to the canopy and fruit of infected hosts via wind or by splashing during rainfall and overhead irrigation events. PHYTOPHTHORA BLIGHT OF PUMPKIN Phytophthora blight can be a serious disease of pumpkin. Symptoms of Phytophthora blight on infected pumpkin are very similar to symptoms on summer squash. Infected plants may suddenly wilt and collapse. Symptoms on infected vines include water-soaked lesions where vines turn blackish-brown and have a slimey appearance. Late in the growing season Phytophthora blight may infect maturing green or ripe pumpkin fruit. Symptoms of Phytophthora blight on infected fruit include the production of masses of white, slimmy spores, which may develop on the undersides of infected fruit. As infection progresses, fruit will begin to become mushy and collapse. Spores from infected fruit may spread to other fruit and healthy plants via rainfall and through puddling water, which is slow to drain off the soil surface. Once fruit are infected they are no longer good and should not be harvested. Continued on next page LANDSCAPE SUPPLY Your Lawn & Garden Outlet Bags for Bucks!! SOUTH JERSEY Premium Topsoil 40 lb bag bags bags Dyed Mulch 2 cu. ft. Reg $3.95 5/$6.00 3/$10.00 NOW AVAILABLE 4 Step Program 5,000 sq.ft ……………………….$64.99* 10,000 sq.ft…………………….$134.99* 15,000 sq.ft…………………….$174.99* * After mail-in rebate. Sales Tax 3.5% 1363 S. Delsea Dr. Vineland Mon.-Fri. 8am-6pm Sat. 8am-4pm *Taxes and Delivery extra 856-563-1500 Designed to be a step ahead ® All Annuals, Patio Planters & Hanging Baskets Summer Sale The great outdoors just got even greater. Mandevillas on Sale Plus w/Coupon take additional $4.00 OFF $5.00 OFF exp. 07/12/09 3.5% Sales Tax Reg. Price Get your FREE 2009 Hardscaping Project Guide! © 2009 EP Henry Growers Of Quality Plants For All Your Gardening Needs WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Hanging Baskets • Bedding Plants • Garden Decorations • Flowering Shrubs • Soils • Mulches, and much more! 470 N. Union Rd. East Vineland (between Oak Rd. & Landis Ave.) Mon. – Sat. 8am-6pm Sun. 9am-5pm Wide Selection Of Old Time Favorites & The Newest Varieties 20% off Any Plant Purchase Grown & Sold Here Now more than ever, you can enjoy your home with an inviting patio from EP Henry. In cooler months, it’s the perfect place to curl up with a book – or entertain in style. As the weather grows warmer, your patio becomes the ultimate outdoor living room, adding even more beauty and value to your home. Only EP Henry offers you integrated Hardscaping™ solutions to suit your lifestyle and outdoor plans. Start with a patio, then add a fireplace or outdoor kitchen, walkway or wall.With over 105 years of experience, help finding the perfect contractor, project financing and a Lifetime Guarantee, no one welcomes you home like EP Henry. Visit your EP Henry Authorized Hardscaping Distributor® for contractor referrals and to see the latest styles, textures and colors. the grapevine { 7 } 856-691-7881 www.cmgrowers.com Cannot be combined with any other coupon. (Before Taxes) Must present coupon. of $25.00 or more. exp. 07/12/09 1969 South East Ave (BetweenGrant&ElmerRd.) Vineland, NJ 08360 Call Mark for Details: 856-692-8650 Mon.-Fri. 7-5 • Sat. 7-12 GROWERS OF FINE ANNUALS & PERENNIALS Annual, Perennials, Tropical Plants, Hanging Baskets, Shrubs Garden Decorations: bird feeders & houses, garden stakes, & ornamental flags. Celebrate Your Outdoor Parties In Style Organic Plant Food 1151 Route 40 Newfield, NJ 08344 Hours: Monday – Saturday 8 am – 6 pm Sunday 8 am – 5 pm 609-381-0110 EVERYTHING REDUCED! SUMMER BLOWOUT SALE! Home Garden and If the slightest symptoms begin to develop on fruit after harvest they should be discarded. Mature pumpkin fruit with masses of white, slimey spores of Phytophthora blight. PHYTOPHTHORA BLIGHT OF PEPPER AND EGGPLANT Phytophthora blight is a serious disease of pepper and eggplant in the home garden. Like Cucurbit crops, Phytophthora blight can infect all parts of pepper and eggplant leading to complete loss. Phytophthora blight can cause root, stem, and fruit rot in pepper and eggplant. Symptoms of crown rot include the development of blackishbrown lesions that start beneath the soil surface as a root rot and extend up the stem from the soil line as lesions develop. Under ideal conditions masses of white spores will develop on infected stems. Spores are splashed from plant to plant via rainfall and overhead irrigation and allowing water to puddle around the base of stems can exacerbate Phytophthora problems. Fruit can become infected by the aerial phase of Phytophthora blight. Spores from infected stems may splash up into the plant canopy causing lesions on leaves and fruit. BUCKEYE ROT OF TOMATO Buckeye rot affects immature green tomatoes that lay on the soil surface. On green fruit, buckeye rot will produce distinct brownish-black lesions that have a definite concentric or target-like appearance. In moist conditions, white fluffy fungal growth will develop on infected fruit. Over time, infected fruit will become soft and mushy. Excessively wet soils often lead to Buckeye rot problems. Staking, caging, or mulching tomato plants to keep fruit from coming into direct contact with the soil is a good way to reduce Buckeye rot. CONTROL MEASURES FOR PHYTOPHTHORA BLIGHT There are a number of cultural practices that can be used to help reduce Phytophthora in the home garden. The first cultural practice you can perform to reduce Phytophthora in the home garden is to remove old plant debris. Phytophthora blight can produce spores, which may overwinter in the soil or on Economic Roofing Stimulus Package Due to the current economic situation, our supplier is overloaded with materials. WE AT SCOTTI BROTHERS KNOW TIMES ARE TOUGH FOR EVERYONE. YOU, US, AND OUR SUPPLIERS. WE WENT OUT ON A LIMB AND PURCHASED A LARGE QUANTITY OF GAF TIMBERLINE ROOF SHINGLES AT A DISCOUNTED PRICE. OUR COMPANY IS PREPARED TO PASS ON THE SAVINGS TO CUMBERLAND COUNTY RESIDENTS. IT’S A WIN-WIN SITUATION FOR ALL OF US. PLEASE CALL US TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE TOM SCOTTI CELL # (856) 498-4841 JOHN SCOTTI CELL # (609) 381-4289 Check Out Our Gift Shop &! Primitive Shed Plantsource Garden Center & WildEast Landis Ave. Bird Shop 5103 Vineland, N.J. 08360 ALL PERENNIALS BUY TWO GET ONE FREE!!! Countryside Garden Club Slide presentation and lecture on growing wildflowers by nature photographer MICHAEL HOGAN Thursday, July 2 Riverfront Renaissance Center for the Arts, 22 N. High St., Millville Free, open to the public. Refreshments served. Call 697-1597 for information 856-696-1877 Open Every Day 8am to 6pm (Between Union & Tuckahoe Roads) All Annual Flats Only $7 each 36 plants per tray { 8 } the grapevine | JULY 1, 2009 infected plant debris. The next growing season, wintering spores may germinate and infect a susceptible host, thus restarting the Phytophthora disease cycle. Proper sanitation measures can keep spores from overwintering and infecting the next crop. At the end of the growing season all plant refuse should be removed and discarded, composted (if the pile is hot enough to kill the spores), or tilled into the soil. Any infected fruit should be removed during the growing season or at the end of the season. Crop rotation is the primary means to help reduce Phytophthora blight in the home gar- VISIT OUR 5 ACRE SITE Coupon BUY 2 YARDS/TONS or more of Coupon MULCH or STONE AND RECEIVE Exp. 7-08-09 BUY 4 PERENNIALS GET THE 5th $10 OFF Excessive water in the form of rainfall or overhead irrigation can lead to Phytophthora blight problems in the home garden. den. Each year plant tomato, eggplant, pepper, and cucurbits in a new location away from areas where any of these crops have been grown in the past since these crops are all susceptible to Phytophthora. A minimum crop rotation of three years is considered essential to help reduce populations of soilborne fungi, such as Phytophthora. A second line of defense against Phytophthora blight is to alter the microclimate surrounding these crops. Fungi thrive in moist, humid conditions, in particularly on leaves that remain wet for long periods of time. Tomatoes, eggplant, peppers, and cucurbits should be grown in a location of full sun with good soil drainage and plenty of air circulation to keep leaves dry. Staking or caging of pepper, tomato, and eggplants to keep plants off the ground will allow more rapid drying of the plant. Watering should be performed in the morning to allow for sufficient drying time of the soil and plant canopy. Cultural practices that promote quick dryContinued on next page Not to be combined with any other offer. FREE Exp. 7-08-09 Coupon 20%OFF All Hanging Baskets Coupon 482 Tuckahoe Rd. Buena Vista, NJ 08310 Coupon Not to be combined with any other offer. Coupon 3 FOR 99 $ Coupon ROUNDUP EXTENDED CONTROL $ 99 1.33 Gallons Pull-n-Spray Bird Feeder Buy any Sunflower bird feeder & get it filled for Droll Yankee SUNFLOWER 49 19 4’ Exp. 7-08-09 Not to be combined with any other offer. Exp. 7-08-09 Not to be combined with any other offer. Exp. 7-08-09 Not to be combined with any other offer. 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WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | OPEN MONDAY-SATURDAY 8:00 AM-7:00 PM • SUNDAY 9:00 AM-5:00 PM • 856-696-1644 CRABTREE’S LANDSCAPING And Turf Management Beautifying the outside since 1989 Serving Vineland, Millville & Bridgeton Areas COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL OVER 2 0 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE! Total Landscape Renovations In-ground Irrigation Systems Sodding, Mulching, Hydroseeding Waterfalls & ponds the grapevine { 9 } 856.875.0774 4th of July SAVINGS! We Have Everything You Need To Beautify Your Backyard! Thursday, July 2nd Receive 25% Off Your Entire purchase! (IN-STOCK ONLY) EXCLUDING SALES & SPECIALS Home Garden and ing soils after irrigation are a good means to help reduce Phytophthora blight in the home garden. Mulching the soil under plants with composted leaves or straw mulch will help to keep spores from splashing up onto the canopy and prevent fruit, such as pumpkin and tomato, from coming into direct contact with the soil. Along with cultural practices, there are preventative chemical fungicides that can be used for Phytophthora blight control. Always read and follow directions on the label of the chemical control you are using. during wet or moist conditions, or in areas that have been well irrigated. Slugs and snails have rasping mouth parts, and damage plants by scraping plant tissue, leaving irregular-shaped holes in leaves, flowers, stems and fruit. During severe infestations, leaves may become shredded. Snails and slugs leave a clear or silvery slime trail on stones, walks, soil, plant foliage, and fruit, often seen before their damage is observed. DESCRIPTION Several species of slugs can be found in the garden. The gray garden slug (the smallest) is dull gray with black spots, and 1 to 2 inches long. The spotted garden slug is grayish with black spots or faint black longitudinal bands on its back, reaching almost 4 inches in length. Three species of snails are commonly found in vegetable gardens: brown garden snail, European garden snail, and decollate snail. All are smaller than slugs, and Nigra Arborvitaes 5’ to 6’ $ 19.99 Each or 10 for $180.00 (WHILE SUPPLIES LAST) EXCLUDING SALES & SPECIALS MONDAY TO FRIDAY 9am – 5pm SATURDAY 9am – 3pm • Gift Cards Available • SEPERS RETAIL CENTER 1114 W. Weymouth Road Newfield, NJ 08344 856-696-4220 Come see us for summertime specials! All patio furniture reduced. Sets up to 60% off. Plenty of summer color annuals Pool chemicals Summer outdoor games Perennials buy 4 get 1 free All Major Credit Cards Accepted Closed July 4th Weekend 4th of July Sale Slugs and Snails in the Vegetable Garden Source: Rutgers Extension. Gerald M. Ghidiu, Ph.D., Extension Specialist in Vegetable Entomology DAMAGE Slugs and snails both feed on young, succulent plants and seedlings, particularly Pontano’s Farm Fresh Produce BLUEBERRIES NOW AVAILABLE Fresh Onions, Squash, Corn, Melons Jersey Field Tomatoes Now Available! FREE 1.25lb. Osmocote with purchase of 8 perennials Osmocote feeds for up to 4 months!!! { 10 } the grapevine | JULY 1, 2009 Come chec k out our Greenhouse Full of Flowers & Fresh Herbs Large Selection of Jersey Fresh Vegetables & Fruit We now accept WIC and Senior FMNP 3086 DELSEA DRIVEFRANKLINVILLE, NJ 08322 856-694-1216 www.doughertygardens.com (End of Lincoln Ave. Towards Millville) PICKED FRESH DAILY 3937 S. Lincoln Ave. 856-825-5911 CUMBERLAND COUNTY COOPERATIVE FAIR July 6-11 Cumberland County Fairgrounds, Carmel Rd., Millville Admission $5 / Children $4 Free Parking 4-H & Open Class Exhibits, Farm Machinery, Animal Exhibits, Petting Zoo, Pet Show, Horse Show, Tractor Pull, Amusement Rides, fireworks on the 4th of July and demolition derbies on Monday and Saturday & much more. KIDS DAY on Wednesday, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday Gates Open at 4 p.m.; Wednesday and Saturday, Gates Open at 11 a.m. Cumberland County Fair Association, PO Box 611, Bridgeton, NJ 08302 Phone: (856) 825-3820 ash barriers. 6. “Snailproof*,” a commercial product consisting of ground incense cedar sawmill by-products, is effective as a ground covering. 7. Home remedies such as wine, vinegar, ground glass, sand barriers and ethyl alcohol traps are not effective and dangerous. 8. Predators include robins, starlings, English sparrows, toads, and garter snakes, and should be encouraged. 9. Pitfall-type traps, such as “Garden Sentry*,” are commercially available. These are reusable plastic traps set in the ground and baited. Slugs and other pests fall in and are unable to escape. 10. Chickens, ducks, or geese will feed on slugs early in the morning, when slugs are active. CHEMICAL CONTROL: 1. Poison baits, called molluscicides, are available for slug and snail control in home gardens. Ready-to-use baits containing metaldehyde (Buggeta, Deadline) and carbaryl (Sevin Bait) are available at garden supply centers, hardware stores, etc. Baits are packaged in a foil-wrapped, sealed container to keep the bait fresh. Once opened, they should be used within 6 weeks, or the baits are no longer attractive to the slugs. Apply baits in the evening immediately after a rain or after irrigation the two garden snails have a rounded or globular spiral shell, while the decollate snail has a cone-shaped spiral shell. LIFE HISTORY Slugs and snails are found in moist, shaded locations, or areas that have many weeds or organic trash. Most species overwinter in the egg stage, hatching in early spring and feeding immediately. Most species live one season or less, and adults may deposit eggs throughout the season. NONCHEMICAL CONTROL: 1. Slug populations can be reduced by good garden sanitation (foliage, trash, and weed removal) to improve air movement and ventilation and to reduce moist habitats. Fruit-laden plants, such as tomatoes, should be staked to keep fruit from contacting the ground. Grow your garden in the sun, keeping it free of weeds, shrubbery, or compost. 2. Slugs are mainly a problem during a wet season or in the spring. Hand picking, especially at night or during early morning, is tedious but effective. 3. Since slugs and snails like to congregate in sheltered areas, place small, thick wooden boards on the soil surface of infested areas and check under them during the day to remove and destroy slugs. 4. Grapefruit skins can be placed in the garden upside down on the soil surface. Slugs are attracted to, and will congregate under them. Turn over and remove slugs each day. 5. Wood ashes can be sprinkled around plants to discourage slugs and snails. A ridge of ashes, 1 inch high and 3 inches wide, is an effective barrier. Rain or irrigation impairs the performance of Slugs are mainly a problem during a wet season or in spring. Hand picking, at night or during early morning, is tedious but effective. when slugs are active and when the pellets will stay moist. Effectiveness of baits may be increased by placing pellets under small, wooden boards in infested areas of the garden. 2. Pesticide sprays and dusts are generally ineffective, partially due to the protective layer of slime covering these pests. 3. Slugs are attracted to stale beer or malt. Bury pie tins in the soil so the lip is just below the soil surface, then fill with beer. Remove drowned slugs from the pans each morning. Empty the beer and refill every 3 to 4 days. NOTE: Adding flour to the stale beer or malt will make it sticky enough to trap the slugs. I Honda. Power you can count on. HRR216K2VXA Lawnmower $499 At work, home or play… † WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | HRX217K2HXA Lawnmower EU2000i Generator $729 † $999 † 12 MONTHS No Payments No Interest Option* See these products at the Honda Power Equipment Dealerships listed below. Vineland Rental Country, Inc. † Prices shown are manufacturer’s minimum advertised price. * The Honda Power Equipment Mastercard® card issued by Wells Fargo Financial National Bank is a dual-line credit card. Special terms apply to purchases charged with approved credit to the Honda Power Equipment line of credit. No payments are required during the special-terms period. The no-interest option means there is no interest if the purchase is paid in full within the special-terms period; otherwise interest accrues from date of purchase at the regular APR. For newly opened accounts, the regular APR for purchases is 23.90% and the default APR is 27.90%. All APRs given are as of June 1, 2009. All APRs may vary. If you use the card for cash advances, the cash advance fee is 4% of the amount of the cash advance, but not less than $10.00. Offer expires 12/31/2009. Connection of a generator to house power requires a transfer device to avoid possible injury to power company personnel. Consult a quali?ed electrician. For optimum performance and safety, we recommend you read the owner’s manual before operating your Honda Power Equipment. Not all dealers carry all products. Consult your local Yellow Pages. © 2009 American Honda Motor Co., Inc. AH916-01-89441-3 the grapevine { 11 } Staycations Continued from cover • Tour exhibits at the Down Jersey Folklife Center that show how various ethnic groups have settled in, and shaped, the area. • Browse the many shops and galleries. During your Wheaton Arts day, you may want to spend time in the wellknown nearby Glasstown Arts District on High Street. Dozens of fine galleries, restaurants, boutiques, artist studios, and general merchandise stores line the downtown area. Note especially the Riverfront Renaissance Center for the Arts and its rotating exhibits of works by local artists. Be sure to see the Village on High in the 500 block where artists of different media and vendors maintain small, eclectic cottages where they work and display their creations and wares. Stop at the Stepping Stone Café, even if it’s just to say hello to the penultimate optimist, owner Antoinette Bodine. Keep in mind, too, that there’s a huge celebration downtown on the third Friday evening (July 17 and August 21) of every month. A few miles away, the Army Air Field Museum, located at America’s first World War II defense airport in Millville, displays aviation material, featuring the noted P-47 Thunderbolt. Other exhibits show the Tuskegee Airmen, USO women, and artifacts from World War I, as well as from the conflicts in Korea and Vietnam. While at the airport, kids and adults alike would probably be thrilled with a plane ride over southern New Jersey. Big ing platforms, and hiking trails. Popular viewing platforms are at the Wetland Restoration Site in Port Norris, Thompson’s Beach Natural Viewing Area, and Bayside. Call 888-627-7437 for details and directions. There are about 20 other great birding sites like Bear Swamp, Egg Island/Turkey Point, and Peaslee wildlife management areas. For rare plants and wildlife, visit the 3,500-acre Manumuskin River Preserve. If you’re inclined, Fortescue is one good place for chartering a fishing boat to go out on the Delaware Bay for the morning or the day. Mauricetown, a restored 1700s fishing village at the mouth of the Maurice River is worth a tour and the nearby East Point Lighthouse stands guard surrounded by undisturbed marsh. Family-oriented restaurants in this portion of your stay-cation include Millville Queen on E. Broad Street in Millville and Port-Of-Call at the southern end of Route 55. The Cumberland County Tourism Department at 856-453-2177 can probably lead you to where you want to go. Its Web site is http://www.moretoffer.com. ALL ABOARD Kids love the 30-mile ride from Richland to Tuckahoe and back aboard the Cape May Seashore Line. You can ride coach or in a convenient café or luxurious lounge car. The times of operation are limited to every other Saturday, but it’s worth arranging. The roundtrip is a bit under two hours. The train stations are picturesque. Trains leave Richland at 11:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Dates are in the index to this article. Down the road from the train station is a Patcong Valley Model Railroad exhibit, where members work on and display their trains every Saturday until 1 p.m. Right next to the station is one of the more unusual stores in the region, called It’s A Toy Store. Frank and Robert Mosentoff have assembled room after room of vintage toys and memorabilia, plus new toys. Mockups of Spiderman, Betty Boop, and dozens of other pop culture icons adorn the crowded interior. There’s a TV view- The glassblowing demonstration at WheatonArts is not to be missed. Sky Aviation has the planes. It’s expensive, but many people enjoy seeing their home from the air along with wherever else you want to go. Call a few days ahead. WILD AND SCENIC The Maurice River and its tributaries Community Pool Summer Schedule Monday through Friday, noon to 7 p.m. The hours of 5:30 to 7 p.m each day is an ADULT ONLY (18+) swim time for City of Vineland residents (through September 4th) The Carl Arthur Pool, located at Third and Plum streets, and the West Side Park Beach (W. Almond Road) are both open Monday through Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. for the summer season (through September 4th) The Vineland Water Utility is presently in a Stage II – Mandatory odd/even Water Restrictions, by a State issued Administrative Consent Order. The Order is in effect until further notice. { 12 } the grapevine | JULY 1, 2009 PUBLIC NOTICE WATER RESTRICTIONS Stage II is mandatory odd/even outside use per odd/even street address. Enforcement is as follows: 1 st Violation: Warning 2nd Violation: Warning 3rd Violation: $100 Fine 4th Violation: $250 Fine 5th Violation: Water Service will be shut off until Emergency is over There are exceptions for some new sod & seeding, as well as commercial use. Please refer to Ordinance No. 2008-63. Thank you for your cooperation. John A. Snidenbach, CPWM Superintendent Water Utility form one of the most beautiful watersheds in New Jersey. The best way to introduce yourself to the natural wonders is with a Maurice River Cruise on an open boat, The Joyce Ann, under the guidance of Capt. Dave Scherer. His two-hour trip to Mauricetown and back takes you through miles of gorgeous wild land and you’ll probably see an eagle or two along with many waterfowl, such as egrets and ospreys. It departs from Ware Avenue Municipal Dock in Millville. Children under 10 ride for free. If The Joyce Ann ride makes you want to see more of the forest and wetland area, you’re fortunate because Cumberland County encompasses huge tracts of wilderness, containing woods roads, view- City of Vineland WATER UTILITY 330 E. Walnut Road Vineland, New Jersey 08360 • (856) 794-4056 FAX (856) 794-6181 John A. Snidenbach, Superintendent ing area. Open Sat. 12-7 and also Wed., Thur. Fri., and Sun. The historic Renault Winery is about 10 miles from Richland in Egg Harbor City. It’s the country’s oldest continuously operated winery. Tours and tastings are available and there are many special events. A gourmet restaurant and golf course add to its appeal. Bring a friend and share the fun $ After $100 mail-in rebate 49 Only 99 Buy one, get one FREE! ® BlackBerry Curve 8330 smartphone BlackBerry Curve™8330 smartphone Buy one BlackBerry Curve 8330 smartphone for only $49.99 after $100 Buy one BlackBerry ® Curve™ 8330 smartphone for only $49.99 after $100 v mail-in rebate and get second one FREE after $100 mail-in rebate and mail-in rebate and get a second one FREE after $100 mail-in rebate and $49.99 in-store rebate. $49.99 in-store rebate. Recent additions at the Cohnnzick Zoo in Bridgeton include wallabies, miniature kangaroos from Australia. $ WESTERN SWING Getting up early is the order of this day— and, if you choose a Saturday, you can begin and end in the same locale— Cowtown, New Jersey. Start early, because the unusual bazaar that is the Cowtown Flea Market starts at 8 a.m. and many of the best bargains sell first. It’s an indoor and outdoor calliope of great deals on produce, clothing, electronics, and novelty items. Kids will like some of the toys, and they’ll definitely like the cotton candy. You could go south to Fort Mott State Park for a picnic and take a walk around the fortifications where there used to be huge guns set up to guard the Delaware River. There’s a ferry to Fort Delaware on Pea Patch Island, which held similar battlements. Traveling a dozen miles north from Cowtown instead takes you to Mullica Hill, which is known for its antique and Requires new line of service and two-year agreement and BlackBerry Requires new line of service and two-year agreement and a BlackBerry ® data plan. Handset pricing varies by Sprint Authorized Rep. and may be subject to Handset pricing varies by Sprint Authorized Rep. and may be subject to add’l req. See store for details. 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Sprint and the logo are trademarks of Sprint. ©Research In Motion, the RIM logo, BlackBerry, the BlackBerry logo and SureType are registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and may be pending or registered in other countries – these and other marks of Research In Motion Limited are BlackBerry logo and SureType are registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and may be pending or registered in other countries these and other marks of Research In Motion Limited are used with permission. Other marks are the property of their respective owners. used with permission. Other marks are the property of their respective owners. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Continued on next page Christmas in July Sale (Sale dates July 1-31) ATTENTION GRADUATES Protect Your Certificate For Years to Come! ON SALE NOW (REGULAR PRICE $24 NOW ONLY $12) (excludes craft kits & sale items) 15% off 856-697-2639 • 1 178 Karin St. Vineland, NJ 08360 (excludes already discounted items & Gymboree) 30% off Summer Clothing Gymboree Summer Clothing the grapevine { 13 } 20% off (excluding Melissa & Doug) 20% Toys WWW.CHAMPIONAWARDS.US Summer Hours: Closed Sun/Mon. Tues-Thur. 10-5 * Fri. 10-6 * Sat. 10-4 2757 S. Main Rd., Vineland * 856-213-6739 Staycations Continued from previous page specialty shops and restaurants. The Mullica Hill Quilt Company is a colorful and friendly place for all ages. According to a representative, “It makes you smile to come in here.” You have many choices for sandwiches or snacks at the Amish Farmers Market where you can also buy fresh produce, cheeses, baked goods, and candy, and genuine Amish furniture and soaps. Harrison House Diner has great smoothies. Going back to where you started, just before Cowtown is Richmond’s Restaurant, which bills itself as “purveyors of classic and contemporary comfort food since 1894.” You feel like you’re dining in the 1950s and there are good children’s menu choices and 39 ice cream flavors. Manager Jessica Waddington recommends her “Molly the Mouse” sundae for the little ones—candies make up the face, with pretzel sticks for the whiskers. Then, go to the rodeo, this one located 2,000 miles east of Wyoming. Every Saturday night through September, the 55year-old Cowtown Rodeo shows you hundreds of cowboys and cowgirls competing in events like calf roping, bronc riding, steer wrestling, and bull riding. It’s a oneof-a-kind, thrilling family experience. HISTORY, ANIMALS, AND MARSHMALLOWS Museums are the order of your day if you choose to visit historic Bridgeton. There’s the South Jersey All Sports Museum that recognizes local athletes and George Woodruff Indian Museum (in the Public Library) that displays 25,000 arrowheads and other items as much as 10,000 years old. The Seabrook Educational and Cultural Center depicts the history of JapaneseAmericans and the hardship they suffered during World War II plus holds exhibits about the vibrant Seabrook community and internationally known Seabrook Farms. One of the region’s top attractions is the Cohanzick Zoo, New Jersey’s first zoo, which just celebrated its 75th anniversary. The Zoo is home to many exotic animals including two rare white Siberian tigers. Recent additions include wallabies, miniature kangaroos from Australia. The Out to Lunch and Sunday Concert events are popular. Nearby Greenwich is the site of the Cumberland County Prehistoric Museum, a one-room display of Stone Age tools, pottery, and marine fossils. There’s also the Gibbon House, a grand 1730 structure furnished with 18th and 19th century items. Before you start your day, try Angie’s Diner at 1 1/2 Broad Street in Bridgeton, a converted caboose that serves a good plain breakfast. Several authentic Mexican restaurants dot the downtown. A few miles north of Bridgeton, you can have much of the convenience of home with all the enjoyment of camping with a cabin rental at Parvin State Park. Sometimes they’re all booked, but calling two weeks in advance might land you one for a two-night minimum stay and up to two weeks in a quaint, furnished cottage on a lake with bunk beds, kitchen, bath with shower, picnic table, and barbecue grill. You probably won’t need the fireplace, but keep Parvin in mind for the fall. There are nature walks and exhibits that have been conducted by Paul Taylor for decades (he’s retired now, but known to conduct events regardless.) There’s a tent and trailer campground, beach, canoe/ kayak rentals, picnic groves, good fishing, and trails. Bring on the marshmallows. I Watch for our continuing series of “Staycation” ideas throughout the summer. Contact The Grapevine with your suggestions and ideas. Market Closed July 4 FRESH FO ODS MARKET MARKET SCHEDULE July 4 Market Closed for Holiday Pets on Parade – All pets welcomed! Pirate’s Treasure Hunt (for kids) Eco Day Cohanzick Zoo Vineland’s 148th Birthday Party! Children’s Clothesline Art Show July 11 July 18 { 14 } the grapevine | JULY 1, 2009 & SPECIALT Y July 25 Aug 1 Aug 8 Aug 15 VINELAND TROLLEY VINELAND TROLLEY RIDE THE TROLLEY TO AND FROM THE MARKET FREE! Runs Landis Ave — Kidston Towers to WalMart This event is sponsored in part by VDID/Vineland Main Street. This ad has been paid for with funds approved for such use by the New Jersey Urban Enterprise Zone Authority. INDEX OF MAJOR ATTRACTIONS WheatonArts – 1501 Glasstown Road, Millville, 856-825-6800. www.wheatonvillage.org. Open Tue through Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission: Adults $10, Seniors: $9, Students: $7, Children 5 and under: free. “Make Your Own” programs have fees ranging from $55-$135. No admission fee to visit shops only. Discount coupons are available on the Web and in promotional literature. Riverfront Renaissance Center for the Arts – 22 N. High Street Millville, 856825-4500. www.riverfrontcenter.org. Sun., Wed., and Thur. 11 a.m.–5 p.m., Fri. 11 a.m.–8 p.m. (later on Third Fridays), Sat. 11 a.m.–7 p.m. Glasstown Arts District: 800-8874957. www.glasstownartsdistrict.com. Various hours for the different businesses, many are open Wed. through Sat. Clockwise from opposite page: Patcong Valley Model Railroaders in Richland, East Point Lighthouse, cabin at Parvin State Park, Bogarts Books on High Street in Millville and The Joyce Ann at a dock in Millville. Army Air Field Museum – 1 Leddon St., Millville, 856-327-2347. www.p47millville.org. Open Tue.-Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Big Sky Aviation – 103 Leddon St, Millville, 800-752-9207. www.bigskyaviation.net. $180 an hour (can fly for less time) for up to three people. Maurice River Cruises – 856-3271530 or 856-327-2016. www.glasstownartsdistrict.com/index.php?cod_cate g=73. Departures at 1 and 4 p.m. Fri., Sat., and Sun. Adults $20, Seniors $15, Children 10-16 $10, Under 10 – free. Coupons for a significant discount are available through downtown merchants. Cape May Seashore Lines — 1275 Harding Highway, Richland, 800-9842055. www.capemayseashorelines.org/richland.html. Online reservations accepted. Saturdays July 11 and 25, Aug. 8 and 22, Sept 12 and 26. Coach $15, ages 2-12, $10. Café and Lounge (all ages) $20. Village on High – 501 N. High St., Millville. Open 12-5 Thur. through Sun. Continued on next page Christ centered education at an affordable price. – Serving students in grades K4-12 Reaching the mind, the heart and the hands . . . for Christ! WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Tuesday Tours Stop by & check us out! ENROLL NOW for the 2009-2010 school year. Don’t delay – limited space • • • • • • • Any Tuesday, 8am-4pm No appointment needed! K4 and K5 – Full day Elementary School (grades 1-5) Middle School (grades 6-8) High School (grades 9-12) The Cyber School@CCS (grades 3-12) CCS Non-Traditional Programs New Program…For Autistic & Cognitive Impaired Fully accredited by MSACS and ACSI Richard Monteleone c o n c e p t s a lo n Salon Fabrojae proudly welcomes the grapevine { 15 } ENROLL TODAY www.cccrusader.org admissions@cccrusader.org Cumberland Christian School 1100 W. Sherman Avenue ~ Vineland, NJ 856 – 696 – 1600, ext. 10 to our staff! Staycations Continued from previous page Historic Renault Winery Resort — 72 N. Bremen St., Egg Harbor City, 609965-2111. www.renaultwinery.com. Tour is $3 per person and includes tasting of eight varieties. Sun.-Thur. 11-4, Fri. 11-7, Sat. 11-8. Cowtown Flea Market – 780 Route 40, Pilesgrove, 856-769-3202. Open Tuesday and Saturday only, 8 am to 4 pm. Cowtown Rodeo – same address as Flea Market, 856-769-3200. www.cowtownrodeo.com. Saturday night 7:30 p.m. Adults $15, Children 12 and under $10, Under 2 free. Group rates available. Fort Mott State Park – 454 Fort Mott Road, Pennsvill, 856-935-3218. www.state.nj.us/dep/parksandforests/p arks/fortmott.html. No admission fee. Closes at sunset. Ferry to Fort Delaware runs 10:30, 12:30, and 2:30 through Sept. 17. Adults $11, Seniors/military $10, Children 2-12 $6. No service Mon. and Tue. South Jersey All Sports Museum — Burt Ave., Bridgeton, 856-451-7300. www.co.cumberland.nj.us/content/171/ 217/836.aspx. Call for hours. Free. George Woodruff Indian Museum – 150 E. Commerce St., Bridgeton, 856-451-2620. www.bridgetonlibrary.org/Museum.htm. Mon. and Fri. 10-5, Tue.-Thur. 10-8, Sat. 10-4. Docents available Sat. 11-2. Free Cohanzick Zoo —Mayor Aitken Dr., Bridgeton, 856-453-1658. www.cityofbridgeton.com/Recreation/zoo.htm. 95 daily. Free, donations accepted.. The Seabrook Educational and Cultural Center – Route 77, Upper Deerfield, 856-451-8393. www.seabrookeducation.org/. Mon.Thur 9-2. Free. Programs for 20 people or more: $100. Cumberland County Prehistorical Museum – 1461 Bridgeton Rd., Greenwich, 856-455-8141. www.cchistsoc.org/prehistorical-museum.html. Wed., Sat., Sun. 12-4. Free. Gibbon House – 960 Ye Greate St., Greenwich, 856-455-4055. www.co.cumberland.nj.us/content/171/ 217/834.aspx. Mon., Wed., Sat. 1-4 p.m. (weather permitting). $2, under 12: $1. Parvin State Park — 701 Almond Road, Pittsgrove, 856-358-8616 www.njparksandforests.org/parks/parvi n.html Beach open 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., except closed on Wed. and Thur. $2 per person access. Campsites: $20/night. Four-bunk cabins: $45 per night, $315 per week. Six-bunk cabins: $65 per night, $455 per week. I I Official Words { DENNIS PALMER, EXEC. DIR., CHIEF ENG., LANDIS SEWERAGE AUTHORITY } The Greenest Treatment Plant The Landis Sewerage Authority aims to be just that for the State of New Jersey. Cohanzick Zoo Summer Camp Kids, are you looking for something exciting to do this summer? Parents, do you want to introduce your children to a fun and educational summer camp? The Cohanzick Zoo is holding its Annual Zoo Camp during the month of July. For $85 ($75 for Cohanzick Zoological Society Members), campers will receive a complimentary t-shirt and enjoy five days full of zoo adventure, including games, crafts, snacks and, of course, animals! Space is limited to 15 per session, so sign up soon. SESSIONS ARE AS FOLLOWS: Session 1: 5 and 6 year olds, July 6–10, 8AM-12PM Session 2: 5 and 6 year olds, July 6–10, 1PM-5PM { 16 } the grapevine | JULY 1, 2009 Session 3: 7 and 8 year olds, July 13–17, 8AM-12PM Session 4: 7 and 8 year olds, July 13–17, 1PM-5PM Session 5: 9, 10, 11 year olds, July 20–24, 8AM-12PM Session 6: 9, 10, 11 year olds, July 20–24, 1PM-5PM Session 7: 12, 13, 14 year olds, July 27–31, 8AM-12PM Session 8: 12, 13, 14 year olds, July 27–31, 1PM-5PM Session 9: Junior Zoo Keeper Camp for Teens, 15, 16, 17, 18 year olds, August 3–7, 8AM-12PM For more information about Zoo Camp and registration forms, call Regina Davis at 856-453-1658 or download the registration form online at www.CityofBridgeton.com. he goal of the Landis Sewerage Authority (LSA) is to become the greenest wastewater treatment plant in New Jersey and reduce our carbon footprint to near zero. Perhaps there could even be a negative footprint through multiple reuse and recycling programs. The recent funding of a windmill by a Sustainable Jersey grant in the amount of $10,000 will complete our multimedia green energy program. We are part of the City of Vineland Sustainability Team that was appointed by Mayor Romano. The LSA is the largest facility in New Jersey that treats wastewater to a very high level of treatment and returns the water back to the aquifer through infiltration basins and spray irrigation. Most treatment plants discharge their treated wastewater to a stream, river or the ocean where it is lost. The LSA places the water back to the ground, from where it came. The plant produces wastewater solids that are high in nutrients nitrogen and phosphorus, due to our high level of treatment. Many facilities waste these solids by placing them in landfills or burning by incineration. The LSA has a 400-acre farm and utilizes these solids to T grow corn, hay and straw with a natural organic-based, wastewater solids-derived fertilizer. Crops are grown, carbon is removed from the air—all with a fertilizer that is not petroleum-based, as most fertilizers are. For the last two years, farm crop sales have exceeded $100,000, which helps stabilize the LSA user rates. In addition, the LSA has planted 150 acres of southern yellow pine, which also are fertilized with the wastewater solids, and they are removing carbon from the air as they grow. The plant has a Co-Generation engine, which is fueled by methane from the treatment process. This is a greenhouse gas that was wasted previously by being burned in a flare. Now the gas is collected, run through a clean-burning engine to produce 170kW net of electricity and 900,000BTU of hot water per hour, that is used in the plant. Currently under construction is a 2.3MW solar electric project, which is planned to be expanded to 4MW facility. This will be one of the largest land-based solar projects in New Jersey. This project is a joint Public/ Public/Private partnership between the City of Vineland Municipal Electric Utility, Landis Varicose Sewerage Authority and Conectiv. The last piece to our recycle, green and sustainability energy program is to install a windmill to help power our Administration Building. This recent grant is to help offset the construction costs for our facility, which has a proven tract record of recycle, reuse, greenhouse gas reduction, co-generation of power, carbon removal, and the site of a large solar power project. I Veins • • Featured on ? and WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Reach Out To The Most Qualified Specialist Minimally Invasive Insurance covered 30 min. Office Treatment Free Vein Screening Call to schedule an appointment Wind Energy Fast Facts • “Double cropping” benefit for rural communities: A single, utilityscale wind turbine provides $3,000/year per megawatt or more in income to a landowner leasing his wind rights. Farmers continue to grow crops up to the base of the turbines located on their land. • Operating characteristics of a wind turbine: A wind turbine runs 60 to 80 percent of the time, and operates at its full rated power output level 10 percent of the time. On an average day, it generates 30 to 35 percent of what it would generate if it ran at full power all the time. (*This characteristic is a function of economic design. It would be possible but inefficient and more costly to design wind turbines with a very small generator and large blades resulting in a high “capacity factor” but feeble electricity production). • Efficiency characteristics of a wind turbine: Wind has one of the highest energy payback ratios of any power technology. Energy Payback Ratios (EPR) compare the amount of energy produced by a power plant to the amount of energy it takes to build, run, and eventually decommission that plant. The more efficient the technology, the higher the EPR.* Charles L. Dietzek, D.O., FACOS Raymond S. Wojtalik, M.D., FACS Voorhees • Sewell • Vineland 856.309.VEIN (8346) Specializing in spider and varicose vein treatment * Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI. 50%OFF GRAND OPENING DRY CLEANING 2950 College Dr., Suite 2B, Vineland • www.VeinVascular.com Miracle Cleaners Miracle Cleaners 14 ye 14 years ears and counting d unting Years, Years, months, d th days: Th seem lik an eternity when They like t it h e you can’t ?nd a good home with a caring family. There family. are many older children in foster care who want to stop counting the days and start living in the moment. d Please become a KidsPeace foster parent. e Contact KidsPeace today: 3 345 N. Lincoln Ave., Ste. A-2 Ave., V Vineland, NJ 08361 8 856-794-9950 www w .fostercare.com www.fostercare.com We We respect our clients’ privacy. The model represented in this publication is for illustrative purposes only and in no way represents or privacy. pu ublication endorses KidsPeace. © 2009 KidsPeace. K K the grapevine { 17 } 20 Years Experience Mon-Fri 8:00 – 6:00 Sat. 8:30 – 5:30 • 856-765-0044 Union Lake Crossing Shopping Center (Facing ShopRite Market) LIMITED TIME OFFER $ 5 O a $25 purchase $ purchase with this with this ad Expires Expires 10/15/09 r We Are We Are Quality Shoes. Rea Quality Shoes. Reasonably Priced! t asonably Priced! l Invest in Your Community Bank Locally Celebrating Year Celebrating 75 Years of Service to the ears Service rs Community You Call Home Community You Call Home o Professional Images Nails Images Expert Ori tal Nail Care Expert Oriental Nail Care ient r Frank and Lynn Martini Martini Shoes Frank and Lynn Mart of Martini Shoes tini MARIO J. RUIZ MESA, A.A.I. MARIO J. RUIZ – MESA, A.A.I. U Martini Shoes, at 615 E. Landis Ave., had its birth Martini Shoes, at 615 E. Landis Ave., had its birth when my grandfather, Frank R. Martini, cobbler when my grandfather, Frank R. Martini, a cobbler from Italy, came to this countr y and started to sell from Italy, came to this country and started to sell shoes out of his house. shoes out of his house. Since those humble beginnings, we have Since those humble beginnings, we have a established family tradition of dedication to our established a family tradition of dedication to our cr a cra , experience, and individua lized customer experience, and individualized customer ser vice. service. We’re family shoe store, and we provide full line We’re a family shoe store, and we provide a full line of shoes, snea kers, work boots, and prom footwear, as of shoes, sneakers, work boots, and prom footwear, as well as orthopedic, medical, and diabetic footwear. well as orthopedic, medica l, and diabetic footwear. Art is part of my wife Lynn’s talents and her Art is part of my wife Lynn’s ta lents and her y artwork is also for sale here. artwork is also for sale here. What’s been going on in downtown Vineland is What’s been going on in downtown Vineland is super. It’s great to see Landis Avenue grow again. super. It’s great to see Landis Avenue grow again. I invite you to come see for yourself and join our family invite you to come see for yourself and join our family of dedicated customers. of dedicated customers. Like my grandfather, and my father a er him, I Like my grandfather, and my father er him, am proud to say, “I am Downtown Vineland.” am proud to say, “I am Downtown Vineland.” I founded DeSoto Jewelers, at 651 E. Landis Ave., founded DeSoto Jewelers, at 651 E. Landis Ave., a lmost 20 years ago, bringing with me my bilingual almost 20 years ago, bringing with me my bilingual abilities and the knowledge I gained working in the abilities and the k nowledge gained work ing in the the years, my business has come to be known for the years, my business h s come to be k nown for ha quality service. qualit y ser vice. Whether you want to buy ne jewelry or a watch, Whether you want to buy ne jewelr y or watch, have some jewelry appraised, sell jewelry or an estate have some jewelr y appraised, sell jewelr y or an estate collection, I can help you. I repair and customize collection, can help you. repair and customize jewelry on the premises, set diamonds while you wait, jewelr y on the premises, set diamonds while you wait, and do some minor repairs for you to pick up in a and do some minor repairs for you to pick up in couple of hours. couple of hours. It’s great seeing the positive changes in downtown It’s great seeing the positive changes in downtown Vineland. Like an old, ne watch, Landis Avenue Vineland. Like an old, ne watch, Landis Avenue seems to get better with age. If it’s been a while since seems to get better with age. If it’s been while since you’ve been downtown, I invite you to visit and see you’ve been downtown, invite you to visit and see why I am proud to say, “I am Downtown Vineland.” why am proud to say, “I am Downtown Vineland.” { 18 } the grapevine | JULY 1, 2009 Martin Sh Martini Shoes a ni hoes The Brands You Want Brands You Want r s Jew er Je elers J wellers Jewelers We Buy We Buy Gold & Diamonds uy Diamonds Jewelry Watch Repairs Jewelry & Watch Repairs e While You Wait While You Wait 856-691-5688 856-691-5688 VINELAND VINELAND E D Enjoy th sweete side of life. Enjoy the sweeter side of life. the er FUEL HOUSE FUEL HOUSE U O e Co. Coffe 601 E. Landis Ave. (Behind Wells Fargo) Landis Ave. (Behind Wells Fargo) QUAL Y MUFFLER QUALITY MUFFLE UALIT LIT ER & BRAKE BRAKE R I have been the owner and broker of Vineland have been the owner and broker of Vineland and have served as a realtor in Vineland for 26 years. and have ser ved as realtor in Vineland for 26 years. Vineland Realty is a commercial real estate rm with Vineland Realty is commercia l rea l estate rm with Whether you want to buy a property or rent, any of Whether you want to buy propert y or rent, any of my ve salespeople or I can give you the personalized my ve sa lespeople or can give you the personalized service you deserve. If you want to meet with us to ser vice you deser ve. If you want to meet with us to do a home evaluation or to go over your needs for a do home evaluation or to go over your needs for rental you’re seeking, you can walk right in and we’ll renta l you’re seek ing, you can wa lk right in and we’ ll be glad to serve you. We’re totally computerized and be glad to ser ve you. We’re totally computerized and can locate that dream house for you. can locate that dream house for you. I’m a lifelong Vinelander with a love for my I’m lifelong Vinelander with love for my in business here and why I am proud to say, “I am in business here and why am proud to say, “I am Downtown Vineland.” Downtown Vineland.” Lamar Uph m Lamar Upham pha Ott Upham Ott Uph m pha WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | D O N K E Y ’ S P L A C E Den s P. Ingraldi Dennis P. Ingraldi nni Licensed Real Estate Broker Licensed Real Estate Broker any any Create-A-Salad Create-A-Salad with with this ad Donk ysCheesesteak.com DonkeysCheesesteak.com ke $ 00 1 the grapevine { 19 } 856- 690-9482 856-690-9482 Start Fresh Today! Credit Card Debt • Medical Bills Utility Bills • Surcharges And Even Some Income Taxes Stop Wage Executions Reduce Car Payments Free Office Visit-Start Fresh Financially! Want to wipe out your debt? WIPE OUT: I Historical Vineland { VINCE FARINACCIO } Victory Day The day brought residents together to raise a large sum of money in sales of War Bonds and Saving Stamps. ineland for Victory Day” proclaimed the local ads. National newspapers referred to it as the “Vineland Plan.” No matter what they chose to call it, these terms applied to the Borough’s patriotic response to the country’s entrance into World War II and its unyielding support for the war effort. On Memorial Day, May 29, 1942, nearly six months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Vineland organized its own retaliatory campaign against the Axis powers by putting together a day dedicated to our troops’ victory. The day centered on two events, an afternoon parade and an evening dance, to bring residents together for the purpose of raising what was originally expected to be $50,000 in sales of War Bonds and Saving Stamps. STOP SHERIFF SALE BANKRUPTCY IS YOUR LEGAL BAILOUT! Listen to Seymour Wasserstrum Esq. Live on the Radio Every Thursday Night From 8-9 pm on 92.1 FM Helping people wipe out their bills – since 1973 205 Landis Ave., Vineland www.wipeoutyourbillstoday.com $100 OFF w/this ad – CR We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for Bankruptcy Code. “V Seymour Wasserstrum, Esq. SEYMOUR WASSERSTRUM Esq. -Bankruptcy Attorney- 856-696-8300 The idea for this one-day celebration originated at the suggestion of Franklin Lamb, a Vineland native and special consultant to the Retail Advisory Committee of the U. S. Treasury. Vineland merchants agreed to promote the sale of bonds and stamps in their stores, which would remain open until 10 p.m., while, in an unprecedented move, banks agreed to open from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. Merchants, in ads placed in the May 28 edition of the Times Journal, encouraged consumers to purchase bonds and stamps over store merchandise. The day prior to the festivities, the center of town was decorated in flags and red, white and blue streamers. Sidewalk booths adorned in bunting had been set up for Red Cross volunteers and others to sell the bonds and stamps. Word of the fundraiser had spread throughout the country and national media was focused on Vineland, with reporters and photographers from leading news services poised to cover the event. It was announced that Don McNeill’s national radio show Breakfast Club, heard locally on WFIL and WJZ, would publicize Victory Day. New Jersey Governor Select from over 300 Pieces to Create Your Own Masterpiece At LaTorre Hardware A “Paint Your Own” Pottery Studio Before Fun After Fun { 20 } the grapevine | JULY 1, 2009 Join Carmie for Christmas in July Selected items for the month of July 50% OFF 1607 S. Delsea Drive, Vineland, NJ 08360 Open Tuesday & Wednesday 10am – 6pm • Thursday 12 – 8pm Friday 12 Noon – 6pm • Saturday 10am – 4pm • Closed Sunday & Monday. 856-691-3637 www.carmiespotterypaintworks.com VINTAGE VINELAND Charles Edison commended the Borough and Township on their efforts. Before the Victory Day proceedings were underway, the Times Journal reported that the projected goal of $50,000 for the War Bonds and Saving Stamps sales had been readjusted to a lofty half million dollars. Chairman of the Vineland for Victory Day Committee A. B. D’Ippolito even predicted that the end results would exceed that figure. The Times Journal reported that on May 29 the parade began at 2:15 p.m. Area children were the prominent feature of the event, which included representatives of the student bodies of both public and parochial schools in Vineland and Landis Township. The students were joined by Red Cross nurses, patriotic and civic organizations, a wingless airplane and several horse-drawn vehicles. The parade traveled on Landis Avenue from East Avenue to Fourth Street and back. Peggy French, a star of Broadway musicals and comedies, was guest of honor, marching in the parade and later appearing at the reviewing stand to promote the purchase of bonds and stamps. Mayor John C. Gittone served as parade marshal. The Colonial Ballroom was the site of the evening festivities, dubbed a “Victory Ball.” In keeping with the purpose of the day’s celebration, admission to the event was the purchase of a least a dollar’s worth of War Stamps. The dance began at 9 p.m. with Enrico Serra’s orchestra providing the entertainment before a midnight jam with Frank Testa’s Orchestra. The Retail Advisory Committee of the U. S. Treasury ordered 4,000 copies of the Victory Day edition of the Times Journal in order to send them to other areas of the country to promote Vineland’s accomplishment and to encourage similar events. By June 1, 1942, Vineland had earned the praise and congratulations of the rest of the nation through news articles, editorials and radio broadcasts. And the final tally of the Victory Day sales? It turns out that D’Ippolito’s prediction was correct. The Times Journal reported that a total of $618,773 bonds and stamps were purchased. That’s more than 12 times the original goal set. Whether you refer to this day as “Vineland for Victory Day” or the “Vineland Plan” or simply “Victory Day” doesn’t seem to matter. Each is the equivalent of success. I Who Is She? Maybe a great-great aunt on your father’s side? Over the years, the Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society has acquired many old-time images. Kate Harbold, at the Society, is busy cataloging the photos from Vineland’s rich past, but she needs the help of The Grapevine readers in identifying the people and places captured on film so long ago. If you know something about this portrait, we ask that you contact either Harbold at the Society or use the contact information on page 3 to inform us. The mission of the VHAS is to acquire, maintain, and preserve Vineland’s history. The Society was founded in 1864, just three years after the establishment of the town of Vineland. It is the second oldest historical society in New Jersey, second only to the New Jersey Historical Society. The VHAS consists of a museum, library, and archives, open to the public on Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m., same hours Tuesday through Friday for research. It is located at 108 South Seventh Street, Vineland (691-1111). Getting Divorced? Bonnie L. Laube, Esq. Greenblatt & Laube, PC Divorce, Separation, Custody, Child Support, Parenting Time, Alimony, Asset Distribution, Emancipation, Domestic Violence Certi?ed by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Civil Trial Attorney Come Peek at our Wedding Invitations NO Holiday Greeting Cards Baby Products and Much More… 856-691-0424 • email: bll@greenblattlaube.com 200 North Eighth Street • PO Box 883 • Vineland, NJ 08362 All major credit cards accepted www.HereComes ~ We Deliver Quality Product ~ At A Discount “How To Quickly Get Rid Of Neck Pain Without Surgery Or Medication!” Or, Get This Amazing FREE VIDEO & REPORT By Going Here Now: www.Vinelandpainrelief.com/7 FREE VIDEO & Report Reveals A Little-Known Neck Pain Removal Secret That Quickly Eliminates Neck Pain Without Drugs Or Surgery! Grab The FREE VIDEO & REPORT Now! Just Call our Toll-Free 24 Hour FREE Recorded Message at 1-888-989-1578 ! Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. ON WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | eBride.cceasy.com the grapevine { 21 } 18 -H o l e Co u r s e Han dica p-Ac cess ible I COMMUNITY CALENDAR HAPPENINGS THURSDAY, JULY 2 Cataract Coffee Talk. SurgiCenter, 251 SUNDAY, JULY 5 Weekly Dance. North Italy Club Hall, East Ave. and Virano Ln. County chapter of the Single Parents Society holds the dances for people age 50 and up, married or single. Live band performs music for waltz, rhumba, swing, foxtrot, line dances, and more. 7:30-10:30 p.m. $7 members, $9 non-members 697-1814. Now Offering Group Springboard Classes Bi r t h d a y Pa r t y P a c k a g e s Gi ft Cert ifi cat es Availab le $5.00 until 5PM • $6.00 5PM to Close South Lincoln Ave. Learn more about cataract surgery. Register with Stacey, Nurse Manager at 691-8188 ext. 272. Fund Raising Opportunities for your school or organization The springboard offers progressive spring resistance to complement the movement of the body for maximum fitness. You will achieve a deeper core engagement than is possible with traditional Pilates mat work. THURSDAY, JULY 2 Photographic Society Meeting. Newfield Senior Center, Catawba Ave. and Church St, Newfield. New members welcome. 7:30 p.m. 794-2528 or 691-4563. JULY 6 THROUGH 11 Cumberland County Fair. Fairgrounds, Carmel Rd., Millville. 4-H & Open Class exhibits, farm machinery, animal exhibits, Group of 4 includes a round of golf, hotdog or nachos and (1) soda for $25 73 Landis Ave. Upper Deerfield Twp. Located next to Rita’s Water Ice July 1 – July 29 (5 pm – Close) Wednesday N ig h t S p ec i a l FREE MEN’S PROSTATE CANCER SCREENING will occur on Saturday, July 11 at 9 a.m, at South Jersey Healthcare’s Bridgeton Health Center, 333 Irving Avenue, Fourth floor in Bridgeton. All are invited to attend and learn about PSA testing and prostate cancer screenings. If you do not have health insurance and would like to attend, RSVP to Christine Gregory at 575-4436. WANTED: VENDORS FOR INDOOR FLEA MARKET: Spaces are available for $15. Bring your own table (some tables will be available on a first come, first serve basis). Sale will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church, Eighth and Wood streets, 8 a.m-2 p.m. on Saturday, July 18. Set-up time is 7 a.m. for all vendors. Avena Coin & Jewelry will be purchasing gold and silver items. To reserve a space, call 691-1589. Classes starting soon… Space is limited to 4 per class. Call now to reserve your place. 856-453-PUTT (7888) www.landislinks.com Hours: 11 am-10pm Daily (856) 213-6365 Lincoln Plaza • 3722 E. Landis Ave. VINELAND HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 1969 has planned its 40-year reunion for Saturday, November 28, from 7 to 11 p.m., at Centerton Country Club, 1022 Almond Road, Pittsgrove. Tickets are $69 per person. Additional information can be found at: www.vhsclassof69.com If you are a member of the class of 1969 or know of someone who is, send any of the following information—name, address, email, or telephone number— to: rocknangel@cccnj.edu Don’t know what to do with your Cumberland County Does… shrink wrap? A RIBBON-CUTTING on Saturday, June 20, marked the grand opening of the fifth annual Fresh and Specialty Foods Market, which takes place on the 700 block of Landis Avenue in Vineland from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. each Saturday (except July 4) through August 15. The Market, which features fresh produce, craft vendors and other exhibitors, as well as weekly special attractions, is THINK CHRISTMAS! St. Isodore’s Church is sponsoring a New York bus trip to Radio City Music Hall’s Christmas Spectacular. The trip is scheduled for December 5 and includes orchestra seating for a 2 p.m. matinee, dinner in the city at Salmon River, as well as bus transportation. Cost is $185 per person. Reservations and a nonrefundable $75 deposit are being taken by Arlene at 696-2362. { 22 } the grapevine | JULY 1, 2009 To prepare the shrink wrap for recycling, remove doors, zippers, vents, nylon stripping, etc. and other non-shrink wrap materials and roll into a 4’-5’ wide bundle, keeping it free from dirt and other debris. To secure the roll, tie it with a strip of shrink wrap. MARK YOUR CALENDAR: The West Jersey Grove Association’s Annual New Jersey Peach Festival will be held Saturday, August 22, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Malaga Camp Meeting (4400 N. Delsea Drive) in Newfield. Highlights include the Lil Miss and Mr. Peach Contest, live entertainment, games, and some “peachy” baked goods and treats. Admission is free, but you’ll want to ante up $5 ($3 for kids 10 and under) for the signature Peach Festival special cake topped with fresh peaches and whipped topping. Proceeds will go toward upgrading and maintaining the camp buildings. Call 466-0288. sponsored by the Vineland Downtown Improvement District (VDID)/Main Street Vineland and Sun National Bank. Sun National Bank has been a partner for all five years, having donated a total of $15,000 to help revitalize downtown Vineland. Pictured from left: Judy Johnson, Sun Regional VP of Southwest Division; Diane Sacco, Sun VP and Community Banking Center Manager and VDID/Main Street Board of Directors Vice-Chair; Bob Romano, Vineland Mayor; Gary Galloway, VDID/Main Street Board of Directors Chair and owner of Rental Country; Todd Noon, VDID/Main Street Vineland Executive Director. amusement rides, fireworks on the 4th of July and demolition derbies on Monday and Saturday. Kids Day on Wednesday, Gates open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday at 4 p.m.; Wednesday and Saturday, at 11 a.m. Admission $5, kids $4. Free parking. 825-3820 hot dogs, barbecue chicken, sausage and peppers). An appearance by a Russian Balalaika Orchestra accompanied by folk dancers. 1 p.m. Free Admission. Visit www.holytrinitychurch.us FISHING FOR FUN AND PRIZES JULY 1 DEADLINE 22nd Annual Delaware Bay Fishing Tournament. With more than $12,000 in cash and prizes, the tournament is scheduled for Saturday July 11 (if minimum tournament field is entered by the cutoff date). Prizes presented in three categories—bluefish, weakfish and flounder. Prizes are $2,000 for first place in each category, $1,000 for second and $500 for third. Entry fee $100 per boat; each boat allowed a maximum of five fisherman on board. In addition to tournament day, is the popular Captain’s Night, scheduled for Wednesday, July 8, at Gia’s Suburban House in Bridgeton. The tournament is sponsored by the Bridgeton-Cumberland Tourist Association and the Cumberland County Recreation Commission. For additional details please call the Recreation Commission office at 453-2184. SUNDAY, JULY 19 Hermandad Latina Block Party. 410 Montrose St. Free food, beverages, and entertainment. 364-0247. WEDNESDAY, JULY 8 Planning Board Meeting. Council Chambers, City Hall, Seventh and Wood sts. 7:30 p.m. GOLF, SPORTS, ETC. SATURDAY, JULY 11 Fresh and Specialty Foods Market/Pets on Parade. 700 block of Landis Ave. 8 a.m.-noon. p.m. each Saturday through August 15. Vendors will sell fresh fruits and vegetables and various crafters and other exhibitors will be on hand. Trolley will shuttle between Kidston Towers and Walmart, providing free transportation for anyone going to the Market. 794-8653. THROUGH JULY 27 Midget Football/Cheerleading Signups. Third St. and Chestnut Ave. 6-7:30 p.m. on Fridays, July 10, 17 and 24. Saturday registrations 9 a.m.-noon on July 11, 18 and 25. 974-3645. WEEKLY THROUGH OCTOBER 6 Senior Golf Association Events. Various courses throughout southern New Jersey. Annual membership $20. JULY DATES: July 7 (Centerton), July 14 (off), July 21 (Back Creek), July 28 (Westwood). AUGUST DATES: Aug. 4 (White Oaks), Aug. 11 (Patriots Glen), Aug. 18 (off), Aug. 28 (TBA). Call Paul Doerr to join or for exact dates, entry deadlines, tee times, locations, and additional information, 691-4098. JULY 11 AND 12 Walk in the Vineyard Wine Trail Weekend. Bellview Winery, Atlantic St., Landisville. Special vineyard tours, wine tasting, winery tours, and grape-themed recipes. 11 a.m.-5 p.m, Free admission. 697-7172, www.BellviewWinery.com JULY 13 THROUGH 17 SonRock Kids Camp Vacation Bible School. South Vineland Uunited Methodist Church, corner of Sherman Ave. and Main Rd. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Classes for age 4 to 8th grade, plus an adult class. Everyone is welcome. FRIDAY, JULY 10 Searching for America’s Best TwoSome. Ron Jaworski’s Running Deer Golf Club, 1111 Parvin Mill Rd., Pittsgrove. Presented by Callaway Golf, a national Amateur 2 Person better ball event. 1 p.m. Tee Times. Fee to members of Ron Jaworski Golf Courses $60, non-members $110. Each participant gets one-year subscription to Golf Magazine and a dozen Callaway iX Tour Balls. Call Running Deer Pro-Shop 358-2000 ext. 18 for details. player (includes lunch, dinner, practice range, green and cart fees). $20, lunch only. $40, dinner only. 11 a.m. registration and picnic lunch. Noon shotgun start. Four-person scramble format. For pre-registration or sponsorship information, call 691-7400 or visit www.vinelandchamber.org/events. THURSDAY, JULY 23 Amputees Across America. HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital, 1237 W. Sherman Ave. A welcome recption will be held in honor of the cyclists who are riding in bicycle relays across the country (started in California on May 27) and visiting hospitals to increase public awareness of amputees as people with active lifestyles. 4 p.m. TUESDAY, JULY 14 City Council Meeting. Council Chambers, City Hall, Seventh and Wood sts. 7:30 p.m. SUNDAY, JULY 19 1st Annual Russian Festival. Holy Trinity Russian Orthodox Church at 2221 West Landis Ave. Sample the stroganoff, vareniki and shashlik, pielmeni, pirozhki and golubtsi, kvas sweet ale and Russian beer (also THURSDAY, JULY 16 Chamber of Commerce Golf Classic. Buena Vista Golf Club, Rt. 40 and Country Club Lane, Buena. $150 per only at South Jersey’s Premier Car Wash WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Just $850 YES! Voted #1 “Best of Best” 2008 + Tax Can get my car clean INSIDE & OUT??? SATURDAY, JULY 25 Barbara Cook Run-Ride-Walk for Cancer. New Jersey Motorsports Park, Millville. This year’s event will feature new bike routes including 62-mile (Metric Century) and 31-mile rides, plus an 8-mile fun ride for family riders. A post-event barbeque fundraiser will include raffles and auctions. Longer cycling events begin 8 a.m., other registrations 4:30 p.m., events at 6 p.m. Visit www.ACTIVE.com. JULY 4 AND 7 Member Days at New Jersey Motorsports Park. 8000 Dividing Creek Rd., Millville. The Drivers Club at New Jersey Motorsports Park and Radical Sportscars will have a host of two-seater sports racers from the British constructor at select Drivers Club days, giving club members an opportunity to sample additional high performance vehicles. The Drivers Club allows members to drive their cars on both the 2.25mile Thunderbolt Raceway and the 1.9-mile Lightning Raceway at the Millville, N.J. facility. Members have over 30 days each season to hone their driving skills with instruction from top-level driving coaches. In addition to the lapping program, the Drivers Club also hosts a time trials program in 2009. Cars compete in various classes based on potential performance, with the overall Club Champion crowned at season’s end. More information on the Drivers Club at New Jersey Motorsports Park is available at www.njmp.com, by calling 327-7216, or e-mailing membership@njmp.com. Information on Radical is available at www.radicalsportscars.com. Tickets for all spectator events at New Jersey Motorsports Park are available at www.njmp.com. Children 12 and under are admitted free to all events at New Jersey Motorsports Park. SATURDAY, AUGUST 1 Joshua Moren Memorial Slo-Pitch Softball Tournament. Fiocchi Field, 1755 Galli Dr. Fee per team $150, Home Run Derby $10 per player. Team registration deadline 7 /28, game day check-in 8 a.m. rmg0004@auburn.edu for details about tourney and sponsorship opportunities. EVER Guaranteed! Windows included with this ad. Best Wash the grapevine { 23 } 2611 S. Main Rd. Vineland, NJ 08360 (Between Grant & Sherman) GV I Faces in the News Proud Parents Cervini is College Graduate Amanda Lyn Cervini of Upper Deerfiled, graduated from the University of South Carolina with a bachelor’s degree in biological sciences, a minor in psychology and a 3.5 grade point average. While attending the university, she volunteered at the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Midlands. Cervini attended Salem Community College in 2003/04, then attended Gloucester County College from September 2004 to May 2006 and graduated with a 3.8 GPA and an associate degree in arts and sciences. She was also a member of Phi Theta Kapp Honor Society. Cervini plans to attend medical school, then a career in the medical field. A graduate of Woodstown High School, Cervini is the daughter of Joann Chiari Cervini of Upper Deerfield and the daughter and stepdaughter of Richard Michael and Teri Cervini of Vineland. Ms Beverly Eldridge and Darryl Eldridge would like to announce that after many years of hard work and dedication, Dr. Holly Eldridge graduated from The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey on May 20. “We would like to give special thanks to all her friends and family for the grateful help and loving support you gave our daughter.” SEND US YOUR FACES — IT’S FREE! More Faces in the News on pages 4 and 6 Get your photos published in The Grapevine… birthdays, engagements, weddings, anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them the address listed on p. 3. { 24 } the grapevine | JULY 1, 2009 Newly Renovated & Open For the Summer The Best Sushi Bar in Cumberland County Beer Garden BYOB Breakfast & Lunch Thursday – Saturday 5-8 Monday – Saturday 8-3 Daily Specials OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Monday Trivia 8:30-10:30 World Tavern Poker 6:30 & 9:30, 2 games Tuesday $1.00 Tacos Wednesday Karaoke 9-12 Thursday DJ 9-12 Ouside Raw Bar (clams, oysters & U Peels) Friday & Saturdays Live Entertainment Sunday Kids Eat Free Ages 10 & below – 1 kids meal/Adult Check out our under $15.00 Comfort Menu 856-293-1200 123 North High St. Millville, NJ Dinner Chinese & Japanese Cuisine Offering a new dinner menu for 2009 Always Fresh, Never Over-priced The Looking Glass Cafe is Millville Arts Districts’ Original and Longest Running Casual Dining Establishment Catering On- and Off-Premises Available for Your Special Event 16 N. High St. Millville NJ 08332 Coming Soon Hibachi Japanese Steak House • Catering • Banquet Facilities/Wedding Reception • Eat In/Take Out & Delivery We deliver min. $25-$30 Hours: Open 7 Days A Week M-Th: 11am-10pm Fri & Sat: 11am-11pm Sunday: 12 noon-10pm 856-327-1666 (856) 765-1818 Fax: (856) 765-0588 WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | 101 E Main St. Millville, NJ 08332 Gypsy Smokehouse Tues.- Sun. 11am-7pm Closed Monday Served with celery & Blue cheese BBQ, Honey Mustard, Mild (Spicy) Medium (Hot), Hot (Very Hot), Insane (Need we explain) Beef Brisket, Pulled Pork, Pulled Chicken, Smoked Sausage Served S.O.S. (Sauce On Side) All Platters include sandwich, cornbread & 2 sides BBQ Extended Hours on Fridays & Weekends All Summer Long! 19 E. Oak Street Millville, NJ Phone: 856-327-1000 Fax: 856-327-1009 WINGS 10/15/20/25 Pieces Seasoned & Smoked until they are fall off the bone tender! Served Wet (Sauced), Dry (No Sauce) and S.O.S. All Platters include sandwich, cornbread & 2 sides Half Rack or Full Rack RIBS the grapevine { 25 } ! ”      Open ’Til 9:00 Every Friday MyArtMyMillville.com EATING OUT From fine dining to lunch spots to bakeries, the area has choices to satisfy any appetite. Call for hours. Amato’s Restaurant, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 692-5756. Veal, chicken, seafood, and pasta specialties for dinner. Open for lunch, too. Closed Sundays. Andrea Trattoria, 1833 Harding Hwy., Newfield, 697-8400. Chef/owner Andrea Covino serves up Italian specialties in an atmosphere of fine dining. Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave, Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food served tapas style, specialty martinis, catering, private parties. Extensive wine list. Live music Friday nights. Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-0909. This breakfast and lunch spot offers a menu of sandwiches named for colleges near and far. Bain’s Deli, 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 5631400. Come in for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Daily specials include coffee of the day. Barbera’s Chocolates on Occasion, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 690-9998. Homemade chocolates and candies, custom gift baskets. Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees, desserts, drink specials. Take-out, too. Happy Hour buffet Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. NFL flat-screen TVs. Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy., Vineland, 6975500. Steaks, veal, chicken dishes. Meet friends at the bar. Open daily for lunch and dinner. Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 205-0012. The “Gutbuster” a 21-oz. burger, pizza, salads, wings, subs, dinners. Bojo’s Ale House, 222 N. High St., Millville, 327-8011. All food is homemade, including the potato chips. Casa Dori II, Brewster Rd. and Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 794-1888. Authentic Italian, lunch and dinner; catering avail. Continental Room at the Ramada Inn, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 6963800. Open for lunch Mon.-Fri., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Open to hotel guests and the public. Crust N Krumbs Bakery, Main and Magnolia rds., 690-1200. Cakes, pies, cookies, breads, and doughnuts. Custom wedding cakes, too. Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call for lunch and dinner specials. Soft ice cream and cakes year-round. Mon.-Sat 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 6961900. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Take-out, too. Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. Open 24 hours. Kids eat free Tues. and Sat. Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave., Vineland, 691-5511. Family time-honored recipes, fresh ingredients. Donkey’s Place, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland, 690-1777. One-of-a-kind cheesesteaks made on large, fresh poppyseed rolls. Dreamz Cafe, 2184 Union Lake Crossing, Millville, 765-5029. Panini, sandwiches, salads, soups. Also, gelato, Italian coffee, desserts, smoothies, and frappuccino. Esposito’s Maplewood III, 200 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks, seafood and pasta dishes at this Italian restaurant. Eric’s, 98 S. West Ave., Vineland, 205-9800. Greek and American cuisine. Pizza, too. Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. & Tuckahoe Rd., Vineland, 691-6080. Italian cuisine and dinner buffets to savor. Family-owned. Fresh Restaurant, 1405 Mays Landing Rd., Millville, 327-3435. Jumbo lump crabcakes, Black Angus burgers. Wed. is pasta night. Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli, 527 S. Brewster Rd.., 697-3509. Name says it all. Daily specials, catering. Closed Sunday. General Custard’s Last Stand, 2578 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 696-2992. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner served Tues.-Sat. Gina’s Ristorante, 110 N. High St., Millville, 825-4241. Italian cuisine, lunch and dinner, BYOB, nothing over $20. Giorgio’s Restaurant 363 E. Wheat Rd., Buena, 697-2900. Serving lunch and dinner daily. Italian cuisine, pizza. Giovanni’s Italian-American Deli. 1102 N. East Ave., Vineland, 692-0459. Pizza, Italian subs, all your lunch favorites. The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf Course, 4049 Italia Rd., Vineland, 691-5558. Restaurant and lounge open to the public for lunch Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Jake’s. 611 Taylor Rd., Franklinville, 6945700. Italian-American, served lakeside. Lunch, dinner, happy hour, Sunday brunch. Joe’s Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-8860. Barbecue and Kosher chickens, homemade sides, catering for all occasions. Kawa Thai & Sushi, 2196 N. Second St. (Rt. 47), Millville, 825-9939. Thai and Japanese cuisine. BYOB. Landicini’s Family Restaurant & Pizzeria Landis and Lincoln aves., Vineland, 6913099. Italian cuisine, gourmet pizza salads. Open for lunch and dinner. Larry’s II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-9001. Three meals daily. Sunday breakfast buffet, early-bird dinners. Library V Restaurant, 206 Rt. 54, Buena, 697-9696. Renowned for prime rib, steaks, seafood, salad bar. Closed Mon. and Tues. La Locanda Pizzeria & Ristorante, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 794-3332. Pasta, veal, chicken. Lunch and dinner. Closed Sunday. Lucia’s Ristorante, 785 W. Sherman Ave., Vineland, 692-0300. Italian fine dining and regional cooking. Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 563-0030. Italian-American cuisine, seafood and veal. Open daily for lunch and dinner, Sunday breakfast buffet. Manny & Vic’s, 1687 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 696-3100. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Manny’s Pizza, 426 N. High St., Millville, 327-5081. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Martino’s Trattoria & Pizzeria, 2614 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 692-4448. Brick oven pizza, risotto, polenta. Three meals daily. Merighi’s Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. Banquet/wedding facility as well as intimate restaurant. Nicky G. Fridays 9 p.m.–midnight. Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s Head rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet lunches and dinners in a casual setting. Moe’s Southwest Grill, 2188 N. 2nd St., Mill- ville, 825-3225. Tex-Mex, burritos, catering. MVP Bar, 408 Wheat Road, Vineland, 697-9825. Full bar menu, live entertainment, drink specials. Neptune Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge, 1554 South Delsea Drive, Vineland, 6922800. American cuisine, array of cocktails. Next Oar, 127 N. High St., Millville, 2931360. Weekly menu, made-to-order dishes. Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek cuisine—lamb dishes and salads. Paperwaiter Restaurant & Pub, 1111 Village Dr., Millville, 825-4000. A special place for all your special occasions. Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland, 6940500. Breakfast, lunch, dinner specials; convenient drive-thru, mini-meal specials. Pete’s Pizza, 20 W. Park Ave., Vineland, 205-9998. Pizza (including whole wheat), subs, wings. Open daily 11 a.m-10 p.m. The Rail, 1252 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-1440. Bar and restaurant with daily drink specials and lunch specials. Richland House, 1303 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-5700. Eclectic dinners and casual lunch fare. Closed Mondays. Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville, 3278878. Authentic Vietnamese—noodle soups, curry, hotpot, Buddhist vegetarian. Serene Custard, NW Blvd. and Garden Rd., Vineland, 692-1104. Pulled pork, hot dogs, homemade ice cream, party cakes. South Vineland Tavern, 2350 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-7888. Breakfast, lunch, dinner daily. Seafood and prime rib. Steakhouse at Centerton Country Club, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3325. Lunch and dinner. Steaks, reserve wines, upscale casual. Stewart’s Root Beer, 585 Delsea Dr., Vineland, 696-8062. Burgers, hot dogs, fries, floats and shakes. Sweet Life Bakery, 601 East Landis Ave., Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood bakery. Homemade pastries, cakes, coffee. Tony Sopranos, 107 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 405-0200. Pizza, Mexican Southwest fare, Atkins-friendly salads. Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs, chicken, fish, steaks. Always clams, eat in or take out service. Villa Filomena, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena Vista, 697-7107. Dinner combos, grilled meats, fish. Lunch and dinner daily. Wheat Road Cold Cuts, 302 Wheat Rd., Vineland, 697-0320. Deli and catering. Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-8899. Dinners, grilled sandwiches, wings in eight flavors. Willmott’s Pizza. 12 S. Seventh St., Vineland, 696-1525. Hand-tossed pizzas, stromboli, breakfast pizza. Offering Takeout or eat in service. Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville, 3270909. Continental cuisine and spirits served in a casually upscale setting. Ye Olde Centerton Inn, 1136 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3201. American classics served in a building right out of a Rockwell painting. of July { 26 } the grapevine | JULY 1, 2009 BBQ 4th Graduations, Reunions, BBQ’s, Dinner Parties, Engagements, Weddings, Bar/Bat Mitzvahs, Birthday, Retirement, Teen Parties, Christenings, Showers, Etc. No job too big or small We can accomodate any multi ethnic cuisine including asian, spanish, italian you name it we can make it FOR 4TH OF JULY AND EVERY SUNDAY Custard Stand Ye Round Ice Cream Cakes • Catering ORDER EARLY! In Ice Cream Stand Hot Meatball Sandwichs & Kustard Kitchen GRADS over 14 years experience vegan and gluten free 856-692-7473 • Cell 609-247-8341 • Fax 856-692-7664 OPEN ar 856-691-5438 1370 S. Main Road Vineland, NJ I Culinary Adventures { STEPHEN WILSON / PHOTO: JILL M C CLENNEN Meal Planning 101 Simplifying the food chain—one meal and one family at a time—is a good plan. ecently, I’ve been reading books that present critiques of the American food system, such as Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver and Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma. These books can be difficult to read because of the sometimes ugly truths they tell, but they creating much-needed debate and dialogue on the subject of where our food comes from. Then it was brought to my attention that there’s a movie out called Food Inc. I searched online and saw that the movie presented itself as “lifting the veil on our nation’s food industry, exposing the highly mechanized underbelly that’s been hidden from the American consumer with the consent of our government’s regulatory agencies.” Last week, my mother invited Jill and R me to a showing of Food Inc. at The Ritz in Voorhees. After watching the movie, we all left the theater talking about the effects of the industrialized food system on our lives. On one hand, the benefits are obvious— cheap, accessible food; an endless supply of fruits and vegetables available yearround; the ability to feed an ever-increasing population. On the other hand, the dangers of industrialization lurk beneath— the reliance on fossil fuels to run the entire system; the environmental and social consequences; the indifference towards freshness, flavor and seasonality; and the inhumane treatment of animals and people in factory farms. What I found most interesting about the film was how interconnected our food system is with so many of the problems that plaque society… everything from environmental pollution, to immigration, to health care. Of course the makers of the film have their own agenda, I checked out some websites that offer criticisms of Food Inc.—always a good idea when forming an opinion. I ultimately believe that our food sys- tem is somewhat broken and no one is to blame but ourselves. We can only change it one person or one family at a time. If we change our eating habits to support local business and family farms, cut out the soda Continued on next page Fresh Fruits & Vegetables NOW IN Also available Watermelon, Canteloupe & Corn Jersey Blueberries (while supplies last) with this ad FRESH EGGS $1.00 a dozen WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | OPEN 8am-6pm 7 days a week Tuckahoe Rd. (between Landis Ave & Chestnut) Your Spot for Delicious Summer Party Pastries & Desserts Pies • Cakes Pastries • Cookie Trays Place Your 4th of July Order Early! $ 2.00 OFF CREATE YOUR OWN SALAD: With Chicken, Grilled Chicken, or Crispy Chicken Exp: 7/15/09 Cheesesteak Sandwich $ Toppings are lettuce, tomato, carrots, cucumbers, black olives, sliced eggs, croutons, onions, bacon bits, pepperoncini OFF 2.00 Exp: 7/15/09 the grapevine { 27 } Open For Saturday July 4th & Sunday July 5th 6:30am – 1:00pm Closed Monday We use only the freshest high quality ingredients! Michael Pollan, below, is the author of Omnivore’s Dilemma. and sugary drinks, learn to enjoy cooking and eating with family, and most importantly, teach our children healthy and sustainable eating habits, we can negate some of the negative consequences that our food system is having on our collective health. If you have a free evening, check out Food Inc. at the theater, or grab a copy of The Omnivore’s Dilemma or Animal, Vegetable, Miracle from Amazon.com or at the local library. Learn about where your food comes from and what’s in it. All this stuff about the evils of the food system made me crave some real food. I stopped into Lucia’s on Sherman Avenue a few days later to drop off some leftover cookies we had from the bakery for Chef Murray and the rest of the staff. In the kitchen, I found Murray dropping squash blossoms into the hot oil of the fryer. They were so orange and seriously beautiful. He told me that he had gotten them from Malench Farm right down the road, and I can assure you they were picked that morning because they looked so nice and fresh. Murray had stuffed them with ricotta and basil and dipped them in a thin beer batter. Little tiny yellow squashes still clung to the bottom of each blossom. He offered to quickly fry a few for me. He gingerly slipped them into the hot oil, and they emerged a few minutes later to be In the movie Food, Inc., Joel Salatin of Polyface Farms talks about his grass-fed herd. placed in a to-go container and drizzled them with a little sun-dried tomato sauce. He then gave me a big fat Jersey tomato and told me to slice it and sprinkle the slice with a little salt. I got back to the bakery, and Jill’s eyes grew wide when she saw and smelled the treat I had in my hands. We put the food onto a plate and dug in. It was divine… pleasantly salty and cheesy, delicately flavored with the squash blossom and hints of basil with contrasting textures of warm ricotta and crisp tempura batter. Real food. Local food. Prepared by skilled hands and treated with the utmost respect from the farmer, to the chef, to the eater. It was a perfect food chain, a simple and delicious system. We can change our common food future one meal at a time. Remember that each meal is a vote for what you believe in, so vote wisely! I Stephen Wilson along with his wife Jill McClennen owns The Sweet Life Bakery. You may contact him via email at thesweetlifebakery@verizon.net. The OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Top Banana DIV. OF ZUKERMAN FOODS Wholesale Outlet Wheat Road & Delsea Drive, Vineland • 641-0815 HOURS: Mon. – Thurs. 9-6:30; Friday 9-8; Sat. 9-6; Sun. 11-5 Sale 7/1/09 to 7/6/09 Major Credit Cards Accepted NOW ACCEPTING E.B.T. CARDS!!! EGGS & MILK LOW PRICE ALWAYS! Ready to pick up. Easy shop by Phone or Fax 641-0813 ICEBERG LETTUCE Head 77¢ AGED ASIAGO CUTS $4.97 lb. VAR. WTS. PRE-WRAPPED STELLA CARROTS 1 lb. bags $ FRESH 2 for 1.00 EGGS EXTRA LARGE { 28 } the grapevine | JULY 1, 2009 LEHIGH FARMS HANOVER MILK WHOLE – 2% – 1% PORK & BEANS SERVES 20 Big 114 oz Can $ dozen CALIFORNIA 77¢ GALLONS $2.89 3.77 BING CHERRIES Jumbo $2.77 lb. GRILLIN’ TIME 1 lb. Sugardale Franks 99¢ 1 dz. Frank Buns $1.69 20 lb. Charcoal $5.99 JERSEY FRESH “TOP CROP” BLUEBERRIES 2 for $3.00 PINTS SHOP SMART • SAVE SMART • EAT SMART I Recipe Corner { LISA ANN DiNUNZIO } Recipe Swap Tips and recipes will help you create a delicious 4th of July barbeque. reetings! It’s time to “get our grill on.” If you’re planning to fire up the grill this 4th of July, you’ll want to make sure you prepare and cook your food properly so it’s delicious as well as safe to eat. Follow these helpful tips for the perfect barbeque and have a happy and safe 4th of July! • Keep all meat and poultry refrigerated until ready to grill. • Always marinate meats in the refrigerator. • After marinating meat or poultry, discard the marinade. • Don’t cross-contaminate! Use clean plates to transfer cooked foods from the grill to the table. Never place cooked food on the same plate or tray that was used with the raw food. • Eat grilled meats as soon as they are cooked, or shortly thereafter. • Keep grill stable and use in well- because we always have guests. Give my burger recipes a try.” All American Burger 1 lb. Grade A ground sirloin 1 small onion, finely chopped 1 tbs. grill seasoning of choice 1 tbs. Worcestershire sauce ¼ tsp. salt ½ tsp. freshly ground pepper American cheese slices, if desired 4 hamburger buns 1/4 tsp. black pepper 2 tbs. soy sauce 1 tsp. onion powder 1/2 tsp. garlic powder 1/4 tsp. ground ginger 1/2 cup Teriyaki sauce, divided G ventilated outside area. • Use long barbeque utensils to avoid getting burned. • Don’t leave a grill unattended and never attempt to move a grill when it’s hot. • Keep cold foods cold until serving time. • Keep grilled meats hot by holding them on a part of the grill where they won’t continue to cook until your ready to serve. • Cook all poultry until cooked completely through, and juices run clear. • Refrigerate any leftover food quickly to avoid bacteria growth, which happens quickly— especially in warmer weather. The following recipe and story is shared by Kyle Reeds, who writes: “At my house, I’m the ‘Grill King.’ I cook everything possible on the grill, from burgers, steaks, and vegetables, to grilled fruit. I make plenty In large bowl, combine ingredients and mix well. Form 4 patties and grill about 4 inches from medium-hot coals, turning once until desired doneness, (approximately 5-7 minutes on each side for medium). Make sure burgers are cooked through before serving. Add cheese to burgers the last 30 seconds to 1 minute of grilling time before adding to bun. Serve with slices of tomato, onion, lettuce and pickle, if desired. Mix ground beef, egg, 2 tablespoons of Teriyaki sauce, breadcrumbs, salt, pepper, soy sauce, onion powder, garlic powder and ground ginger in a bowl. Shape beef mixture into 4 patties, each about 3/4 inch thick. Grill patties about 4 inches from medium-hot coals, turning once, until desired doneness, (approximately 5-7 minutes on each side for medium). Make sure burgers are cooked through before serving. Brush each burger with remaining Teriyaki sauce during the last 2-3 minutes of grilling. Serve on toasted sesame seed buns, or rolls of choice. From my grill to yours, Bon Appetit. I Lisa Ann DiNunzio is the author of Seasoned With Love, Treasured Recipes and Lisa Ann’s Seasoned With Love II. Send recipes for publication to lapd1991@aol.com or to The Grapevine, 3660 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08361. Grilled Teriyaki Burgers 1 lb. lean ground beef 1 egg 1/2 cup breadcrumbs 1 tsp. salt 1853 Vine Rd. Vineland 691-4848 Fax: 856-691-2294 marcaccimeats@verizon.net Start Your Summer Off Right at Big Apple! Come & Party On Our Outdoor Deck Serving Breakfast Sunday at 9 am 1/2 Price Drinks All Day Long We Are Open July 4th Inside or Outside on Our Deck EBT Vineland’s neighborhood bakery, where everything is made from scratch and quality counts. OV 40 YEER AR IN S BUSIN ESS WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | (Giveaways all day on the deck) a 6th street between Landis and Elmer in Downtown Vineland Monday & Wednesdays All-You-Can-Eat Snow Crab Legs! Tuesday – Bike Night Rain or Shine. Thank You For Your Support & Business Friday July 3rd 11-3 pm 856-692-5353 www.thesweetlifebakery.com HOT DOGS HAMBURGERS ROASTED PIG & SODA FREE Join Us the grapevine { 29 } I Entertainment FRIDAY, JULY 10 Tara Jacoby Art Exhibit. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. 7 p.m. $8 for admission and cheese spread sampling, $15 if also participating in the wine tasting. Jacoby, a Vineland native who relocated to New York City four years ago, currently lives in Brooklyn’s fast growing art district. After receiving her Associates degree in Graphic Design from Cumberland County College, she decided to attend the Fashion Institute of Technology in NYC for Illustration. In addition to being a full-time student, Jacoby also works as the exhibition coordinator for the Museum of American Illustration at the Society of Illustrators in NYC and still manages to squeeze some freelance illustration jobs in between. Her work, which will be on exhibit at Fuel House through August 7, ranges from ink drawings, watercolor paintings, digital media and oil paintings. Music for the evening’s festivities will be provided by the local bands Raccoon Fighter, A’s Rage and Wellspring & Honor. WINE AND CHEESE TARA JACOBY ART EXHIBIT OPENING, OUTDOOR 4TH OF JULY CONCERT, AND SPANISH ROMANCE. TUESDAY, JULY 7 Gene Boney Band. Joe Dale Pavilion at Bruno Melini Park, 616 Central Ave., Minotola. 7-9 p.m. All are welcome; bring your own chair. Free concert. FREE SUMMER CONCERTS AT GIAMPETRO PARK Enjoy these free concerts all summer long, as well as dancing on the adjacent dance floor. Held Monday evenings at 7 p.m at the Enrico Serra Band Shell. If raining, the concert will be held at Memorial School Auditorium, Main Road and Chestnut Avenue. • July 4 (Saturday): Red, White & Blue Band • July 6: Phil Vitale Trio • July 13: Joe Luisi, One Man Big Band • July 20: Ross Ippolito Combo • July 27: Buddy Gale Big Band • August 3: Greg Albert Duo • August 10: Corky Gale’s Combo • August 17: Doctors of Rhythm • August 24: Gene Boney Band • August 31: Frank Marone Combo • September 7: Bud Cavallo Duo Special arrangement for persons with disabilities can be made if requested in advance. Contact the Business Administrator’s Office at 7944000 ext. 4144. Transportation arrangements for seniors and/or disabled should be made through CATS (6917799) at least 48 hours ahead of time. WEDNESDAY, JULY 8 City Rhythm Orchestra. Michael Debbi Park, Cedar Ave., Richland. A blend of swinging jazz, rockin’ blues, R&B, and original material. 7 p.m. rain or shine. Seating available or bring a lawn chair. Free concert. THURSDAY, JULY 9 Romantic Spanish Music. Vineland Public Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland. Program features the vocals of Calixto Negron with Benny Munoz on the guitar. CDs by both performers will be on sale after the program. 6-7:30 p.m. Free, but seating is on a first-come, firstserved basis. 794-4244. THURSDAY, JULY 9 Karaoke Night. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. 7 p.m. $3. FRIDAY, JULY 10 Vineland Homecoming of Drop Dead Sexy and Eleven Eleven. Merighi’s Savoy Inn, Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Advance tickets $10, at the door $15. Buy tickets online at www.savoyinn.com. JULY 1, 2, 3, 4, AND 7 Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Wednesday: ’70s and ’80s Throwback Night (frozen drink specials) 8 p.m.midnight, Thursday.: Karaoke with DJ Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday: Blue Moon Dance Party, $3 Blue Moon drafts, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Saturday: Latin Dance Party, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Tuesday: Country Western Dance Party (beer and shot specials), 8 p.m.-midnight. SATURDAY, JULY 4 Cardigans and Hollowbodies. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. Live jazz. 5-7 p.m. AT THE CASINOS HEADLINERS, COMEDY ACTS, AND MORE JULY 2, 3, AND 4 Nightlife at Villa Filomena. Villa Filomena Ristorante & Lounge, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena, 697-7107. Thurs.: Ladies Night, Fri.: Live music, Sat.: Italian Accordian. Tickets: 1-800-736-1420; www.ticketmaster.com unless otherwise noted. Bad Company. Resorts. 8 p.m. $185, $125, $85. Tropicana. Liverpool Club Theater in North Tower. Wed.–Sun., 8:30 p.m., $25. THROUGH AUGUST 9 A Bronx Tale. Harrah’s. Tuesday through Thursday 8 p.m., Friday through Sunday 9 pm. $65, $55, $40. THROUGH SEPTEMBER 5 Hypno-Sterical. Trump Marina. Thursday and Friday 9 p.m., Saturday 10 p.m. $22.50. THROUGH SEPTEMBER 6 Carnival of Wonders. Trump Plaza. 8 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday, 9 p.m. Friday, 3 and 7 p.m. Sunday. $25. THROUGH SEPTEMBER 6 Cirque Dreams Pandemonia. Taj Mahal. 8 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday, 9 p.m. Friday, 3:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. $35 and $25. COMEDY & MORE HEADLINERS FRIDAY, JULY 3 The Wallflowers. Borgata. 9 p.m. $35. 1-800-298-4200. Monsters Of Classic Rock. Hilton. 9 p.m. $15. Clutch. Showboat House of Blues. 8 p.m., $$25, $28.50. The Doobie Brothers. Tropicana. 9 p.m. $35-$75. SATURDAY, JULY 4 Joe Cocker. Hilton. 8 p.m. $60. Comedy Club at Borgata. Borgata Music Box: three comedians daily, 9 p.m. (except during headliner engagements) 1-800-298-4200. Comedy Stop at the Trop. Three comedians nightly. Sun.-Thurs., 9 p.m., $23; Fri., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $23; Sat., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $28. Order tickets by phone at the Comedy Stop Box Office: 1-877FUNNY-AC or 609-348-0920. Visit www.comedystop.com. Fame. Tropicana. Monday and Thursday 8 p.m., Tuesday and Wednesday 3:30 and 8 p.m., Sunday 7 p.m. Yesterday: A Tribute to the Beatles. JULY 2, 3, AND 4 Nightlife at Bojo’s. 222 N. High St., { 30 } the grapevine | JULY 1, 2009 Millville, 327-8011. Thurs: Ladies Nite with Charlie. Fri: TBA. Sat: Singalong. Sun: Nascar/Baseball. FRIDAY, JULY 3 Randy & Ryan. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. Live acoustic music. 7 p.m. JULY 3, 4, AND 5 Nightlife at Old Oar House. Old Oar House Brewery, 123 N. High St., Millville, 2931200. Fri.: TBA, 9 p.m. Sat.: TBA, 9 p.m., Mon.: Trivia Night 8:30-10:30 p.m. Gold & Silver is at a 25 Year High! • Gold Jewelry • Silver Jewelry • Sterling Silver Flatware • Gold Rings • Gold Bracelets • Gold Chains • Gold Class Rings • Dental Gold • Other Gold or Silver Items • U.S. Eagles • K-Rands • Pandas • Mexican-Pesos • Canadian Maple Leaf • Gold and Silver Bars • National Currency • U.S. Paper Money 1864 to 1922 • Don’t Forget That Old Jewelry Box That’s Full of Jewelry Franciscan Troubadours Entertain The Franciscan Troubadours, a music ministries group from St. Francis of Assisi Parish in Vineland, visited Baker House Assisted Living recently. Pictured are Maryann Borden, Delores Gardela, Annette Lipartito, Ron McMahon, Karen Cliff, Ida DiBidgida, Grace Quick, Muriel Chalow, and Florence Rerrarie. Not pictured are Charlotte Ferrarie, Charles DeAngelis, Irene Sauro, Izzy Kalagian, Connie Pratt, Mary Giglio, Harry and Ann Marie Ackley and Norene Ritter. The group was organized in 1995 by Florence Ferrarie. The original accompaniest was well-known guitarist Frank Marone who still sings and plays occasionally with the group. Anyone who plays an instrument or likes to sing is welcome to join the group—call Grace at 692-3519 or Florence at 691-4917. FRIDAY, JULY 10 Hofenakus, Music by Brian London. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. 7 p.m. 2581 E. Chestnut Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361 Owned & Operated by the Avena Family for over 35 years JULY 12 TO 18: PAINTERS WORKSHOP Places are still available for Maurice River School of Painters Workshop at Barn Studio. The Barn Studio of Art will host a weeklong workshop with the Maurice River School of Painters in Millville. The workshop is open to all artists interested in taking their current landscape painting capabilities to the next level, and is appropriate for all media. The Maurice River School was established in 1965 and offers a relaxing, non-competitive work environment. The workshop includes daily demonstrations by guest instructors, including Stan Sperlak, Bill Ternay, Jill A. Rupinski, Ruth Formica, and Pat Witt, founder of The Barn Studio of Art, followed by tranquil days of uninterrupted painting time, lively conversations with fellow artists from across the U.S., and a chance to sample Down Jersey cuisine. The workshop culminates with a “Third Friday” gallery opening on July 17 in Millville’s Glasstown Arts District. Complete workshop price of $475 includes a welcoming reception July 12, and a boat cruise on the Maurice River July 13. Participants may register for single days at $105 per day, space permitting. Space is limited. Contact Nancy Witt Mulick at (614) 565-7549 for additional. The Barn also is offering full slate of classes for children, teens, and adults through August 1. (856) 794-1600 • 856-776-6407 FRIDAY, JULY 10 Static Addiction. Good Sports Bar & Grille, 1477 Panther Rd., Vineland, 6929200. Deck Party, 10 p.m-2 a.m. WILLIAMS SATURDAY, JULY 11 Dan Barry. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. 7 p.m. Totally Tobacco (Formerly Williams Liquors) WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | SATURDAY, JULY 11 The Groovement, Roades, Elisa Fredricks (and more). Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 5631400. 7 p.m. $8. TUESDAY, JULY 14 Joe Luisi, One Man Big Band. Joe Dale Pavilion at Bruno Melini Park, 616 Central Ave., Minotola. 7-9 p.m. All are welcome; bring your own chair. Free concert. Wed. July 9 4 pm -7 pm WEDNESDAY, JULY 15 The Gene Boney Band. Michael Debbi Park, Cedar Ave., Richland. Big Band music, Billy Joel, ballads, waltz’s, jitterbug and upbeat music.. 7 p.m. rain or shine. Seating available or bring a lawn chair. Free concert. Special Deals and Spectacular Giveaways from DREW ESTATE THROUGH JULY 30 Picturing America. Vineland Public Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland. Selected works of art spanning several centuries, all by American painters, sculptors, photographers, and architects. Expanded selection of cigars, pipes and tobacco Join our Private Lounge to relax,enjoy a smoke…and so much more the grapevine { 31 } 137 S. Delsea Dr · Vineland · 856.692.8034 I Downtown Vineland { TODD NOON, EXEC. DIR., VDID/MAIN STREET } The 3/50 Project Support independent businesses and you’ll bring money back to Vineland. H ow’s this for a concept? Think of three independent businesses downtown where you like to shop. Then spend a total of $50 per month at these independent businesses. The idea really is a natural, especially with all the great independent merchants we have downtown and considering how fast you can spend $50 these days. Here are the benefits for the community. For every $100 spent in independently owned stores, $68 returns to the community through taxes, payroll, and other expenditures. Only $43 stays here when you shop at a national chain. Furthermore, if only half of the employed population spent $50 each month at independently owned businesses, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, $42.6 billion in revenue would be generated. This shows why it is so important and beneficial to support your local independent downtown merchants. This principle—embracing the concept of supporting independent, locally owned businesses by inspiring customer loyalty to these downtown storefronts—has started a major initiative called The 3/50 Project. Started in March of this year in Minneapolis, Minnesota, it has transformed a grass-roots movement into a national trend. As of May 31, more than 5,000 supporting businesses, including a growing number of Vineland’s independent businesses, have signed on. In fact, you can visit their website at www.350project.net and join more than 79,500 others who have already done so. Think about this the next time you go shopping. Buy downtown and see more of your money stay here and benefit Vineland. *** The Fresh and Specialty Foods Market will be taking a break this weekend, but will return on July 11. Presented by VDID/Main Street Vineland and sponsored again by Sun National Bank, the Market runs each Saturday until August 15, on the 700 block of Landis Avenue from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. The July 11 market will feature the second annual “Pets on Parade.” Bring your pet—any pet. Prizes will be awarded for Most Interesting Pet, Best Dressed Pet, Best Pet Trick, Ugliest Pet, Most Original Float or Wagon, Most Original Costume with a Patriotic Theme. The competition will begin at 9:30 a.m. and the winners will be announced at 11 a.m. Also, you can cast your vote every week of the Market, in the Little Miss & Mister Cherry Tomato photo contest. The winner will be crowned at the International Food & Cultural Festival on Saturday, August 22 and will ride in the Holiday Parade on November 28. All the proceeds will go toward the great cause of downtown revitalization. You won’t want to miss Landis Avenue’s own “bash at the beach” as the Vineland Seafood Festival returns for a second year— bigger and better than before—on Saturday, July 18 (rain date: Sunday, July 19), from 3 to 9 p.m. The 600 block of Landis Avenue will be full of sun, fun, and seafood dishes from Vineland’s finest restaurants and fresh food vendors, plus live music and much more. Many other vendors will also be here offering a wide range of delicious foods. Admission is free, other than the price of the food and merchandise. Take-outs will be available. *** Remember that for all our downtown events, support your downtown merchants and businesses. If you can stop into any of them during an event, please do so. If you do not have an opportunity during that time, make a point of coming back at a later time to stop in. The businesses, and we at VDID/Main Street Vineland, will greatly appreciate your support and patronage. *** For more information VDID/Main Street Vineland’s “endless summer” of events and activities, call the office at 794-8653 or visit the website—www.mainstreetvineland.org. Have a great Fourth of July and enjoy the fireworks! I The Grapevine’s Crossword Puzzle { 32 } the grapevine | JULY 1, 2009 ACROSS 1. Florida city 6. Material bodies 11. Boob tube 14. Arrived extinct 15. 1st Hebrew letter 16. Wrong prefix 18. Rust fungi 21. Slang for money 23. Barbary sheep 25. Make a mess of (British) 26. Urban green areas 28. Small edible herring 29. Glowing 31. German “the” 34. ___eway: portal 35. Large body of water 36. Produces electricity 39. Ironies 40. A stout sword 44. Lives in solitude 45. Fathers in baby speak 47. Foreigner 48. Fooled 50. Telegraphic signal 51. Instruct 56. Big Blue 57. Kitchen chopping blocks 62. From a time 63. Soviet missles DOWN 1. Earl Grey recepticle 2. Soda can metal 3. Of I 4. Polyvinyl acetate 5. Suffer 6. A way to take in liquids 7. Express delight 8. Manganese 9. Equally 10. Pasta wheat 11. Papuan monetary unit 12. Point between S and E 13. Ceramic tub covering 14. Algerian dinar 17. Coburg and Gotha 19. Lupino, actress 20.Swiss river 21. Belongs to comic Saul 22. But goodie 24. Denmark 25. The cry made by sheep 27. Heroic tales 28.Building plots Solution to last week’s puzzle 30.___eless: stag 31. Rubbish 32. Copal resin 33. Small European finch 36.Celtic 37. A way to drench 38.Feel sorrow 39. Herringlike fish 41. Not good 42.Website suffix for educational institution 43. Very fast currents 46.Point one point S of SE 49. Blood sugar disease (abbr.) 51. Habitual facial twitch 52. Point midway between NE and E 53. Silver 54. Ed Murrow’s home 55. Ad ___ 58.Atomic #22 59. Tennessee 60.Gold 61. Rural delivery I In Our Schools Giavanna Landicini Gabriela Leone Nicholas Luciano Roderick Maier Jeffrey Martine Jana Martini Marielena Richards Aaron Blandino Christopher Booth Dennis Campanella Sarah Consalo Evan Cressman Dana DaSilva Kaylee Falasco Lee Fiocchi Anthony Gaunt Sarah Gibney Lindsey Gloway Matthew Marroccelli Sejal Menghani Marley Williams Deja Williams Samantha Zarankin SIXTH GRADE: Lisa Curley Paige Granato Ashley Harridan Laina Lovisone Caroline Madonna Jared Martine Jessica Middleton Kelsee Tepper Sophia Valla Eric Bradway Monica DeDomenico Sonseeahray Dreher Donovan Fava Lukas Gavigan Nicholas Gibney Carolina Jost Megan Kuhl Jenna Lambert Allison Landi Lia Stiles Nicholas Trotz SEVENTH GRADE: Michael Booth Andrew Gee Matthew Gladfelter Julia Martini Marialena Melillo Jessica Panno Henry Rodriguez Taylor Santangelo Dane Spoltore Jael Vaquero Lindsey Zakian Drew Bencie Paul Bergamo Themba Lungu MaryKate McCormick Karla Salazar Morgan Smith Vincent VanNoord EIGHTH GRADE: Kevin Allen Monica Canglin Garrett Catalana Angela Christaldi Anthony Consalo Kelsey Cugini Samantha Gaudio Joseph Gaunt Megan Iaconelli Hayley Kane Theresa Riordan Jeffrey Rowan Mark Rowan Gabriella Sorantino Josey Swanberg Christian Walker Matthew Anderson Brianna Andreoli Victoria Caterina Adriana DeBartolomeis Ashley Gonzalez Nathaniel Jones Christopher Repice Genevieve Russo Nathan Seaverns Steven Steigerwalt Selena Zayas Bishop Schad Regional School 4th Quarter Honors List FOURTH GRADE: Kelly Bagby Anna Marie Bernard David Cross Vincent D’Augustine Jaime DiMatteo Sarah Hatten Robert McCormick Michael Miles Emmey Swanberg Neal VanNoord Julian Allen Leila Baez-Amberths Andrew Dion Salvatore Gallina Bryan Garcia Madison Giovinazzi Siani Gomez Gianna Lovisone Domenico Marts Brittney Mulvey Thomas Quinones Alyssa Rodriguez Kasey Siena Matteo Vivirito Allison Walker Kirsten Ziglar FIFTH GRADE: Emily Bencie Gianna Bianco Anthony D’Ottavio Mennies Teachers Selected for Celebration of Teaching Mennies School teachers Susan Serra and Mary Lou Brown have been selected by former students to participate in Cumberland County’s Celebration of Teaching program. Former and current Cumberland County Teachers of the Year and the office of the County Superintendent of Schools sponsor the program to encourage quality tenth and eleventh grade students to consider teaching as a career. Vineland High School juniors Andrew Bermudez selected Mrs. Serra and Sara Munsick selected Mrs. Brown. Students and selected teachers were invited to attend a dinner at the Cumberland County Tech Ed Center to design and develop a hands-on teaching activity. All 23 students were given the opportunity to introduce themselves, tell why they wanted to go into education as well as why they selected their teacher. In photo, from left: Mrs. Brown, Sara Munsick, Andrew Bermudez and Mrs. Serra. Beautiful Smiles, Made Affordable OUR SERVICES MILLVILLE FAMILY DENTAL Union Lake Crossing Shopping Center 2144 N. 2nd St., Millville WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | NEW PATIENT WELCOMING PACKAGE $ 80 (reg. $230.) Includes oral exam, full mouth series of x-rays, cleaning & polishing, oral cancer screening, periodontal (gums) evaluation. With coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Emergency Walk-Ins Welcome • Same-Day Denture Repair • • • • • • • • • • • Cleaning & X-Rays Porcelain Veneers Cosmetic Dentistry Periodontal Therapy (Gum Treatment) Full Mouth Reconstruction Implant Rehabilitation Root Canals (One Visit) Full & Partial Dentures Bleaching White Fillings Crowns & Bridges 856-825-2111 Open 7 Days a Week. Day & Evening Hours Proud Member Of The Allied Dental Practices Of NJ Personalized Dentistry SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO OUR SENIOR CITIZENS the grapevine { 33 } Se Habla Español E D W A R D P O L L E R , D D S • G L E N N P R A G E R , D D S • TO D D P R A G E R , D D S • D A N I E L D I C E S A R E , D M D I Real Estate How Much House Can You Afford? The New Jersey Association of Realtors unveils an online, interactive New Jersey-specific database to examine housing affordability. he New Jersey Association of Realtors® (NJAR®) Governmental Research Foundation (GRF) has unveiled an online, interactive database prepared by the nationally recognized Center for Housing Policy that compares wages for selected occupations with the costs of owning and renting a home. The purpose of the New Jersey-specific Paycheck to Paycheck database is to examine housing affordability around the state. “Paycheck to Paycheck is a tremendous way for consumers to analyze the affordability of various housing options throughout of occupations: teacher, police officer, registered nurse, retail sales worker, and janitor. To view the database, visit www.njar.com/ paycheck2paycheck. “As home prices continue to level off, the buying power for many potential homeowners has certainly increased,” added Hanley. “However, certain segments of our state’s workforce still find it difficult to afford to enter the housing market. For areas like New Jersey where home prices are higher than other parts of the country, we need to be vigilant in our efforts to create affordable housing opportunities for all of our residents.” T the Garden State,” said 2009 NJAR GRF President Bill Hanley. “Every day, realtors see the frustration and discouragement of working families unable to realize their dream of homeownership. This database is another way realtors are working to shed light on housing issues facing New Jersey.” Paycheck to Paycheck provides custom charts examining the affordability of homes in all 21 counties in New Jersey for workers in 29 different occupations. Users can compare one occupation across three counties or up to 10 occupations in a single county. If no occupations are selected, Paycheck to Paycheck analyzes the following default set $155,989 to afford to purchase a home in Bergen County, while in Salem County a household would need to earn $54,026 to buy a house. In Hunterdon, Middlesex and Somerset counties, a yearly income of $53,600 is needed to rent a two-bedroom apartment. A household would need to earn $35,800 annually to afford to rent a twobedroom apartment in Cape May County. Examining specific occupations used in the database shows that janitors and retail sales workers are priced out of every housing market in New Jersey. Also, a twoincome household is needed for a retail sales worker or a janitor to afford to enter FINDINGS the rental market. For teachers, police offiBergen County is the most expensive home- cers and nurses, counties in southern New ownership market in the state, with a medi- Jersey provide more affordable housing an home price of $481,250. Salem County is options. There are several counties where the least expensive area to purchase a home, households with two teachers, police offiwith a median home price of $147,500. cers or nurses could afford to purchase a Hunterdon, Middlesex and Somerset coun- home, including Burlington and Gloucester ties ranked as the most expensive rental counties. According to the database, teachmarkets in the state, with a fair market rent ers, police officers and nurses generally can for a two-bedroom apartment coming in at afford New Jersey’s rental markets. $1,340. Fair market rent for a two-bedroom To calculate homeownership affordabiliapartment in Cape May County is $895. ty, Paycheck to Paycheck follows convenAdditionally, the data indicates a house- tional mortgage underwriting guidelines hold would need to have a yearly income of and assumes that not more than 28 percent Avoid last minute problems and excuses, close the deal with Gateway Funding. For excellent service, competitive rates and complimentary pre-qualifications, call Blaise Menzoni. FHA • VA • Conventional Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. Get amazing results from your advertising campaign in The Grapevine. Get the benefit of our distribution to every residence in Vineland (approx. 22,250)! Ride the wave of excitement as The Grapevine’s debut has excited our town’s citizens. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call { 34 } the grapevine | JULY 1, 2009 Blaise Menzoni LOAN OFFICER Gateway Funding DMS, LP Office 856.692.9494 Fax 856.691.3687 Cell 856.297 .7087 1 17 E. Landis Ave • Suite C • Vineland, NJ 08360 1 Licensed by NJ department of Banking and Insurance 856-457-7815 or E-MAIL: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. Opening Doors to Home Ownership Most to Least Expensive HOMEOWNERSHIP MARKETS Rank County Median Home Price of household income should be used to pay the mortgage, property taxes and insurance. The database further assumes a down payment of 10 percent. DATA SOURCES Information represented in the database was obtained from a variety of sources. On the homeownership side, data provided by First American Core Logic, which includes sales of both new and existing homes, was utilized. The average property tax rate for each county comes from the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, and the costs of homeowner’s insurance for each county were estimated using average premiums reported by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners. The Federal Housing Finance Board’s Monthly Interest Rate Survey was used to determine the interest rate for a 30-year, fixed-rate, non-jumbo mortgage. On the rental side, the database uses the Fair Market Rents (FMR) established by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Information on prevailing wages for the selected occupations comes from a proprietary database maintained by www.Salary.com. I Most to Least Expensive RENTAL MARKETS Rank County 2-BR Fair Mkt. Rent Homes with Immediate Occupancy 1 Bergen …………………..$481,250 2 Morris……………………$455,500 3 Somerset ……………… $447,750 4 Hunterdon …………… $422,000 5 Essex…………………….$420,000 6 Monmouth…………….$405,000 7 Union …………………….$375,000 8 Middlesex……………. $360,000 9 Passaic ………………….$352,900 10 Hudson ……………….. $340,000 11 Mercer …………………. $326,750 Cape May………………$321,000 12 13 Ocean……………………$298,000 Sussex …………………. $288,310 14 15 Warren…………………. $274,000 16 Burlington……………. $270,000 17 Atlantic ……………….. $260,000 18 Gloucester …………….$244,000 19 Camden………………..$208,000 20 Cumberland …………..$170,000 21 Salem …………………….$147,500 *Data from 3rd Quarter 2008 1 Hunterdon . . . . . . .$1,340 Middlesex . . . . . . . .$1,340 1 1 Somerset . . . . . . . .$1,340 4 Bergen . . . . . . . . . .$1,256 4 Passaic . . . . . . . . . .$1,256 6 Monmouth . . . . . . . .$1,251 6 Ocean . . . . . . . . . . .$1,251 8 Hudson . . . . . . . . . .$1,192 9 Mercer . . . . . . . . . .$1,120 10 Essex . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,103 10 Morris . . . . . . . . . . .$1,103 10 Sussex . . . . . . . . . . .$1,103 10 Union . . . . . . . . . . .$1,103 14 Atlantic . . . . . . . . . .$1,033 15 Warren . . . . . . . . . .$1,007 16 Cumberland . . . . . . .$956 17 Burlington . . . . . . . . .$932 17 Camden . . . . . . . . . .$932 17 Gloucester . . . . . . . . .$932 17 Salem . . . . . . . . . . . .$932 21 Cape May . . . . . . . . .$895 *Data from 3rd Quarter 2008 2 PLUS ACRES This 4 Bedroom 2-story Bungalow has been completely remodeled and is ready to move into. Kitchen has a center island with all new appliances. This quiet setting home comes with 2 plus Acres. Call today for your personal tour. Vineland LIKE BRAND NEW This 3 Bedroom rancher is like brand new. Large eat-in Kitchen, 2 full Baths, Basement nice and high with Family room, sits on almost 2 Acres. Home seems small but is very deceiving. Vineland INGROUND POOL This home speaks for itself. All Brick home. Two Bedrooms on first floor & 2 Bedrooms on second floor with 1/2 Bath. Gorgeous wood floors in LR, FR, DR. The Kitchen is completely remodeled with a huge granite top island. Basement is finished. Fenced-in back yard has a wonderful in-ground pool for perfect entertainment. MOTIVATED SELLERS ! Vineland FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Worldwide Convenience • Personal Attention Savings Home Equity Checking VISA Credit Cards Auto Loans VISA Check Cards Personal Loans Online Banking 4 LARGE BEDROOMS WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Plus Much More! “Serving Members for Over 70 Years” 37 West Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08360 This is one spectacular home. 4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths. Wood floors in Dining Room, tile floors in eat-in Kitchen, and Hallway. Laundry on first floor. Above ground pool is less than one year old. Concrete pad, covered with large awning off the Kitchen patio door, excellent for entertaining. 9′ garage doors. Call Listing Agent for more details! Vineland Call Me Today 856-696-0767 Also serving members at: 28A Cornwell Dr. Bridgeton, NJ 08302 (609) 501-2340 CARMEN MINGUELA Realtor / Associate Bilingual Circle of Excellence, 2003 thru 2008 the grapevine { 35 } 856-453-9094 www.cumcofcu.org Graham Realty • 1101 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08360 Business (856) 606-0696 ext 107 Fax: (856) 691-3020 CMINGUELA@AOL.COM Clifford Graham broker of record Coldwell Banker Excel Realty to our team of Real Estate Professionals MARK GOULD Mark D. Gould is a seven year land, commercial, new and existing residential specialist. Mark can provide you with commercial or residential land, residential or commercial rentals, as well as new and existing homes. “We like Mark’s professionalism and energy towards his clients. He has sold a lot of real estate over the years and understands the complexities in the real estate market,” says Russ and April Puesi, Managing Partners of Coldwell Banker Excel Realty. Mark Gould goes above and beyond to meet your needs. He has a good report with clients and takes their concerns seriously. Coldwell Banker Excel Realty welcomes Mark Gould to their Family and invites you to call him on his cell at 609-977-5083 or by email at mgould5857@yahoo.com TERRENCE SPENCER Born and raised in Vineland and a graduate of Vineland High School, Terrence obtained a B.S. in Business from Thomas Edison College and a M.Ed. from Grand Canyon University. He has been employed by the Vineland Board of Education as a middle school teacher and high school varsity coach for many years and continues to serve in that capacity. A husband and father of four daughters, he enjoys family trips to Disney World and the Jersey Shore. His hobbies include running and weightlifting, movies, and inspirational readings. Terrance has been involved in real estate in an investment capacity since 1998 and has fostered many friendships over the years. He looks forward to serving the community and making dreams of homeownership a reality. Terrance Spencer can be reached by his cell at 856-207-8354 or by email at tasm.1@verizon.net. is Proud to Welcome JASON JUDICE I would like to briefly share with you some insight into who I am, and what I can do to help you buy or sell a home. By choosing to work with me, you will gain the knowledge of an eight year veteran in the mortgage banking business. I have closed over $340 Million Dollars in residential loans across the country over the past eight years. I know exactly what underwriters are looking for in order to ensure your loan gets approved. My knowledge in the industry plus my passion to make my clients happy will be the perfect fit for you and your family. In my opinion, having a great RealtorLoan Officer combination, can be the difference between a client getting a property or losing it to another potential buyer. I will go to every extent needed to make sure your experience is nothing short of spectacular. I look forward to meeting and exceeding all your real estate needs in the future! Personal: I recently moved to Vineland, NJ after living and working in Mount Laurel, NJ for the past ten years. I am very excited about the opportunity to grow my business in Vineland, while continuing to service my existing clients. In my spare time I am an active volunteer firefighter and also enjoy playing golf. Jason can be reached by cell at 609-707-5700 or by email at j.judice@comcast.net JENNIFER GIZZI A new agent to Coldwell Banker Excel Realty, Jennifer Gizzi joined the team in May. A native of Riverton, New Jersey, Jennifer moved to Egg Harbor Township three years ago. “I am eager and willing to answer any questions you may have in your home search. Let me know how I can help you today!” Jennifer can be reached by her cell at 856-577-2680 or by email at jenngizzi@gmail.com. Move-In Condition Lovely brick two story home with garage and enclosed porch. Eat-In Kitchen, 3 bedrooms, 1 Full Bath, Newer windows, back roof and garage roof only 9 years old. Public water & sewer. Vineland City. $105,000 Exclusive Area In an exclusive area of established families. Artistically Landscaped; a magazine picture home. Spacious Master Bedroom with Loft and huge walk-in closet. Sunken Dining Room with hardwood floors and gas logged Fireplace. Living Room with cathedral ceilings and fireplace. Spacious ceramic tile work island. A must see!!! To All Agents: See [Agent Remarks] for further details regarding BBC. Public water & septic sewer. Vineland City $289,000 Nice Ranch Style Home Beautiful with a finished basement. New…..then after laundry in the basement please add in 3 bedrooms, 1 Full bath, Eat-In Kitchen, and Porch. Public water & private sewer. Great house at a great price! Vineland City $159,000 Rare Trees Hundreds of rare trees frame this peaceful East Vineland property. 1.75 acres; one of the most beautiful lots around !!! Must see… Vineland City $89,900 Looks As Fresh As The Day It Was Built Come and enjoy what new construction feels like. Home has an open floor plan, with a spectacular morning room. Bonus– a Full Finished Basement!!! 4 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Baths, EatIn Kitchen. Public water & sewer. Vineland City $257,500 Spacious!!! Open floor plan affords this home a great opportunity for large family gatherings. Wonderful Florida Room allows you to enjoy the great outdoors all seasons. Basement is beautifully finished— Ready to move into. 3 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Baths, Eat-In Kitchen. Public water & sewer. A must see! Vineland City $259,900 Two Years Young! – 4 Bedrooms, 3 1/2 Baths 2600 sq ft of great living space. Home has a Living Room, Family Room, Formal Dining Room, Main Level Utility Room. There is a Full Finished Basement with a Full Bathroom. Home is equipped with a Video Security System. Home has Surround Sound inside and outside. All it takes is a phone call to see this magnificent home! Public water & sewer. Vineland City $287,9000 Very Charming Two story with 3 bedrooms, 1 full bathroom and a half bath. Large Living Room with Gas Log Fireplace, Eatin Kitchen, Florida Room, Large Yard with 2 car detached garage. Hardwood floors thru out. Public Water & Sewer. Vineland City $169,000 About To Start Construction…. There’s time to make selections for roof, siding, countertops and floors. Comes with a 10-year Home Warranty. Approximate completion date: OCT 2009. Pictures show what the Model will look like. Pictures are of a previously built model. Vineland City $225,000 Great East Vineland Location… Newer kitchen with clear cedar ceiling; hardwood floors throughout; air and furnace within 7 years; huge deck; great Florida Room; window treatments to stay. Subject to short sale approval. 4 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Baths. Public water & sewer. Vineland City $219,900 2 Years New – 3 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Baths! This home boasts spacious rooms, lots of closets, dual zone central air, first floor laundry and more. Full basement has high ceilings and could easily be finished for additional living space. Home Owner’s Warranty from the original builder! Vineland City $174,900 Cell: (856) 392-1523 • Office (856) 696-1111 x125 • www.cbexcelrealty.com • 1100 E Landis Ave Vineland, NJ 08360