Archive for August, 2009

Posted on August 31st, 2009 by by Mike

August 26, 2009

INSIDE BACK TO SCHOOL CHECKLIST • CUMBERLAND PLAYERS • NORTH ITALY BBQ VOLUME 2 | ISSUE 29 | AUGUST 26, 2009 CONNECTING YOU { STORY AND PHOTOS: MICKEY BRANDT } T O V I N E L A N D . W E E K L Y. Visit us online www.grapevinenewspaper.com At Organic Natural Foods Market, customer Gloria Branca (left) talks to employees (left to right) Sarah Chaudhri and Poonam Rattan. Dr. Ray Patel, store owner is at right. It’s not the health reform politicians are talking about… but many believe it’s a better way to better health. hey work outside of traditional Western medicine. They believe the body itself is its own best healer and that the mind, body, and spirit are integrated. They question prescription drugs and invasive medical procedures unless they are clearly necessary. Some carefully point out that they T practice healing and are not medical professionals. They practice holistically. They provide alternatives. Dr. Michael Sarnoff of Vineland first wants people to know what his practice is not. The Vineland chiropractor says, “It’s not cracking bones and relieving back pain. It’s about life enhancement.” He has been practicing since 1999 and clearly enjoys talking about the art of chiropractic. “Your nervous system controls all your organs and it’s totally contained in your spine,” he says. “If your spine is out of alignment, it’s like keeping your hand over your mouth while you’re talking.” He describes regular spinal adjustments as essential to health, not merely useful for relief of symptoms. His practice is called The Good Life, but, more importantly, it’s housed in the Café of Life, which also offers massage, childbirth classes, music and exercise classes for mothers and children, yoga, dance, and health and holistic healing events. Denise Cooper of Vineland recently started seeing Dr. Sarnoff for serious shoulder pain—she didn’t want to have surgery and explains why. “They said ‘Oh you need an MRI, oh you need to do this and that;’ I didn’t want to be a guinea pig for the doctors.” She says the pain is now gone, but she continues chiropractic to maintain her health. Health, that is, in the meaning Dr. Sarnoff gives it. “Health isn’t the absence of symptoms,” he says, “it’s the ability to adapt to internal and external changes.” Dr. Ray Patel, who owns Organic Natural Foods Market in Vineland, is a naturopath, using natural remedies to help his clients. He calls it “the science of nature.” His specialties include colonic cleansing, what he calls “a gentle warm colon bath that can Continued on page 22 Deneen DePre, Herschel Martin, and sister Megan Martin accept a check from Bob Burns and Tom Dechen. Support for Noah Last week, Brewster Fine Wines & Liquors donated $2,000 to the family of Noah Cook, who is in need of a new wheelchair after a July 16 car accident. Noah has Osteogenesis Imperfecta, a brittle bone disorder that causes him to be confined to a wheelchair, but his chair was damaged beyond repair in the accident. Noah also sustained serious injuries. The following fundraisers have been scheduled for the benefit of Noah. DENNY’S, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Wednesday, August 26 from 8 to 11 p.m. FUELHOUSE COFFEE CO., 736 Landis Ave., Saturday, August 29 (see page 25). TEXAS ROADHOUSE, 2299 N. 2nd St, Millville, Sept. 21 through Sept. 24, from 3:30 to 10 p.m.; and Sept. 26 and Sept. 27 from noon to 4 p.m. (A Texas Roadhouse coupon—found on www.welovenoahcook.blogspot.com) must be presented. PASTA FAMILY FUN NIGHT, Wallace Middle School: 688 North Mill Rd., Friday, Sept. 25 from 5 to 8 p.m. I Se Habla Español Buy with Confidence Buy from 1517 SOUTH DELSEA DRIVE, VINELAND NJ 856-692-1700 • www.rossihonda.com 2008 President’s Award Winner & 2008 Council of Excellence Winner Rossi HONDA Visit Us At www.rossihonda.com The OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Top Banana DIV. OF ZUKERMAN FOODS Wholesale Outlet Wheat Road & Delsea Drive, Vineland • 641-0815 HOURS: Mon. – Thurs. 9-6:30; Friday 9-6; Sat. 9-6; Sun. 11-5 I Faces in the News Flaim – Miller Sale 8/26/09 to 8/30/09 Major Credit Cards Accepted NOW ACCEPTING E.B.T. CARDS!!! EGGS & MILK LOW PRICE ALWAYS! Ready to pick up. Easy shop by Phone or Fax 641-0813 CAMPBELL SOUP 50 OZ. CANS — ALL VARIETIES JERSEY FRESH 1 FREE with 1 Family Size Live Well! CORN 6 for $2 GREEN PEPPERS $ WHITE RED PEPPERS $ 1.49 lb. EXTRA LARGE ICE! 8 LB. 1.79 COOL OFF! 49¢ lb. EXTRA LARGE COKE ALL FLAVORS SPRITE — DR. ‘P’ — FANTA, ETC. CRYSTAL GEYSER TOMATOES SPRING WATER JERSEY FRESH Ryan Robert Flaim and Brenda Ann Miller have announced their engagement. Flaim is the son of Robert and Cynthia Flaim of Vineland. Miller is the daughter of Richard and Shirley Willis of Hopewell Township and Thomas Miller of Delaware. Flaim is a graduate of Vineland High, a 1996 graduate of Cumberland County Technical Education Center, and a Pennco Tech graduate. He also holds a 2006 Associates Degree in Business Management from Cumberland County College. He is coowner of R&R Flaim Next Generation Produce LLC. and owner of Flaims’ Next Generation Farm, LLC. Miller is a graduate of Cumberland Regional High School and a 2006 graduate of Cumberland County Technical Educational Center’s electrical program. She currently works with her fiancee at R&R Flaim Next Generation Produce LLC. 2 Lt. 99¢ 49¢ Lb. $ 24 / 16.9 oz. 3.77 case Congratulations On your ballet recital, Samaria Jaliece Silva SOMMER MAID ICEBERG QUARTERS SWEET CREAM LETTUCE $1.79 lb. lg. head 69¢ ea. BUTTERSALTED ONLY LIGHTLY FARM FRESH GRADE A EGGS Extra Large 99¢ Dozen Happy Birthday To our Sweet 15, Miranda Jazelle Silva SHOP SMART • SAVE SMART • EAT SMART MASS OF FORGIVENESS HEALING & PEACE Forgiveness: To Forgive & Be Forgiven. Healing: Spiritual, mind & body. Peace: Peace in Christ. Gage Charles Gallo Today is your birthday. Happy Birthday to you. 2 YEARS OLD Love, Grandmom and Grandpop Gallo { 2 } the grapevine | AUGUST 26, 2009 e Mass will be celebrated by Fr. Richard McAlear. Father’s gifts of teaching and healing are powerful indicators of the healing love of Jesus Christ being poured out on today’s world. All are welcome. More Faces in the News on page 5 SEND US YOUR FACES — IT’S FREE! Get your photos published in The Grapevine… birthdays, engagements, weddings, anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them the address listed on p. 4. St. Padre Pio Parish, OLP Church, 4680 Dante Ave., Vineland Saturday Sept. 12th, at 5 PM Liturgy Rotary Supports Fedup-4U The Vineland Rotary Club presented Fedup-4u with a check for $1,300. From left is the director of Fedup-4U Shemise Finch, founder James Cooper and the president of the Rotary Club Ted Lane. The new date for Fedup 4U’s Pink Carpet Gala is September 27, at St. Anthony’s Hall. Call 364-8103 for more information. Lazy, Hazy, Crazy Days of Summer On the swing, eating treats and making silly faces, these friends are from left: Madison Rudolph, Caden and Jace Quiles, and Mia Rudolph. INDEPENDENT LEADERS PENDENT EADERS ENT RS “WHY ARE WE RUNNING?” HY RUNNING?” NI Summer Fling at Veterans Home Several members of The Boys & Girls Club of Vineland performed for residents of the New Jersey Veterans Memorial Home in Vineland at Dotty Cullen and Friends’ “Summer Fling” celebration. Club youth members sang, danced and entertained the veterans. Club Director Chris Volker stated: “These events give our young people a chance to show off their talents and, at the same time, do something that the veterans really enjoy— provide good entertainment. The Club strongly feels that it’s important to give back to these veterans that have given so much for us.” Other performers at the event included the Golden Boys of Delsea High and the fabulous Joy Dancers. Vineland Mayor Robert Romano also made an appearance and handed out Cracker Jacks to all of those in attendance. Pictured here are Club members and singers Najee Wilson, left, and Ashley Birmingham, right, with Dotty Cullen who has been holding events for veterans at the home for over two decades. Over the past few years, we have become disheartened over the path of the Freeholder Board…a path dictated by its current Director. As former Freeholders, we have tried in good faith to work for change within the structure of our party. Unfortunately, we could not overcome the exclusionary tactics, the false rhetoric, the bullying, and the selling of our county to outside interests. So now we will run as Independent Leaders and will address issues such as: u p Leaders r : Establishing a full time technical ll education school. . Developing a workable rkable transpor tation an. transportation plan. Creating Creating a viable open space and recreation plan with full community recreation involvement. Implementing a public review of review ethics in county g government. government. Bringing respect, dignity, and civility respect, dignity, back to county government. go nment. over ( (L-R) Jennifer (Lookabaugh) Sw , Bruce Peterson, and Jane Christy ) Jennifer ( g ) Swift, Bruce Peterson, wift, , Jane Christy r y WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | With With your h help on NOVEMBER 3RD, we will restore the NOVEM MBER re estore Freeholder Board to its rightful position as the truly representative Fre eeholde Board er ul tru representative uly government of all the people of Cumberland County. go rnment over nd County. y the grapevine { 3 } Paid for by Independent Leaders, Gregory Peterson, Treasurer, 49 Acorn Drive, Bridgeton, NJ 08302 or terson, Treasurer, eton, I Editor’s Letter The Race Riot of 1989 High Efficiency Heating and Cooling and Water Heating Equipment Eligible for up to $1500 in Federal Tax Credits and up to $400 in Rebates Not all anniversaries are celebrations. There are some events that we’d just as soon forget. In doing so, we might spare ourselves some discomfort, but we may also rid ourselves of the opportunity to learn from the past—even if it’s a part of our history that may not be among our proudest moments. August 28 marks the 20th anniversary of one such dark moment in the history of Vineland. Late that night and into the following morning, about 200 people rampaged down Landis Avenue in anger after a young black man was shot to death by a white Vineland police officer the day before. The shooting victim had been pursued by the police officer who was trying to arrest him on outstanding warrants for weapons offenses. The shooting occurred after a foot chase that ended in a gravel pit just off Southwest Boulevard when the suspect hurled rocks and swung a steel rod at the officer, resulting in the officer’s shooting of the man. The following evening, a Monday, about 100 blacks gathered outside police headquarters on Wood Street shouting, “We want justice.” By about five hours later, a crowd of 200 mostly teenage and young minority men began rioting along Landis Avenue, throwing rocks and bottles and smashing store windows at a couple dozen shops in the center of town. Nearly 100 state and Vineland police officers donned riot gear and patrolled the center city streets for hours, arresting more than 30 people (on charges of resisting arrest, rioting, burglary and aggravated assault) before the crowd dispersed and the rioting ended by 3 a.m. It is estimated that $100,000 in damage was done. But that’s just the material damage. The damage caused by both the shooting and the resulting riots cannot be measured. Vineland was always a relatively peaceful community. Prior to this incident, a Vineland police officer had never used fatal force in the city’s history. Relations between whites, blacks and Hispanics previously and since can be characterized as tolerant, if not harmonious. At the time of these incidents 20 years ago, I was away at college and I remember hearing about what had happened and being completely flabbergasted. It was surreal. These types of things only happened in cities like Detroit or Los Angeles, not in my little hometown. Just two years prior to the racial unrest, I remember that Vineland High School had two cafeterias and that the white kids ate in one, while most of the minorities ate in the other. (Apparently, this practice continued up until recently.) This was certainly not school policy, but a voluntary choice made by the students year after year. Even then, I knew that this was strange. I would occasionally eat in the “other” cafeteria with my black and Puerto Rican friends and nobody gave me a second glance. But the separation continued, and that separation extended beyond the lunchrooms. Even though the color barriers supposedly had been stricken down—at least legally—in the 1960s, obviously the underlying resentments still festered just below the surface. Twenty years later, we now have an African American sitting in the Oval Office of the White House. As a nation, we’ve come a long way in terms of improved race relations. Here in Vineland, the scars left by the shooting and riots in 1989 have faded, though they may never fully heal. I invite you to submit letters to the editor with your thoughts on how far Vineland has come—or how far the city has yet to go—in the achievement of a truly color-blind society. No inflammatory remarks will be allowed, but if you have thoughtful and thought-provoking comments to offer, we will welcome them. { CONTENTS } 1 Outside the (Pill) Box Many health practitioners—and their patients—profess they have the answer to better health. MICKEY BRANDT 2, 5 6 Faces in the News Fruit on the Vine A call for interested volunteers to come out to a networking event. TODD NOON 7 Just the Right Dose Patient care seems to have been replaced with an abundance of tests and medications. DEBORAH A. EIN 8 8 10 12 Community Calendar Letters to the Editor Crossword DINING: A Barbeque North Italy Club does not disappoint at its recent chicken barbeque. STEPHEN WILSON Serving Vineland for over 100 years! 691-1950 State Lic. # 12089 18-19 HOME & GARDEN 20 Theatrical Vineland The Cumberland Players traces its beginnings back to 1946. VINCE FARINACCIO 20 25 Vintage Vineland Entertainment 26-27 BACK TO SCHOOL 28 Recipe Corner Cucumbers inspire some really cool recipes. LISA DINUNZIO BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIAL STARTS 30 REAL ESTATE { STAFF } MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor LORI GOUDIE Art Director GAIL EPIFANIO Controller JACK EPIFANIO Distribution SHERRY MUNYAN Advertising Executive MARIE HALPIN-GALLO Advertising Executive PATTY ALI Graphic Designer MARYANNE BERTRAND Advertising Assistant Get the kids in for their haircuts before school starts! STOP IN TO THE SALON & Enter To Win A Back Pack Full of School Supplies! Drawing 9/05/09 { 4 } the grapevine | AUGUST 26, 2009 KIDS HAIRCUTS 14 Years & Younger ONLY $8 WOW (cannot be combined with any other offers or specials.) exp 08/31/09 Get your Loved One A Gift Certificate Today The Grapevine 3660 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361 PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816 EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com HOURS Mon. – Wed. 9-5pm, Thurs. & Fri. 9-7pm Sat. 8:30-3pm & Sun., 9-1 pm WALK-INS WELCOME! NO APPOINTMENTS NECESSARY 5006 E. Landis Ave.Vineland (856) 691-2202 MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2009. All rights reserved. I Faces in the News “Rapping” Up Summer Camp 2009 A group of Ellison Explorers campers “rapped” up the summer with “Making Music” week and a visit to CAS Music Productions in Vineland. Under the guidance of owner Chris Orazi, campers toured the production studio and learned first-hand how their favorite songs make their way onto CDs. Next, they recorded a rap song of their own. Called, “Ellison…The School That Rocks Out Loud,” the song put a perfect “rap” on Summer Camp 2009! Pictured are Ellison rappers, front row, from left: Kyle Kinkade (Milmay); Giuliano Finizio (Vineland); Ethan Infranco (Vineland). center row: Nicole Wolkowitz (Vineland); Kimberly Kinkade (Milmay); Kevin Kinkade (Milmay); Luca Colaprico (Milan, Italy); Gianni Finizio (Vineland); Back row: Cara Torres (Vineland); Gillian Moore (Millville); (Back Row) Ryan Banks (Vineland). 1853 Vine Rd. Vineland 691-4848 Fax: 856-691-2294 Specials For August 26-29 EBT marcaccimeats@verizon.net Saluting the Docs The Horizon NJ Health Physician Recognition Dinner was held recently. Pictured from left: Philip M. Bonaparte, MD-Vice President Clinical Affairs/ Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of NJ and Chief Medical Officer at Horizon NJ Health; David B. Rosenberg, MD; and Karen Stover, Horizon NJ Health, Manager of Network Contracting and Servicing. In group photo, front row from left: Terri L. Murphy, DO, Anjali A. Desai, MD, Renu Doshi, MD, Michelle D. Corrales, MD, and Kemi A. Alli, MD. Back row: David B. Rosenberg, MD, James E. Hubbs, DO, Richard A. Renza, DO, Dr. Philip M. Bonaparte (CMO HNJH and VP HBCBNJ), Olabode O. Ogidan, MD. FRESH BEEF CHICKEN PICNIC SHORT THIGHS BONELESS AVERAGE (8-10 lb) LEAN WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | $ 49 1 lb. .89¢ $249 lb. lb. RIBS Happy Birthday To our two little angels, Isabella Cooney, 2, and Kendall Cooney, 1 All our Love, Mom Mom & Pop Pop Cooney PORK PORK BUTTER ITALIAN CHOPS CHOPS STEAKS SAUSAGE $ 99 $ 59 $ 79 $ 89 Come in and check out our great selections and prices on all your Bar B Q Meats! CENTER CUT END CUT BEEF OUR OWN HOT OR SWEET the grapevine { 5 } 1 lb. 1 lb. 2 lb. 1 lb. I Downtown Vineland { TODD NOON, EXEC. DIR., VDID/MAIN STREET } Fruit on the Vine Mark your calendar for the Volunteer Information and Networking Event on September 10. ur summer schedule of activities has wound down and we have some important events coming up in the fall, so this is a great time to get our current volunteers re-energized and new volunteers excited about joining us. We are having a networking event to do just that. It is important for everyone to know what VDID/Main Street stands for, what it does, and what its four standing committees contribute to the program. We want you to come to the networking event if you are interested in joining us in our work. If you are currently a volunteer, come and bring a friend. Since volunteers are the core of our organization—the fruit of our vine—we are calling the event V.I.N.E. (Volunteer Information and Networking Event). It will O take place on Thursday, September 10, from 4:30 to 6 p.m., at Hangar 84, Sixth and Elmer streets. Free refreshments will be provided by Landicini’s Restaurant. Aside from the fellowship and the food, this will be an opportunity to have the Main Street program set out before you in a way that is easy to understand and in a way to get you excited about what we do. The roles and activities of the four committees— Organization, Promotions, Design, and Economic Restructuring—will be explained, so you can decide which is the best fit for you, whether you are new to VDID/Main Street Vineland or have been away for a while and want to come back. I want to thank our Volunteer Subcommittee—Lee Burke, Iris Jimenez, Ronda Abbruzzese, Gary Galloway, and Stephanie Castor-Litzie—for helping to put this event together. We would really like to have you join us. Call the VDID/Main Street office by Friday, September 4, so we can count you in. *** Looking ahead, there’ll be plenty of good eatin’ at the Third Annual Rock ’n Roll ’n Ribs ’n Chili Cook-Off, on Saturday, September 26 (rain date is September 27), on the 500 and 600 blocks of Landis Avenue. For a fee of $5, you can taste the entrants’ recipes and vote for your favorite. Your votes will determine the People’s Choice Awards picked by the public. For the Judges’ Panel Awards, a group of judges will visit each contestant individually and anonymously select their own winners. In case you want more than a taste, contestants will also be selling full servings of their chili and ribs at reasonable prices. In addition, a special award will be given by the Event Subcommittee for the “best booth showmanship.” Members of the city’s fire stations, and other local and area fire companies, are expected to take part in a separate competition for the Mayor’s Cup—awarded to the makers of the best firehouse chili. Competitors must cook in a kitchen approved by the city’s Health Department. The entry fee of $65 covers a required oneday vending permit, the necessary fire safety permit, and contest costs. To register, call the VDID office or visit the website. *** I want to thank everyone who helped with the International Food and Cultural Festival last Saturday, despite the rains that quickly came and shortened the event. These events are always the result of the hard work of our dedicated volunteers, with help and cooperation from various City departments. This year, we also had the partnership of the Mayor’s Youth Council with their Youth Fest event. As always, I appreciate the contributions made by everyone. No amount of rain can dampen their dedication. *** The “I am Downtown Vineland” ad campaign in local newspapers, including this one, shows the wide array of businesses downtown ready to serve. The businesses greatly appreciate your support and patronage. I For more information on VDID/Main Street Vineland’s events and activities, call 794-8653 or visit www.mainstreetvineland.org. { 6 } the grapevine | AUGUST 26, 2009 1 I Gleanings { DEBORAH A. EIN, MANAGING EDITOR } Just the Right Dose As we walk through the stages of life, health care has a huge impact every step of the way. ith health care reform so much in the news these days, the topic of this week’s cover story hits close to home for most everyone. Perhaps it’s an oversimplification, but I believe the problem, besides the lifestyle that drives us to go to the doctor, is that when we get there, we are over-tested and over-medicated. After my first or second visit to the obstetrician during my first pregnancy, I hightailed out of his office to find an alternative. All the talk of amniocentesis and the likelihood of a Caesarian delivery drove me away. I was fortunate to find a group of five midwives in a practice with an equal number of obstetricians, who realized that not every patient needs or desires the same W level and type of care. Throughout the entire pregnancy, I never had an ultrasound until my baby was a week “overdue.” I’m all for finding alternatives to drugs, but I’m not an extremist. When we couldn’t find Bradley natural childbirth classes in the area, we participated in the classes offered through the practice (and probably would have in any event). I wasn’t interested in a home birth, and when the going got rough during labor, I accepted a dose of Demerol. After finding out in my second pregnancy that I was having twins, I had regular ultrasounds and after my twin due date, weekly stress tests. (Nonetheless, I stuck with my midwives.) I could have done without the first ultrasound, however, which was misread by a doctor (who, strangely enough, we never saw again) and caused us much unnecessary anxiety. And two friends of mine also worried about early ultrasounds that showed serious problems. Happily, months later, healthy babies were born. While maternal care seems to involve over-testing, pediatrics tends to lean toward over-medicating. I am not a parent who denies my children immunizations, but I do believe that all of us need to go easy on the antibiotics, especially when it comes to our children. We teach our kids to “just say no to drugs,” but actions do speak louder than words. In this week’s Back-to-School section, we have included information on antibiotic overuse. It speaks to all of us, but especially to parents who might be “surprised, maybe even angry, if they leave the doctor’s office empty-handed.” Most of us go to the doctor to get a prescription, especially if our children are ill, but there are real dangers in over-prescribing antibiotics. In a study published in Pediatrics, Nathan Kuppermann, professor and chair of emergency medicine at UC Davis School of Medicine, expands on a danger only mentioned in the article printed in our Back-toSchool section. He found that bacterial meningitis can be masked in children already on antibiotics for a presumed ear infection, strep throat or some other condition. Bacterial meningitis kills if not caught and treated quickly, so antibiotics can present a lethal danger in some cases. Another case in point is the story of the Gardasil vaccine for girls. Millions of women and girls as young as 14 have been inoculated with the vaccine, which is supposed to eliminate two of the many viruses that may cause cervical cancer. I wonder if we have just subjected a generation of American females to a guinea-pig trial, before finding out that the medicine might cause blood clots. Where does that leave the girl who has no family history of cervical cancer but several family members who have suffered blood clots and stroke? Is she still one less, as the pushy TV commercials professed? In our Letters to the Editor column a couple of weeks ago and again this week, readers have weighed in on the topic of health care reform. This week’s letter discusses Medicare and home health care, issues all of us will face as our parents and/or we ourselves age. It will help to have many people in all stages of life participating in this debate that will affect us all for many years to come. I Visit Our New Website! www.yourrentalcity.com WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Additional Discounts: • All orders booked for any future event and paid for in full* will receive ADDITIONAL 10% discount! • If you spend over $1000 you’ll get another 5% discount, or if you spend over $3500 take off another 5%! Fine Print: Maximum of 25% discount can be given on rental changes. Discounts do not apply to state taxes or damage waiver charges. This coupon is not valid with any other offer or discounts at this time. Also, discounts do not apply to: generators, comfort stations, chair cover/sashes, frozen drink machines, and 60’ or 80’ wide tents. * Payments made in full are non-refundable. the grapevine { 7 } 1297 West Landis Ave, Vineland, NJ 08360 856-696-1666 • yourrentalcity.com augustcoupon@rental-city.com Own Your Memories Rent Everything Else! LETTERS to the Editor lion people. Of those one million, Medicare directly employs more than 250,000 workers. Can we really afford to cut those jobs at a time when the unemployment rate is going up every month? We all need to consider the repercussions. I request that you contact your Congressional delegate(s) and urge them not to cut the Medicare home health benefit simply in the name of “reform.” —Michael F. Comegys, Director Bayada Nurses, Cumberland County I COMMUNITY CALENDAR HAPPENINGS WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26 Low Back Pain and Sciatica. The CyberSpot, 610 E. Landis Ave. 7-8 p.m. Heidi Shelley from the Foundation for Wellness Professionals will speak about natural methods to eliminate back pain without use of drugs aor unnecessary surgery. Free but limited to first 20 callers. 691-1313. THE LANDIS THEATER FOUNDATION invites any interested persons to attend a “town hall” style meeting at the Vineland Public Library on Wednesday, August 26 at 7 p.m., to discuss details of the ongoing redevelopment of Vineland’s historic Landis Theater. Discussions will include the timetable for completion of the theater and its projected Grand Opening, management structure and community involvement, and a description of planned performances. A question and answer session for members of the public will follow the presentation. Vineland in Need of Rent Control Fairmount Avenue Car Cruise In case you are wondering what the Fairmount Avenue Car Cruise is ….it isn’t. Let me explain. Yours truly had taken ill and had an extended hospital stay near the day of the great Delsea Drive-in Cruise. A group of cruisers were staging around the corner from my home (on Fairmount Avenue). These friends and fellow gearheads decided to swing (cruise) by my house and make me remember that my car buddies were thinking about me. Cruisers from Nostalgia Knights and South Jersey Cruisers Association Car Club were the lead rides. I got the best seat in the house, which was from the comfort of my front lawn. I’m now on the mend and this gesture is an example of what I’ve stated for a long time. The car community is made of the finest group of people you want to meet. Thank you one and all. —Ben Notaro, Vineland Medicare Cuts Will Devastate Home Health Community We should not destroy home health care in the name of “reform,” we should be supporting it. The proposed $50 billion cut in Medicare reimbursements to the home health community over the next 10 years will have a devastating effect in reduced client benefits and significant losses in jobs. As an employee in the home health community, I can attest to the fact that patients recover more quickly when the home care they receive is delivered in the comfort and familiarity of their home as opposed to a more restrictive environment. Perhaps, at some point, we all have experienced a loved one or someone we know who has benefited from home care services. Home care allows patients to take an active role in their care, without restricting their independence or limiting family interaction and ultimately saving time and money for Medicare. In addition to the numerous benefits that home health care offers, think about the economic impact this level of cut could have on our already weakened economy. These cuts will put many jobs in jeopardy. The home health community directly employs one mil- { 8 } the grapevine | AUGUST 26, 2009 According to the Truth & Renting booklet published by the NJ Department of Community Affairs, “The State of New Jersey has no laws that establish, govern or control rents.” The tenant is almost entirely at the mercy of the landlord. The landlord makes the rules, controls and maintains the property, determines services to be afforded and can raise the rent at will. And there is very little the tenant can do about it. Because the state does not protect the tenant, it is up to the municipalities to do so. More than 100 communities in the state have passed some type of rent control ordinance designed to protect the tenant from unconscionable rent increases and eviction. The City of Vineland is in dire need of a rent-control ordinance. Thirty-four percent of the population of Vineland or 20,000 citizens rent and occupy 6,723 units. Forty-three percent pay between $500 and $749 rent per month. The city has recently initiated an inspection program to ensure all rental units are kept up to code. The problem is, only 1,600 units or 24 percent of all rental units will be inspected. This leaves about 92 percent of all citizen/renters with absolutely no protection at all. Mobile home park owner/tenants are particularly vulnerable to ownerllandlord abuse because they own their own homes which are located on rented land. If the homeowner is forced into eviction because the landlord imposes unreasonably high rent increases, the equity in the home decreases. Most “mobile” homes are not designed to be moved and the costs of doing so are prohibitive; and once moved, the home always loses its value. The tenant can try to sell the home, but if a mobile home park has the reputation of exorbitant rent increases, the home becomes difficult to sell. The alternative to moving: The tenant must pay the higher rent, but in doing so the home and the neighborhood often suffers because there is less available income for upkeep improvements and maintenance. In Vineland there are 20 mobile home parks with a minimum of 2,000 units total. That is 30 percent of all rental units in the city—one in every 10 citizens. There was a time when mobile homes were considered AMY SERRA will be returning to Vineland from Los Angeles to do a product demonstration with Become Beauty Cosmeceuticals on August 27 and 28 from noon to 2 p.m. at Thomas Serra Salon, 1167 East Landis Avenue. Serra is also booking one-on-one mini-facials from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Different than a cosmetic, the scientific promise of a “cosmeceutical” skin-care product is prevention and repair at a cellular level. Call Thomas Serra salon for details. FREE FAMILY CAREGIVER TRAINING is being sponsored by Friends Village at Woodstown. The foursession workshop, presented by the Alzheimer’s Association, is designed to help caregivers and family members of individuals with Alzheimer disease and related disorders, to cope with the everyday and long-term care needs of their impaired relatives. Workshop topics will include the medical overview of dementia (9/8), daily care issues (9/15), enhancing communication and managing behaviors (9/22), as well as legal and financial issues (9/29). The sessions will start at 9:30 a.m. and run to 11 a.m. each Tuesday. Seating . will be limited, so R.S.V.P to Kristina Zumbo, CSW, SJ Program Coordinator for the Alzheimer’s Association, Delaware Valley Chapter, by September 3, at 797-1212 ext. 414. All sessions will be held in the Fenwick Commons Community Room, Friends Village, Woodstown. includes materials. Class size is limited to 15. The Clay College Ceramic Arts Studio is located at 108 N. High Street. Call 765-0988 for more information and to register, or log onto cccnj.edu CAT ADOPTION DRIVE at Cumberland County SPCA means reduced fees for cats and kittens to promote feline adoptions and lower euthanasia rates. When: Now through September 30 Fee: Kittens $60 (regularly $80), Cats $45 (regularly $80)I Includes: Spay/Neuter surgery, shots, parasite treatment, i.d. tag, cat carrier. Why: To find good homes for the abundance of kittens/cats we are caring for and save lives. Where: Visit the cats at CCSPCA, 1244 N. Delsea Drive in Vineland or the Millville Petsmart. View the cats online at www.cumberlandcountyspca.org DH/PERFIL LATINO TV, Inc. states that both of its productions Perfil Latino and Una Hora con Dios will be showing under Telemundo signal (ch 62) on Sundays at 9:30 a.m. Perfil Latino is an established weekly, bilingual, multicultural, community-oriented television program that started 12 years ago in the form of 5- to 10-minute educational segments sponsored by the Hispanic congregation of St. Mary Magdalen Church in Millville. The contents of the segments, the services provided to the public and the enthusiasm of its presentation further the creation of a full 30-minute independent program. Una Hora con Dios is s religious broadcast promoting the Catholic faith, and featuring local and regional parishes. The programs aired on Comcast cable QBC TV-2, but now will also be showing under Telemundo signal. WORKING WITH CLAY is a creative way for youngsters to express their individuality. Cumberland County College’s Clay College offers non-credit pottery courses for children and teens. Classes are scheduled for four age groups including teens. The fee for each class is $100 (teen class $150) and Continued on page 10 THURSDAY, AUGUST 27 Public Meeting. Vineland City Hall, 640 E. Wood St., (Council Chambers, 2nd Floor). Discussion of the Vineland Municipal Utility’s progress. Utility reps will discuss past accomplishments, future strategies, customer service initiatives, electric utility infrastructure improvements, and water utility infrastructure improvements. 7 p.m. CHURCH NEWS Jewish Federation of Cumberland County, in conjunction with Beth Israel Congregation of Vineland and Congregation B’nai Tikvah of Turnersville, invites the community to Rhapsody, an evening of incomparable music with performances by Israel’s rising young piano star Lev Chebotarev and local composer, performer and teacher Ross Kuhnreich on Wednesday, September 2, 2009 at 7 p.m. at Beth Israel Congregation (1015 East Park Avenue Vineland). A dessert reception will be served following the concert. Tickets must be purchased in advance. Admission is $18. Call 696-4445. Bishop Sylvestre D. Romero will visit Trinity Episcopal Church (Eighth and Wood streets) on Sunday, September 6. He will celebrate and preach at the 9 a.m. Eucharist. On Sunday, September 13, Bill and Karen Itzel and Family present a Gospel Concert at 5:30 p.m. at Newfield Park, Catawba Avenue in Newfield. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy the music of these Grammy and Dove nominees. If it rains, call 697-3005 for alternate location. St. Padre Pio Parish, OLP Church, (4680 Dante Ave.) will hold a Liturgy, Mass of Forgiveness, Healing and Peace on September 12 at 5 p.m. The Mass will be celebrated by Fr. Richard McAlear. All are welcome. WEEKLY THROUGH OCTOBER 6 Senior Golf Association Events. Various courses throughout southern New Jersey. Annual membership $20. Call to join or for schedule. 691-4098. AUGUST 19 & 26, SEPTEMBER 9 Vineland Ice Hockey Registration. Canlan Ice Arena, 2111 Industrial Way. Offering both high school level Varsity and J-V positions. Any skater, grades 8 through 12, attending the following schools is eligible: Vineland, Delsea Buena, Millville, Bridgeton, Oakcrest, Cumberland Christian, and Sacred Heart. 7-9 p.m. Absolutelyglass @comcast.net. THURSDAY, AUGUST 27 Tax Workshop. Cumberland County College, George P Luciano Family Center, . 3322 College Dr. Free workshop is for Vineland/Millville and Bridgeton Urban Enterprise Zone businesses, CPA’s, accountants and financial services. 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m. 563-0440. AUGUST 29 & 31, SEPTEMBER 2 North Vineland Little League Fall Ball Registration. Dr. Charles Cunningham Park, West Ave. and Wheat Rd. All age groups: 816 years old (Jr. Farm League, Farm League, Little League, Senior League). Players must live in North Vineland between the areas on the North side of Landis Avenue to the Malaga border and West of Main Road to the Norma border. Saturday 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Monday 6-8 p.m.; Wednesday 6-8 p.m. $10. 794-8806. SATURDAY, AUGUST 29 Giant Yard Sale. Vineland High School South, 2880 E. Chestnut Ave. The sale, rescheduled due to rain on 8/22, will be held in the parking lot, next to the auditorium. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. (Rain date is August 23.) Space reservations can be made by calling 794-6800 ext. 2539. SATURDAY, AUGUST 29 Financial Healing Seminar. Acquire the Legacy Counseling Center, 717 Landis Ave. A discussion of family sending plans, financial setbacks, freedom from debt etc. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free will donations. 213-5845 ext. 112. SEPTEMBER 4 THROUGH 6 AMA Superbike Championship Weekend. New Jersey Motorsports Park, Millville. The American Superbike class will be joined by the Daytona SportBike, SuperSport and SunTrust Moto-GT classes. 327-7217. SATURDAY, AUGUST 29 Car Wash Fundraiser. Veterans Memorial School, 424 S. Main Rd. The girls’ tennis team at Vineland High School wash cars to benefit the Dream Foundation. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. $5 for cars, $7 for trucks. SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 13 2nd Annual Run For Life. Wheat Road Golf, 2142 E. Wheat Rd. 5K this year in memory of Ronald K Brownlee Jr, who lost his battle with leukemia last June. All proceeds benefit The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. 9 a.m. 5 K Run or 1 Mile Walk $20 if reg by Sept. 5, $25 day of race. www.therunforlife5k.com. surgery. 9 a.m. Register with Stacey, Nurse Manager at 691-8188 ext. 272. SUNDAY, AUGUST 30 Weekly Dance. North Italy Club Hall, East Ave. and Virano Ln. County chapter of the Single Parents Society holds the dances for people age 50 and up, married or single. Live band performs music for waltz, rhumba, swing, foxtrot, line dances, and more. 7:30-10:30 p.m. $7 members, $9 nonmembers 697-1814. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 Photographic Society Meeting. Newfield Senior Center, Catawba Ave. and Church St, Newfield. New members welcome. 7:30 p.m. 794-2528. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 Old Timers Baseball Reunion. Semper Marine Hall, W. Landis Ave. (opposite 84 Lumber). All former players, family members, and fans are invited to come out and mingle with old teammates and to honor newly elected members to the Hall of Fame. 5 p.m., dinner at 6 p.m. $20 payable at the door. only at South Jersey’s Premier Car Wash WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Just $850 YES! Voted #1 “Best of Best” 2009 + Tax Can get my car clean INSIDE & OUT??? TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8 City Council Meeting. Council Chambers, City Hall, Seventh and Wood sts. 7:30 p.m. MONDAY, AUGUST 31 Women’s Health Institute Lecture Series. SJH Regional Medical Center, Sherman Ave., Vineland. This month’s lecture will focus on interstitial cystitis, a urinary bladder disease that can cause pain, pressure and frequency of urination. 6 p.m. Free. Register at (800) 770-7547. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9 Planning Board Meeting. Council Chambers, City Hall, Seventh and Wood sts. 7:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 Ellison’s 15th Annual Golf Tournament. Buena Vista Country Club, Rt. 40, Buena. This year’s golf outing is part of The Ellison School’s 50th Anniversary celebration. Registration begins at 11:30 a.m., followed by a buffet luncheon. Tournament at 1 p.m. Putting and hole-in-one contests offering more than $6,500 in prizes. Entry fee of $150 includes greens fees, carts, tips, luncheon and dinner. Advertisement and sponsorship opportunities are available. 691-1734. GOLF, SPORTS, ETC. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 Red Cross Blood Drive. Vineland Developmental Center, East Campus Auditorium, 1676 E. Landis Ave. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. EVERY SATURDAY Canoe & Kayak Trip. Parvin State Park, 701 Almond Rd, Pittsgrove. On Parvin Lake and Muddy Run. Meet at 10 a.m. at Fire Ring (between CS 13 and 15). Bring your own boat or rent one from Al & Sam’s. 358-8616. EVER Guaranteed! Windows included with this ad. Best Wash the grapevine { 9 } THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 Cataract Coffee Talk. SurgiCenter, 251 South Lincoln Ave. Learn more about cataract 2611 S. Main Rd. Vineland, NJ 08360 (Between Grant & Sherman) GV Letters Continued from page 8 affordable housing, but those days are but a memory. An average mobile home being sold in Vineland is $84,38 with over 40 percent on the market in the $89,000 to $140.000 range. Mobile home park owners in Vineland charge their tenants $500 or more for rent. Imagine paying $6,000 or more a year in rent on top of a $50,000-plus mortgage. Over 50 percent of the homes in our city are valued between $50,000 and $100,000 and they own their own land. Mobile homes in Vineland are definitely not “affordable.” The renter has only one means of protection under the law and that is to have the municipality pass a rent-control ordinance. It is necessary to convince our elected officials that such a need exists. Rent control refers to laws or ordinances that set price controls on the renting of residential housing. It functions as a price ceiling on residential property. Rent control is necessary to prevent landlords from imposing rent increases that force key workers or vulnerable people (i.e. senior citizens) to leave an area. Maintaining a supply of affordable housing is essential to sustaining an economy. Homeowners who support rent control point to the neighborhood instability caused by high or frequent rent increases and the effect on schools, youth groups, and community organizations when tenants move frequently. In some regions, rent control laws are more commonly adopted for mobile home parks (sometimes called manufactured home communities). Reasons given for these laws include residents owning their homes (and renting the land), the high cost of moving “mobile” homes, and the loss of home value once they are moved. Rent control (sometimes called rent stabilization) is a collection of laws that regulate how much a landlord can raise (or must reduce) the rent, limit reasons for eviction, protect against substandard housing, and preserve affordable housing in a community. The only way to convince the city committee that a rent control ordinance is needed is for the tenants to make a visible show of support. More than 200 Vineland renters have already voiced their support through a grassroots organization know as Vineland MHP Citizens for Rent Control. For more information, contact: Vineland MHP Citizens for Rent Control c/o Joseph L. Ready 1616 Pennsylvania Ave. Lot 239 Vineland, NJ 08361 —Joseph L. Ready, Vineland The Grapevine’s Crossword Puzzle ACROSS 1. ____ ‘n Boots 5. So. Am. Cuniculus 10. Boston Orchestra 14. Herb for burns 15. Higher up 16. Scottish hillside 17. Br. King 1016-1035 18. Evil spirit 19. Mentally healthy 20. Cathode 21. Licensed practical nurse 22. -__, denotes past 23. Benniseed 27. In an abject way 30. Lacking vigor 31. Equalled 100 centavos (abbr.) 32. The rate of movement 35. Assists in wrongdoing 38. Swiss river 42. Turkish leaders 43. Megabyte 44. 2001 Spielberg film 45. Diagonal fabric cut 46. ____na: 91765 47. African antelope 49. “Natural Affection” author 50. Metric capacity unit 52. Point between NE and E 54. Covers wall with wood 56. Window pane frames 59. Egyptian sun god 60. ___ Lanka 62. Atomic #79 63. Whale ship captain 66. The absence of war 68. Wooden pins 70. Queen of the gods 71. Ire 72. Affirmative! (slang) 73. Arabian Gulf 74. Singer Della 75. God of fire (Hindu) DOWN 1. Wrapped containers 2. Forearm bones 3. Small coin (French) 4. Place in a mounting 5. Cushion-like mass 6. Cain and ____ 7. Make a calculation 8. River in England 9. 1/100 yen 10. Non-commercial TV 11. Opening 12. One part of 54 Across 13. Shabby and untidy 24. Inspiring admiration 25. Partner of Pa 26. Tooth coverings 27. In addition to Solution to August 12 puzzle 28. Equally 29. Skin disease caused by mites 32. Soft baby food 33. Gone by 34. Cambridge river 36. Where wine ferments (abbr.) 37. Browning of the skin 39. Own (Scottish) 40. A scrap of cloth 41. Point between E and SE 48. Norm 51. Lincoln’s state 53. Sodium 54. Other name for Czech capital 55. Expressed pleasure 57. MN 55120 58. Japanese food 60. W. Samoan monetary unit 61. Frosts 64. They ___ 65. Prohibition 66. Golf score 67. Before 68. 1/100 kyat 69. Electric brain test { 10 } the grapevine | AUGUST 26, 2009 Save our Communities, Our County, Our Improvement Authority Cumberland County Improvement Authority is undergoing a transition, and it may not be for the better. This is a letter of encouragement and support of Steven Wymbs, CCIA’s executive director. Wymbs needs our help because his job is in jeopardy; his contract was deemed “Null and Void” at a recent CCIA meeting. For the past six years I have witnessed Freeholder Louis Magazzu openly criticize Wymbs and CCIA’s operation. Several times he created roadblocks in its operations and has most recently maneuvered the appointments to this board resulting in a board majority that answers directly to Magazzu. Wymbs has effectively solved critical problems. He preserved the former Millville National Bank, a landmark that became the cornerstone for Millville’s downtown revitalization. This improvement set the tone for Millville’s successful Arts District. He was an invaluable member of committees that worked to repair and preserve the famed Holly Murals and the Governor Stokes Mausoleum. Under Wymbs’ leadership, the CCIA sponsored the “More to Offer” tourism campaign, which the CCIA’s Magazzu-controlled board voted to cut this year. In comparison, and in a down economic market, all of our surrounding counties either continued their tourism campaigns or initiated one where one had not existed before. With Wymbs at the CCIA helm, thousands have benefited by the CCIA’s many Environmental Enhancement Grants each year. Cumberland County needs Steven Wymbs to continue building and maintaining our communities. His continuation with CCIA as its executive director should be an essential concern of anyone committed to improving our County. —Jane Y. Christy, Independent Leader Candidate for Freeholder WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Do You Have Dangerous Trees? Call For Your Free Evaluation Good, Clean Work At Reasonable Prices Don’t Be Fooled. Call A Certified Aborist. For All Your Tree Care. the grapevine { 11 } Pruning • Tree Removals • Storm Damage Elevations • Shrubbery Trimming • Stump Grinding Owner Operated Local Business • Fully Insured Owner Working At All Jobs! FREE ESTIMATES www.forresttreesurgeon.com 10% Off Any Tree Service Forrest Tree Surgeon • 856-694-0922 Must present coupon at time of estimate. Not valid with other offers. Exp. 9/12/09 Grapevine p12-17 082609-de:Layout 1 8/24/09 8:29 PM Page 12 I Culinary Adventures Gourmet Lunches & Dinners Take Outs & Package Goods SERVING THE FOOD YOU LOVE IN A VERY DIFFERENT WAY. { STEPHEN WILSON | PHOTOS: MARIE GALLO } A Barbeque to Remember North Italy Club’s chicken barbeque lives up to the hype. S Milmay Tavern has “foodFood • Better Prices with flavor” Better DUNGENESS CRAB SPECIAL $9.95 Tuckahoe Road & Millville-Mays Landing Road, Milmay N.J. Chuck Boone Band Saturday, August 29 (609)476-3611 Open 6 days 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Closed Monday Crowds gather outside the North Italy Hall, while club members busy themselves preparing the barbequed chicken and other delicacies. everal months ago, I went to a function at the North Italy Club on East Avenue in Vineland. While there, I was handed a piece of paper by someone. In it, Mary Tootsie Louisane told me that the North Italy Beneficial Association makes “the most mouth-watering, succulent” chicken at its barbeque. I then read about the secret sauce that has been handed down since the first barbeque so many years ago. This was a chicken barbeque that I needed to check out. Fast forward to last weekend. On Facebook, Den (the chef at the North Italy) had posted a few updates informing his friends that he had been working hard to prepare the chicken barbeque. The morning of, he invited everyone to come out and enjoy the festivities. Jill and I arrived at the North Italy Club about an hour after the barbeque had omena lla Fil Vi is NOW Same Owner, Same Staff, Same Wonderful Service & Food You’ve Come To Love! RESTAURANT • LOUNGE • BAKERY Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner   { 12 } the grapevine | AUGUST 26, 2009 s Cakes A r Fabulou Try Ou   rs   e s Appetiz   ced Drink Redu y 3-6pm • day-Frida Mon nu ray of me lightful ar utiful patio y a de Come enjo items on our bea ery ge ra From Bak and beve nd Treats Come & Party On Our Outside Patio & Bar! Thursday Night – Ladies Night    am-2pm  8 LIV MENT TERTAIN EN E We Specialize In Private Parties & Special Events (Private Room – seating up to 70 people, Main Dining Room – Seating up to 120 people) Major Credit Cards Accepted Gift Certificates Available Starting September Theme Nights to Come Mon. – Sat. 10am-2am • Sun. 8am-2am Large Selection of Italian Entrees Starting at $13.95 Weekly Lunch & Dinner Specials Large Array of Domestic & Imported Wines Available Open 7 Days a Week • Restaurant Hours: Sun.-Thurs. 11am–10pm; Fri. & Sat. 11am-11pm 856-697-7107 or 856-697-7207 • 821 Harding Highway, Buena, NJ Hours: 3513 Delsea Drive • Vineland 856-765-5977 • Fax 856-825-0707 Grapevine p12-17 082609-de:Layout 1 8/24/09 8:29 PM Page 13 started. After picking up our tickets, we went around the building to where the food was being served. People were sitting around the picnic tables, eating and drinking and having a good time. The fire pits were off to the right, and the chickens were all lined up in the same manner as at the Forest Grove and Dorothy barbeques. We spotted two sheltered areas and walked over to the larger shelter, since it appeared as though the chickens were being served there. Fortunately, there wasn’t a line, so we walked right on up, gave up our tickets, and got two platters in return. We were invited to grab as many grilled long hots as we’d like, then were directed to a large pan of the spicy local peppers. I picked up the tongs and placed a few into one of the platters. They looked nice and charred and were covered in oil. Den told me that a group of 15 to 20 guys usually get together every year to put on the barbeque, and it’s a great opportunity for them to hang out and spend some time with their fellow club members. The preparations usually start on Thursday, as there is much work to be done. The pits need to be cleaned, the racks that hold the chicken need to be powerwashed, and the club grounds have to be tidied up. And of course, the food needs to be made. Cases of long hots are cleaned, the spe- was yelled out, and in a flash, I had my sausage and pepper sandwich. I put a little catsup on it, and chowed down. It was great, the sausage (from Joe’s Butcher Shop) was excellent, and the peppers were hot, but pleasantly so. Last year’s long hots were HOT, too hot in my opinion, but this year’s have been great. We went home to eat the chicken, because we Indoors and outside, folks chowed down on good eats at the wanted to share with North Italy chicken barbeque. Mayor Robert Romano (No. 33 Grandmom. The chicken above) and wife Ann, far right, came out to eat and mingle. was perfectly cooked, with crispy, salty, and slightly smoky skin. The meat was moist and tencial basting sauce is prepared, tomatoes der. The macaroni salad was surprisingly are sliced, corn is shucked. The macaroni good, as was the corn on the cob. The salad is made on Friday, which allows two sliced tomatoes were juicy and sweet, and full days for all the flavors to mingle. since all the produce was from local farms There is a lot of work to be done at an (kudos to the North Italy Club for that), event such as this, and you have to appreI’m not surprised everything was so deliciate all the time and effort that’s put in! Before we left, Jill and I passed the cious. Good job guys, I can’t wait until smaller of the shelters and couldn’t help your next barbeque… I’ve already marked but notice that there were sausages and January 31, 2010, on my calendar. I peppers being cooked. The smell was Stephen Wilson along with his wife Jill enticing, so I had to have one. I was told McClennen owns The Sweet Life Bakery. there were sweet and hot sausage, and You may contact him via e-mail at sweet and hot peppers. I went for sweet thesweetlifebakery@verizon.net. sausage with hot peppers. “Sweet and hot” Look For Your NEW 1601 North High St. Wheaton Plaza, Millville, NJ Vineland’s neighborhood bakery, where everything is made from scratch and quality counts. OPENING SOON Other Convenient Locations: 3849 Delsea Dr. in Vineland • 315 N. Delsea Dr. in Vineland Routes 40 & 54 in Buena • 395 S. Main Road in Vineland WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | a 6th street between Landis and Elmer in Downtown Vineland 856-692-5353 www.thesweetlifebakery.com 09/16/09 the grapevine { 13 } 13 Try our award-winning Chocolate Chip Cookies the best in South Jersey, according to the most recent SJ Magazine annual readers’ poll Mon. to Fri.6am-2pm Sat.-Sun.7am-1pm Grapevine p12-17 082609-de:Layout 1 8/24/09 8:29 PM Page 14 EATING OUT From fine dining to lunch spots to bakeries, the area has abundant mouthwatering choices to satisfy any appetite. Call for hours. Amato’s Restaurant, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 692-5756. Veal, chicken, seafood, and pasta specialties for dinner. Open for lunch, too. Closed Sundays. Andrea Trattoria, 1833 Harding Hwy., Newfield, 697-8400. Chef/owner Andrea Covino serves up Italian specialties in an atmosphere of fine dining. Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave, Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food served tapas style, specialty martinis, catering, private parties. Extensive wine list. Live music Friday nights. Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-0909. This breakfast and lunch spot offers a menu of sandwiches named for colleges near and far. Bain’s Deli, 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. Serving breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Daily specials include coffee of the day. Barbera’s Chocolates on Occasion, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 690-9998. Homemade chocolates and candies, custom gift baskets. Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees, desserts, drink specials. Take-out, too. Happy Hour buffet Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. MLB games on flat-screen TVs. Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy., Vineland, 697-5500. Steaks, veal, chicken dishes. Meet friends at the bar. Open daily for lunch and dinner. Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 205-0012. Featuring the “Gutbuster” a 21-oz. burger, pizza, salads, wings, subs, dinners. Crust N Krumbs Bakery, Main and Magnolia rds., 690-1200. Cakes, pies, cookies, breads, and doughnuts. Custom wedding cakes, too. Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call for lunch and dinner specials. Soft ice cream and cakes year-round. Mon.-Sat 9 a.m.8 p.m. Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 696-1900. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Takeout, too. Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. Open 24 hours. Kids eat free Tues. & Sat. Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave., Vineland, 691-5511. Family time-honored recipes, fresh ingredients. Donkey’s Place, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland, 690-1777. One-of-a-kind cheesesteaks made on large, fresh poppyseed rolls. Dreamz Cafe, 2184 Union Lake Crossing, Millville, 765-5029. Panini, sandwiches, salads, soups. Also, gelato, Italian coffee, desserts, smoothies, and frappuccino. Esposito’s Maplewood III, 200 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks, seafood and pasta dishes at this Italian restaurant. Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. & Tuckahoe Rd., Vineland, 691-6080. Italian cuisine and dinner buffets to savor. Family-owned. Fresh Restaurant, 1405 Mays Landing Rd., Millville, 327-3435. Jumbo lump crabcakes, Black Angus burgers. Wed. is pasta night. Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli, 527 S. Brewster Rd., 697-3509. Name says it all. Daily specials, catering. Closed Sun. Giorgio’s Restaurant 363 E. Wheat Rd., Buena, 697-2900. Serving lunch and dinner daily. Italian cuisine, pizza. Giovanni’s Italian-American Deli. 1102 N. East Ave., Vineland, 692-0459. Pizza, Italian subs, lunch favorites. The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf Course, 4049 Italia Rd., Vineland, 691-5558. Restaurant and lounge open to the public for lunch Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Jake’s. 611 Taylor Rd., Franklinville, 6945700. Italian-American, served lakeside. Lunch, dinner, happy hour, Sunday brunch. Joe’s Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-8860. Barbecue and Kosher chickens, homemade sides, catering for all occasions. Kawa Thai & Sushi, 2196 N. Second St. (Rt.47), Millville, 825-9939. Thai and Japanese cuisine. BYOB. FRUIT • PRODUCE • DELI • SANDWICHES 1362 S. Delsea Dr. Vineland SPECIALS FREE EGGS 856-362-5978 WITH ANY PURCHASE OVER $15 JERSEY NECTARINES…..$129 lb. GREEN & YELLOW SQUASH…79¢ lb. ROMAINE LETTUCE……85¢ a head XTRA LARGE LONG WATERMELONS.$449 ea { 14 } the grapevine | AUGUST 26, 2009 CUBAN PEPPERS………69¢ lb. MANGO’S….$500 Box or 80¢ea ASPARAGUS……………….$299 lb. JERSEY CORN…35¢ an ear/$385 dz GREEN BELL PEPPERS……69¢ lb JERSEY TOMATOES……….59¢ lb. Since 1957 AMERICAN CHEESE WHITE & YELLOW $2.49 lb. BUFFALO CHICKEN BREAST $5.99 lb. PREMIUM HOMESTYLE TURKEY BREAST $5.99 lb. PREMIUM TAVERN HAM $4.49 lb. PREMIUM BOLOGNA $3.19 lb. MILK • EGGS • FRUIT BASKETS LISCIO BAKERY ROLLS • BREAD Featuring Dietz & Watson Meats & Cheeses DELI SPECIALS Best Pizza in Town Landicini’s Family Restaurant & Pizzeria Landis and Lincoln aves., Vineland, 6913099. Italian cuisine, gourmet pizza salads. Open for lunch and dinner. Larry’s II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-9001. Three meals daily. Sunday breakfast buffet, early-bird dinners. La Locanda Pizzeria & Ristorante, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 794-3332. Pasta, veal, chicken. Lunch and dinner. Closed Sun. Lucia’s Ristorante, 785 W. Sherman Ave., Vineland, 692-0300. Italian fine dining and regional cooking. Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 563-0030. Italian-American cuisine, seafood and veal. Open daily for lunch and dinner, Sunday breakfast buffet. Manny & Vic’s, 1687 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 696-3100. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Manny’s Pizza, 426 N. High St., Millville, 327-5081. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Merighi’s Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. Banquet/ wedding facility as well as intimate restaurant. Nicky G. Fridays 9 p.m.–midnight. Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s Head rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet lunches and dinners in a casual setting. Moe’s Southwest Grill, 2188 N. 2nd St., Millville, 825-3525. Tex-Mex, burritos, catering. MVP Bar, 408 Wheat Road, Vineland, 6979825. Full bar menu, live entertainment, drink specials. Neptune Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge, 1554 South Delsea Drive, Vineland, 6922800. Live lobsters, seafood, prime rib, steak, cocktails and wine. Next Oar, 127 N. High St., Millville, 2931360. Weekly menu, made-to-order dishes. Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek cuisine—lamb dishes and salads. Paperwaiter Restaurant & Pub, 1111 Village Dr., Millville, 825-4000. A special place for all your special occasions. Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland, 6940500. Breakfast, lunch, dinner specials; convenient drive-thru, mini-meal specials. Pete’s Pizza, 20 W. Park Ave., Vineland, 205-9998. Pizza (including whole wheat), subs, wings. Open daily 11 a.m-10 p.m. Custard Served with Fresh Strawberry Toppings Serves 8 people $ STRAWBERRY ICE CREAM PIE $6.95 1.00 OFF with coupon Fresh Dessert Item 9 Non-Fat Sugar Free Flavors Daily • 25 Hand Dip Flavors Flavor Burst • Banana Splits • Water Ice Sundaes • Milkshakes • Volcanoes • New Low Carb Soft Serve Hotdog & Soda $1.98 Come Sit Under Our Gazebo Credit & Debit Card Purchases Now Accepted Pizza • Subs • Strombolis • Steaks Salads • Dinners $ 00 OFF YOUR ORDER OF $ 10 OR MORE With This Coupon Cannot be combined with any other offers Exp. 9/15/09 2 Open 7 Days • Noon-10pm • 692-2748 1231 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland Route 40 & 47 Malaga, NJ 08328 • 856-694-4474 Grapevine p12-17 082609-de:Layout 1 8/24/09 8:29 PM Page 15 The Rail, 1252 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-1440. Bar and restaurant with daily drink specials and lunch specials. Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville, 327-8878. Authentic Vietnamese—noodle soups, curry, hotpot, Buddhist vegetarian. Serene Custard, NW Blvd. and Garden Rd., Vineland, 692-1104. Pulled pork, hot dogs, homemade ice cream, party cakes. South Vineland Tavern, 2350 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-7888. Breakfast, lunch, dinner daily. Seafood and prime rib. Speedway Cafe at Ramada Vineland, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 6928600. Open 6 a.m.-11 p.m. daily for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Steakhouse at Centerton Country Club, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3325. Lunch and dinner. Steaks, reserve wines, upscale casual. Stewart’s Root Beer, 585 Delsea Dr., Vineland, 696-8062. Burgers, hot dogs, fries, floats and shakes. Sweet Life Bakery, 601 East Landis Ave., Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood bakery. Homemade pastries, cakes, coffee. Tony Sopranos, 107 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 405-0200. Pizza, Mexican Southwest fare, Atkins-friendly salads. Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs, chicken, fish, steaks. Always clams, eat in or take out service. Villa Fazzolari, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena Vista, 697-7107. Dinner combos, grilled meats, fish. Lunch and dinner daily. Wheat Road Cold Cuts, 302 Wheat Rd., Vineland, 697-0320. Deli and catering. Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-8899. Dinners, grilled sandwiches, wings in eight flavors. Willmott’s Pizza. 12 S. Seventh St., Vineland, 696-1525. Hand-tossed pizzas, stromboli, breakfast pizza. Offering Takeout or eat in service. Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville, 3270909. Continental cuisine and spirits served in a casually upscale setting. Ye Olde Centerton Inn, 1136 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3201. American classics served in a building right out of a Rockwell painting. 2 $ includes up to 4 phones Day Only 5 /mo. Friday and Saturday Friday and Saturday August 28th 29th August 28th & 29th Swanson Communications Swanson Communications 2639 S. Main Road, Vineland 2639 S. Main Road, Vineland SALES EVENT Food Refreshments Food & Refreshments Prizes Give Aways Prizes & Give Aways Family Locator Demonstrations Family Locator Demonstrations $59.99 59.99 S Samsung Exclaim ng Exclaim FR FREE After $50 mail-in rebate, eligible ail-in rebate, eligible upgrade or new activation and new activation and two-year agreement. reement. San Sanyo SCP-2700 After After $50 mail-in rebate, eligible upgra upgrade or new activation and two-y two-year agreement. 15-day FREE trial! 15-day FREE trial! 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East Avenue 2639 S. Main Road 2639 S. Main Road Vineland Vineland 856-563-1771 856-563-0330 856-563-1771 856-563-0330 856-563-0110 856-563-0110 **Monthly charges exclude taxes, Sprint Surcharges [incl. USF charge of up to 12.9% (varies quarterly), Administrative Charge (up to $1.99/line/mo.), Regulatory Charge ($0.20/line/mo.) state/local fees by area]. Sprint **Monthly charges exclude taxes, Sprint Surcharges [incl. USF charge of up to 12.9% (varies quarterly), Administrative Charge (up to $1.99/line/mo.), Regulatory Charge ($0.20/line/mo.) & state/local fees by area]. Sprint Surcharges are not taxes or gov’t-required charges and are subject to change. Details: Sprint.com/taxesandfees. Surcharges are not taxes or gov’t-required charges and are subject to change. Details: Sprint.com/taxesandfees. May require up to a $36 activation fee/line, credit approval & deposit. Up to $200 early termination fee/line applies. Phone Offer: Offer ends 9/7/09. While supplies last. Taxes and services charges excluded. No cash May require up to $36 activation fee/line, credit approval deposit. Up to $200 early termination fee/line applies. Phone Offer: Offer ends 9/7/09. While supplies last. Taxes and services charges excluded. No cash back. Requires activation at the time of purchase. Mail-in Rebate: Requires purchase by 9/7/09 activation by 9/21/09. Line must be active 30 consecutive days. Allow 10 to 14 weeks for rebate. Other Terms: Coverage back. Requires activation at the time of purchase. Mail-in Rebate: Requires purchase by 9/7/09 & activation by 9/21/09. Line must be active 30 consecutive days. Allow 10 to 14 weeks for rebate. Other Terms: Coverage not available everywhere. The 3G Sprint Mobile Broadband reaches over 270 million people (incl. data roaming). Nationwide Sprint Network reaches over 275 million people. Offers not available in all markets/retail not available everywhere. The 3G Sprint Mobile Broadband reaches over 270 million people (incl. data roaming). Nationwide Sprint Network reaches over 275 million people. Offers not available in all markets/retail locations or for all phones/networks. Pricing, offer terms, fees features may vary for existing customers not eligible for upgrade. Other restrictions apply. See store for details. 2009 Sprint. Sprint and the logo are locations or for all phones/networks. Pricing, offer terms, fees & features may vary for existing customers not eligible for upgrade. Other restrictions apply. See store for details. © 2009 Sprint. Sprint and the logo are trademarks of Sprint. Other marks are the property of their respective owners. trademarks of Sprint. Other marks are the property of their respective owners. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Lab Puppies four males all black Current Vaccinations & Vet Checked Family Raised Parents on site Getting Divorced? Bonnie L. Laube, Esq. Greenblatt & Laube, PC Divorce, Separation, Custody, Child Support, Parenting Time, Alimony, Asset Distribution, Emancipation, Domestic Violence Certi?ed by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Civil Trial Attorney the grapevine { 15 } 856-696-9491 856-691-0424 • email: bll@greenblattlaube.com 200 North Eighth Street • PO Box 883 • Vineland, NJ 08362 All major credit cards accepted Grapevine p12-17 082609-de:Layout 1 8/24/09 8:29 PM Page 16 We Are We Are FUEL HOUSE FUEL HOUSE U O e Coffe VINE Co. John Casalinuovo, Marilynn Maldonado, Russ Casalinuovo, Marilynn Maldonado, Russ M l o s Swanson, Swans Communications son Swanson, Swanson Communications Landis Avenue a Landis Avenue Sta , New eld National Bank Bank ( Full Service Printing & Copy Center Ser vice ng Copy Ph. VINEL AND VINELAND L { 16 } the grapevine | AUGUST 26, 2009 We are We are Downtown Vineland.” Downtown Vineland.” “We are Downtown Vineland.” “We are Downtown Vineland.” We Have We Have Chef Wear! v Wear! Invest in Your Community Bank Locally Celebrating 75 Years of Service g munity to the Community You Call Home $ 5 o any purchase of $25 or more any purchase of $25 or more O er Expires 10/15/09 er Expires 10/15/09 Grapevine p12-17 082609-de:Layout 1 8/24/09 8:30 PM Page 17 NELAND Jew rs J eler Jewelers Jewelers Authentic Jamaican Cuisine Featuring Smoked Chicken & Ribs Jerk Chicken · Oxtail · Curried Goat Hours: Mon-Thur 11am-9pm · Fri 11am-10pm · Sat 9am-10pm 731 Landis Ave (Across from the Courthouse) 856.691.9555 We Buy Gold Diamonds We Buy Gold & Diamonds Jewelry Watch Repairs Jewelry & Watch Repairs While You Wait While You Wait Enjoy the sweeter side of life. Enjoy the sweeter side of life. Large Selection Diam Large Selection of Diamond mond Engage ement Rings at Lowest Prices t Engagement Rings at Lowest Prices 601 Landis Ave. (Behind Wells Fargo) 601 E. Landis Ave. (Behind Wells Fargo) (Left to right) Robert Zikowski and Jas (Left to f t) Robert Zikowski and Jason k k son Brandt, Brand & Madison Developmen Co. r t r dt velopment nt Brandt, Brandt Development Co. www.rienzi bridal salon.com www.rienzibridalsalon.com $ 5 O a $25 purchase purchase with this ad with Expires 10/15/09 Expires Brides Bridesmaids Proms Proms 745 745 E Landis Avenue dis Avenue (corner of 8th and Landis Ave) Ave) Vineland, NJ 08360 Vineland, N J 08360 856.692.4060 856.692.4060 free parking in rear g Mothers Gowns Mothers Gowns Quality Shoes. Reasonably Priced! Quality Shoes. Reasonably Priced! Ma Martini Shoes Martini Shoes Shoe The Brands You Want Brands You Want r QUALIT Y MUFFLER QUALITY MUFF U FLER & BRAKE BRAKE R WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | “We are “We are Downtown Vineland.” Downtown Vineland.” Lamar Lamar Upham r Ott Upham Ott the grapevine { 17 } Dennis P. Ingraldi Dennis P. Ingraldi Licensed Real Estate Broker Licensed Real Estate Broker 856- 690-9482 856-690-9482 Home Garden and Landscaping • Lawn Cutting • Fertilizing Garden Center • Mushroom Compost Mulch • Top Soil • Fill Dirt • Stone Irrigation Repairs & Installation • Pool Sand Snow Removal • Winter Salt in Bulk County Applies for Green Acres Grant Cumberland County Board of Chosen Freeholders approved a resolution last week, supporting the N.J. Department of Environmental Protection’s Division of Green Acres grant application to the U.S. Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Coastal Wetlands Conservation Program. The grant, if approved, will allow Green Acres to wetlands along the Cohansey River. Director Magazzu said, “the Board of Chosen Freeholders supports the preservation of wetlands, open space and recreation areas within the county, where appropriate. However, if there is a buyer identified for the lands known as Cohanzick Golf Club, it is important to note that the Board of Chosen Freeholders would support that that acreage be carved out of the total project to allow the golf course to remain an active facility.” Freeholder and County Planning Board Liaison Nelson Thompson said, as it stands today, if the Coastal Wetlands Conservation Program Funds are used to acquire the land, it must go fallow. “We are appreciative of the efforts put forth by Green Acres to preserve open space in our county. We are also pleased that Green Acres has indicated that if a buyer is identified prior to them acquiring the land, they will be happy to work with the buyer by carving out the necessary acreage to allow the golf course to remain open.” Notice of whether or not Green Acres will be successful in receiving the grant is anticipated sometime in November. Delivery Available tionnaire posted on the Cumberland County web page. County officials are eager to get as much input from the public on such topics as redevelopment, transportation, renewable energy in a “green economy,” and marketing the County’s tourism. Freeholder Director Louis N. Magazzu, liaison for the Economic Development Board, is encouraging all residents to weigh in. “We are taking a long-range approach to the ways we can improve economic growth in the County, and we feel that to kick off this effort we need to start with what the people want to see happen in the communities in which they live and do business.” Economic Development chair Matt Milam said the board is gearing up for a long-range plan workshop at the end of the month where responses on the survey will be carefully analyzed and discussed. “We want to roll up our collective sleeves and take a hands-on approach to the way the County responds to 21st century challenges in this new economy.” Freeholder liaison William Whelan insists on the importance that issues like quality of life for residents and businesses have in developing communities throughout the county. “Clearly the environment where we raise our families, work and build our businesses must be one that encourages one to stay in Cumberland County and to invest in its success.” School Wins “Painting a Brighter Future” Grant A fresh coat of paint brightens up any room, and this summer Arthur P. Shalick High School will receive up to 40 gallons of paint to refresh its learning environment. Shalick High was selected from more than 250 schools as the winner of a paint grant through Swanson Hardware Supply’s partnership with True Value Foundation’s “Painting a Brighter Future” program. A True Value Foundation paint grant helps renew an atmosphere that sets a positive tone for educators to teach and children to learn. Partnering with True Value Foundation, Residents Asked to Weigh In on Green Economy United Lawn L.L.C. 41 S. Wade Blvd. Millville, NJ 08332 856-327-3212 • Fax: 856-293-9588 { 18 } the grapevine | AUGUST 26, 2009 The Cumberland County Economic Development Board wants to know what residents in all 14 municipalities think should be the County’s approach to its future development initiatives. Toward that end, residents are invited to take a few minutes to answer a short ques- CRABTREE’S LANDSCAPING And Turf Management Beautifying the outside since 1989 Serving Vineland, Millville & Bridgeton Areas COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL OVER 2 0 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE! Total Landscape Renovations In-ground Irrigation Systems Sodding, Mulching, Hydroseeding Waterfalls & ponds 856.875.0774 Shalick High was selected from more than 250 schools as the winner of a paint grant through Swanson Hardware…. educational environment in their respective communities. Who better than a hardware store owner to help convince local school officials on how 40 gallons of paint can enhance the learning environment for area students. Retailers identified elementary, junior high or high schools in their neighborhoods that met basic qualifications and encouraged the schools to apply for paint grants, which were awarded based on need. An extensive judging process evaluated several aspects of the school, including student population, involvement with the surrounding community and the reasoning behind the school’s request. Using this set of criteria, an advisory committee of True Value Company professionals identified the top 60 applicants as grant winners, each of whom were notified by their local True Value hardware store. True Value Foundation was established in 2008 to unite True Value retailers in helping people in their communities build stronger lives through charitable programs. Through the foundation, America’s local hometown True Value hardware stores are encouraged to support youth programs, create solutions for community and social issues, and inspire adults to continue to learn through new experiences. By uniting retailers in this mission through local initiatives, the foundation brings positive change to more people in True Value communities. I Between Grant & Elmer Rd. 1969 South East Ave Vineland, NJ 08360 Call Mark for Details: 856-692-8650 Mon.-Fri. 7-5 Sat. 7-12 Sales Tax 3.5% FREE 2009 Hardscaping Project Guide Swanson Hardware Supply, notified neighborhood schools of the grant last fall and encouraged them to apply. Swanson Hardware Supply is delivering the paint to the school, located at 718 Centerton Road in Pittsgrove. Shalick High School will be using the 40 gallons of paint to enhance the aesthetic environment of the school. The more than 700 students next fall will enjoy learning in the newly painted facility. “Through True Value Foundation’s Painting a Brighter Future program, we’re able to help Shalick High School and give back to the community we love to serve,” said Phil Vitale. “The donation will not only save the school money, but more importantly will create an environment that fosters learning, inspires creativity and builds community.” Painting a Brighter Future is the signature program of the True Value Foundation, a philanthropic organization of True Value retailers nationwide. Serving as ambassadors for the foundation, True Value retailers introduced the Painting a Brighter Future program to their towns, championing the cause of enhancing the © 2009 EP Henry Make an impression before they get to the door. Your driveway should be your personalized welcome mat. EP Henry pavers are a beautiful and practical alternative to asphalt or concrete.With a variety of colors, styles and patterns at your disposal, you can add instant curb appeal – and lasting value too! Trust EP Henry to help you create the driveway of your dreams now – then add a walkway, patio, wall or pool deck when you’re ready.With over 105 years of experience, help finding the perfect contractor, project financing and a Lifetime Guarantee, no one welcomes you home like EP Henry. Visit your EP Henry Authorized Hardscaping Distributor® for contractor referrals and to see the latest styles, textures and colors. LANDSCAPE SUPPLY Your Lawn & Garden Outlet SOUTH JERSEY Start Fresh Today! Credit Card Debt • Medical Bills Utility Bills • Surcharges And Even Some Income Taxes Stop Wage Executions Reduce Car Payments Free Office Visit-Start Fresh Financially! Want to wipe out your debt? 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Delsea Dr. Vineland Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm Sat. 8am-2pm *Taxes and Delivery extra 856-563-1500 SEYMOUR WASSERSTRUM Esq. -Bankruptcy Attorney- 856-696-8300 I Historical Vineland { VINCE FARINACCIO } Theatrical Vineland Cumberland Players traces its origins to a group that would meet and read scripts. umberland Players is a survivor, a 63-year old veteran of the Vineland arts scene that first demonstrated its ability to endure when it outlived the other five organizations formed in February 1946 from the Community Arts Group. “There was a group of people in Vineland who loved plays,” current Cumberland Players president Kathe Johnson explained recently. “I think they originally started by going to see plays in Philadelphia and New York…and then they would meet and read scripts out loud and decided to produce shows.” Chartered in 1946 as The Little Theatre of Vineland, the group presented three well-received one-act plays before an invited audience at the Reber School C auditorium in June of that year. By September, the group brought in Philadelphia drama coach Mary Myers to instruct its members on the basics of acting. The next month, it officially organized with Jesse T. Morie as president and the Orchard Road Community Hall as its rehearsal place. With Myers as director, rehearsals for the troupe’s first full-length play, Ring Around Elizabeth, were underway by early 1947. According to the Times Journal, this production, sponsored by the Vineland Kiwanis Club, was presented at the Vineland High School auditorium on March 20 and 21, 1947. Myers remained at the helm for the May staging of Noel Coward’s Blithe Spirit as well as the December production of George Washington Slept Here, which actually opened at the West Trimble Lodge in West Collingswood before its Vineland presentation on December 11 and 12 under the sponsorship of the Newfield Kiwanis Club. By this point, rehearsals had moved to the Borough of Vineland Republican Club. The Times Journal identifies Frank Meottle and Virginia Curtis as the directors of the Little Theatre’s fifth and sixth plays, 1948’s Petticoat Fever and 1949’s Another Language. Curtis soon joined Sid Caesar’s television hit Your Show of Shows Cumberland Players… outlived the other five organizations formed in February 1946. where future playwrights Woody Allen and Neil Simon were staff writers before producing works the Little Theatre would stage over the next several decades. With sponsorship ranging from the Vineland VINTAGE VINELAND Pinelands Backdrop Who are these men in uniform? Do you recognize any of them or know their story? ers in identifying the people and places captured on film so long ago. If you know something about this photograph, we ask that you contact either Harbold at the Society or use the contact information on page 4 to inform us. Also, the VHAS is starting an oral history project, and encourages anyone with stories of Vineland to come to the VHAS and be interviewed. The interviews will not be made public; they will just be preserved. If you prefer, you may write your stories down and send them to VHAS. For instance, tell the history of your street or neighborhood, tell how you grew up in Vineland, including the anecdotes, firsthand or secondhand accounts, stories that tell the unique characteristics of growing up in Vineland. The mission of the VHAS is to acquire, maintain, and preserve Vineland’s history. The Society was founded in 1864, just three years after the establishment of the town of Vineland. It is the second oldest historical society in New Jersey, second only to the New Jersey Historical Society. The VHAS consists of a museum, library, and archives, open to the public on Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m., same hours Tuesday through Friday for research. It is located at 108 South Seventh Street, Vineland (691-1111). { 20 } the grapevine | AUGUST 26, 2009 Over the years, the Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society has acquired many old-time images. Kate Harbold, at the Society, is busy cataloging the photos from Vineland’s rich past, but she needs the help of The Grapevine read- Junior Police to the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Little Theatre mounted two more productions in 1949, The Man Who Came to Dinner, directed by Florence Horowitz, and My Sister Eileen, the first of a record 14 plays, directed by Philadelphia Plays and Players member John J. Crowley, according to the group’s website. In March 1950, between performing a pair of one-act plays at events sponsored by the Exchange Club and the Chamber of Commerce, the Little Theatre purchased the building on Sherman Avenue that was once the South Vineland Methodist Church. Work soon began on turning the structure into a theater. “It took them three years to add a stage, put a basement in, bathrooms, lobby and they all did it themselves,” Johnson explained. A Times Journal article from October 1950 reveals that the building was utilized while it was being refurbished. The article describes the building’s entire interior as the set for a forthcoming production of Arsenic and Old Lace, citing that it was the first time “the group had an actual set to work in.” While the new facility effectively accommodated rehearsals, the production would be transferred to Vineland High School for the November 6 and 7 performances, the first not sponsored by an outside group. A 1952 Times Journal article reported that, with the impending merger of Vineland Borough and Landis Township, the Little Theatre “appropriately changed its name to ‘Vineland Community Theatre,’” a move that did not prevent the continued use of the original moniker. The group’s new home was officially christened with the November 1953 production of Come Back Little Sheba, launching a rewarding six decades at the Sherman Avenue site. Building on its drama and comedy repertoire, the group slowly added musicals to the mix so that today it is a standard summer feature. Children’s theater and teen workshops followed. By 1962, the group won first prize in the New Jersey Theatre League’s Drama Tournament with a production of Sunday Costs Five Pesos. In 1977, the name was changed to Cumberland Players but it remains the same organization that offers our area brief visits by Arthur Miller, Thornton Wilder and even William Shakespeare. I Next week: Inside Cumberland Players. Varicose • Veins • Featured on ? and WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Reach Out To The Most Qualified Specialist Minimally Invasive Insurance covered Please Watch for Our Free Vein Screening in the Fall 30 min. Office Treatment Charles L. Dietzek, D.O., FACOS Raymond S. 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He also Through careful talking and questioning with offers iridology, finding health conditions by each client, she determines which modality looking into the eyes. of massage is best. She provides deep tissue, Dr. Patel has 10 years experience as a acupressure, sound therapy, hot rocks, and naturopath and has done about 4,000 reflex points, but avoids some of the more colonic cleansings in the past few years. In esoteric treatments available in the field. his native India, he was an ayurvedic (natur“I wouldn’t do anything I wouldn’t do on al) pharmacist. He holds a Master of myself,” she says. Science degree, is a certified nutritionist The outgoing and humorous Rink Alternative Health Dr. Michael Sarnoff, who specializes in chiropractic care for children, examines the spine of his son Noah. Sarnoff points out that kids are good at adjusting their own spines through gyrating play. believes her work supplements medical care and provides stress relief. “That’s why I’m doing real well, because of all the stress,” she half-jokes. Rink’s profession sprang from her own medical history: She has severe arthritis and says her work is critical to her own health. “When I’m not massaging, I don’t feel good,” she says. “If I wasn’t doing massage, I’d probably be a couch potato.” Barbi Ambrose of Millville started seeing Rink on her doctor’s recommendation before and after knee surgery. “I swear by this for people having surgery,” she says, “I strongly recommend it.” Ambrose sometimes tries to trick Rink by E VOLUT I ONS f o r Co n s c i o u s L i v i n g, L LC I n t e gra l Me di c i n e & Ho l i s t i c He a l t h (856)-690-8999 • www.lwillevolve.com Wayne Mesiano, MS, L.Ac. Come and meet our practitioners and sample our services: Wayne Mesiano, L.Ac: Acupuncture, Qi Gong, Tai Chi Jill Mesiano, C.R.: Reflexology { 22 } the grapevine | AUGUST 26, 2009 Evolving Human Potential through Healthy… Salon Fabrojae’ Swedish Massage Deep Tissue Massage Prenatal/Pregnancy Massage Reflexology & Hot Rock Massage Melt Away Your Stress At CHOICE Tony Tognucci, Educator: Educational Workshops Sally Seligman, C.Y. I.: Yoga, Feng Shui Lou Giunta, Ph.D., C.H.t: Hypnotherapy Patrecia Schwailik-Giunta, EFT-ADV Emotional Freedom Technique, Nutrition CHANGE RESPONSIBILITY Gift Certificates available for all occasions We accept MC ,Visa & Discover Janet Sacco, CMT: Massage, Energy (Chi) work Paul Lewis, L.Ac.: Acupuncture, Herbs Our Massage Therapist Will Consult With You In Order For You To Receive The Proper Treatment! Discounted Pre-Paid Massage Packages Available Acupuncture, Qi Gong, Tai Chi, Reflexology, Massage, Herbs, Nutrition, Acupressure, Meditation, Essential Oils, Reiki, Hypnotherapy, Ayurveda, Feng Shui, Educational Workshops, Emotional Freedom Technique (856) 794-9696 Madison Square 782 Brewster Rd. Vineland, NJ 08361 Monday – 9 am – 2 pm • Tuesday – 9 am – 9 pm Wednesday – 9 am – 9 pm • Thursday – 9 am – 8 pm Friday – 9 am – 5 pm • Saturday – 7 am – 4 pm 1350 S. West Blvd. Vineland, NJ 08360 individually created affirmations to help relieve the underlying emotional stress of the condition. According to Schwailik-Giunta, EFT works by combining the positive verbal words with the kinesthetic act of tapping and realigning the meridians—subtle energy lines—of the body. The practitioner says she was on a healing journey for many years, trying many modalities. EFT worked so well for her she decided to Dr. Ray Patel performs a colonic cleansing, a procedure he estimates he’s done about 4,000 times in the past few years. offer it to others. “EFT is great with stress and not revealing where her body is hurting or phobias and can be effective in just a few tight, but says Rink can always tell. sessions,” she says, “and some say it cures “On a one-to-10 scale, she’s about a 20 things that were incurable.” Schwailikwith me,” Ambrose proclaims. Giunta has been an EFT therapist for a year Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) is and is also a certified nutrition consultant. a modern therapy based on an ancient art. Patrecia’s husband, Lou Guinta, Ph.D., is Locally, Patrecia Schwailik-Giunta is a a certified hypnotherapist, using a techpractitioner. She describes it as the “emonique that might be better known than his tional version of acupuncture.” It’s a simple wife’s. Dr. Guinta warns, though, that hyptapping procedure that gently realigns the notism is woefully misunderstood by many body’s energy systems. because its therapeutic use is confused Schwailik-Giunta first discusses the with common stage hypnotism. He doesn’t client’s emotional and physical issues. induce trances, he doesn’t cast spells. He Then, under guidance, the client performs strongly asserts how many myths there are a repetitive series of taps on certain points to overcome about his practice. on his or her face and torso while repeating Continued on next page CCC Donation Helps Health Care Students Teaming with high schools from Vineland, Millville and Bridgeton, as well as the Cumberland County Technical Education Center, Cumberland County College recently donated 285 textbooks, valued at more than $30,000, for dual-credit courses that enable students to accumulate college credits while taking classes to meet high school graduation requirements. The donation is part of Cumberland County College’s Healthcare Careers Preparation Pathways program that makes accessible a career ladder leading to family-sustaining jobs in health care. Dual-credit courses are an integral part of that career ladder. CCC purchased the books through a community-based job training grant from the U.S. Department of Labor. In the photo, from left: Diane Garrison and Jeanne Setser, Millville Senior High School; Dr. Jacqueline Galbiati, CCC interim vice president; Charlotta Birdsall, Bridgeton High School; Tammy Monahan, Vineland High School; Paula Corson, Millville Senior High School; and Veronica Pensa, Cumberland County College. BEST O THE BE F 15 Yea ST rs 2009 SPECIAL SPE I S CIAL Tai Tai Chi Classes at Yi’s s at Yi’s Karate of Vineland Karate Vineland If you’ve ever wondered if If you’ve ever wondered if u the Martial Arts is right for Martial Arts is right you or your child – NOW is you r your child NOW is the time to nd out! the time to nd out! With our Month Membership With ou 3 Month Membership ur – money saving special – y saving special p you will truly see the bene ts of you will truly see bene ts Tang Soo Do and KNOW whether Tang o Do and KNOW whether it is rig t for you or your family. it is right you your family gh Back To School Memory, Attention & Stress Products • Energy Products for Late Night Studying • Formulas for ADD or ADHD • Omega 3 Fish Oils & DHA for Concentration • Large Gluten-Free Department including Children’s Snacks • A Total Homeopathic Medicine Supplier • 100% Whole Food & Food Based Vitamins • Total Body Cleanses • Natural Allergy Relief • Flor-Essence and Essiac • Weight Loss Products • Vegetarian Food Department • Refrigerated & Frozen Food Items • Complete Body Building Department (Club Discounts) • Natural Cosmetics, Skins & Hair Care Products Improve Your Health Improve Your Health & Well Being! Well Being! -improve circulation -improve circulation -increased immunity -increased immu y unit -reduces stress -reduces stress -be er balance & -be er balance coordination coordination n and much more! and much more! r Every Sunday Ever y Sunday 9 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. a.m. a.m. Ron McCracken Ron McCracken Taijiquan Instructor Taijiquan Instructo or WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | 1437 S. Delsea Dr. • Vineland, NJ 691-0774 Gift Certificates Available • Stocking Over 50,000 Items Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. Get amazing results from your advertising campaign in The Grapevine. Get the benefit of our distribution to every residence in Vineland (approx. 22,250)! Ride the wave of excitement as The Grapevine’s debut has excited our town’s citizens. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. 3 M O N T H M E M BE R S H I P MONTH MEMBERSHIP includes Un form – only $139.95 includes Uniform only ni (New Students Only Limitations Apply) (New Students Only – Limitations Apply) n Kardio-Kickboxing , Self-Defense, Tai Chi Kardio-Kickboxing, Self-Defense, Tai Chi k LI LE TIGERS – Martiall Arts Program for 4-6 year olds TIGER S Martia Arts Program year olds the grapevine { 23 } 856-405-0008 www.vinelandmar tialar ts.com www.vinelandmartialarts.com w ar Alternative Health Continued from previous page “I cannot make you do anything you wouldn’t normally do,” he carefully points out. “Hypnotism is about having your body so relaxed and your mind so focused that you can make changes from the inside out,” he says. He notes hypnotherapy can help so much because it reaches the subconscious mind, where permanent memories and ways of behaving are stored. Positive motivations attained through hypnosis help Dr. Guinta’s clients with weight management, smoking cessation, habits and phobias, addictions, and other emotional problems. “If you can listen and follow directions, I can help you if you want it,” he says. Similar to his wife, Dr. Guinta came to hypnotherapy through personal experience. Evolving the Bridge Wayne Mesiano is a bridge-builder. His bridge crosses a significant divide from one side where there is a patient needing help to the other side where physical, mental, and spiritual growth and healing can bring that help. Mesiano, a licensed acupuncturist, recently opened Evolutions for Conscious Living, in Vineland, which he calls an integral medicine and holistic health center. He has gathered a group of practitioners who work individually and together to “assist people in changing health behaviors which will help them develop as a person as well.” He could be called a grounded visionary and his calm but intense demeanor complements both aspects. Evolutions is a business and he steadfastly runs it, but his ideals and hopes go far beyond. He believes the changes holistic care can bring at a deep level are going to be “the new health care. “Health care reform has to be people reforming themselves,” Mesiano says. “There has to be a values shift—from materials to well-being of the self, and health must be foremost in the shift.” Acupuncture and Chinese medicine are the key vehicles to this new way of living. The instrument is the needle that Mesiano says “tonifies” the circulation of energy (called chi) in the body, stimulating it if it is low or suppressing it if it is too high. Conditions responding to acupuncture include digestion issues, back and muscular-skeletal pain, allergies, women’s issues, and emotional depression. Ultimately, it treats the spirit. “It’s a bridge to reach the patient on all levels: physical, mental, and spiritual,” Mesiano says, “the highest level is connection to soul development.” Surrounding the hub of Mesiano’s nineyear-old acupuncture practice now stand spokes of professionals, including his wife, Jill, who offer reflexology, yoga, massage, Reike, holistic nutrition, and homeopathy. In addition to acupuncture, Mesiano personally provides Chi Gong, Tai Chi, zero balancing acupressure, essential oils, and meditation. Patrecia Schwailik-Giunta and Lou Giunta practice their EFT and hypnotherapy at his center. Evolutions is still in its first year, looking high and looking deep, trying to evolve to reach those still unknown heights and insights. —Mickey Brandt Patrecia Schwailik-Giunta demonstrates EFT with Janet Sacco, seated. Hypnotherapy helped him overcome stage fright in his musical performances. “It worked for me. It helped my standing in front of audiences throughout the world and being the best performer I could be,” he says. Dr. Guinta remains a professional musician. These practitioners may have somewhat unconventional ways of healing people, but it seems many times, the results of their therapies cannot be denied. I Health Now Natural Food Store Offering Nutrition Assistance & Dietary Support! INTRODUCING NEW B SE HA ANOL LA ESP Gluten Free Pizza & Pasta Wheat Free • Gluten Free • No WBRO • All Natural We use only the finest all-natural ingredients to bring high quality, wheat-free/gluten-free pizza, pasta and pierogi to your table. It is with confidence that we can say “Our wheat-free and gluten-free foods are just as good as the ‘real’ thing.” 310 Wheat Road, Vineland RETAIL STORE OPEN Mon. – Fri. 7am – 5:30pm Sat. 9am – 3pm Tired of Being Tired? We Can Help Boost Your Energy! Vitamins, Herbs, Vegetarian Foods, Bibles, and Much More! Wanda Agosto Certified Iridology Doctor of Naturopathy We are a natural food store with a great selection of organic produce and natural meats. We have a new Super Saver Buying Club. Shop & Save $$ from our 20,000 item catalog! Join Us Every Thursday (2:30 – 6:30 pm) For LifeWay Cafe Day @ Health Now. PH: FAX: 856-697-3400 856-697-1757 www.contespasta.com contespasta@comcast.net Your Total Purchase! With This Ad! Exp: 9/30/09 1 0%OFF (856) 691-6001 502 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08360 { 24 } the grapevine | AUGUST 26, 2009 Try LifeWay Cafe’s Made To Order Specialties: Custom Organic Smoothies Organic Fruit Whips Fresh Squeezed Organic Juices Colonic Ionic Iridology ORGANICS Natural Food Market Dr. Ray Patel M.S.,CN, ND. Free Customer Nutritional Counseling 1370 S. Main Rd. Vineland Ph: (856) 205-9700 Fax: (856) 205-0524 Hours: Mon,Tue,Wed,Sat-9am-6pm Thur, Fri 9am-7pm • Closed Sunday Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. Bring In This Ad & Receive a FREE GIFT the next time you come in! 1301 North Delsea Drive, Vineland 856.794.4856 Tuesday 10-5 pm, Wednesday 10-5 pm, Thursday 10 – 7 pm Friday, 10-7 pm, Saturday 10- 5 pm Naturopath I Entertainment INTERACTIVE THEATER, OUTDOOR CONCERTS, A BOOK LAUNCH, AND NIGHTLIFE. AUGUST 26, 27, 28, 2/SEPTEMBER 1 Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Wednesday: ’70s and ’80s Throwback Night (frozen drink specials) 8 p.m.midnight, Thursday.: Karaoke with DJ Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday: Blue Moon Dance Party, $3 Blue Moon drafts, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Saturday: Latin Dance Party, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Tuesday: Country Western Dance Party (beer and shot specials), 8 p.m.-midnight. High St., Millville, 327-3714. Ann Boyle’s Turn of the Sentry, 6-9 p.m. AUGUST 28 AND 29 Nightlife at Old Oar House. Old Oar House Brewery, 123 N. High St., Millville, 2931200. Fri.: Fuss, 9 p.m. Sat.:Ottomatix, 9 p.m. SATURDAY, AUGUST 29 Punky O’ Dell. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. 7 p.m. THURSDAY, AUGUST 27 Don’t Call Me Francis. Annata Wine Bar, SATURDAY, AUGUST 29 Bound By Nothing, Rob Smith, Peanut Butter Lovesicle. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. Noah Cook benefit. 5 p.m. $10. EAGLE SOARS IN FIRST SEASON The Hammonton arts community has been enjoying its first summer of performances at the rebuilt Eagle Theatre. This weekend, two shows are on tap. 216 Bellevue Ave., Hammonton, 609-7049797. 9:30 p.m. Tickets $10. AUGUST 27, 28, AND 29 Nightlife at Villa Fazzolari. Villa Filomena Ristorante & Lounge, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena, 697-7107. Thurs.: Ladies Night, Fri.: Live music, Sat.: Italian Accordian. MONDAY, AUGUST 31 Frank Marone Combo. Giampetro Park Enrico Serra Band Shell, E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 7 p.m. Free concert. FRIDAY, AUGUST 28 An Evening of Music With Friends. Eagle Theatre, 208 Vine St., Hammonton. Sometimes silly, sometimes serious, join these Friends and more as they journey together in their favorite songs. This special cabaret event features the volunteers that helped bring The Eagle Theatre to life. Come out for a night of incredible music as these artists bring their talents to the stage. 7:30 p.m. Tickets $12 and $10. 609-704-5012. AUGUST 27, 28, AND 29 Nightlife at Bojo’s. 222 N. High St., Millville, 327-8011. Thurs: Ladies Nite with Charlie. Fri: Ravioli Shanker. Sat: Singalong. Sun: Nascar/Baseball. THROUGH AUGUST 31 Myer Glick Artwork. Vineland Public Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 794-4244. Original paintings in acrylic and watercolors; hand-crafted stained glass work. This exhibit focuses on local resident and Holocaust survivor Myer Glick’s zest for life. SATURDAY, AUGUST 29 Riddlesbrood Touring Theatre Company. Eagle Theatre, 208 Vine St., Hammonton. You’re the next contestant on “Cash a La Carte.” Get ready to play all of your favorite TV gameshows in this new interactive comedy. Whether it’s spinning a wheel, guessing a price or answering trivia, in this show…you’ll play, you’ll laugh, and you’ll win. So what are you waiting for…come on down! 8 p.m. Tickets $15 and $13. 609-704-5012. FRIDAY, AUGUST 28 Tom Moran/Ant Farm. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. 5 p.m./ 7 p.m. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 Bud Cavallo Duo. Giampetro Park Enrico Serra Band Shell, E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 7 p.m. Free concert. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26 Buddy Gale Orchestra. Michael Debbi Park, Cedar Ave., Richland. Big Band favorites from the 1930s to the present. 7 p.m. rain or shine. Seating available or bring a lawn chair. Free concert. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26 Nightlife at Ramada. Harry’s Lounge at Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 696-3800. Wednesday: Ladies Night, 1/2 price appetizers all night and live entertainment. Happy Hour MondaySaturday, 4-6 p.m. $1 off all drinks. FRIDAY, AUGUST 28 Solfege Radio, Class 6, Break The Chair, Right After All, To Satellite, April May, Pop Art Paranoia. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. 6 p.m. $0/$12. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 Don’t Call Me Francis. Merighi’s Savoy Inn, 4940 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 6918051. Benefits The Courage and Valor Foundation, which was created to ensure that we remember forever, the fallen firefighters of September 11th. 9 p.m. $12. Call about VIP Package Deal $50. FRIDAY, AUGUST 28 Book Launch. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. AT THE CASINOS Tickets: 1-800-736-1420; www.ticketmaster.com unless otherwise noted. HEADLINERS, COMEDY ACTS, AND MORE WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Melissa Etheridge. Showboat House of Blues. 9 p.m. $102, $87, $67, $52, $42. COMEDY & MORE Comedy Club at Borgata. Borgata Music Box: three comedians daily, 9 p.m. (except during headliner engagements) 1-800-298-4200. Comedy Stop at the Trop. Three comics nightly. Sun.-Thurs., 9 p.m., $23; Fri., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $23; Sat., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $28. Order tickets by phone at the Comedy Stop Box Office: 1-877-FUNNYAC or 609-348-0920. comedystop.com. Fame. Tropicana. Monday and Thursday 8 p.m., Tuesday and Wednesday 3:30 and 8 p.m., Sunday 7 p.m. SATURDAY, AUGUST 29 The Black Crowes. Borgata. 8 p.m. $59.50, $49.50. 1-800-298-4200. Susie Essman & Richard Lewis. Hilton. 8 p.m. $35. Heaven & Hell. Showboat House of Blues. 8:30 p.m. $65, $49.50. Donna Summer. Taj Mahal. 8 p.m. $75, $50 and $35. Yesterday: A Tribute to the Beatles. Tropicana. Liverpool Club Theater in North Tower. Wed.–Sun., 8:30 p.m., $25. HEADLINERS THURSDAY, AUGUST 27 Blue October Cult with Switchfoot and Ours. Showboat House of Blues. 8 p.m. $35, $30. THROUGH SEPTEMBER 5 Hypno-Sterical. Trump Marina. Thurs, and Fri. 9 p.m., Sat. 10 p.m. $22.50. THROUGH SEPTEMBER 6 Carnival of Wonders. Trump Plaza. 8 p.m. Tues., Wed., Thurs., Sat.; 9 p.m. Fri.; 3 and 7 p.m. Sun. $25. the grapevine { 25 } FRIDAY, AUGUST 28 Counting Crows. Borgata. 8 p.m. $85, $65. 1-800-298-4200. Dom Irrera & Jeffrey Ross. Borgata. 9 p.m. $35. 1-800-298-4200. THROUGH SEPTEMBER 6 AUGUST 29 AND 30 Ragdoll. Trump Marina. 8 p.m. Saturday and 7 p.m. Sunday. $25. Cirque Dreams Pandemonia. Taj Mahal. 8 p.m. Wed., Thurs;, 9 p.m. Fri.; 3:30 and 8 p.m. Sat. and Sun. $35 and $25. I Read the school handbook and make sure I your child understands the rules. Review the school’s federal “report card.” The Dangers of Antibiotic Overuse Source: www.kidshealth.org Every year, your family probably faces its share of colds, sore throats, and viruses. When you bring your child to the doctor for these illnesses, do you automatically expect a prescription for antibiotics? Many parents do. And they’re surprised, maybe even angry, if they leave the doctor’s office empty-handed—after all, what parent doesn’t want their kid to get well as quickly as possible? But your doctor could be doing you and your child a favor by not reaching for the prescription pad. HOW ANTIBIOTICS WORK Antibiotics, first used in the 1940s, are certainly one of the great advances in medicine. But overprescribing them has resulted in the development of bacteria that don’t respond to antibiotics that may have worked in the past. Plus, kids who take antibiotics when they aren’t necessary run the risk of adverse reactions, such as stomach upset and diarrhea. To understand how antibiotics work, it helps to know about the two major types of germs that can make people sick: bacteria and viruses. Although certain bacteria and viruses cause diseases with similar symptoms, the ways these two organisms multiply and spread illness are different: Bacteria are living organisms existing as single cells. Bacteria are everywhere and most don’t cause any harm, and in some cases may be beneficial. Lactobacillus, for example, lives in the intestine and help digest food. But some bacteria are harmful and can cause illness by invading the human body, multiplying, and interfering with normal bodily processes. Antibiotics are effective against bacteria because they work to kill these living organisms by stopping their growth and reproduction. Viruses, on the other hand, are not alive and cannot exist on their own—they are particles containing genetic material wrapped in a protein coat. Viruses “live,” grow, and reproduce only after they’ve invaded other living cells. Some viruses may be fought off by the body’s immune system before they cause illness, but others (colds, for example) must simply run their course. Viruses do not respond to antibiotics at all. WHY IT’S HARMFUL TO OVERUSE THEM Taking antibiotics for colds and other viral illnesses not only won’t work, but also has a dangerous side effect: over time, this practice helps create bacteria that have become more of a challenge to kill. Frequent and inappropriate use of antibiotics selects for strains of bacteria that can resist treatment. This is called bacterial resistance. These resistant bacteria require higher doses of medicine or stronger antibiotics to treat. Doctors have even found bacteria that are resistant to some of the most powerful antibiotics available today. PLAN TO BE INVOLVED I Mark school events on the family calendar. I Attend the back-to-school program. I Schedule and attend parent-teacher conferences. I Meet leaders of the parent-teacher group. PLAN HEALTHY MEALS I Have nutritious food on hand for breakfast and after-school snacks. I Find out how much school breakfasts and lunches cost. I Find out whether snacks and drinks are available at school or can be brought from home. I Ask where to obtain weekly school lunch menus. I Alert school staff if your child has a severe food allergy. ARRANGE TRANSPORTATION I Practice getting to school with your child. • BUS: Make sure she knows where and when to be picked up before and after school. • BICYCLE: Review road safety and make sure he has a helmet. • ON FOOT: Walk the route together and review pedestrian safety guidelines. I Arrange a carpool if necessary and introduce your child to the other adults and children. I Compile contact information of parents who can pick up your child in an emergency. MAKE AFTER-SCHOOL PLANS I Arrange child care or after-school activities. I Choose extracurricular activities carefully to avoid overscheduling. I Make sure your child knows where to go after school each day. HELP YOUR CHILD PREPARE FOR SCHOOL I Arrange for your child to play with others in his age group before classes start. I Discuss your child’s feelings about starting school and talk over any concerns. I Talk with your child about her daily school schedule. I Talk about peer pressure with your child. I Have your child memorize your home address and home and work phone numbers. I Tour the school with your child so she can find her classrooms, the restrooms, and the cafeteria. I Arrange a time for you and your child to meet his new teachers. LAY THE GROUND RULES I Establish a firm bedtime before school starts. I Determine where and when your child will do homework. I Figure out a plan for balancing homework and play time. I Set rules for the time spent on TV, video games, and computer use for non-school projects. Back-to-School Checklist Source: www.schoolfamily.com Don’t forget a thing! This comprehensive checklist will help make sure all your i’s are dotted and t’s crossed before your child’s first day. FIRST STEPS I Call the school district with questions about your child’s school. I Find out what day classes start and what time your child should arrive. I Enroll your child (if she is not already registered from the previous year). I Fill out emergency contact sheets and any other required forms. CHECK MEDICAL REQUIREMENTS I Make sure your child has all required immunizations. I Schedule a physical exam for your child if needed to participate in school activities. I Get your child’s vision checked before school starts if he is due for an exam. I Notify the principal’s office, the school nurse, and your child’s teachers about any health problems or medications. STOCK UP ON SCHOOL SUPPLIES I Check the school website or call for a list of required supplies. I Find out whether students will store supplies at school or bring them home each day. { 26 } the grapevine | AUGUST 26, 2009 I Buy a backpack or bag to carry daily items. I Review the school dress code. I Buy school uniforms and gym clothes, if necessary. LEARN ABOUT THE SCHOOL 1370 S. Main Rd. Vineland I Find out whether the teacher prefers to communicate by phone, e-mail, or written note. Get that new look for School Open 7 days Walk-Ins Welcome 856-794-2727 I Know what your child is expected to learn in her grade level. I Familiarize yourself with the information on the school website. I Note the phone numbers for checking school Boys! ’s Men Young cut Hair closures or reporting absences. I Find out the procedure for taking your child out of school ear.ly. We Welcome April Bernard to our Staff Antibiotic resistance is a widespread problem, and one that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention calls “one of the world’s most pressing public health problems.” Bacteria that were once highly responsive to antibiotics have become increasingly resistant. Among those that are becoming harder to treat are pneumococcal infections (which cause pneumonia, ear infections, sinus infections, and meningitis), skin infections, and tuberculosis. TAKING ANTIBIOTICS SAFELY So what should you do when your child gets sick? To minimize the risk of bacterial resistance, keep these tips in mind: • Treat only bacterial infections. Seek advice and ask questions. Letting milder illnesses (especially those thought to be caused by viruses) run their course to avoid the development of drug-resistant germs may be a good idea—but it’s still best to leave what constitutes a “mild illness” up to your doctor. Even if the symptoms don’t worsen but linger, take your child to the doctor. At the office, ask questions about whether your child’s illness is bacterial or viral, and discuss the risks and benefits of antibiotics. If it’s a virus, don’t pressure your doctor to prescribe antibiotics, but ask about ways to treat symptoms. • Use antibiotics as prescribed. • Don’t save antibiotics for next time. • Never use another person’s prescription. Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD Date reviewed: November 2008 Ask your doctor about ways to treat the symptoms that are making your child uncomfortable, such as a stuffy nose or scratchy throat, without the use of antibiotics. The key to building a good relationship with your doctor is open communication, so work together toward that goal. Use the medication properly. Antibiotics are only effective against a bacterial infection if taken for the full amount of time prescribed by the doctor—and they take time to kick in, too, so don’t expect your child to feel better after taking the first dose. Most kids take one to two days to feel a lot better. Similarly, don’t let your child take antibiotics longer than prescribed. And most important, never use antibiotics that have been lying around your home. Never take antibiotics that were prescribed for another family member, either—doses for kids vary, and if your child did have an illness requiring antibiotics, you’d want to make sure you were treating it correctly. Help fight antibiotic resistance by taking simple steps to prevent the spread of infections. Encourage hand washing, make sure your kids are up to date on immunizations, and keep kids out of school when sick. Doctors are aware of increasing antibiotic resistance and are trying to solve the problem. New antibiotics may be on the horizon, but antibiotics will continue to need to be prescribed and used appropriately. I CREATIVITY Amanda Morgan’s Boutique of &STYLE    New Shine & Gloss Treatments Specializing in current coloring techniques & hair texturizing. Manicures – Pedicures – Acrylics – Waxing – Full Bridal Services.                                                                WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Always Accepting Talented New Staff Youngblood Cosmetics. the grapevine { 27 }    856-696-3900 BREWSTER VILLAGE 2630 E. CHESTNUT AVE. VINELAND NJ          18 -H o l e C o u r s e H a n d i c a p – A c c e ss i b l e I Recipe Corner { LISA ANN DiNUNZIO } Recipe Swap Wednesday N ig h t S p e c i a l 5pm- close Fund Raising Opportunities for your school or organization Senior Citizen Rates • Visa & Mastercard Accepted $5.00 until 5PM • $6.00 5PM to Close B i r th d a y P a r t y P a c k a g e s 73 Landis Ave. Upper Deerfield Twp. Located next to Rita’s Water Ice Cucumbers straight from the farm or garden can be made into a cool treat. reetings! As September quickly approaches and the days of summer come to an end, I’m thankful for another great season of farm market produce. I’ve enjoyed picking out beautiful tomatoes, cucumbers, corn, lettuce, string beans, melons, peaches and a variety of other fruits and vegetables. Recipes taste so much better when made with fresh ingredients. But now it’s time to “switch gears” and focus on autumn with its own glorious splendors and gifts. Apples will be in abundance and I, for one, look forward to recipes made with this healthy “good for you” fruit. So send in those favorite “apple” recipes and enjoy the last few weeks of summer! The following story and recipe were submitted by Deanna Brown who writes, “When cucumbers are in abundance from our garden, I like to make this recipe for my family. It’s a delicious, creamy and cool salad that’s perfect to serve on a hot summer day.” 856-453-PUTT (7888) www.landislinks.com Hours: 11 am-10pm Daily (1) Round of Golf for a Group of 4, FREE Hot Dog or Nachos & (1) FREE Soda – Only $25.00 Hot Dogs• Chili/Cheese • Nachos • Sausage • Sodas & Soft Pretzels Indoor & Patio Seating Gift Certificates Available Video Games G “Since cucumbers are plentiful right now, I would like to share this recipe for refrigerated pickles.They are delicious and a great way to use those extra cucumbers from your garden.” Creamy Cucumber Salad 3 cucumbers, peeled and thinly sliced 1 tsp. salt 1 cup sour cream 2 tbs. fresh squeezed lemon juice 1 small onion, peeled and thinly sliced 1 tsp. sugar Black pepper, to taste 1 head romaine lettuce, washed, dried and chopped Refrigerator Pickles 7 cups unpeeled sliced cucumbers 2 cups chopped onion 1 cup chopped pepper 2 cups sugar 1 cup white vinegar 1 tbs. salt { 28 } the grapevine | AUGUST 26, 2009 In a medium bowl, toss cucumber with salt; cover and refrigerate for 3-4 hours, or until well chilled. In a small bowl, combine sour cream, lemon juice, onion, sugar and pepper, mix well. Reserve 1/4 cup of the mixture for garnish. Combine cucumber with remaining sour cream mixture. Refrigerate for 2 hours or until well chilled. To serve, arrange cucumber slices on top of the romaine lettuce and drizzle with reserved sour cream mixture. Here’s another recipe, this one submitted by Amelia Schenk, who writes: In large bowl, add sugar, vinegar and salt. Add cucumbers, onion and pepper, mix well. Let sit until they form their own juice (approx. a few hours, or overnight in the refrigerator). Then put cucumbers into jars and refrigerate. These also freeze well. As always, from my kitchen to yours, Bon Appetit. I Lisa Ann is the author of Seasoned With Love, Treasured Recipes and Lisa Ann’s Seasoned With Love II. Send recipes for publication to lapd1991@aol.com or to The Grapevine, 3660 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08361. Newly Renovated & Open All Summer The Best Sushi Bar in Cumberland County Beer Garden Let BJ’s Cook for You Tonight! To Place an order Call (856)825-8123 Now serving soft serve and water ice BYOB Best of the Best 2009 RIBS BJ Roasters Ribs are barbequed in our own Zesty Sauce Served Fri. & Sat. only after 4 while supplies last! FULL RACK (BBQ on side)..$17.99 HALF RACK (BBQ on ribs)..$9.99 RIB PLATTER (BBQ on ribs)..$10.99 Rib Platter Only Served with 2 side items Daily Specials Breakfast & Lunch Mon.-Sat. 8-3 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Come Check Out Our Popular Under $15 Menu Including: BEST OF THE BEST RIBS BEST OF THE BEST 2009 WINGS BEST BEST WINGS OF THE Open Late Friday Night & Sunday Brunch 8-12 Starts Sept 13 Stuffed Peppers-Pork Ribs-Stuffed Shells Rosemary Chicken-Pub Steak AFTER 5:00 BAR SPECIALS Chinese & Japanese Cuisine Offering a New Dinner Menu for 2009 Always Fresh, Never Over-priced 12 Pak..$7.99 25 Pak..$13.99 50 Pak..$22.99 100 Pak..$38.99 Hot Sauce and Blue Cheese served on the side Stop by for lunch during the 2nd Annual Arts, Antique & Music Festival Sunday, Sept. 13, 2009 • 10 am-6pm MONDAY-THURSDAY The Looking Glass Cafe is Millville Arts Districts’ Original and Longest Running Casual Dining Establishment 16 N. High St. Millville NJ 08332 Catering On- and Off-Premises Available for Your Special Event 10% OFF ANY REGULAR PURCHASE (minimum purchase $15) w/this coupon-Not Valid w/other offer-GVN-Expires 9/30/09 231 N. High Street (corner of High & Mulberry Sts) Millville, NJ 08332 856-327-1666 Sunday $1.00 Slider $5.00 Martini menu Monday $1.00 Hot Dog $5.00 Dog Fish Head 60 minute IPA 20 oz Tuesday $1.00 Taco’s $5.00 Margarita’s Wednesday $1.00 Sloppy Joe’s $5.00 Long Island Iced Tea Thursday $1.00 Pizza $5.00 Import/Micro 20 oz. Friday & Saturdays Live Entertainment 856-293-1200 123 North High St. Millville, NJ Coming Soon Hibachi Japanese Steak House • Catering • Banquet Facilities/Wedding Reception • Eat In/Take Out & Delivery We deliver min. $25-$30 Hours: Open 7 Days A Week M-Th: 11am-10pm Fri & Sat: 11am-11pm Sunday: 12 noon-10pm (856) 765-1818 Fax: (856) 765-0588 WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | 101 E Main St. Millville, NJ 08332 Gypsy Smokehouse Tues.- Sun. 11am-7pm Closed Monday Served with celery & Blue cheese BBQ, Honey Mustard, Mild (Spicy) Medium (Hot), Hot (Very Hot), Insane (Need we explain) Beef Brisket, Pulled Pork, Pulled Chicken, Smoked Sausage Served S.O.S. (Sauce On Side) All Platters include sandwich, cornbread & 2 sides BBQ Extended Hours on Fridays & Weekends All Summer Long! 19 E. Oak Street Millville, NJ Phone: 856-327-1000 Fax: 856-327-1009 WINGS 10/15/20/25 Pieces Seasoned & Smoked until they are fall off the bone tender! Served Wet (Sauced), Dry (No Sauce) and S.O.S. All Platters include sandwich, cornbread & 2 sides Half Rack or Full Rack RIBS the grapevine { 29 } ! ”      Open ’Til 9:00 Every Friday MyArtMyMillville.com REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS With rates at historic lows, now is a great time to buy a new home or consider refinancing your existing mortgage. For unparalleled service, great rates and a variety of financing options, call Blaise R. Menzoni. FHA • VA • Conventional The following transactions of $1,000 or more were filed with Cumberland County in the month of July 2009 (transactions may have occurred in an earlier month). Names listed may, in some cases, be those of buyers’ or sellers’ representatives. BRIDGETON 53 Albertson Ave., Sec. Housing & Urban Development (by Atty.) to Thomas DiGuiseppi on 7/13/09 for $65,000 344 Fayette St., Albert B Kelly to Kevin D McCormick on 7/13/09 for $125,000 540 N Burlington Rd., Velma D Carey to David Gonzalez on 7/16/09 for $62,000 201 N Pearl St., Theresa A Williamson (Exec.) to Mark James Devine, IV on 7/20/09 for $59,500 COMMERCIAL TWP 1305 Spring Garden, Morgan JP Chase Bank to Ackerman Real Estate Investments LLC on 7/10/09 for $97,500 213 Daffodil Rd., Judson Moore, Jr. to Martin Keoughan on 7/17/09 for $28,000 405 Gooseberry Rd., Thomas A Poulter (Exec.) to Pro Form Homes LLC on 7/20/09 for $11,500 DEERFIELD TWP 478 Richards Rd., Alfred Werner Minklei to Daniel Johnson on 7/17/09 for $180,000 FAIRFIELD TWP 435 Ramah Rd., Glenn Drummonds to Mark K Carney on 7/20/09 for $196,000 GREENWICH TWP 51 Pier Rd., Barry S Arnold to Matthew G Moore, Jr. on 7/13/09 for $164,000 885 Ye Greate St., Robert H Hansteen to Charles E Schemelia, III on 7/15/09 for $149,000 LAWRENCE TWP 552 Newport Rd., Christopher Puff to Raymond Golley on 7/16/09 for $185,000 380 Main St., Sec. of Housing & Urban Development (by Atty.) to Jillian Konschak on 7/20/09 for $76,100 Harris Ave., Jersey Comfort Homes LLC to Steven Adamson on 7/20/09 for $212,000 MILLVILLE 17 Sterling Pl., Rhonda Spiels to Down Jersey Builder LLC on 7/10/09 for $40,000 305 Roselle Dr., Quality Management LLC to Rosemary Vigliotti on 7/13/09 for $20,000 372 Esibill Ave., Elizabeth Heichel (Exec.) to Meihale Lascarides on 7/14/09 for $140,000 701 Richard Dr., RPJ Properties LLC to Chad Smith on 7/14/09 for $182,000 Blaise Menzoni LOAN OFFICER Gateway Funding DMS, LP Office 856.692.9494 Fax 856.691.3687 Cell 856.297.7087 1 17 E. Landis Ave • Suite C • Vineland, NJ 08360 1 Licensed by NJ department of Banking and Insurance Opening Doors to Home Ownership Beautiful Smiles, Made Affordable OUR SERVICES { 30 } the grapevine | AUGUST 26, 2009 MILLVILLE FAMILY DENTAL Union Lake Crossing Shopping Center 2144 N. 2nd St., Millville NEW PATIENT WELCOMING PACKAGE $ 80 (reg. $230.) Includes oral exam, full mouth series of x-rays, cleaning & polishing, oral cancer screening, periodontal (gums) evaluation. With coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Emergency Walk-Ins Welcome • Same-Day Denture Repair • • • • • • • • • • • Cleaning & X-Rays Porcelain Veneers Cosmetic Dentistry Periodontal Therapy (Gum Treatment) Full Mouth Reconstruction Implant Rehabilitation Root Canals (One Visit) Full & Partial Dentures Bleaching White Fillings Crowns & Bridges 856-825-2111 Open 7 Days a Week. Day & Evening Hours Proud Member Of The Allied Dental Practices Of NJ Personalized Dentistry SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO OUR SENIOR CITIZENS Se Habla Español E D W A R D P O L L E R , D D S • G L E N N P R A G E R , D D S • TO D D P R A G E R , D D S • D A N I E L D I C E S A R E , D M D 2135 Freeman Ave., Dania C Kelli Nedohon to Robert Robbins on 7/15/09 for $280,000 1302 G St., Donald Bonualas to ModCon Inc. on 7/16/09 for $40,000 211 Fulton St., David Hunter to Dewain Spatola on 7/16/09 for $70,900 607 S 2nd St., Dominick Lee to John J Webb on 7/16/09 for $77,500 812 E Vine St., Susan M Justis to Michael Sanderson on 7/16/09 for $128,900 406 Smith Rd., Nicholas A Gentile to Harold Garrison on 7/16/09 for $270,000 621 &C Pine St., Donna Souder Moore (Exec.) to Affordable Investments & Rentals LLC on 7/17/09 for $67,500 528 N 4th St., Chinaster Jones to Larry Waters on 7/17/09 for $109,000 13 Wildwood Ave., David G Bartels to Scott M Gallagher on 7/17/09 for $154,900 5 Rosewood Rd N., Dennis W Woolley to Silver Run Realty LLC on 7/20/09 for $76,500 2967 Boston St., David E Riley to George Lazos on 7/20/09 for $85,000 2723 Cedar St., George A Lazos to David Riley on 7/20/09 for $127,000 1812 Macavoy Terr., Juan Cerda to Robert Caulford on 7/20/09 for $170,000 UPPER DEERFIELD 40 Love Ln., Marion English to 40 Love Lane LLC on 7/10/09 for $1,500,000 1619 Third Ave., Tom W Dooley, Jr. to Richard R Jackson (Trust) on 7/16/09 for $50,000 184 Northville Rd., Dennis Spence to Brent Durham on 7/16/09 for $240,000 VINELAND 735 S Main Rd., Carolyn R Vannozzi to Rita M Falasca on 7/10/09 for $151,000 1020 Michael Ave., Edward Spellmon to Kuzmicz B&D Construction LLC on 7/13/09 for $20,000 Columbia Rd &C., James Thistle to Kevin T Sweeney on 7/13/09 for $60,000 793 S 8th St., Sec. of Housing & Urban Development (by Atty.) to Joseph J Reymer on 7/13/09 for $60,000 16 Victory Ave., New Directions Properties LLC to Joseph M Cook on 7/13/09 for $168,450 39 N Valley Ave., Laura Kousmine to Edward Gove on 7/14/09 for $159,000 1910 S Main Rd., Beatrice Kiritsis (Exec.) to Scott Blair on 7/14/09 for $185,000 3761 Panther Rd., U.S. Bank Trust (by Atty.) to Waca Investments LLC on 7/16/09 for $170,100 2500 Old Farm Dr., Tradition Homes At Vineland LLC to NVR Inc. (DBA) on 7/17/09 for $77,500 317 W Elmer St., Ruth Phillips (by Atty.) to Adriana Flores on 7/17/09 for $78,500 1966 Almond Rd., Roberto Rodriguez to Robert W Wozunk on 7/17/09 for $90,000 3137-39 Starlet Dr., Joseph Nemeth to Bela Nemeth on 7/17/09 for $134,000 1926 Roosevelt Blvd., Dorothy A Slaw (Est. by Exec.) to Assured Property Solutions LLC on 7/17/09 for $150,000 718 W Crescent Dr., Victoria Furman (Exec.) to Norman C Legore on 7/17/09 for $154,000 1943 Joel St., William G Harned to Gail L Guenther on 7/17/09 for $164,000 640 Wayne Ave., Raymond Lopez to Andres Rodriguez on 7/17/09 for $198,900 157 Hendricks Ave., Gina Marie Barber to Kenneth M Faison on 7/17/09 for $206,000 1037 E Chestnut Ave., Robert Linton to Diocese of Camden on 7/17/09 for $225,000 1733 Junior Dr., Robert Acosta to William J Gruman on 7/17/09 for $248,000 1165 Mayfair Ct., Gene Matalucci to John W King, II on 7/20/09 for $185,000 1155 Utopia Ln., Haggeo Gautier to Janiry Delvalle on 7/20/09 for $190,000 2009 BEST OF THE BEST Offers you all you would expect in apartment living and more, “a place to call home” 5 Large Floor Plans One & Two Bedroom Apartments and Three Bedroom Townhomes Features: • Washer & dryer in all apartments • Individual heat & central air • Spacious rooms & generous closets • Wall-to-wall carpeting • Pool & playground (856) 696-1929 1301 S. Lincoln Ave.Vineland, NJ www.oakvalleyapartments.com 30 YEAR TIMBERLINE Roof Shingle Upgrade With new roof system. Offer good to August 31, 2009. www.scottibrothersinc.com John’s Cell: (609) 381-4289 • Tom’s Cell: (856) 498-4841 WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | FREE ESTIMATES • FULLY INSURED LIC# 13VH00096200 Time is Running Out!!! … for the $8,000 CREDIT for Qualified First-Time Home Buyers. To qualify, you must purchase and settle a home before November 30, 2009. Call Maturo Realty, Inc. 856-696-2255 for more details and let one of our experienced, professional agents find a home for you today. the grapevine { 31 } Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. CALL VISIT PLAY 1234 All Summer Long At Our New West Landis Avenue Branch Now, those living or working on both sides of Vineland can enjoy the full banking services that have made our 175 S. Main Road headquarters Cumberland County’s fastest growing bank. Call 691-1234 to learn more. Or better yet, visit 1234 W. Landis during our Endless Summer Fridays 2. While you’re at our new branch, meet our professional staff and enter to win $1234 in the Capital moneycard grand prize drawing.† NEW BRANCH NOW OPEN At 1234 West Landis Avenue Next to the Wal-Mart Supercenter 2.02% APY* NOW Checking Account No minimum balance or monthly fees. Free logo checks. Unlimited check writing. No fee ATM/Debit card. Lobby Hours Both Locations: Monday – Wednesday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM Thursday & Friday: 8:30 AM – 6:00 PM Saturday: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM Drive-Thru Hours Both Locations: Monday – Thursday: 8:00 AM – 6:00 PM Friday: 8:00 AM – 7:00 PM Saturday: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM Or Anytime at CapitalBankNJ.com Plus! Spin The Endless Summer Fridays 2 Wheel of Prizes and Win! Opening any new account at either Capital branch during our Endless Summer Fridays 2 gets you a spin of the wheel for the chance to win a beach towel, hibachi, cooler bag, or camp chair. Se Habla Español All rates are guaranteed through December 31, 2009. Offer may be withdrawn at any time without previous notice. Fees may reduce earnings. *Annual Percentage Yield (APY). Interest rate may vary. Limitations may apply. †You need not open an account to play or win, nor do you need to be present at the time of the drawing to win. Drawing date: Friday, September 4, 2009. All federal, state and local tax liabilities and gratuities are winner’s responsibility. Our Focus Is You. 175 S. Main Road & 1234 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland, NJ • 856.690.1234 Member FDIC

Posted on August 26th, 2009 by by Mike

August 19, 2009

INSIDE BACK TO SCHOOL • PET CARE • LADIES’ ACOUSTIC NIGHT • SKEE BALL VOLUME 2 | ISSUE 28 | AUGUST 19, 2009 CONNECTING YOU { STORY AND PHOTOS: MICKEY BRANDT } T O V I N E L A N D . W E E K L Y. Visit us online www.grapevinenewspaper.com With SUVs and trucks in the junkyards and an equal number of new fuel-efficient cars on the road, dealers struggle with the logistics and used car dealers scream foul. I t’s 1999. You want power and style and room for your family. You can afford the vehicle and the gas. You go for the dream and buy a big SUV. Now, it’s 2009. The cost of gas has gone up—a lot. Maybe you don’t need so much power, maybe you’ll settle for a smaller car. Your SUV has a new moniker: It’s become a “clunker.” Local new car dealers are for the most part pleased with the “cash for clunkers” program. They think it’s a great thing for consumers and it has boosted their sales significantly. Ron Rossi, owner of Rossi Honda in Vineland describes a “dramatic increase in volume,” reporting 30 to 35 additional sales since the program began about a month ago. He notes that sometimes a customer doesn’t qualify for the program but decides to buy a car anyway. Ivan Nelson, general manager of Lilliston Ford in Vineland says, “We’ve sold everything. We’ve broken sales records in the car line.” He says his dealership has sold about 50 vehicles plus about 40 more at Lilliston Chrysler in Millville. Merle Graham, sales manager for Bob Novick Auto Mall in Bridgeton says “it’s been very successful,” and his business has sold around 30 vehicles so far. A spokesperson for Toyota of Vineland is too busy to comment. When this reporter calls on him, he says simply, “We’re knee deep in customers right now.” “It’s a great program,” Nelson says. “The politicians who put this together had great foresight in how it would excite the economy.” Continued on page 10 5 Anthony Olivio, 8, of Millville, at Loyle Lanes. FUN RAINY DAY ACTIVITIES STORY & PHOTOS: MICKEY BRANDT Summer is winding down and the kids are weary of the usual outdoor activities. Or maybe we’re about to have another round of rainy days. There are many indoor family activities that can keep the whole family happy (and get Mom that much closer to putting the crew back on the school bus), including these: 1. Too warm? Try ice skating, at Canlan Ice Sports right here in Vineland’s Industrial Park. There’s open skating seven afternoons a week, plus skating with a light show and DJ on weekend evenings. Skate rentals available. 2. Be a kid in a candy store? Visit Continued on page 11 “Clunkers” are scrapped at yards such as Giordano’s Recycling on North Mill Road. CALL VISIT PLAY NEW BRANCH NOW OPEN            All Summer Long At Our New West Landis Avenue Branch 1234 2.02% APY* NOW Checking Account No minimum balance or monthly fees. Free logo checks. Unlimited check writing. No fee ATM/Debit card. Now, those living or working on both sides of Vineland can enjoy the full banking services that have made our 175 S. Main Road headquarters Cumberland County’s fastest growing bank. Call 691-1234 to learn more. Or better yet, visit 1234 W. Landis during our Endless Summer Fridays 2. While you’re at our new branch, meet our professional staff and enter to win $1234 in the Capital moneycard grand prize drawing.† All rates are guaranteed through December 31, 2009. Offer may be withdrawn at any time without previous notice. Fees may reduce earnings. *Annual Percentage Yield (APY). Interest rate may vary. Limitations may apply. †You need not open an account to play or win, nor do you need to be present at the time of the drawing to win. Drawing date: Friday, September 4, 2009. All federal, state and local tax liabilities and gratuities are winner’s responsibility. Plus! Spin The Endless Summer Fridays 2 Wheel of Prizes and Win! Opening any new account at either Capital branch during our Endless Summer Fridays 2 gets you a spin of the wheel for the chance to win a beach towel, hibachi, cooler bag, or camp chair. Our Focus Is You. 175 S. Main Road & 1234 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland, NJ • 856.690.1234 Member FDIC Chinese Buffet • Take Out • Sushi 3.5% SALES TAX NOW OPEN FRUIT • PRODUCE • DELI • SANDWICHES 1362 S. Delsea Dr. Vineland • 856-362-5978 R Featuring (next to T& F Camera) Come Visit Our Recently Renovated Featuring Expanded Dining Area “Largest Buffet in Town” Over 100 Items that change daily including: Sushi Rolls, Shrimp, Crab Legs, Chicken, Mussels, Clams, Fish, Squid, Asian Cuisine, Appetizer, Soups, Salad, Fruit, Dessert, Cakes, Ice Cream and much more……….. ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET LUNCH BUFFET Mon.-Sat.: 11:00am-4:00pm Adult $6.50 Kids (3-11) $3.95 U TRY OAT GRE OR F SUBS CH! LUN DELI SPECIALS AMERICAN CHEESE BUFFALO CHICKEN BREAST PREMIUM HOMESTYLE TURKEY BREAST PREMIUM TAVERN HAM $ DIETZ & WATSON DIETZ & WATSON DIETZ & WATSON DIETZ & WATSON Dietz & Watson Meats and Cheeses $ SUGARBABY MELONS………$299ea IDAHO POTATOES……..5 lbs/$150 MANGO’S….$500 Box or 80¢ea RED BELL PEPPERS……..$129 lb. PICKLES……………….69¢ lb. ROMAINE LETTUCE……85¢ a head CANTELOUPES……..$139 ea. SEEDLESS WATERMELONS….$399ea GREEN BELL PEPPERS………..69¢lb JERSEY TOMATOES……….39¢ lb. MILK • EGGS • FRUIT BASKETS LISCIO BAKERY ROLLS • BREAD SPECIALS WITH ANY P U OVER RCHASE $15 FREE EGGS 2009 BEST OF THE BEST { 2 } the grapevine | AUGUST 19, 2009 2.49 lb. 5.99 lb. 5.99 lb. 4.99 lb. BRUNCH Sunday: 11:30am-4:00pm Adults $7.75 Kids (3-11) $4.50 $ DINNER www.chowsgarden.com 1101 N. 2nd St. Reema Plaza Rt.47 Millville, NJ Sun.-Thurs.: 4:00pm-9:00pm Adults $9.25 Kids (3-5) $4.50 Kids (6-11) $5.95 WEEKEND SEAFOOD BUFFET Served with 3/4 lb. Snow Crab Legs Fri.-Sat.: 4:00pm-10:00pm Adults $12.95 Kids (3-5) $5.00 Kids (6-11) $7.95 Buffet Take Out Available Senior Citizen Over 65 Years Old 10% OFF Buffet Only $ 856-327-3259 Sale Runs 8/19 to 8/23 Open 7 Days Mon-Sat 8am-7pm Sun 8am-2pm I Faces in the News Mazur Family Celebrates Summer About 100 people attended the annual Mazur barbeque, held on August 8. The event took place at 1060 S. Eighth Street, Vineland, the home of David W. Mazur, the patriarch of the Mazur family in southern New Jersey. The cookout started with the playing of the national anthem and a prayer by Pastor Stephen Cooper. A horseshoe contest was won by Kevin Gordan from Sicklerville, with Melvin Livingston of Vineland and Steven Pozzobon placing second and third, respectively. Winner of the bocce ball game was Thomas Laskay from Howell. Trophies were given to the best dancers—first place to Ruth Reynado (left, in photo) from Cape May Court House, second to Beatriz Besas (sitting), also of Cape May Court House, and third to Elisa Ford (center) from Oceanview. VRDC Awards Scholarships The Board of Directors of the Vineland Regional Dance Company (VRDC) awarded $14,950 in scholarships to a number of its 2009/2010 dancers. The VRDC presents scholarships annually to qualified dancers for summer programs. Awardees were chosen by an independent scholarship committee based on an essay, scholastic grades, an interview and overall presence, articulation, commitment, technique and dedication to dance. Receiving scholarships to attend outside summer programs were: Laura Schwegel of Vineland, $100; Andrea and Nicole Mitchell of Dorothy, $100 each; Claire Zabielski of Greenwich, $250; and Erin Kane of Millville, $350. Gwen Baraneicki-Zwil of Bridgeton was awarded a $750 scholarship to attend the Glenda Brown Choreographic Project in Kansas, and Jenna Silicato of Delaware received a $900 scholarship to attend the Craft of Choreography in Seattle, Washington. The prestigious Marie Bayuk Scholarship of $1,500 was awarded to Elizabeth Tkaczynski of Bridgeton; she also attended the Glenda Brown Project. Several VRDC dancers also received scholarships in May from Regional Dance America/Northeast (RDA/NE). Erin Kane received a $500 cash scholarship to attend the Glenda Brown Project, and Jenna Silicato received the RDA/NE scholarship of $1,650 to attend the Craft of Choreography. VRDC’s Ballet Mistress Kelly Bocchetti Millar received the first Jonathan Phelps Scholarship of $500 for being the most outstanding modern dancer at the festival, in addition to a matching $500 grant from the VRDC Board of Directors to attend the Craft of Choreography. VRDC dancers receiving $250 scholarships from the Philadelphia Dance Theater to attend its summer intensive program were: Erin Kane, Elizabeth Tkaczynski, Claire Zabielski, Valentina Parente of Pittsgrove, Marialena Melillo of Vineland and Juliana Martine of Vineland. Members of the Vineland Regional Dance Company for the 2009-2010 season are: soloists Erin Kane and Elizabeth Tkaczynski and full company dancers Gwen Baraniecki-Zwil, Marialena Melillo, Andrea Mitchell, Nicole Mitchell, Valentina Parente, Laura Schwegel, Jenna Silicato, Claire Zabielski, Aria Asselta of Vineland, Melissa Carabrese of Vineland, Julia Martini of Vineland and Mia Klekos of Vineland. Apprentices for this year are Carlina Filluzzi, Kristi Jackson, Adina Luciano, Juliana Martine and Spencer Wetherington. The Board of Directors was also proud to award each VRDC dancer attending an outside summer dance intensive a $500 scholarship to the VRDC’s Summer Program. These scholarship awards totaled $6,500. In the photo, back row from left: Jenna Silicato, Erin Kane, Gwen Baraniecki-Zwil, Elizabeth Tkaczyski, Valentina Parente. Front row: Laura Schwegel, Nicole Mitchell, Andrea Mitchell, Claire Zabielski, Marialena Melillo. Twice as Nice Twins Dereck Jr. (DJ) and Domenick (Magic) Stubbs of Vineland turned 3months-old on August 13. Happy 3 months. We love you! Love Mommy & Daddy (Dominique & Dereck Sr.) WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | SOUTH VINELAND 15-16 STATE, REGIONAL CHAMPS The South Vineland Senior League baseball team beat a New York team to become the Senior Little League Baseball Eastern Regional champions last week. Next, they advanced to participate in the league’s World Series in Bangor, Maine over the weekend. They opened by beating a team from Italy in the first round on Sunday. the grapevine { 3 } SEND US YOUR FACES — IT’S FREE! Get your photos published in The Grapevine… birthdays, engagements, weddings, anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them the address listed on p. 4. More Faces in the News on page 5 I Editor’s Letter Boys of Summer High Efficiency Heating and Cooling and Water Heating Equipment Eligible for up to $1500 in Federal Tax Credits and up to $400 in Rebates As you look through the Faces in the News pages in this week’s issue (and in the past couple of issues), you’ll see photos of several Vineland baseball teams that have earned district, state and regional titles in recent weeks. For all the teams that have won these tournaments, thousands more across the country have fallen short of their goals to play in the Little League World series or other season finale games to cap the 2009 baseball season. But participating is enough to create long-lasting memories for most kids, no matter how well or poorly their teams play. This column is being written from Cooperstown, NY, home of the National Baseball Hall of Fame. What you may not know is that this area is also home to the Cooperstown All Star Village, the ultimate youth travel baseball experience for children 12 and under. All Star Village is a place where hundreds of pre-teen boys from all across the country gather to—quite literally—eat, sleep and play baseball for an entire week. My son’s team is enjoying their time here as they stay in bunkhouses with their teammates and coaches and play two games per day against some of the best teams between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. The kids are playing well in the National Cooperstown Tournament of Champions (I’m missing one of their games as I write this column), but this is definitely a situation where, “it doesn’t matter if you win or lose,” it’s WHERE you play the games. We haven’t yet visited the National Baseball Hall of Fame, though we’re very excited about checking it out before we head home. This baseball Mecca extends well beyond the grounds of the Hall of Fame. The entire region is ground zero for all things baseball and those who enjoy (or obsess about) the national pastime are in heaven while they’re here. This week will be one that my son will surely never forget. And while he’s the one actually playing in games here, my wife and daughter and I are making lasting memories of our own. My son’s AAU travel baseball team, the South Jersey Riptides, has been playing together and raising funds for this trip for four years. It’s something they’ve strived for and anticipated for much of their young lives. In the meantime, we’ve lived the lives of travel sports families everywhere for years. As I talked to many folks around Vineland in the weeks leading up to this trip, I’ve heard lots of “been there, done that” statements from parents whose children swam, cheered or played football, baseball, basketball, soccer or other competitive sports. The lifestyle of the travel sports family is often the same. True family vacations are often replaced by weekend or week-long tournaments throughout the region, and in some cases, around the globe. We’ve made many sacrifices to get here, but we’ll never look back with regret about doing whatever it takes to give our kids the opportunity to an experience like this trip… A trip that gave us a new appreciation for the lyrics, “Take me out to the ball game.” { CONTENTS } 1 CARS: Stimulus or Bust? Cash for Clunkers” program has its advocates…and its critics. MICKEY BRANDT 1 5 Fun Rainy Day Activities Or things to do when the heat gets unbearable. MICKEY BRANDT 3, 5 6 Faces in the News Double the Fun The first Youth Fest pairs up with the International and Cultural Festival. TODD NOON 7 Life in a Red State The Jersey tomato reigns supreme in August. DEBORAH A. EIN Serving Vineland for over 100 years! 8 Conflicts and Confusion Last week’s Board of Education meeting had both. LEE BURKE 12 Community Calendar 691-1950 State Lic. # 12089 14-15 PET CARE 16 Entertainment 18-19 HOME & GARDEN 25 The Origins of Skee Ball A local inventor gave up his rights to the game. VINCE FARINACCIO 25 22 Vintage Vineland DINING: New York is for Foodies The Big Apple attracts a special kind of tourist. STEPHEN WILSON BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIAL STARTS 25 Recipe Corner Another way to use those Jersey tomatos—bruschetta. LISA DINUNZIO { STAFF } MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor LORI GOUDIE Art Director GAIL EPIFANIO Controller JACK EPIFANIO Distribution SHERRY MUNYAN Advertising Executive MARIE HALPIN-GALLO Advertising Executive PATTY ALI Graphic Designer MARYANNE BERTRAND Advertising Assistant Get the kids in for their haircuts before school starts! STOP IN TO THE SALON & Enter To Win A Back Pack Full of School Supplies! Drawing 9/05/09 { 4 } the grapevine | AUGUST 19, 2009 —MIKE EPIFANIO, Editor & Publisher KIDS HAIRCUTS 14 Years & Younger ONLY $8 WOW (cannot be combined with any other offers or specials.) exp 08/31/09 Get your Loved One A Gift Certificate Today The Grapevine 3660 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361 PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816 EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2009. All rights reserved. HOURS Mon. – Wed. 9-5pm, Thurs. & Fri. 9-7pm Sat. 8:30-3pm & Sun., 9-1 pm WALK-INS WELCOME! NO APPOINTMENTS NECESSARY 5006 E. Landis Ave.Vineland (856) 691-2202 I Faces in the News YMCA Celebrates Krause’s 98th Birthday Last week, the YMCA of Vineland surprised long-time member Ted Krause with a celebration of his 98th birthday. Pictured here with Lisa Scheetz, Krause has been a member of the YMCA of Vineland for 39 years. He swims at the facility five days per week, works five days a week, and attends prayer services seven days a week. He explains: “I love to swim, and it’s very important to my health. I plan to keep swimming at the Y until the good Lord calls me.” YMCA regulars recognize that Ted Krause exemplifies healthy living and were happy to salute his 98 years. Get Fit, Stay Fit Work In Progress Fitness Studio sponsored a boot camp at Waltman Park in Millville. Fifteen people participated in running and obstacle challenges. The next boot camp will be in early fall, check our event page at WorkInProgress FitnessStudio.com for more information or call 765-3482. 1853 Vine Rd. Vineland 691-4848 Fax: 856-691-2294 Specials For August 19-22 EBT marcaccimeats@verizon.net FRESH FRESH GROUND CHICKEN HAMS LEGS BEEF TRUE CUT WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | AVERAGE (20-25 lb) .85 .99¢ $1890 ¢ lb. (10 LB BAG) lb. Seminole Sequel: A Second Championship of 2009 The Vineland-based 9-year old-South Jersey Seminoles won their second tournament championship of the summer season, capturing the Medford Killer B Tournament title. The undefeated Seminoles beat Medford 8-3 to win the championship. Pictured hoisting their championship trophies in front row, from left: Julian DelValle, Jordan Rodriguez, Kyle Garret, Jared DeWinne, Tito Valentin, Josh Hood. Second row: Shawn Vazquez, Dominic McGlaughlin, Johnny Alongi, Sammy Celebre, Lou Pinotti. Back row: Coaches Carlos Rodriguez, Jose DelValle, Chuck Pinotti, Joseph DeSimine. Not pictured: Sammy DeSimine, Marcos DelValle. The Seminoles, who will advance to the 10 and under age group for the upcoming fall season, will hold tryouts at their home field, Melini Park in Buena, on Monday, August 24 at 6 p.m. If you have a player interested in playing with the Seminoles (must be 10 or younger on April 30, 2010), call 609-992-9421. OUR PORK SIRLOIN FAMOUS CUBES STEAKS BACON $ 89 $ 59 $ 59 Come in and check out our great selections and prices on all your Bar B Q Meats! the grapevine { 5 } 1 lb. 4 lb. 2 lb. I Downtown Vineland { TODD NOON, EXEC. DIR., VDID/MAIN STREET } Double the Fun The International Food and Cultural Festival pairs with the Youth Fest this Saturday on the Avenue. B uilding partnerships strengthens both sides and it shows in the results. For that reason, I have always believed in the benefits achieved by organizations collaborating with each other for the greater good. This weekend is an example of such a collaboration—VDID/Main Street Vineland partnering with the Mayor’s Youth Council to produce a fun time downtown for all. Our Third Annual International Food and Cultural Festival is coming up this Saturday (or Sunday, if it rains), from 3 to 8 p.m., on the 500 block of Landis Avenue. Those who are familiar with the festival from past years know that it presents a tour of various cultures from around the world in our own backyard—a “virtual 18 -H o l e C o u r s e H a n d i c a p – A c c e ss i b l e vacation” right on Landis Avenue. You can sample the French, Greek, Hispanic, Italian, and Jamaican cultural traditions—food, musicians, dancers, artists, and crafters—and then come back for a helping of some down-home food and music. Speaking of music, we will have headliners such as Frank Marone and the Italians, Joe Rivera and Zona Zero, and Dun Phalyn. All this and no passport necessary! But that’s not all. Our popular Homemade Wine Competition will return and we will be introducing a Tomato Sauce/Gravy Competition. Along with naming the winners of these two competitions, we will also be announcing the winner of the Little Miss & Mister Cherry Tomato photo contest, the voting for which has been going on all summer. The winners will ride on our float in our annual Holiday Parade on November 28. While the festival is going on, the Mayor’s Youth Council—a fine group of students who could be the young leaders of tomorrow—will be holding its Youth Fest on Sixth Street, between Landis Avenue and Elmer Street. Starting at noon, it will feature activities for children and adults, a silent auction, artists and artisans, live bands, and children’s games. It will end with a concert at Hangar 84 in the evening. Two great events downtown on the same day…the result of new organizations partnering to double the fun. It doesn’t get much better than that! *** While our Promotions Committee has been hard at work on these summertime events, some ceremonies of a quieter but no less significant nature have marked some important work of the Design Committee. With more and more new facades brightening downtown storefronts—and construction underway on others—we have been honoring those businesses that have successfully completed the City’s façade improvement program with medallions bearing the likeness of Charles K. Landis. Ceremonies for the presentation of the first four medallions—to Bain’s Deli, Sun National Bank, Q-Ball Billiards, and NAPA Auto Parts—have already taken place. With more than 70 businesses participating in the façade improvement program, these decorative medallions will grace the fronts of quite a few downtown buildings and show further proof of the changing face of downtown Vineland. *** Remember that for all our downtown events, please support the downtown merchants and businesses. If you can stop into any of them during the events, please do so. If you do not have an opportunity during that time, make a point of coming back at a later time to stop in. The businesses, and we at VDID/Main Street Vineland, will greatly appreciate your support and patronage. I For more information on VDID/Main Street Vineland’s “endless summer” of events and activities, call the office at 794-8653 or visit www.mainstreetvineland.org. { 6 } the grapevine | AUGUST 19, 2009 (1) Round of Golf for a Group of 4, FREE Hot Dog or Nachos & (1) FREE Soda – Only $25.00 Hot Dogs• Chili/Cheese • Nachos • Sausage • Sodas & Soft Pretzels Indoor & Patio Seating Gift Certificates Available Wednesday N ig h t S p e c i a l 5pm- close Fund Raising Opportunities for your school or organization Senior Citizen Rates • Visa & Mastercard Accepted $5.00 until 5PM • $6.00 5PM to Close B i r th d a y P a r t y P a c k a g e s 73 Landis Ave. Upper Deerfield Twp. Located next to Rita’s Water Ice YOUR HAIR NEEDS A SPA DAY TOO! Put The Shine & Moisture Back Into Your Hair W i t h B o t a n i c a l H a i r & S c a l p T h e r a p y SM A potent sensory experience and intense repair for hair. It begins with a scalp, neck and shoulder massage—with up to 12 aroma-therapeutic essential oils—to increase scalp circulation while targeting pressure points that release tension. Then hair is treated with one of two intense repair formulas: Moisture Immersion, for up to 71% softer, smoother strands; or Strength Infusion, for up to 71% more resistance to combing breakage. At every step, aroma-therapy elevates, soothes and recharges. Call and schedule your Hair Spa Today! 856-453-PUTT (7888) www.landislinks.com Hours: 11 am-10pm Daily Video Games Back to School Savings Purchase a Liter of Shampoo & Conditioner & Get A Styling Product for 1/2 PRICE! With This Ad – Exp: 8/31/09 (Cannot be combined with any other offers) I Gleanings { DEBORAH A. EIN, MANAGING EDITOR } Life in a Red State The kitchen on canning day is very rosy, and allows us to enjoy Jersey tomatoes all year long. aving nothing to do with politics, the title of this column, I must admit, is taken directly from a chapter title in Barbara Kingsolver’s book, Animal, Vegetable, Miracle. In the book, Kingsolver tells of a journey her family, living in rural Virginia, made in trying to eat only locally grown food over the course of one year. The book’s chapters run from January to December, detailing what they did and learned each month of their journey. “Life in a Red State” is the August chapter. For the past two years, I have used the Kingsolver “Family Secret Tomato Sauce” recipe for the sauce I have canned into quart-sized jars. The “secret” part of the Kingsolver recipe is that it includes cinna- H mon and nutmeg, which are often used in tomato dishes in Greek and some Middle Eastern cuisines. This year, I’m looking for a recipe for an Italian sauce that will go better over pasta. Living in Hammonton with many Italian neighbors making their gravy, I should be able to find a recipe that makes my family exclaim, “Now, that’s Italian.” Except no one seems willing to hand over their secrets. This Saturday, at the International Food and Cultural Festival on Landis Avenue, a Tomato Sauce/Gravy Competition will be held. I don’t know whether recipes will be available, but maybe at least the winners can be convinced to supply them. Last year, my friend Michelle and I canned peaches together, then divvied up the jars with the golden prizes. Amish women, too, get together for “canning bees,” visiting each other’s houses in a regular sequence to make sure that everyone has what they need stashed away in their cupboards for the winter. Making a party out of work is always a good idea, although canning can be as relaxing a solitary project as it is a joint venture. We didn’t get together for putting up tomato sauce last year, partly because Michelle and I had different philosophies about what to do with the tomato harvest. To can or to freeze, that is the question. She likes to cook up meat sauce and for safety reasons must freeze it. I like to be able to grab a jar of sauce without having to thaw it out. Kingsolver shares my opinion. “I’m not the world’s only mother, I’m sure,” she writes, “who frequently plans dinner in the half-hour between work and dinnertime. Thawing takes time…. A jar of spaghetti sauce, a box of pasta, and a grate of cheese will save us.” This year, Michelle and I might flip-flop. She wants to try canning and add the meat in when she heats up the sauce for a meal…and I’m thinking about (while tomatoes are in season) doubling the recipe each time I make a batch and freezing some for a later meal. That way, I can pick tomatoes straight from the vine. (If I were Maria von Trapp, I would have to list the unique scent of tomato vines as one of my favorite things.) Even so, I will be canning before the season is over. For me, it’s more of a September chapter, however. I’ll go to a farm market for a basket or two of seconds. When the kids are out the door and on the bus, I will heat up the kitchen with some boiling pots of water, and before you know it, I’ll have the tomatoes in different stages—colanders will be full of rinsed ones, some will be scored and dipped in the steaming water, others will be in the sink full of cold water with skins peeling away, more will be in a state of puree in the food processor or bubbling in pans on the stove or in the crockpot. Later in the day, I’ll be ladling the red sauce into the steamed jars and placing the jars into the boiling water to seal the lids. By time the kids get home from school, the jars will be lined up on the counter. “What’s for dinner?” they’ll ask. “Noodles and sauce,” will be my answer. “Thought so,” one of them will say, to the ping of a jar being sealed. I If anyone would like to share a bulk recipe for Italian sauce, your secrets are safe with me. MEMBERSHIP “Building A Better You” SEPTEMBER MEMBER ROUND-UP rejoin or join the YMCA as a full facility member and receive 50 % off the Joining fee Pay the Annual Full Facility Member fee in full- no Joining fee CHILD CARE Register Now For our Child Care programs: School Age Care (Kindergarten to 8th grade) 9 locations – 8 Vineland Elementary Schools -YMCA Our school age care features the Horizon Foundation’s Healthy U program. Toddler Program (18 months to 3 years) Limited Space Our program includes activities to promote growth in all areas of development Mortgage rates are now the lowest in decades! WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | The YMCA of Vineland is a licensed Child Care provider. Prior to employment, all staff thoroughly screened and background checked. All Child Care are trained and experienced staff. Newfield National Bank offers various mortgage options along with knowledgeable professionals for a stress-free experience. Dial 1-800-690-3440 extension 1107 or 1108 to talk to your hometown mortgage professional. YOUTH SPORTS Outdoor Soccer ages 3-5 Indoor Basketball ages 6-14 Youth Sports Open House Parent Meeting Saturday, September 12, 2009 10:00am at the YMCA. Visit our website: www.ccaymca.org or call (856)691-0030 for more information the grapevine { 7 } YMCA of Vineland Cumberland Cape Atlantic YMCA 1159 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08360 Member FDIC Mortgage Center 12 North West Blvd., Newfield NJ 08344 1-800-690-3440 x1107 or 1108 www.newfieldbank.com I Civic Engagement { LEE BURKE } Conflicts and Confusion At the BOE meeting, search rules and personnel transfers dominate talks, which become strained at times. A Visit Our New Website! www.yourrentalcity.com t the August 12 Board of Education meeting, board solicitor Robert DeSanto rendered his legal opinion on four board members’ possible conflict of interests regarding the search for a new superintendent. Board members Frank DiGiorgio, Anthony Fanucci, Patricia Phillips and Thomas Ulrich all have immediate family members who are employed by the school district. The New Jersey School Boards Association (NJSBA) is conducting the search on behalf of the district and believes the four members may face ethics charges if they participate in the remaining second and third rounds of the interview process. DeSanto noted there is no existing legal opinion, but said it is possible that a board member may re-enter the process under certain conditions. He said he based his opinion on the State Ethics Commission (SEC) advisory A30-07 related to another matter of an internal candidate supervising a spouse and, therefore, could not be objective or impartial. DeSanto advised that a conflicted board member may wish to re-enter the process, if an internal candidate fails to make it to the final round. If they choose to do so, information on other candidates gleaned from the second round would be “off the table” said DeSanto. He added, however, that some questions could be asked from the second and third rounds to “get up to speed.” He suggested that a board member ask, in good conscience, if they can make an “informed, inde- pendent and objective decision.” As of Thursday, the only remaining internal candidate among the six recommended by NJSBA is Dr. Mary Gruccio. The next two rounds of interviews will take place on August 31 and September 1. During the public comment period on agenda items, Deanna Speranza-Murphy, a fifth grade resource room teacher at Durand Elementary School for 12 years, addressed the board with a detailed statement of her late notification on being transferred to D’Ippolito Elementary School. She said this was the second year in a row that this has occurred and that Principal Dale Hoover assured her in July she would remain at Durand. Murphy asked the board for its consideration of her appeal of the central administration’s decision to transfer her. Before the board could respond, DeSanto cautioned the board on any discussion based on confidentiality issues involving other employees. Superintendent Ottinger asked that Ruth Polof, director of special education, explain the circumstances of her decision in the matter of personnel transfers. Polof stated the reason for Murphy’s transfer was that no students are enrolled at Durand for the coming year that would be in need of a resource room teacher. She further explained that when situations like this arise, an attempt is made to move personnel to “try and make the best fit based on student needs.” Board members Phillips, Ulrich and DeWinne raised questions on why late notice occurred, if there { 8 } the grapevine | AUGUST 19, 2009 Additional Discounts: • All orders booked for any future event and paid for in full* will receive ADDITIONAL 10% discount! • If you spend over $1000 you’ll get another 5% discount, or if you spend over $3500 take off another 5%! Fine Print: Maximum of 25% discount can be given on rental changes. Discounts do not apply to state taxes or damage waiver charges. This coupon is not valid with any other offer or discounts at this time. Also, discounts do not apply to: generators, comfort stations, chair cover/sashes, frozen drink machines, and 60’ or 80’ wide tents. * Payments made in full are non-refundable. 1297 West Landis Ave, Vineland, NJ 08360 856-696-1666 • yourrentalcity.com augustcoupon@rental-city.com Own Your Memories Rent Everything Else! were seniority issues and if other employees were involved in this transfer. Maryanne Greenfield, executive director of personnel, explained that the process involves more than 2,000 applications, is time consuming, and could be done sooner without board approval, but because of “letters flying around” she still has some for board approval. She assured the board the district “doesn’t take lightly” these issues. Ulrich noted inconsistencies in the names on the list of transfers from the previous week’s work session and what the board was being asked to vote on. Board president Frank Giordano expressed confusion on updates provided since the work session. Ottinger explained he investigated the Murphy transfer and of two other Durand teachers, and supported the decision to recommend the transfers. In a roll call vote, the board approved the acceptance of personnel recommendations with the exception of the transfer issue referred to as item No. 5. In the final board member remarks section of the meeting, Ulrich brought up the transfer issue again saying the principals and district supervisors need to deal with employees in a straight-forward manner. He felt there was a breakdown in communications and that the administration “needs to be fair and consistent” in its personnel policies to avoid having the board intercede. Ottinger attempted to respond to Ulrich, but was cut off by Giordano who said he wasn’t going to open up the issue again. Ottinger objected and pressed to be heard and after a heated exchange of words, Giordano declared Ottinger “out of order.” Ottinger referred to Giordano as a “dictator” and said the public “needs to take a real hard look at this board.” After a brief silence, board member Diamaris Rios asked Giordano why Ottinger “doesn’t have a right to respond.” Giordano relented and Ottinger explained he had investigated the transfer matter and had to deal with letters written to board members. He said the board could have chosen not to intercede. I The next regularly scheduled meeting of the BOE is 7 p.m., Wednesday, August 26, at 625 Plum Street. For Every Woman’s Imaging Needs, We’re Here For You When your physician orders an ultrasound or DEXA scan, South Jersey Healthcare has five area locations to serve you. And now each location features digital mammography for a faster and more accurate diagnosis. But that’s not all we offer. With overlapping services, no matter what type of imaging your doctor requests—CT, MRI, fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, interventional radiology, or just a general x-ray—our state-of-the-art technology and the region’s largest and most experienced radiology group will accurately report the results to your doctor in a timely manner. So when you need a digital mammogram, DEXA scan, or any other radiology services, look to South Jersey Healthcare. We’re here for you. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | west40autodetailing.vpweb.com (Bluebell Rd & Rt. 40 Vineland) Auto Detailing & Headlight Restora on WEST 40 Call our appointment line: 1-866-SJH-APPT www.SJHealthcare.net the grapevine { 9 } (856) 305-2884 SJH Regional Medical Center • SJH Elmer Hospital • SJH Bridgeton Imaging SJH Millville Imaging • SJH Hammonton Imaging CARS Continued from page 1 “Cash for clunkers” is the catchy name for the Car Allowance Rebate System (CARS) begun on July 24 with two goals— aiding the ailing car industry and improving fuel economy in the fleet on the road. To qualify, trade-in vehicles have to be less than 25 years old and have a fuel economy of 18 miles per gallon or less. (Regulations vary for trucks and SUVs). The size of the rebate ($3,500 or $4,500) depends on the fuel economy of the replacement vehicle. The customer is credited with the rebate and the government is supposed to reimburse the dealership. Other dealer incentives can be offered on top of the CARS credit. Cars submitted under the program are junked, not resold. Customers are supposed to receive the scrap value of their trade-in, minus $50 for dealer costs. Dealers destroy the engines of the clunkers by running a silicate solution through them. Then, they send them to approved scrap yards for demolition and recycling. A Department of Transportation analysis shows, so far, that the average mileage of the trade-ins has been 15.8 mpg and of Lilliston Ford general manager Ivan Nelson is pleased that all these “clunkers” are accumulating. Each one represents the sale of a new vehicle. the new vehicles, 25.4 mpg—a 61 percent increase. Despite the “clunker” designation, many trade-ins are less than 10 years old and run well, although with low gas mileage. “It should have been called ‘cash for gas guzzlers’,” says Graham. Vehicle leases of at least five years qualify for the credit. As of last Friday, a customer can arrange to buy a car the dealer doesn’t have yet. Factory orders now qualify for the credit. While dealers are excited about the boost in sales, they are less pleased with the federal government’s administration Clunker FAQs: May I receive or use more than one credit under the CARS program? No, the CARS Act specifies that not more than one credit may be issued to a single person, not more than one credit may be issued for joint registered owners of a single eligible trade-in vehicle, and that only one credit under this program may be applied toward the purchase or lease of any single new vehicle. What is the value of the credit for the purchase or lease of a new passenger car? The value of the credit for the purchase or lease of a new passenger car depends upon the difference between the combined fuel economy of the vehicle that is traded in and that of the new vehicle that is purchased or leased. If the new vehicle has a combined fuel economy that is at least four, but less than 10, miles per gallon higher than the traded-in vehicle, the credit is $3,500. If the new vehicle has a combined fuel economy value that is at least 10 miles per gallon higher than the traded-in vehicle, the credit is $4,500. The value fuel efficiency requirements for SUVs, vans, and trucks vary. Is this program only for American cars? No. You may trade in or buy a domestic or a foreign vehicle. I just traded in my old car for a new vehicle last month. Can I go back to the dealer and apply for a credit? If you purchased the vehicle before July 1 you are not eligible for credit. If you purchased the new vehicle on or after July 1, 2009 you may be eligible for credit. Please contact your dealer to see if you meet the eligibility requirements. Can I use this credit in combination with manufacturer’s rebates and discounts? The CARS Act requires the dealer to use the credit under the CARS program in addition to any rebates or discounts advertised by the dealer or offered by the new vehicle’s manufacturer. The dealer may not use the credit to offset these rebates and discounts. Can I combine this credit with other government incentives? Yes. You can combine this with other State and Federal incentives, such as the hybrid vehicle credit. In addition to this credit, will I get the full value of my trade-in vehicle? No. The law requires your trade-in vehicle to be destroyed. Therefore, the value you negotiate with the dealer for your trade-in vehicle is not likely to exceed its scrap value. The law requires the dealer to disclose to you an estimate of the scrap value of your trade-in vehicle. SOURCE: www.cars.gov National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) CARS Hotline at (866)-CAR-7891 of the program. Most think automotive industry representatives should have had more input in designing the program, or at least received some training or preparation in how to operate it. Rossi thinks the government rushed into the program without enough thought. “Overall I like the program,” he says. “But we’re doing this on the fly. I’m a believer in doing a thing right and not doing it too fast.” The Web site that dealers have to use to get approval for transactions draws ire. “It’s a blend of high tech and extremely archaic systems,” says Nelson. “They couldn’t have made it more difficult.” All dealers are still waiting for their reimbursements, even though the law requires they be sent within 10 days. “We’re the highest in the area to get paid,” says Nelson, “and we have two.” At press time, Rossi and Novick were still waiting for their first government payments. Nationally, it has been estimated that less than 2 percent of the $900 million owed to dealers has been paid. There have been reports of dealers in other areas making customers sign documents agreeing to reimburse dealers if government payments don’t come. “It’s a leap of faith, show me my money,” says Graham. Rossi points out that older Hondas don’t qualify as clunkers because their fuel economy ratings are higher than 18 mpg. He says that’s no problem because he’s getting a lot of domestic auto tradeins. He also mentions that the scrapping of hundreds of thousands of vehicles will impact the availability and price of lowerend used cars. Lilliston representatives are as knowledgeable as possible about CARS, according to Nelson, because they’ve had extensive in-house training. “We’re the area’s clunker experts. We’ve been students of the system since the law was signed,” he says. Graham mentions that having enough new cars to sell could turn into a limiting factor in the program’s success. He notes that many factories are shut down in the recession. “The biggest problem is inventory. We’ve been pretty much wiped out of certain models.” Not all car dealers are happy with “cash for clunkers.” Those who sell older cars are suffering because of it. “It’s killing us,” says Rick Medio, vice president of R and R Car Sales in Vineland. “I used to sell 10 to 25 cars a week, now I sell no cars per week.” He thinks it’s unfair for the government to subsidize new car dealers at his expense. Now, people can buy a new car for only a little more than a used car. “They’re buying brand new cars for $8,000, banks are giving them the loans just like that,” Medio says. He notes the similarity to the recent housing market CASH FOR CLUNKERS REGULATIONS: • You are required to leave your tradein vehicle at the dealership and sign over the title to the trade-in vehicle at the time of the deal. • Your vehicle must be less than 25 years old on the trade-in date • Only purchases or leases of new vehicles qualify. • Generally, trade-in vehicles must get 18 or less MPG (some very large pickup trucks and cargo vans have different requirements). • Trade-in vehicles must be registered and insured continuously for the full year preceding the trade-in. • You don’t need a voucher; dealers will apply a credit at purchase. • Program runs through November 1, 2009, or when the funds are exhausted, whichever comes first. • The program requires the scrapping of your eligible trade-in vehicle and that the dealer disclose to you an estimate of the scrap value of your tradein. The scrap value, minus $50 the dealer keeps for administrative fees, will be in addition to the rebate, and not in place of the rebate. • To participate in the CARS program, you do not have to sign an agreement to pay back the dealer the CARS credit amount if the deal is rejected. What to bring to dealer to qualify: • One-year Proof of Insurance. • Proof of Registration going back at least one-year. • “Clear” title (free of any liens or other encumbrances). I • The vehicle manufacturer date found on the driver’s door or door jamb is less than 25 years old when you trade it in. Once you are at the dealer you will be asked to certify to the following under penalty of law. The above documents will provide proof to the dealer to assist in this certification process. • The trade-in is drivable. • You are the registered owner, and have been for at least the last year. • The trade-in has been continuously insured for the last year. • The trade-in is titled in your name and has been for the last year. • You have not previously participated in the CARS program. where people ended up with homes they couldn’t pay for. “They want a car; they don’t even care if they can pay for it. I think it’s going to be an ugly, ugly mess,” he says. So, as with so much in economics, and life too, there are predictable and unpredictable consequences of the “cash for clunkers” program. There’s a horde of SUVs and trucks in the junkyards and a matching number of fuel-efficient cars on the road, while dealers struggle with their computers and used-car dealers scream foul. There are even people who are keeping that big SUV, or buying a new, bigger one. “It’s a fascinating program, we’ll see,” Rossi says. I { 10 } the grapevine | AUGUST 19, 2009 Rainy Day Fun Continued from page 1 Incredible Bulk in Millville where what used to be called “penny candy” is plentiful. Buttons—the little candies on paper— jelly beans and Jelly Bellys, necklaces, gummi everythings, you can also of course buy in bulk. Blowouts now on Easter eggs and peeps. 3. Take your 3-year-old bowling? Loyle Lanes Bowling Center in Vineland has “bumper bowling” where remote-activated rails block the gutters. In a recent remodeling, the family recreation arena added, among other improvements, 10-foot high video screens that display music videos, sports events, and cable and Internet programming. 4. See fine pottery or work with clay yourself? Cumberland County College’s Clay College in Millville not only showcases the work of students and artists, but offers open studio hours for adults and children to experience claymaking. Onetime or continuing series of classes. 5. Something for nothing? A free double feature goes up on the screens of Regal Cinemas in Vineland every Tuesday and Wednesday morning at 10 a.m. all summer. Ratings are G and PG. Showings in multiple theaters assure no one is turned away. • Canlan Ice Sports, 2111 Industrial Way, Vineland, 856-691-2222. No kids under 10 without an adult. Weekdays: $7. Weekends: $9 afternoon or evening. Rentals $3. • Incredible Bulk, 101 N. High St., Millville, 856-327-3332. Open Mon.-Thur. 9-5:30; Fri. 9-7; Sat. 9-4. • Loyle Lanes Bowling Center, 3565 S. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 856-825-2000. Opens 9 a.m. every day. Various prices. • Clay College, 104 N. High St., Millville, 856-765-0988. Gallery open Mon. and Tues. 12-9; Wed. 11-9; Thur.-Sat. 10-9; Sun. 11-7. Single class: $25, includes materials. Series: various fees. • Regal Cinemas, 3849 S. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 856-327-0018. www.teamnissan.com CASH FOR CLUNKERS $500 ADDITIONAL WITH THIS AD NEW IN STOCK UNITS OFF WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | 1715 S Delsea Dr. Vineland, NJ 08360-6308 • (856) 696-CARS WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH PAST, PRESENT OR FUTURE ADS AD MUST BE VALIDATED BEFORE PURCHASING EXP AUG 31ST,2009 Do You Have Dangerous Trees? Call For Your Free Evaluation Good, Clean Work At Reasonable Prices Don’t Be Fooled. Call A Certified Aborist. For All Your Tree Care. the grapevine { 11 } Pruning • Tree Removals • Storm Damage Elevations • Shrubbery Trimming • Stump Grinding Owner Operated Local Business • Fully Insured Owner Working At All Jobs! FREE ESTIMATES www.forresttreesurgeon.com 10% Off Any Tree Service Forrest Tree Surgeon • 856-694-0922 Must present coupon at time of estimate. Not valid with other offers. Exp. 9/12/09 BUYING GOLD & SILVER • Gold Jewelry • Silver Jewelry • Sterling Silver Flatware • Gold Rings • Gold Bracelets • Gold Chains • Gold Class Rings • Dental Gold • Other Gold or Silver Items • U.S. Eagles • K-Rands • Pandas • Mexican-Pesos • Canadian Maple Leaf • Gold and Silver Bars • National Currency • U.S. Paper Money 1864 to 1922 • Coin Collections • Estates I COMMUNITY CALENDAR HAPPENINGS WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19 Zoning Board Monthly Meeting. City Hall, Council Chambers on the 2nd floor, Seventh and Wood sts. The meeting offers residents the opportunity to voice their opinions about applications for variances from zoning regulations. 7 p.m. discussion of redefined rules for man’s new roles. 7-9 p.m. Free will donations. 2135845 ext. 115. FRIDAY, AUGUST 21 Zumba for the Cure. SJ Fitness Connection, 1430 W. Sherman Ave. Twohour Zumbathon will be led by instructors Laura Latorre, Stephanie Padilla, Kelly Creamer, and LeeAnn Brizak. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $15 donation. All proceeds go to the Breast Cancer 3-Day that they will be participating in October 16-18. Space is limited so RSVP to LBrizak@yahoo.com. FRIDAY, AUGUST 21 Calling Men Only. Acquire the Legacy Counseling Center, 717 Landis Ave. Join a THE GIRLS’ TENNIS TEAM at Vineland High School is holding a car wash on Saturday, August 29, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Veterans Memorial School to benefit the Dream Foundation. Cost is $5 for cars and $7 for trucks. The school is located at 424 S. Main Road. CLEAN OUT YOUR CLOSETS and attics! Jubilee Women, Inc. is hosting a flea market to benefit Jubilee House, a home in Vineland for homeless pregnant women. The flea market will take place (shine-outdoors, rainindoors) at St. Francis of Assisi Church grounds, 23 West Chestnut Avenue, on Saturday, September 19, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Spaces are $15 each; bring your own table. Call Alice Corica at 4281707 for rental space. second trip is set for Sunday, November 22, to Miracle on 34th Street, also at the Trop. Same cost and times apply. Call 362-8855 to reserve your seat for either trip. GIA’S FIGHT: “BUENA’S ANGEL” Beef & Beer is a fundraiser 2581 E. Chestnut Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361 (856) 794-1600 • 856-776-6404 Owned & Operated by the Avena Family for over 35 years Coin & Jewelry Co. Avena VE ! SABIG RETHINK INK Think again. { 12 } the grapevine | AUGUST 19, 2009 S.T.E.P.S. FOR KIDS is now accepting fall registrations at 691-0030, ext. 119. The program is for boys and girls ages 8 to 12, who are overweight and at risk for obesity. With their parents, the children attend a 12-week program that focuses on learning how to eat healthy and offers simple exercise techniques that help children and their families achieve and maintain healthier lifestyles. The course begins with a parent meeting on September 16 at the Cumberland Cape Atlantic YMCA in Vineland. Classes will be held on Saturday mornings at the Wallace School in Vineland beginning September 19. Classes are filled with interactive activities for both kids and parents. Instructors include an exercise specialist, a registered dietitian and a parent facilitator. Children attending will need a doctor’s note to participate. Visit www.sjhsteps.com for more information. for 3-year-old Giavanna Krumaker. She has had neuroblastoma for two years, and has had seven surgeries. Gia was recently hospitalized again for three months. Even when she is in and out of the hospital there is always a smile on her face. Donations are being accepted at Susquehanna Bank, made out to Gia’s Fight. The fundraiser is set for September 12 at Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar (2142 Wheat Rd) from noon until 8 p.m. Tickets are $20; kids eat for free. Contact Toni at 362-5746. Think you have to pay high prices for quality ink and toner? Get your cartridges from Cartridge World, with a % satisfaction guarantee, for a LOT less. THE VINELAND ICE HOCKEY team has opened registration for the 2009/2010 season, offering both high school level Varsity and J-V positions. Any skater, grades 8 through 12, attending the following schools is eligible: Vineland, Delsea Buena, Millville, Bridgeton, Oakcrest, Cumberland Christian, and Sacred Heart. Registrations will be held on August 19 and 26, and September 9 at Canlan Ice Arena from 7 to 9 p.m. E-mail request for registration packets can be made to :Absolutelyglass@comcast.net. The season will run October through February. The first varsity game is October 5 against Cherry Hill West High School at the Fylers’ Skate Zone Voorhees at 7:10 p.m. Over 1,700 locations worldwide Main Road A CASINO SHOW BUS TRIP is Magnolia Rd 1370 S Main Rd, Magnolia Court Shopping Center Vineland NJ 08360 856-692-0372 ©2008 Cartridge World. All rights reserved. Organics Market Mail Room 1881-C2 (12/08) The Global Ink and Toner Experts being sponsored by Petway Elementary School on Sunday, October 18, to Footloose at the Tropicana. The bus leaves Petway at noon and leaves the casino at 7:30 p.m. Cost is $59 and includes $20 in coin, buffet dinner, show ticket and motorcoach transportation. A www.cartridgeworldusa.com/Store305 SATURDAY, AUGUST 22 International and Cultural Festival. 700 block of Landis Ave. 3-8 p.m. Sample French, Greek, Hispanic, Italian, and Jamaican cultural traditions. Enjoy music by Frank Marone and the Italians, Joe Rivera and Zona Zero, and Dun Phalyn. Also, Homemade Wine and Tomato Sauce/Gravy competitions. 794-8653. ods to eliminate back pain without use of drugs aor unnecessary surgery. Free but limited to first 20 callers. 691-1313. International THURSDAY, AUGUST 27 Public Meeting. Vineland City Hall, 640 E. Wood St., (Council Chambers, 2nd Floor). Discussion of the Vineland Municipal Utility’s progress. Utility reps will discuss past accomplishments, future strategies, customer service initiatives, electric utility infrastructure improvements, and water utility infrastructure improvements. 7 p.m. Food & Cultural Festival S 3– 500 Block Landis Ave. SATURDAY, AUGUST 22 Giant Yard Sale. Vineland High School South, 2880 E. Chestnut Ave. The sale will be held in the parking lot, next to the auditorium. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. (Rain date is August 23.) Space reservations can be made by calling 794-6800 ext. 2539. SATURDAY, AUGUST 29 Financial Healing Seminar. Acquire the Legacy Counseling Center, 717 Landis Ave. A discussion of family sending plans, financial setbacks, freedom from debt etc. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free will donations. 213-5845 ext. 112. Homemade Wine Competition* Homemade Sauce/Gravy Competition* (Is it Sauce or Gravy? You Decide!) SATURDAY, AUGUST 22 New Jersey Peach Festival. Malaga Camp Meeting, 4400 N. Delsea Dr., Newfield. 10 a.m.3 p.m. at Highlights include the Lil Miss and Mr. Peach Contest, live entertainment, games, and some “peachy” baked goods and treats. Admission is free, signature Peach Festival special cake topped with fresh peaches and whipped topping $5 ($3 for kids 10 and under). Proceeds will go toward upgrading and maintaining the camp buildings. Call 466-0288. GOLF, SPORTS, ETC. EVERY SATURDAY Canoe & Kayak Trip. Parvin State Park, 701 Almond Rd, Pittsgrove. On Parvin Lake and Muddy Run. Meet at 10 a.m. at Fire Ring (between CS 13 and 15). Bring your own boat or rent one from Al & Sam’s. 358-8616. Crowning of Mr. & Miss Cherry Tomato Foods from Around the World (and Vineland) and Live Music SUNDAY, AUGUST 23 Weekly Dance. North Italy Club Hall, East Ave. and Virano Ln. County chapter of the Single Parents Society holds the dances for people age 50 and up, married or single. Live band performs music for waltz, rhumba, swing, foxtrot, line dances, and more. 7:30-10:30 p.m. $7 members, $9 nonmembers 697-1814. WEEKLY THROUGH OCTOBER 6 Senior Golf Association Events. Various courses throughout southern New Jersey. Annual membership $20. Call to join or for schedule. 691-4098. SUNDAY, AUGUST 23 Newfield Day/Old Fashion Peach Social. Newfield Public Library will hold its annual Old Fashion Peach Social in The Grove along with all the other Newfield Day festivities. Top off your chicken barbeque with peach pie, cobbler, or ice cream and topped with fresh Jersey peaches. Two servings sizes ($5 or $3); take-outs available. 697-0415. FRIDAY, AUGUST 21 Dick Baum Memorial Golf Tournament. Running Deer Golf Club, 1111 Parvin Mill Road, Pittsgrove. Cumberland County Habitat For Humanity hosts. 11 a.m. registration; noon lunch; 1 p.m. shotgun; 5 p.m. dinner. $100 golfer donation (includes greens fee, golf cart, lunch, dinner). Call 563-0292. kM Fran l i an e Ita nd th ea aron s D un Phal yn SUNDAY, AUGUST 23 Pink Carpet Gala. St. Anthony’s Hall, Wheat Road. The event will benefit the South Jersey Healthcare Foundation, Susan G. Komen race for the Cure. Central South New Jersey affiliate and Fedup-4u. Dancing, African-American food, Italian dishes, a live band playing ‘80s and new music, award ceremony, special guest speakers, Gospel singers, poetry and a dedication to the late Michael Jackson (come join in on the thriller dance) Call James Cooper at 364-8103 for tickets. P.S.—Wear some pink. , Zo ivera Joe R ro na Ze SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 13 2nd Annual Run For Life. Wheat Road Golf, 2142 E. Wheat Rd. 5K this year in memory of Ronald K Brownlee Jr, who lost his battle with leukemia last June. All proceeds benefit The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. 9 a.m. 5 K Run or 1 Mile Walk $20 if reg by Sept. 5, $25 day of race. www.therunforlife5k.com. *To compete in the Homemade Wine or Sauce/Gravy Contest Vineland Mayor’s Youth Council Talent Show/Fair & Battle of the Bands Activities for Youth and Adults Hangar 84 Tickets only $10 Silent Auction Arts and crafts Open Air Bands Games for Kids throughout the day Inflatables Contact VDID/Main Street 603 East Landis Avenue 856-794-8653 WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | MainStreetVineland.org WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 Ellison’s 15th Annual Golf Tournament. Buena Vista Country Club, Rt. 40, Buena. This year’s golf outing is part of The Ellison School’s 50th Anniversary celebration. Registration begins at 11:30 a.m., followed by a buffet luncheon. Tournament at 1 p.m. Putting and hole-in-one contests offering more than $6,500 in prizes. Entry fee of $150 includes greens fees, carts, tips, luncheon and dinner. Advertisement and sponsorship opportunities are available. 691-1734. TUESDAY, AUGUST 25 City Council Meeting. Council Chambers, City Hall, Seventh and Wood sts. 7:30 p.m. the grapevine { 13 } WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26 Low Back Pain and Sciatica. The CyberSpot, 610 E. Landis Ave. 7-8 p.m. Heidi Shelley from the Foundation for Wellness Professionals will speak about natural meth- VINELAND TROLLEY VINELAND TROLLEY This ad has been paid for with funds approved for such use by the New Jersey Urban Enterprise Zone Authority. FREE – PARK & RIDE: The trolley will be running during the event. Trolley runs from Walmart to Kidston Towers. Pick up on Wood or Elmer in Festival Area. PET CARE Guaranteed To Contain Any Dog The Most Versatile Underground Fence Made Money Back Guarantee Lifetime Equipment Warranty Service & Install Any System Vet Recommended Indoor/Outdoor Systems Locally Owned & Operated Year Round Installation Low Price Guarantee By: Dog Guard Out of Sight Fencing of NJ Owner Responsibilities: Feeding, Grooming, and Training Source: Ted DeNofio, Ted’s Pet Country Club As pet owners, we have many responsibilities that can strongly influence the quality of our pet’s lives and our own lives. I will address a few of the more important ones and how we can help your pet live a better life. The first one is feeding. Few people realize the importance of feeding your pet a great diet. Food is responsible for most of the skin and coat problems that we see. When your pet is licking his paws or chewing at the base of her tail, it is usually an indication of food problems. Other indicators are red spots on the stomach and other areas of the body, ear infections, soft stools and some behavior issues. The best way to address these issues in many cases is to switch to a better brand of food. We offer Merrick, which I believe is one of the best brands on the market, but there are others that are great, too. It might be a good idea to go online and research the various diets, including raw food diets, of which I am a big proponent. Try to find a good dry food that your pet likes and then supplement it with some raw food. Not only will you help your pets feel much better, but they will be happy MARK POLLARD, OWNER-OPERATOR www.dogguardnj.com FREE ESTIMATES 856-691-6461 they get to eat some real food. Another big responsibility is grooming your pet. It is very important that this is not taken lightly. All pets need their nails trimmed and ears cleaned regularly. I am a strong believer that all dogs and cats should live in the house with you. Dogs are pack animals so to leave them outside alone is one of the worst injustices you can do to your dog. Since they are in your house, a regular bath is also a must. All dogs and cats should be brushed, but if they have long coats, you may have to brush them daily. If you are a do-it-yourself type of person, then try and keep your pet as comfortable as possible, but insist that he allow you to groom him. We use padded tubs and tables in our salon to help keep them comfortable and calm. Starting when they are young makes this goal much easier to attain. Be very gentle but thorough when cleaning and brushing because small tangles become large mats very quickly. We use high-quality slicker brushes when brushing long coats, and then we follow with a comb to make sure we didn’t miss any tangles. Make sure you use high-quality dog or cat shampoo and, most importantly, rinse well so you don’t dry out your pet’s skin. In our salon, we use Nature’s Specialty’s allnatural shampoos and conditioners for your pet’s safety. When cleaning ears, use a good quality pet ear cleaner on a swab of cotton. Be careful when clipping nails that Lab Puppies four males one female all black Current Vaccinations & Vet Checked Family Raised Parents on site We provide trustworthy, reliable Pet Sitting for any pet! Over 30 years of Experience!!! All Critters Sitting Service We truly “care” for your pet! allcritterssitting@yahoo.com www.allcritterssitting.vpweb.com 856-696-9491 While you’re away or at work, leave your home & your pet in the capable care of { 14 } the grapevine | AUGUST 19, 2009 (856) 313-2172 Bud’s Pet Home Care, LLC Bud Sulzman • Care For Your Pets • Check Our Your House Daily • Take In Your Mail • Water Your Plants Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. Lil’ Pals Pet Photography 856-261-2228 a mobile photography studio H appy At e! Hom I’m S o “Since 1987” 696-8290 For appointments, locations & dates visit us at: www.sjpetphotos.com Customized Photo Packages to Fit Your Family! A Pet Food Drive The Animal Friends Foundation (AFF) has started a Pet Food Drive with the generous support of Sun National Bank to help local pet owners who are experiencing financial difficulties. Seven Sun branches in Cumberland and Atlantic counties will accept food donations of canned and dry dog or cat food. • Branch Address, 401 Landis Avenue • Bridgeton: 15 South Laurel Street, • East Landis: 1184 E. Landis Avenue • Hammonton: 12th and 1st Roads • Millville: 1026 N. High Street • Port Norris: 1736 Main Street • Weymouth: 903 Route 50, Mays Landing AFF is an all-volunteer animal welfare organization committed to finding solutions to the overpopulation of unwanted companion animals through education and financial support of low-cost spay-neuter programs. AFF also supports individuals and organizations that are doing good work with animals throughout southern New Jersey. For more information about the pet food drive or AFF’s other programs, call 503-5572 or visit www.AnimalFriendsFoundation.com. you don’t hit the quick. You should have styptic powder on hand just in case. If this all sounds too daunting, then try a professional groomer. Our salon offers highly trained, professional groomers who are very gentle and care very much about the welfare of your pet. We treat you and your pet with respect and courtesy. We also offer everything from spa treatments and shedless treatments (to help reduce shedding), to oral care and safe, natural flea treatments. Maybe the biggest responsibility of all for dog owners, is properly training your dog. It is not only important for their safety, but also for their everyday well-being, as well as yours. Ask anyone who has an outof-control dog if they are enjoying him. They are usually much more of a burden than a source of pleasure. The good news is it is usually possible to turn them into terrific pets with some good training. But what is good training? The first and most important step is becoming a great “pack leader.” This means you must be in control at all times, not just during a training session. This is vital for all dog owners, even if your pet is not out of control. In order for a dog to have peace in his life, he must have a good pack leader. Otherwise he will feel uneasy, nervous and fearful because he feels like there is no stability in the pack. By providing your dog with the gift of you being a strong, stable pack leader, you can remove all of your dog’s nervous energy—which is the cause of Ted & Kim DeNofio, owners of Ted’s Pet Country Club most behavior problems—and allow him to be a happy, relaxed dog. This is a subject that all dog owners should learn thoroughly, because it is the foundation upon which you build your relationship with your dog. I can help you and your pet develop that relationship. Most people are very surprised at how quickly their dog’s behavior begins to improve once they start taking the right steps. If you would like to learn more about this or any other aspect of dog training, contact me at Ted’s Pet Country Club, 856-825-9400, Tuesdays through Saturdays. I love talking about your dog as much as you do. I hope these tips will help you become a better pet owner and find even more enjoyment in having a pet. Pets can be a wonderful pleasure in our lives if we just do what is best for them. I Visit Our Do-It-Yourself Pet Wash Top Quality Pet Supplies Hydrosurge Therapeutic Bathing System Shedless Treatment Oral Hygiene • All Breeds of Dogs & Cats Safe Natural Flea Dips • No Tranquilizers Oatmeal Baths All Natural Premium Shampoos & Conditioners Excellent Caring Grooming Staff Gentle Professional Dog & Cat Grooming GAROPPO Feed & Pet Supplies ALOTTA LUV ANIMAL LODGE In & Out Runs Large Outdoor Exercise Area Air Conditioned & Heated Kennels Full Service Master Grooming (large dogs accepted) www.alottaluv.com Mon.-Fri. 9 am – 6 pm Sat. – 9 am – 4 pm Sun. 9 am – 11 am & 3 pm – 6 pm We Carry All Natural Pet Food! Boarding • Grooming • Training • Horse • Pig • Pond Fish • Shavings • Poultry • Cattle • Rabbit • Woody Pet • Goat • Sheep • Dog • Cat • Game Bird • Hay/Straw • Wild & Domestic Bird WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Luxurious Spa Treatments Aromatherapy, Paw & Pad Treatment, Blueberry Vanilla Facial & Vitamin Conditioner Best of the Best 8 of 9 years Professional Dog Training Behavior Problems Humanely Solved Innovative Positive Training Techniques Private Instruction, followed by unlimited group instruction 20% 20% 20% OFF OFF OFF ANY PET SUPPLEMENT With this coupon. One coupon per customer. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. exp. 9/20/09 ANY PET TOY With this coupon. One coupon per customer. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. exp. 9/20/09 ANY BIRD FEEDER With this coupon. One coupon per customer. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. exp. 9/20/09 Helping Pets Live Better Lives Vet Recommended the grapevine { 15 } 825-9400 Rt. 47 S. Millville minutes from Rt.55 Member NDGAA Graduate of VIP Grooming Academy Tues-Sat 8-5 Wed 10-7 856-696-4965 2981 N. Delsea Dr. Vineland, NJ 08360 MON.-FRI. 7AM-5:30PM • SAT 7AM-5PM • SUN. 9AM-1PM 1200 Harding Highway (Rt. 40), Newfield, NJ 08344 856-697-4444 Start Fresh Today! Credit Card Debt • Medical Bills Utility Bills • Surcharges And Even Some Income Taxes Stop Wage Executions Reduce Car Payments Free Office Visit-Start Fresh Financially! Want to wipe out your debt? WIPE OUT: I Entertainment THIRD FRIDAY, OUTDOOR CONCERTS, NIGHTLIFE, POETRY ON HIGH, AND HANGAR 84 ROCK SHOWS. Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday: Blue Moon Dance Party, $3 Blue Moon drafts, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Saturday: Latin Dance Party, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Tuesday: Country Western Dance Party (beer and shot specials), 8 p.m.-midnight. STOP SHERIFF SALE AUGUST 20, 21, AND 22 Nightlife at Villa Filomena. Villa Filomena Ristorante & Lounge, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena, 697-7107. Thurs.: Ladies Night, Fri.: Live music, Sat.: Italian Accordian. BANKRUPTCY IS YOUR LEGAL BAILOUT! Listen to Seymour Wasserstrum Esq. Live on the Radio Every Thursday Night From 8-9 pm on 92.1 FM Helping people wipe out their bills – since 1973 205 Landis Ave., Vineland www.wipeoutyourbillstoday.com $100 OFF w/this ad – CR We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for Bankruptcy Code. AUGUST 20, 21, AND 22 Nightlife at Bojo’s. 222 N. High St., Millville, 327-8011. Thurs: Ladies Nite with Charlie. Fri: TBA. Sat: Singalong. Sun: Nascar/Baseball. Seymour Wasserstrum, Esq. FRIDAY, AUGUST 21 Third Friday at Bogarts. Bogart’s Books, FRIDAY, AUGUST 21 Ladies Acoustic Night. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. Lauren Zettler (pictured at right), Bo Rains (top left), JeNell and the Yets (top right), Danielle Deckard, Liat, Lisa Cavallaro. 6 p.m. $8. 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. Tom Moran, Book Signing with Christopher Martin “The Music in Me,” Live music with Dark Hollow. 5 p.m./6 p.m/7 p.m. WASSERSTRUM Esq. -Bankruptcy Attorney- SEYMOUR FRIDAY, AUGUST 21 Select Start, The Anytime. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland. 6 p.m. $10-$12. (frontgatetickets.com). 856-696-8300 FRIDAY, AUGUST 21 DJ Undermind. Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave., Hammonton, 609-704-9797. 10 p.m. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19 The Silvertones. Michael Debbi Park, Family Ow Operated ned & for Over 25 Year s! Cedar Ave., Richland. Entertaining Big Band audiences since 1992. 7 p.m. rain or shine. Seating available or bring a lawn chair. Free. Night, 1/2 price appetizers all night and live entertainment. Happy Hour MondaySaturday, 4-6 p.m. $1 off all drinks. AUGUST 21 AND 22 Nightlife at Old Oar House. Old Oar House Brewery, 123 N. High St., Millville, 293-1200. Fri.: Fuss, 9 p.m. Sat.: Retrospect, 9 p.m. AUGUST 19, 20, 21, 22, AND 25 Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Wednesday: ’70s and ’80s Throwback Night (frozen drink specials) 8 p.m.midnight, Thursday.: Karaoke with DJ WEDNESDAYS IN AUGUST Nightlife at Ramada. Harry’s Lounge at Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 696-3800. Wednesday: Ladies SATURDAY, AUGUST 22 Dan Barry. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. 7 p.m. Why Pay Higher Prices? We have everything you need & the personalized service you deserve! AT THE CASINOS Tickets: 1-800-736-1420; www.ticketmaster.com unless otherwise noted. HEADLINERS, COMEDY ACTS, AND MORE 8 p.m., Tuesday and Wednesday 3:30 and 8 p.m., Sunday 7 p.m. Yesterday: A Tribute to the Beatles. Tropicana. Liverpool Club Theater in North Tower. Wed.–Sun., 8:30 p.m., $25. Chickenfoot. Showboat House of Blues. 9 p.m. $59.50, $49.50. Demi Lovato w/ David Archuleta. Taj Mahal. 7 p.m. $49.50, $39.50. Expert Installation Available { 16 } the grapevine | AUGUST 19, 2009 Large & Unique Selection Carpet • Ceramic Tile Hardwood • Laminate Marble • Vinyl HEADLINERS FRIDAY, AUGUST 21 Journey Unauthorized. Hilton. 9 p.m. $15. Cat Country 107.3 Presents Little Big Town. Showboat House of Blues. 9 p.m. $35, $30. COMEDY & MORE Comedy Club at Borgata. Borgata Music Box: three comedians daily, 9 p.m. (except during headliner engagements) 1-800-298-4200. Comedy Stop at the Trop. Three comics nightly. Sun.-Thurs., 9 p.m., $23; Fri., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $23; Sat., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $28. Order tickets by phone at the Comedy Stop Box Office: 1-877-FUNNY-AC or 609-348-0920. comedystop.com. Fame. Tropicana. Monday and Thursday THROUGH SEPTEMBER 5 Hypno-Sterical. Trump Marina. Thurs, and Fri. 9 p.m., Sat. 10 p.m. $22.50. THROUGH SEPTEMBER 6 Carnival of Wonders. Trump Plaza. 8 p.m. Tues., Wed., Thurs., Sat.; 9 p.m. Fri.; 3 and 7 p.m. Sun. $25. We carry all major brands! 1560 North Main Rd. Vineland, NJ 08360 SATURDAY, AUGUST 22 Frank Caliendo. Borgata. 7 and 10 p.m. $45 and $40. 1-800-298-4200. Gretchen Wilson. Hilton. 8 p.m. $65. Bill Engvall. Resorts. 8 p.m. $65, $55. THROUGH SEPTEMBER 6 Cirque Dreams Pandemonia. Taj Mahal. 8 p.m. Wed., Thurs;, 9 p.m. Fri.; 3:30 and 8 p.m. Sat. and Sun. $35 and $25. 856-691-6000 www.mainlinefloor.com SATURDAY, AUGUST 22 To Die For Presents. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 5631400. 6 p.m. $10. Bring a friend and share the fun Buy one, get one FREE! Buy One Buy One SATURDAY, AUGUST 22 Dark Hollow. The Inn at Sugar Hill, Somers Point/Mays Landing Rd. (Rt. 559), Mays Landing. Jody Janetta collaborates with Vince Farinaccio of Dark Hollow. 6:30 p.m. SUNDAY, AUGUST 23 Poetry on High. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. Host Rita Lyman with featured poet Chris Ritter. 2-5 p.m. $ 29 29 99 99 FREE FREE Get One Get One MONDAY, AUGUST 24 Gene Boney Band. Giampetro Park Enrico Serra Band Shell, E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 7 p.m. Free concert. Requires new line of service or qualified upgrade Requires new line of service or qualified upgrade and two-year agreement. Handset pricing varies and two-year agreement. Handset pricing varies by Sprint Authorized Rep. and may be subject to by Sprint Authorized Rep. and may be subject to add’l req. See store for details. add’l req. See store for details. Buy one LG ® Rumor 2 ™ for only ne LG Rumor for only $29.99 after $50 mail-in rebate and 9 after $50 mail-in rebate and get second one FREE after $50 get a second one FREE after $50 mail-in rebate and $29.99 in store mail-in rebate and $29.99 in store rebate. rebate. TUESDAY, AUGUST 25 Red, White & Blue Band. Bruno Melini Park, Joe Dale Pavilion, 616 Central Ave., Minotola. Bring your own chair. 7-9 p.m. Free concert. Buy One e $ Buy One Buy One WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26 Buddy Gale Orchestra. Michael Debbi Park, Cedar Ave., Richland. Big Band favorites from the 1930’s to the present. 7 p.m. rain or shine. Seating available or bring a lawn chair. Free concert. $ 49 49 99 99 FREE FREE Get One Get One 29 99 99 FREE FREE ® Get One Get One THURSDAY, AUGUST 27 Don’t Call Me Francis. Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave., Hammonton, 609-7049797. 9:30 p.m. Tickets $10. Buy one Samsung Rant for only $49.99 Buy one Samsung Rant ™ for only $49.9 after $50 mail-in rebate and get second after $50 mail-in rebate and get a seco one FREE after $50 mail-in rebate and one FREE after $50 mail-in rebate and $49.99 in store rebate. $49.99 in store rebate. Requires new line of service or qualified upgrade Requires new line of service or qualified upgrade and two-year agreement. Handset pricing varies by and two-year agreement. Handset pricing varies b Sprint Authorized Rep. and may be subject to add’l Sprint Authorized Rep. and may be subject to add l req. See store for details. req. See store for details. Buy one Sanyo SCP-2700 for only yo SCP-2700 for only $29.99 after $50 mail-in rebate and get $50 mail-in rebate and get a second one FREE after $50 mail-in e FREE after $50 mail-in rebate and $29.99 in store rebate. 29.99 in store rebate. Requires new line of service or qualified upgrade e of service or qualified upgrade eement. Handset pricing varies and two-year agreement. Handset pricing varies zed Rep. and may be subject to by Sprint Authorized Rep. and may be subject to ore for details. add’l req. See store for details. MONDAY, AUGUST 31 Frank Marone Combo. Giampetro Park Enrico Serra Band Shell, E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 7 p.m. Free concert. THROUGH AUGUST 31 Myer Glick Artwork. Vineland Public Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 794-4244. Original paintings in acrylic and watercolors displayed in the Doris Tripp Exhibit Room. Hand-crafted stained glass work is exhibited in the display cases on the first floor of the library. This exhibit focuses on local resident and Holocaust survivor Myer Glick’s zest for life and the beauty he finds in the world. 622 E. Landis Avenue 622 E. Landis Avenue Vineland Vineland Vineland Vineland 533 N. East Avenue 533 N. East Avenue 2639 S. Main Road 2639 S. Main Road Vineland Vineland Communications Communications 856-563-1771 856-563-0330 856-563-1771 856-563-0330 856-563-0110 856-563-0110 **Monthly charges exclude taxes, Sprint Surcharges [incl. USF charge of up to 12.9% (varies quarterly), Administrative Charge (up to $1.99/line/mo.), Regulatory Charge ($0.20/line/mo.) state/local fees by area]. Sprint **Monthly charges exclude taxes, Sprint Surcharges [incl. USF charge of up to 12.9% (varies quarterly), Administrative Charge (up to $1.99/line/mo.), Regulatory Charge ($0.20/line/mo.) & state/local fees by area]. Sprint Surcharges are not taxes or gov’t-required charges and are subject to change. Details: Sprint.com/taxesandfees. Surcharges are not taxes or gov’t-required charges and are subject to change. Details: Sprint.com/taxesandfees. May require up to a $36 activation fee/line, credit approval & deposit. Up to $200 early termination fee/line applies. Phone Offer: Offer ends 9/7/09. While supplies last. Taxes and services charges excluded. No cash May require up to $36 activation fee/line, credit approval deposit. Up to $200 early termination fee/line applies. Phone Offer: Offer ends 9/7/09. While supplies last. Taxes and services charges excluded. No cash back. Requires activation at the time of purchase. Mail-in Rebate: Requires purchase by 9/7/09 activation by 9/21/09. Line must be active 30 consecutive days. Allow 10 to 14 weeks for rebate. Other Terms: Coverage back. Requires activation at the time of purchase. Mail-in Rebate: Requires purchase by 9/7/09 & activation by 9/21/09. Line must be active 30 consecutive days. Allow 10 to 14 weeks for rebate. Other Terms: Coverage not available everywhere. The 3G Sprint Mobile Broadband reaches over 270 million people (incl. data roaming). Nationwide Sprint Network reaches over 275 million people. Offers not available in all markets/retail not available everywhere. The 3G Sprint Mobile Broadband reaches over 270 million people (incl. data roaming). Nationwide Sprint Network reaches over 275 million people. Offers not available in all markets/retail locations or for all phones/networks. Pricing, offer terms, fees features may vary for existing customers not eligible for upgrade. Other restrictions apply. See store for details. 2009 Sprint. Sprint and the logo are locations or for all phones/networks. Pricing, offer terms, fees & features may vary for existing customers not eligible for upgrade. Other restrictions apply. See store for details. © 2009 Sprint. Sprint and the logo are trademarks of Sprint. Other marks are the property of their respective owners. trademarks of Sprint. Other marks are the property of their respective owners. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Looking Ahead MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 Bud Cavallo Duo. Giampetro Park Enrico Serra Band Shell, E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 7 p.m. Free concert. Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. Kitchen & Bath Designs K.A.S. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 Don’t Call Me Francis. Merighi’s Savoy Inn, 4940 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 6918051. Benefits The Courage and Valor Foundation, which was created to ensure that we remember forever, the fallen firefighters of September 11th. 9 p.m. $12. Call about VIP Package Deal $50. 856-332-9624 High-end cabinetry at discounted prices. K.A.S. Kitchen & Bath Designs — Meeting all of your cabinetry needs. Quality ~ Style ~ Value the grapevine { 17 } Home Garden and Landscaping • Lawn Cutting • Fertilizing Garden Center • Mushroom Compost Mulch • Top Soil • Fill Dirt • Stone Irrigation Repairs & Installation • Pool Sand Snow Removal • Winter Salt in Bulk 4-H Clubs Educate Kids About Agriculture More than 100 years after its inception, many people still think of 4-H as a program for young people growing up in rural areas. While it is true that 4-H had its roots in agriculture, today’s 4-H Youth Development Program can be found on farms, in the suburbs and even in the inner cities, offering learning opportunities for the varied interests of today’s young people. The majority of children living in New Jersey today are growing up in the suburbs, but 4-H still offers a special opportunity to connect with the State’s agricultural heritage through the animal science program. Youth can learn about all aspects of raising animals: how to care for, feed, breed and select animals for show, market or pleasure. Through the 4-H animal science program, children have the opportunity to learn about horses, dairy and beef cattle, sheep, pigs and other farm animals to which they otherwise might not have access. The goal of the animal science program is the same as that for all 4-H programs: to teach children important life skills through hands-on learning. While learning about their animal of choice, children in the animal science clubs gain a sense of responsibility, learn how to keep accurate records, gain self-confidence, discover potential careers, learn to present themselves in public and at the same time have a lot of fun. They may also participate in special county-wide, state and national 4-H programs. In addition to animal science clubs, events such as the Hippology, Horse Bowl, Horse Judging and even model horse shows allow children who do not own a horse to learn more about them. These 4-H events are becoming more popular as farmland continues to decrease in New Jersey. But, regardless of what kind of 4-H club a child belongs to, the theme is the same: to make learning fun. For more information on the 4-H animal science program or other 4-H clubs, contact the Cumberland County 4-H Office at 451-2800, or visit the New Jersey 4-H website at www.nj4h.rutgers.edu/. Register Now for County Waterways Cleanup The Cumberland County Clean Communities Program is currently registering volunteers for the second countywide public lands cleanup of 2009. The September 26 Waterways Cleanup is sponsored by the Cumberland County Improvement Authority and the Cumberland County Clean Communities Program. As a complement to the Trash Hunt held in March, the Waterways Cleanup targets Cumberland County’s lakes, streams, shores, rivers, parks, and other waterways. Since 1990, the Clean Communities Delivery Available NOW OFFERING THE GUTTER PROTECTION SYSTEM Zero Maintenance Worry Free Proven technology Biocide & Fungcide 25 year warranty 60% cheaper than aluminum guards United Lawn L.L.C. 41 S. Wade Blvd. Millville, NJ 08332 856-327-3212 • Fax: 856-293-9588 856-327-1117 www.herbsshamrocklandscapingllc.com Herbs & Joe Morgan 609-501-0143 { 18 } the grapevine | AUGUST 19, 2009 CRABTREE’S LANDSCAPING And Turf Management Beautifying the outside since 1989 Serving Vineland, Millville & Bridgeton Areas COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL OVER 2 0 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE! Total Landscape Renovations In-ground Irrigation Systems Sodding, Mulching, Hydroseeding Waterfalls & ponds 856.875.0774 Zoning Board to Vote on Tree Replacement Variance Members of the public who are interested in land use decisions and the future character of our town are strongly encouraged to attend this month’s meeting of the Zoning Board of Adjustment. The monthly meeting will be held this Wednesday, August 19, at 7 p.m. in Council Chambers on the 2nd floor of City Hall. The Zoning Board meeting offers the opportunity to voice your opinion about applications for variances from zoning regulations. These variances may, at times, affect the public good. One of the applications to be discussed this month pertains to Vineland’s ordinance on the Conservation of Forests and Trees. Giordano’s Recycling has submitted a site plan to develop approximately 8.5 forested acres of its Mill Road property. The applicant is requesting a waiver of all requirements specified by the tree ordinance, including: tree replacement, conservation of significant trees, and payment in lieu of replanting.The granting of this waiver will set an important precedent. The stated goal of Vineland’s tree ordinance is “to retain rather than replace forest acreage.” When development is necessary, the ordinance insures that the applicant “shall mitigate for the loss of forest.” Such regulations are an attempt to preserve the natural beauty of our town and guide responsible economic development. Our civic leaders adopted land use regulations to encourage redevelopment when possible and reforestation when necessary. However, insuring that the regulations are upheld is the responsibility of every Vineland citizen. Please attend the meeting to show your support of our town’s land use ordinances. Maurice River Bluffs. To volunteer for the September 26 Waterways Cleanup, contact Dennis DeMatte or Rita Danna at 825-3700. The registration form is also available on the Authority’s website at www.ccianet.com. 4-H Dressage Show The Cumberland County 4-H Horse Program will host the last of a series of four Dressage Schooling Series Shows on Sunday, September 6. The show will begin at 9 a.m. and will be held at the Cumberland County Fairgrounds, Carmel Road, Millville. Dressage is an advanced training discipline of horses in which horse and rider combinations perform precision movements at the walk, trot and canter. Entries are judged on exactness and consistency. Dressage has often been described as ballet on horseback. The show will include introductory level, training level and first level tests as well as super level tests. The cost is $25 per ride. Closing date for entries is the Monday before the show. This Dressage Schooling Show Series is sponsored by the Cumberland County 4-H Horse Committee. The show is open to all ages and ride times will be assigned. To register or for more information, contact Ingrid Bergen, at 6926673. I We Have Everything You Need To Beautify Your Backyard! EVERY THURSDAY IN AUGUST Receive 25% Off Your Entire purchase! (IN-STOCK ONLY) EXCLUDING SALES & SPECIALS – Andrea Kornbluh, Vineland 9.99 Select Roses (WHILE SUPPLIES LAST) EXCLUDING SALES & SPECIALS $ Program has removed more than 3.2 million pounds of litter, tires, and illegally dumped waste from our county’s roadways, protected woodlands, and waterways. The Clean Communities Program will provide volunteers with shirts, gloves, and bags. Waste collected as part of this event is brought to the Cumberland County Solid Waste Complex for proper disposal. Volunteers are invited to clean along banks and shorelines, and those with watercraft are strongly encouraged to collect floating debris or debris that is not reachable from the shoreline. Areas can be selected by the volunteers or recommended based on suggestions from residents who have contacted the Authority about a waterway in need of attention. Past sites have included the Maurice River, Menantico Ponds, Union Lake, Corson Park, Commercial Township Restoration Site, the Cohansey River, Turkey Point, South Vineland Park, and the TUESDAY TO FRIDAY 9AM – 5PM SAT 9AM – 12PM • CLOSED SUN & MON • Gift Cards Available • SEPERS RETAIL CENTER 1114 W. Weymouth Road Newfield, NJ 08344 856-696-4220 All Major Credit Cards Accepted Between Grant & Elmer Rd. 1969 South East Ave Vineland, NJ 08360 Call Mark for Details: 856-692-8650 Mon.-Fri. 7-5 Sat. 7-12 Sales Tax WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | 3.5% FREE 2009 Hardscaping Project Guide © 2009 EP Henry Make an impression before they get to the door. Your driveway should be your personalized welcome mat. 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There’s a good chance they’ve even played a game or two, rolling a wooden ball down an inclined lane toward various holes of different values. The correct snap of a wrist or velocity of the ball can be the difference between the lowest and highest points the player can win and then redeem. As its inventor stated, this is a game of both skill and chance but the same can be said about its origins. If you check today, the invention of Skee Ball is credited to Jonathan Dickinson Este, a graduate of Princeton University who, it is said, invented a game called “Box Ball” in 1909 at the Philadelphia lumberyards owned by his father. According to Jim Waltzer, in a 2005 article published in Atlantic City Weekly as well as in his book with Tom Wilk, Tales of South Jersey, Coney Island promoter Maurice Piesen renamed Este’s invention “Skee Ball” and in 1914 began marketing the game into national popularity. The skeeball.com website agrees with this history, but refers to the inventor as J.D. Estes. By 1935, the rights to the game were sold to the Wurlitzer keyboard manufacturing company; the Philadelphia Toboggan Company purchased them from Wurlitzer after World War II. A charming tale that is apparently true except for one detail—the Princeton graduate with the chameleonic surname was not the inventor of the game. That credit goes to a Vineland resident who unfortunately has faded into near oblivion. Joseph Fourestier Simpson, while bearing the name of contemporary television’s most famous cartoon family as well as a current popular female entertainer, was anything but renowned. In a genealogy published in the January 1930 issue of the Vineland Historical Magazine, Simpson identifies he is from a Quaker family that had resided in Salem, New VINTAGE VINELAND Pedaling Through History Do you recognize this bicyclist of a bygone era? And do you have a story to add to the VHAS collection of oral and written histories? needs the help of The Grapevine readers in identifying the people and places captured on film so long ago. If you know something about this photograph, we ask that you contact either Harbold at the Society or use the contact information on page 4 to inform us. Also, the VHAS is starting an oral history project, and encourages anyone with stories of Vineland to come to the VHAS and be interviewed. The interviews will not be made public; they will just be preserved. If you prefer, you may write your stories down and send them to VHAS. For instance, tell the history of your street or neighborhood, tell how you grew up in Vineland, including the anecdotes, firsthand or secondhand accounts, stories that tell the unique characteristics of growing up in Vineland. The mission of the VHAS is to acquire, maintain, and preserve Vineland’s history. The Society was founded in 1864, just three years after the establishment of the town of Vineland. It is the second oldest historical society in New Jersey, second only to the New Jersey Historical Society. The VHAS consists of a museum, library, and archives, open to the public on Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m., same hours Tuesday through Friday for research. It is located at 108 South Seventh Street, Vineland (691-1111). { 20 } the grapevine | AUGUST 19, 2009 Over the years, the Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society has acquired many old-time images. Kate Harbold, at the Society, is busy cataloging the photos from Vineland’s rich past, but she Jersey, before moving to Philadelphia. According to an article by Del Brandt in the Times Journal, Simpson resided in Vineland from 1890 until 1930 at 919 Landis Avenue. He was a realtor, president of the Vineland Knitting Mill and an inventor of various things, the most famous of which was Skee Ball. Brandt reports that in 1911, the game was placed on the market when the Skee Ball Alley Company was formed on Chestnut Street in Philadelphia. Simpson had joined forces with Philadelphian John H. Harper in hopes that his blueprints for the game could be transformed into a marketable product. Instead, after what Brandt calls “anxious times” during a search for a manufacturer, Simpson sold the rights to his invention. The buyer? The J.D. Estes Company. But how, you might ask, can Simpson be the inventor if Estes claims to have created Box Ball in 1909 and Simpson didn’t place his game on the market until 1911? The answer contains the key ingredient that seems to be consistently ignored or overlooked by the Skee Ball world. Only one of these inventors bothered to file for a patent, and that was Simpson in 1907, two years before any epiphany might have occurred in the Estes lumberyard. An examination of the patent reveals that it was filed on November 12, 1907, and contains two pages of Simpson’s specific explanations of the purpose for and operation of his “game apparatus,” in addition to four pages of detailed drawings of the invention, which is never referred to as Skee Ball in the document. The drawings are signed by Simpson and his attorney, Charles A. Rutter, along with two witnesses. Rutter is also a witness to the written specifications. The issue date of the patent, which acknowledges Simpson as a resident of Vineland, is December 8, 1908. Skee Ball went on to become a national craze and, according to Brandt, earned Estes’s company $40,000 in the first year of distribution. In the 1930s, Atlantic City hosted the first nationwide tournament of the game. Since then, it has survived by adapting to the electronic and digital revolutions. Simpson, who according to his Evening News funeral notice died June 17, 1930, at the age of 77, was denied his proper place in the history of the arcade by one bad decision. It seems he lacked the patience required to win at his own game. I Varicose • Veins • Featured on ? and WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Reach Out To The Most Qualified Specialist Minimally Invasive Insurance covered Please Watch for Our Free Vein Screening in the Fall 30 min. Office Treatment Charles L. Dietzek, D.O., FACOS Raymond S. Wojtalik, M.D., FACS Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. Voorhees • Sewell • Vineland 856.309.VEIN (8346) Specializing in spider and varicose vein treatment the grapevine { 21 } 2950 College Dr., Suite 2B, Vineland • www.VeinVascular.com I Culinary Adventures { STEPHEN WILSON | PHOTO: JILL McCLENNEN } New York is for Foodies Two gastro-tourists eat their way through the city that never stops amazing. t was that time of the year again last week when The Sweet Life closed down for summer holiday. After visiting the Poconos for a few days of serious rest and relaxation, we left for New York City for a few days of serious eating. Our first food discovery came on the way to the city, off of I-80. We stopped at the outlets in the Poconos to do some shopping, and since we were hungry, we were also looking for something to eat. As we pulled off the highway, we noticed a small sign that advertised an Indian restaurant “at the top of the hill, next to the Days Inn.” What a peculiar place for an Indian restaurant, we thought, essentially in the middle of nowhere next to a chain hotel. We figured it would either be really good, or terrible. We decided to risk it. Jill drove the car up the hill, and next to the Days Inn, there was a long train car I Greg and the author eat Malaysian cuisine. with a steam engine in the front. On the side of the train car was painted Tandoori Palace. How cool is that! As we walked up the stairs, the smell of curry and naan wafted toward us, and we began to get high hopes for this place. A family of Indians had entered in front of us and they were being seated, which was a good sign. The host returned and showed Jill and me to our table, which was actually situated inside the train car. It was set up like a dining car from the Darjeeling Express, gold and purple were everywhere, and the tables were neatly arranged along the length of the train car. For ambiance alone, this place was special, and luckily, the food was extraordinary as well. The samosas were excellent, fried pastries stuffed with potato and dotted with peas and spices. The chana masala was tomatoey and hot, and the black lentils were creamy and spicy and quite delicious. The flat naan bread was fluffy, buttery, and slightly smoky. The chai tea was hot and sweet and spiked with the essence of cardamom and black peppercorns. Overall, the lunch was very good, especially so considering it was in the most unlikely of locations. After finishing lunch, we made our way into the city and onto the sailboat of Jill’s aunt and uncle. They were about to charter a family out onto the Hudson for a birthday celebration, so Jill and I left the boat basin and made our way down to the East Village to meet our friends Gabby and Greg. I had told Gabby before we arrived that I wanted to eat some good pizza while we were in New York, so she and Greg took us to a place called No. 28 in Greenwich Village. They specialize in Napoli-style pizza, a trend that has apparently captivated the New York City scene recently. Napoli-style pizza has a super thin crust and is baked at a very high temperature to achieve a crisp, ever-so-slightly burnt texture and flavor. First though, we got a bottle of red wine, a Nero d’Avola from Sicily and a salad of arugula, diced tomato and shredded fontina. The wine was a bit heavy, but QUESO OR GUACAMOLE QUESO OR GUACAMOLE with this ad FREE SIDE OF 09/16/09 HOALWAYS FREERE CKSALSA! 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Main Road in Vineland after breathing for a few minutes in our glasses, opened up into a rich, flavorful Sicilian red that we thoroughly enjoyed. The salad was awesome, I love crisp peppery arugula, and the tomatoes cooled down the spice a bit while the cheese added a creamy, pungent component to the salad. We enjoyed every last little scrap in the bowl! The pizzas came out, and since it was getting late, we got two smallish pies. The first was a simple combination of fresh tomato sauce, slices of buffalo mozzarella, and whole leaves of fresh basil. The second had tomato sauce, shredded mozzarella, lots of arugula (love the arugula!) and thin slices of prosciutto, the deliciously sinful Italian ham. Both lived up to their Napoli roots and the hype quite well. We finished the meal with a dish of surprisingly good tiramisu, and a slice of warm chocolate cake topped with a melty nutella chocolate sauce. Yum! The remaining several days of our trip were filled with more tasty experiences. At times, Jill and I just walked around and popped into food stores and ate such delicious treats as rich chocolate ice cream, a very interesting and good tequila/fig gelato, sublime artisan pistachio ice cream from a roadside truck, meaty salami, pungent cheese, crusty bread, strong espresso, bitter chocolates, tangy passion fruit frozen yogurt, fluffy and tart lemon layer cake, and exotic Malaysian dinner delicacies. It was not a bad way to spend a few days of vacation, as gastro-tourists eating our way through the best foodie city in the world. It’s so nice that Vineland is only a few hours away. I will say, though, it is good to be back home cooking and eating out of the garden and farm stands, eating what’s best right here at home in southern Jersey. I Stephen Wilson along with his wife Jill McClennen owns The Sweet Life Bakery. You may contact him via e-mail at thesweetlifebakery@verizon.net. EATING OUT From fine dining to lunch spots to bakeries, the area has abundant mouthwatering choices to satisfy any appetite. Call for hours. Amato’s Restaurant, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 692-5756. Veal, chicken, seafood, and pasta specialties for dinner. Open for lunch, too. Closed Sundays. Andrea Trattoria, 1833 Harding Hwy., Newfield, 697-8400. Chef/owner Andrea Covino serves up Italian specialties in an atmosphere of fine dining. Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave, Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food served tapas style, specialty martinis, catering, private parties. Extensive wine list. Live music Friday nights. Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-0909. This breakfast and lunch spot offers a menu of sandwiches named for colleges near and far. Bain’s Deli, 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. Come in for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Daily specials include coffee of the day. Barbera’s Chocolates on Occasion, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 6909998. Homemade chocolates and candies, custom gift baskets. Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees, desserts, drink specials. Take-out, too. Happy Hour buffet Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. MLB games on flatscreen TVs. Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy., Vineland, 697-5500. Steaks, veal, chicken dishes. Meet friends at the bar. Open daily for lunch and dinner. Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 205-0012. Featuring the “Gutbuster” a 21-oz. burger, pizza, salads, wings, subs, dinners. Bojo’s Ale House, 222 N. High St., Millville, 327-8011. All food is homemade, including the potato chips. Casa Dori II, Brewster Rd. and Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 794-1888. Authentic Italian, lunch and dinner; catering available. Crust N Krumbs Bakery, Main and Magnolia rds., 690-1200. Cakes, pies, cookies, breads, and doughnuts. Custom wedding cakes, too. Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call Continued on next page Whet Vineland’s Appetite. Get your restaurant noticed by advertising on these dining pages in On & Off Premise Catering Available Vineland’s neighborhood bakery, where everything is made from scratch and quality counts. The Grapevine. Every residence in Vineland receives a 6th street between Landis and Elmer in Downtown Vineland Catering For All Your Party Needs! Family Reunions • Company Picnics BBQ • Wedding Rehearsals Baby & Bridal Showers Retirement & Anniversary Parties Funeral Receptions Party Platters • Salads • Hot & Cold Entrees • Pastas • Vegs & Sides & Much More Customized Party Packages Available Let Us Do All The Work No Matter How Big or Small!!! WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | The Grapevine… There’s no better way to draw customers into your establishment! Call today for advertising information: 856-692-5353 www.thesweetlifebakery.com the grapevine { 23 } 856-457-7815 Try our award-winning Chocolate Chip Cookies the best in South Jersey, according to the most recent SJ Magazine annual readers’ poll 856-563-0030 947 North Delsea Dr. Vineland, NJ 08360 only at South Jersey’s Premier Car Wash Just $850 YES! Voted #1 “Best of Best” 2009 + Tax Can get my car clean INSIDE & OUT??? for lunch and dinner specials. Soft ice cream and cakes year-round. Mon.-Sat 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 696-1900. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Take-out, too. Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. Open 24 hours. Kids eat free Tues. & Sat. Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave., Vineland, 691-5511. Family timehonored recipes, fresh ingredients. Donkey’s Place, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland, 690-1777. One-of-a-kind cheesesteaks made on large, fresh poppyseed rolls. Dreamz Cafe, 2184 Union Lake Crossing, Millville, 765-5029. Panini, sandwiches, salads, soups. Also, gelato, Italian coffee, desserts, smoothies, and frappuccino. Esposito’s Maplewood III, 200 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks, seafood and pasta dishes at this Italian restaurant. Eric’s, 98 S. West Ave., Vineland, 205-9800. Greek and American cuisine. Pizza, too. Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. & Tuckahoe Rd., Vineland, 691-6080. Italian cuisine and dinner buffets to savor. Family-owned. Fresh Restaurant, 1405 Mays Landing Rd., Millville, 327-3435. Jumbo lump crabcakes, Black Angus burgers. Wed. is pasta night. Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli, 527 S. Brewster Rd., 697-3509. Name says it all. Daily specials, catering. Closed Sunday. General Custard’s Last Stand, 2578 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 696-2992. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner served Tues.-Sat. Gina’s Ristorante, 110 N. High St., Millville, 825-4241. Italian cuisine, lunch and dinner, BYOB, nothing over $20. Giorgio’s Restaurant 363 E. Wheat Rd., Buena, 697-2900. Serving lunch and dinner daily. Italian cuisine, pizza. Giovanni’s Italian-American Deli. 1102 N. East Ave., Vineland, 692-0459. Pizza, Italian subs, lunch favorites. The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf Course, 4049 Italia Rd., Vineland, 691-5558. Restaurant and lounge open to the public for lunch Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Jake’s. 611 Taylor Rd., Franklinville, 694-5700. Italian-American, served lakeside. Lunch, dinner, happy hour, Sunday brunch. Joe’s Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-8860. Barbecue and Kosher chickens, homemade sides, catering for all occasions. Kawa Thai & Sushi, 2196 N. Second St. (Rt.47), Millville, 825-9939. Thai and Japanese cuisine. BYOB. Landicini’s Family Restaurant & Pizzeria Landis and Lincoln aves., Vineland, 691-3099. Italian cuisine, gourmet pizza salads. Open for lunch and dinner. Larry’s II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-9001. Three meals daily. Sunday breakfast buffet, earlybird dinners. Library V Restaurant, 206 Rt. 54, Buena, 697-9696. Renowned for prime rib, steaks, seafood, salad bar. Closed Mon. and Tues. La Locanda Pizzeria & Ristorante, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 7943332. Pasta, veal, chicken. Lunch and dinner. Closed Sun. Lucia’s Ristorante, 785 W. Sherman Ave., Vineland, 692-0300. Italian fine dining and regional cooking. Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 563-0030. ItalianAmerican cuisine, seafood and veal. Open daily for lunch and dinner, Sunday breakfast buffet. Manny & Vic’s, 1687 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 696-3100. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Manny’s Pizza, 426 N. High St., Millville, 327-5081. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Martino’s Trattoria & Pizzeria, 2614 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 692-4448. Brick oven pizza, risotto, polenta. Three meals daily. Merighi’s Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. Banquet/wedding facility as well as intimate restaurant. Nicky G. Fridays 9 p.m.–midnight. Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s Head rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet lunches and dinners in a casual setting. Moe’s Southwest Grill, 2188 N. 2nd St., Millville, 825-3525. Tex-Mex, burritos, catering. MVP Bar, 408 Wheat Road, Vineland, 697-9825. Full bar menu, live entertainment, drink specials. Neptune Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge, 1554 South Delsea Drive, Vineland, 692-2800. Live lobsters, seafood, prime rib, steak, cocktails and wine. Next Oar, 127 N. High St., Millville, 293-1360. Weekly menu, made-toorder dishes. Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek cuisine—lamb dishes and salads. Paperwaiter Restaurant & Pub, 1111 Village Dr., Millville, 825-4000. A special place for all your special occasions. Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland, 694-0500. Breakfast, lunch, dinner specials; convenient drive-thru, minimeal specials. Pete’s Pizza, 20 W. Park Ave., Vineland, 205-9998. Pizza (including whole wheat), subs, wings. Open daily 11 a.m-10 p.m. The Rail, 1252 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-1440. Bar and restaurant with daily drink specials and lunch specials. Richland House, 1303 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-5700. Eclectic dinners and casual lunch fare. Closed Mondays. Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville, 327-8878. Authentic Vietnamese— noodle soups, curry, hotpot, Buddhist vegetarian. Serene Custard, NW Blvd. and Garden { 24 } the grapevine | AUGUST 19, 2009 EVER Guaranteed! Windows included with this ad. Best Wash Getting Divorced? Bonnie L. Laube, Esq. Greenblatt & Laube, PC Divorce, Separation, Custody, Child Support, Parenting Time, Alimony, Asset Distribution, Emancipation, Domestic Violence Certi?ed by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Civil Trial Attorney 2611 S. Main Rd. Vineland, NJ 08360 (Between Grant & Sherman) GV 856-691-0424 • email: bll@greenblattlaube.com 200 North Eighth Street • PO Box 883 • Vineland, NJ 08362 All major credit cards accepted Rd., Vineland, 692-1104. Pulled pork, hot dogs, homemade ice cream, party cakes. South Vineland Tavern, 2350 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-7888. Breakfast, lunch, dinner daily. Seafood and prime rib. Speedway Cafe at Ramada Vineland, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 692-8600. Open 6 a.m.-11 p.m. daily for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Steakhouse at Centerton Country Club, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3325. Lunch and dinner. Steaks, reserve wines, upscale casual. Stewart’s Root Beer, 585 Delsea Dr., Vineland, 696-8062. Burgers, hot dogs, fries, floats and shakes. Sweet Life Bakery, 601 East Landis Ave., Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood bakery. Homemade pastries, cakes, coffee. Tony Sopranos, 107 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 405-0200. Pizza, Mexican Southwest fare, Atkins-friendly salads. Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs, chicken, fish, steaks. Always clams, eat in or take out service. Villa Filomena, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena Vista, 697-7107. Dinner combos, grilled meats, fish. Lunch and dinner daily. Wheat Road Cold Cuts, 302 Wheat Rd., Vineland, 697-0320. Deli and catering. Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-8899. Dinners, grilled sandwiches, wings in eight flavors. Willmott’s Pizza. 12 S. Seventh St., Vineland, 696-1525. Hand-tossed pizzas, stromboli, breakfast pizza. Offering Take-out or eat in service. Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville, 327-0909. Continental cuisine and spirits served in a casually upscale setting. Ye Olde Centerton Inn, 1136 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3201. American classics served in a building right out of a Rockwell painting. I Recipe Corner { LISA ANN DiNUNZIO } Recipe Swap You can never have too many recipes using the Jersey tomato. reetings! I’m very happy to see that people are generously sharing recipes that other folks can use with the vegetables grown from their garden.I’m sure they are very much appreciated, and will be enjoyed by all who give them a try, so thank you for your submissions! Till next time, have a wonderful week. This story and recipe were submitted by Iris Sanchez, who writes, “This is a perfect recipe to make when wanting to use up the tomatoes from your garden. If you don’t have a garden, then using tomatoes from local farm markets is the next best thing. My kids love this recipe and I must say, so do I!” G un-greasedbaking sheet and bake for 3 to 5 minutes or until slightly browned. In a bowl, combine garlic, chopped tomatoes, mozzarella cheese and basil. Spread mix- ture on top of bread slices and serve. Drizzle each piece of bruschetta with extra olive oil if desired right before serving. As always, from my kitchen to yours, Bon Appetit. I Bruschetta 1 loaf crusty Italian or semolina bread, sliced 2 tbs. olive oil 3 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped 3 – 4 Fresh Italian plum tomatoes, chopped Fresh mozzarella cheese, diced small 4 – 5 fresh basil leaves, cut into pieces Preheat oven to 450°. Brush each piece of bread with olive oil. Place on an Lisa Ann is the author of Seasoned With Love, Treasured Recipes and Lisa Ann’s Seasoned With Love II. Send recipes for publication to lapd1991@aol.com or to The Grapevine, 3660 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08361. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | It’s It’s easy to get distracted by today’s o distracted y today’s r headlines… Frank Parrish & Martin Hoag You may You ma want to wait until “better time ” to invest. e key to ay times times” invest. es long-ter i estment l long-term investment success has historically been to stay i ested rm inv h hi rically b histori ll inv d invested regardle regardless of what’s happening in the world market. Contact the ess what’s wo mark orld ket. investm professionals Hoag-Parris Financial Management investment professionals at Hoag-Parrish Financial Management ment sh for more information. more r Dial 85 Dial 856-691-1900 for a free consultation that carries absolutely 56-691-1900 tion carries no obligation. You can see us online at w w.hoag-par rish.com. obligation. You g www www.hoag-parrish.com. r the grapevine { 25 } Hoag-Parrish Hoag-Parrish Financial Ma Mangement Fi F nancial M ngement Securities offered through Royal Alliance Associates Inc., a registered broker-dealer. Member urities Royal Inc., , broker-dealer. FINRA/SIPC. Advisory Services FINRA/SIPC. Advisory Ser vices offered through Hoag-Parrish Financial Management, a registered NRA/SIPC Hoag-Parrish P Management, Dungeness Crabs Every Wednesday Comes with pasta red or white, salad, garlic bread $ 4940 Landis Ave• Vineland, NJ 08360 19 99 . (856) 691-8051 Serving Vineland and neighboring communities since 1982 2008 International Martial Arts Association Instructor of the Year 856-405-0008 Lincoln Plaza • 3722 E. Landis Avenue Suite G • Vineland, NJ 08361 www.vinelandmartialarts.com Get Ahead! BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIAL August 18, 2009 – October 24, 2009 $ includes FREE uniform Don’t wait until school starts – get a Head Start on earning better grades and achieving more by preparing your mind and body for a great school year! Parents: To see how Tang Soo Do can help your child get better grades and achieve more in School click on the ‘Better Grades’ tab on our website at www.vinelandmartialarts.com (Youth and Adult Tang Soo Do Programs only – Little Tigers is excluded) Space is Limited – Call Today 856-405-0008 We are currently accepting new students in our Little Tigers (4-6 year olds) and Tai Chi Programs. 99 ONLY .00 your shoulders can pinch nerves and interfere with circulation, and you might develop tinSource: www.kidshealth.org. gling, numbness, and weakness in your arms and hands. Other than pawing through it to grab your sciIf you have to struggle to get your backpack ence homework, lunch money, or iPod, you on or off, if you have to lean forward to carry may not give much thought to your backpack. your pack, or if you have back pain, then the It gets used, it gets abused, and it gets shoved in way you are using your backpack (either its the bottom of your locker or the corner of your overall weight or the method you use to carry room. But can your backpack abuse you, causit) may need to be adjusted. If you continue to ing back problems or injury? have back pain or have numbness or weakness in your arms or legs, talk to your doctor. BACKPACK BASICS Bulky or heavy backpacks don’t just cause Backpacks can’t be beat for helping you to back injuries. People who carry large packs stay organized. Multiple compartments keep often aren’t aware of how much space the all your supplies and notes close at hand. packs take up and can hit others with their Backpacks also have health benefits. packs when turning around or moving through Compared with shoulder bags or purses, tight spaces, such as the aisles of the school backpacks are better for carrying all those bus. Students also are injured when they trip books and supplies because the weight of the over large packs or the packs fall on them. pack is evenly distributed across your body Also, carrying a heavy pack changes the way a and is supported by the strongest muscles in person walks and increases the risk of falling, the body: the back and the abdominal musparticularly on stairs or other places where the cles. But backpacks that are overloaded or backpack puts the wearer off balance. used improperly can make for some heavy health problems. TIPS FOR USING BACKPACKS Here are a few tips that will help make your CAN BACKPACKS backpack work for you, not against you: CAUSE PROBLEMS? Consider the construction. Before you Your spine is made of 33 bones called vertegrab that new bag off the rack, make sure brae, and between the vertebrae are disks that it’s got two padded straps that go over act as natural shock absorbers. When you your shoulders. The wider the straps, the incorrectly place a heavy weight on your shoul- better. A backpack with a metal frame ders, such as a backpack filled with books, the (like the ones hikers use) may give you weight’s force can pull you backward. To com- more support, too, although many lockers pensate, you may bend forward at the hips or aren’t big enough to hold this kind of pack. arch your back, and this can cause your spine Make use of another hiking tip: Look for a to compress unnaturally. backpack with a waist belt, which helps to Teens who carry heavy backpacks somedistribute the weight more evenly across times also compensate for the extra weight by the body. Backpacks with multiple comleaning forward; over time this can cause the partments can also help distribute the shoulders to become rounded and the upper weight more evenly. back to become curved. Because of the heavy Try a pack with wheels. Lots of kids weight, there’s a chance you may develop use these as an alternative to backpacks, shoulder, neck, and back pain. but there are guidelines and consideraIf you wear your backpack over just one tions to keep in mind with this kind of shoulder, or carry your books in a messenger pack, too. Many schools don’t allow bag, you may end up leaning to one side to rolling packs because people can trip offset the extra weight. You might develop over them in the halls. lower and upper back pain and strain your Use your locker. Try not to load up on shoulders and neck. Improper backpack use the textbooks for a full day’s classes. Make can lead to poor posture. frequent locker trips to drop off heavy Is your backpack getting on your nerves? It textbooks or extra stuff, like gym clothes or project materials. Figure out the might be. Tight, narrow straps that dig into Time To Buy a Backpack { 26 } the grapevine | AUGUST 19, 2009 Get Your Kids Ready For School & Save! Official Shoe Store for Sacred Heart High School, St. Joseph High School, Bishop Schad, St. Mary’s in Millville Fully stock with the shoes you will need for your schools including cordially invites you to enroll in the 49th season at e Arts of the Dance Centre 1925 East Chestnut Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361 856-692-9606 $ 00 on your purchase of $30 or more! 5 OFF Exp: 9/15/09 Registration: Wed. August 19th 2-7 PM 639 Landis Avenue • Vineland Al’s Shoes 856-691-1180 urs. August 20th 2-7 PM Kinder Creative Klass thru Advanced Ages 3 to Adult With This Ad (Cannot be combined with any other offers) ZUMBA – 6 Days a Week nonessentials, too. If you don’t need an item until the afternoon, why carry it around all morning? Plan your homework. Plan ahead and spread your homework out over the course of the week so you won’t have to tote all your books home on the weekend. Limit your backpack load. Doctors and physical therapists recommend that people carry no more than 10 percent to 15 percent of their body weight in their packs. This means that if you weigh 120 pounds, your backpack should weigh no more than 12 to 18 pounds. Use your bathroom scale to weigh your backpack and get an idea of what the proper weight for you feels like. Pick it up properly. As with any heavy weight, you should bend at the knees when lifting a backpack to your shoulders. Strengthen your core. A great way to prevent back injury is to strengthen the stabilizing muscles of your torso, including your lower back and abdominal muscles. Weight training, pilates, and yoga are all activities that can be effective in strengthening these core muscles. So what’s the best way to carry a backpack? Learn from the hiking pros and wear both straps over your shoulders. Keep your load light enough so that you can easily walk or stand upright, and pack your backpack with the heaviest items closest to your back. Reviewed by: Mary L. Gavin, MD Date reviewed: October 2007 Swine Flu Source: www.kidshealth.org. This spring, swine flu was suddenly all over the news. The virus spread from Mexico, where some people died from it. People in the United States also got sick, but far fewer died. Most people got better after having a fever, sore throat, and body aches, similar to the symptoms of the seasonal flu. Health officials now call swine flu a pandemic. That means the virus has spread throughout the world, can make people very sick, and can spread easily from one person to another. Researchers are working on a vaccine (shot) that would prevent swine flu, also known as influenza A (H1N1.) Why are they working on another flu shot? Because the regular flu shot for the seasonal flu won’t prevent H1N1. And if we can find a way to keep people from getting it in the first place, that would be good for all of us. New viruses like this one are unpredictable, and we probably haven’t seen the last of H1N1—it could resurface in the fall and winter and could make people sicker than it did this spring. Most kids want to know: Should I worry or not worry about this flu? Medical experts say instead of worrying, wash your hands! Worry won’t keep you from getting the flu (or any infectious disease), but good hand-washing often can keep you healthy. Continued on next page 009 UG.31, 2 ENING A OP Thursday, August 20th • 2-3 pm • 6-7 pm Open House Back To School Special $ Focused On The Arts! No Appointment Needed! 20 West Park Ave. Vineland Corner of Delsea & Park Hours:Mon.-Sat.11AM-10PM Sun.12 Noon-9PM www.russobrothersvineland.webs.com Catering Available 2 Large Plain Pizzas 12 Wings & 2 Liter Soda Not to be combined with any other offers Exp. 12/01/09 21 99 WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Registration August 19th-28th Stop In & Register Or Register Online at: www.vinelandpubliccharterschool.org or fax your application to: Get a New Look for Back To School at (856) 691-1005 Small Class Sizes Individual Attention State Regulated Class Time 8 am – 4 pm daily FREE Tuition For Grades K-2nd Grade! 1155B. East Landis Avenue Vineland, NJ 08360 – 4220 Dr. Ann Garcia, Executive Director Call: 856-691-1004 • Fax 856-691-1005 Hair – Color – Cuts – Styling – Nails – Manicure – Pedicure – Acrylics Full Line of Make-up & Skin Care Products 1406 S. Main Road Vineland, NJ 08360 the grapevine { 27 } (856) 691-9299 Now Hiring Experienced Hair Dresser w/Following A virus is a germ, as you probably know, and germs are too small to be seen. Keeping your hands clean—and following other good habits like not sharing drinks and keeping your fingers out of your mouth—can keep germs on the outside. Another way to be helpful is for sick people to stay home from school (if you’re a kid) or work (if you’re a grownup). Anyone who thinks he or she might have the H1N1 virus should see a doctor. If someone has the H1N1 virus, antiviral medicine can help the person get better. SWINE = PIGS Did you know that swine is another name for pigs? The swine flu gets its name because pigs carry this kind of flu. You can get this kind of flu from pigs, but it also can be passed from person to person when someone coughs or sneezes. That’s why hand washing is important and why it’s good to sneeze or cough into your elbow (or a tissue) instead of your hands. JUST THE FACTS The initial news reports on swine flu may have made you confused or worried. Because this is a new illness, the news covered both what was happening and what might happen in the worst-case scenario. Because you’ll probably be hearing more about H1N1, we recommend a “just the facts” approach. Did you ever hear a TV detective say, “Just the facts, m’am?” That means we stick with what we know and make decisions based on that. It’s a good approach with this virus, even though it is now considered a pandemic. That’s a scary word, but it does not mean that the virus will sicken and kill a lot of people. A pandemic means the virus has spread to many countries and health officials need to be ready to handle it. WHAT YOU CAN DO We’ve already talked about washing your hands. Here are some more everyday steps you can take to stay well: • Try to avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth. That’s how germs get in. • Don’t drink out of the same cup or share utensils (forks, spoons) with other people. • Avoid people who are sick (coughing, fever, etc.). Expect to hear about the H1N1 virus for a while. It may be months before we know the whole story and how many people it will affect. In the meantime, keep those hands clean and be sure to tell your mom or dad if you have any concerns. Reviewed by: Mary L. Gavin, MD Date reviewed: June 2009 Small Learning Communities Mr. Theodore Peters, Principal, Vineland High School North 856-794-6800, ext. 2700 As of September 2008, Vineland High School made a major transformation unlike any we have seen in recent history. No longer is our high school configured as a 9-10 building and Try Karate The Little Gym Way    Stop In for your Revitalizing and Moisture Treatments To Renew your Summer Hair • Hair Strengthening • Unique Hair Texturing • High Gloss Treatments • Custom Coloring Techniques • Manicures • Pedicures • Acrylics • Make-Up (Full Line) • Waxing • Bridal Services • Same Day Appointments                                                                { 28 } the grapevine | AUGUST 19, 2009 Brewster Village 2630 E. Chestnut Ave. Vineland, NJ 856-696-3900 Behind Martino’s Trattoria Rest. Always Accepting Talented New Staff             an 11-12 building. No longer are classes a mere 40 minutes in length. No longer are students unchallenged in “general” level courses. No longer are students part of such a large institution that they are not known by other students and teachers. No longer are parents and students going “unnoticed” in our school without the opportunity to know at least one professional member of the school extremely well over all four years of high school. No longer will students take academic courses that are not centered around student interests. We have joined all other Abbott school districts in the following changes as part of our State’s Secondary Education Initiative: The establishment of small learning communities (SLCs) containing no more than 400 students, each with students of grades 9 through twelve; and SLCs will be theme-based, with students and staff given the opportunity to elect an SLC of their choice. Small Learning Communities are an organizational tool used to personalize a large school. Its organization supports student development as well as academic growth over multiple years. Teachers and students work cooperatively and collaboratively in developing a wholesome teaching and learning environment. The SLCs at Vineland Public High include: • Communication • Applied Technology • Business and Leadership • Math/Science/Engineering • Medical/Health/Soc. Sciences • Arts • Environmental Sciences • Liberal Arts Students in all SLCs receive core content area courses in mathematics, English, social studies, and science. These courses prepare all for admission into college as well as for entrance into the world of work. SLC elective courses are not requirements for entrance into college; rather they expose students to options within a career focus in an effort to assist them in making more informed occupational/professional/vocational choices. As of September, 2008, our middle schools and high schools will be transformed in accordance with the state-mandated Secondary Education Initiative standards (SEI). The following changes will be included as part of this mandate: • Small Learning Communities • Student and Family Advocacy Program • A Rigorous Academic Program of Study guidelines regarding just how much sleep children need at different stages in their development. Keep in mind that these numbers reflect total sleep hours in a 24-hour period. So if your child still naps, you’ll need to take that into account when you add up his/her typical sleep hours. Birth-6 Months: 16-20 hours 6-12 Months: 14-15 hours Ages 1-3: 10-13 hours Ages 3-10: 10-12 hours Ages 11-12: About 10 hours Teenagers: About 9 hours If these numbers are surprising, you’re not alone. As adults, we’re accustomed to needing 7 to 9 hours of sleep, and we’re often forced to get by with far less. As a result, it might be tempting to think that our kids have similar sleep requirements, or that they should be able to cope fairly well with a few skipped hours here and there. However, kids who are regularly sleep deprived will exhibit some pretty difficult behaviors. They display frequent irritability, overreact emotionally, have difficulty concentrating, forget easily, wake often during the night, and may even display hyperactive behaviors. TIP: If your kids are extremely reluctant to get up in the morning, consider using an alarm clock with gradually increasing sound, or use a timer to make their bedside lamp turn on just before you want them to wake up. I Vineland Public Schools Demographics SCHOOLS: There are 19 schools. 2 preschool sites, 8 elementary schools, 4 middle schools, 2 high schools, 2 alternative program sites and 1 adult education center. Alignment is as follows: preschool, kindergarten through grade five in elementary school, grades six through eight in middle school, grades 9 through twelve are loacted on the Vineland High School campus (North and South Buildings). STUDENTS: 10,427 EMPLOYEES: 2,044 ACHIEVEMENT: The 2008 graduating class of 715 students included 188 honor students with grade-point averages of 3.0 or above. Percentage of class reaching graduation was 98. This year our graduates have been accepted into institutions of high learning as follows: 4-year degree schools, 16.6%; 2-year degree schools, 51.6%; technical/trade schools, 7.9%; employment, 8.5%; military, 2.8%. TEST SCORES: 2007 CEEB (SAT) – New Categories: Critical Reading – 470; Math – 485; Writing – 465. 2007 U.S. Averages – Critical Redaing – 502; Math – 515; Writing – 494 No More Sleeping In Source: www.about.com You’ll want to be sure your kids are getting plenty of sleep when school starts. If your kids have been staying up extra late this summer, you should gradually move their bedtimes up by about 15 minutes a night. This will make bedtimes easier on you when school begins, and it will help relieve the back-to-school jitters and insomnia. The American Academy of Pediatrics Guide to Your Child’s Sleep provides some helpful Source: VPS website 1370 S. Main Rd. Vineland Get that new look for School Open 7 days Walk-Ins Welcome 856-794-2727 BOXINGDEFENSE • CIRCUIT TRAINING • MMA • KICKBOXING CARDIO • SELF WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Boys! ’s Men Young cut Hair We Welcome April Bernard to our Staff Back To School Special Fun For The Whole Family! For Ages 6 to 106! $ $ Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. 29 down 29 per month* Family, Student & Corporate Plans Available New Members Only *for the first 3 months the grapevine { 29 } 3722 E. LANDIS AVE. VINELAND • LINCOLN PLAZA 856-696-4355 www.tntfightingandfitness.com Get Your First-Time Home Buyer’s ‘Prefund’ Now! There’s still time to take advantage of New Jersey’s First-Time Home Buyers Tax Credit Loan (“TCLP”) Program. You may have heard about the $8,000 tax credit for first-time home buyers, but did you know that you may be able to borrow up to $5,000 against that credit to pay downpayment and/or closing costs? Call David today to find out more about the TCLP Program and to see if you qualify. But don’t wait, this program is only available to those who close on the home purchase by December 1, 2009. I Real Estate Housing Lottery Eleven Cumberland homeowners will be selected for the rehabbed homes in targeted neighborhoods. he application process for new affordable two- to four-bedroom homes in Vineland, Bridgeton and Commercial Township, selling between $68,000 to $170,000, will open on August 19. Families earning between 50 percent and 120 percent of the area’s median income are eligible to apply. The homes are planned for occupancy in early 2010. “This is a tremendous opportunity for us to continue to develop our county and to provide housing to so many more residents,” said Louis N. Magazzu, Cumberland County Freeholder Director. The opportunity is made possible as a result of grant funds received by the Cumberland Empowerment Zone Corporation under Round I of the Neighborhood Stabilization Program. The Program provides funding to rehabilitate FHA • VA • Conventional T David Mazowski LOAN OFFICER Gateway Funding DMS, LP Office 856.692.9494 Fax 856.691.3687 Cell 609.774.1513 1 17 E. Landis Ave • Suite C • Vineland, NJ 08360 1 Licensed by NJ department of Banking and Insurance Opening Doors to Home Ownership abandoned and foreclosed properties in targeted neighborhoods within the EZ municipalities. The county is substantially rehabilitating more than 11 foreclosed or abandoned homes, which may include roof replacement, new HVAC unit(s), new water heater, new windows (dual pane), insulated exterior doors, new appliances, new flooring, interior and exterior paint, new front yard landscaping, baseboards, attic insulation, smoke detectors, new plumbing and electrical and inspection for termites and lead-based paint. To qualify for the lottery in which 11 homeowners will be selected, each interested applicant must fill out a preliminary application by September 15, 2009. “These homes are going to be a great opportunity for any one who qualifies and wins the lottery,” according to Freeholder Director Magazzu. “They are all completely Beautiful Smiles, Made Affordable OUR SERVICES { 30 } the grapevine | AUGUST 19, 2009 MILLVILLE FAMILY DENTAL Union Lake Crossing Shopping Center 2144 N. 2nd St., Millville NEW PATIENT WELCOMING PACKAGE $ 80 (reg. $230.) Includes oral exam, full mouth series of x-rays, cleaning & polishing, oral cancer screening, periodontal (gums) evaluation. With coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Emergency Walk-Ins Welcome • Same-Day Denture Repair • • • • • • • • • • • Cleaning & X-Rays Porcelain Veneers Cosmetic Dentistry Periodontal Therapy (Gum Treatment) Full Mouth Reconstruction Implant Rehabilitation Root Canals (One Visit) Full & Partial Dentures Bleaching White Fillings Crowns & Bridges 856-825-2111 Open 7 Days a Week. Day & Evening Hours Proud Member Of The Allied Dental Practices Of NJ Personalized Dentistry SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO OUR SENIOR CITIZENS Se Habla Español E D W A R D P O L L E R , D D S • G L E N N P R A G E R , D D S • TO D D P R A G E R , D D S • D A N I E L D I C E S A R E , D M D redone, renovated and will add to the beauty of the neighborhoods and the quality of life for the households.” The preliminary applications will be available on August 19, 2009, through Jim Petkovits at Triad Associates, 690-5749 or by visiting www.triadhousingprogram.com. Pre-application forms will also be available at the Bridgeton, Vineland and Commercial Township municipal buildings. To qualify, homeowners’ income, which includes all earned income as well as income from assets, benefits, child support and alimony, must meet the program’s criteria. The income limits can be viewed in the chart below, as well as at www.triadhousingprogram.com for additional counties. A lottery for the new homes will be scheduled in October of 2009. Lottery winners must complete an eight-hour homebuying counseling course, secure a 30-year, fixed rate mortgage, which could be FHA or VA loan, and have the required down payment and closing costs. Units will be deed restricted to ensure continued affordability. The program is authorized through the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs Neighborhood Stabilization Program, the New Jersey Council on Affordable Housing Program and the Housing and Economic Recovery Act. Visit www.njhousing.gov for more affordable housing opportunities. I REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS The following transactions of $1,000 or more were filed with Cumberland County in the month of July 2009 (transactions may have occurred in an earlier month). Names listed may, in some cases, be those of buyers’ or sellers’ representatives. VINELAND 1660 E Oak Rd., Jean D Cortopassi to Jenna L Falciani on 7 /1/09 for $120,000 2560 Michelon Ct., Wieslaw Gluszak to Sandra Cortes on 7 /1/09 for $288,000 201 S 8th St., Gail Blair (Exec.) to Yarilee J Miranda on 7 /2/09 for $183,000 2336 Coronado Dr., Beazer Homes Corp. to /2/09 for $245,000 Olga B White on 7 1430 Venus Dr., Cumberland County Sheriff to New Jersey Home Construction Inc. on 7 /6/09 for $57,400 2542 Monroe Ave., Kuzmicz B&D Construction LLC to Michael A Cifaloglio on 7 /6/09 for $85,000 732 Embassy Terr., Normita Bonilla to Raymundo Beteta-Hernandez on 7 /6/09 for $154,000 920 New Pear St., Paul Letizia to Monty C Johnson on 7 /6/09 for $154,900 1220 N West Ave., Joseph J Reymer to /6/09 for $198,500 Marisol Gonzalez on 7 700 S Mill Rd., Frank Cugino (by Atty.) to Joseph D Cugino on 7 /6/09 for $200,000 3676 Nathan Ln., NVR Inc. (DBA) to Tiffany J Mutcherson on 7 /6/09 for $226,915 1038 E Chestnut & C., South Jersey Health System Inc. to Danza Realty Group Vineland LLC on 7 /6/09 for $1,000,000 65 S State St., South Jersey Health System Inc. to Newcomb Medical Alliance Center LLC on 7 /6/09 for $4,000,000 129 Luciano Ave., Inc. New Jersey Home Construction to Alma M Rivera on 7 /09 /7 for $125,000 1830 W Garden Rd., Nicholas Santandrea to Adrianne Franklin on 7 /09 for $150,000 /7 1225 N West Ave., Kenneth E Jones, Jr. to Walter R Hull on 7 /09 for $195,000 /7 1140 E Landis Ave., John H Wisda to Lauren M Doyle on 7 /09 for $198,500 /7 2964 S Lincoln Ave., Paul Pope to Victor M /7 Maldonado on 7 /09 for $217,500 2480 Old Farm Dr., NVR Inc. to Frank J Pilitowski, Jr. on 7 /09 for $236,390 /7 2241 Delmar Ave., Beazer Homes Corp. to /7 Aaron T Melnick on 7 /09 for $240,000 775 S Delsea Dr., Susquehanna Bank to Fredonia LLC on 7 /8/09 for $200,000 3696 Nathan Ln., NVR Inc. (DBA) to Tammy J Chance on 7 /8/09 for $209,615 1644 Tomahawk Ct., NVR Inc. (DBA) to Ronald Elahi on 7 /8/09 for $265,610 2139 E Chestnut Ave., Terrace East Real Estate Associates LP to Rachel Shaw on 7 /9/09 for $134,900 1600 Arrowhead Trail, Sadgun Thakore to Harkamal Singh on 7 /9/09 for $239,000 2009 Income Limits For Units Located in Cumberland County Number of persons in houselhold 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Max. Annual Income 120% of Median Max. Annual Income 80% of Median Max. Ann. Income 50% of Median ……………………………..$50,300 ………………………$33,550 ……………………$20,950 ……………………………..$57,500 ……………………….$38,300 …………………….$23,950 ……………………………..$64,700 ……………………….$43,100 …………………….$26,950 ……………………………..$71,900 ……………………….$47,900 …………………….$29,950 ……………………………..$77,650 ……………………….$51,750 ……………………..$32,350 ……………………………..$83,400 ………………………$55,550 …………………….$34,750 ……………………………..$89,150 ……………………….$59,400 …………………….$37,150 ……………………………..$94,900 ………………………$63,250 …………………….$39,550 30 YEAR TIMBERLINE Roof Shingle Upgrade With new roof system. Offer good to August 31, 2009. www.scottibrothersinc.com John’s Cell: (609) 381-4289 • Tom’s Cell: (856) 498-4841 WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | FREE ESTIMATES • FULLY INSURED LIC# 13VH00096200 Time is Running Out!!! … for the $8,000 CREDIT for Qualified First-Time Home Buyers. To qualify, you must purchase and settle a home before November 30, 2009. Call Maturo Realty, Inc. 856-696-2255 for more details and let one of our experienced, professional agents find a home for you today. the grapevine { 31 } Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. Our Family of Doctors Bring your entire family to One Location. You will Benefit from a Team of Dental Professionals who can provide to you all Phases of Dentistry including a full time Orthodontics staff. Our Doctors and Specialists are Qualified, Knowledgeable and Caring. Our Friendly, Polite Staff is dedicated to making your time with us a unique, Pleasant Experience. Once you come to Quality Dental Care…You Are Family! Orthodontist License #5738 lity Dental Care Qua Today’s Cosmetic & Family Dentistry Must present coupon. Exp. 8/28/09 Back to School Special Full Braces $2,995 (856) 451-8041 (Across from Walmart) Main Road • Vineland (856) 691-0290 (Next to Acme & Blockbuster) TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS www.quality-dental.com Bridgeton

Posted on August 18th, 2009 by by Mike

August 12, 2009

INSIDE PULLOUT ARTS & CULTURAL GUIDE • HOME & GARDEN • FOOD TWEETS VOLUME 2 | ISSUE 27 | AUGUST 12, 2009 CONNECTING YOU T O V I N E L A N D . W E E K L Y. Visit us online www.grapevinenewspaper.com Trip to the Farm City kids are introduced to farm animals, nature, and Native American culture. STORY AND PHOTOS: STEPHANIE FARRELL 2009 Cumberland County Arts & Cultural Guide ess than five miles from home, but it might as well have been a world away. For the 40 inner-city kids in the Arise Summer Camp at the First United Methodist Church, the trip to Indian Trail Farm meant horse rides, a nature walk, and a chance to pet nervous goats. They gathered in the teepee as Erica Mevoli, the owner and director of the 60-acre farm, taught them about Native American culture. In this peaceful and quiet setting, Mevoli and her staff taught the kids what is involved in caring for animals and respecting nature. “This is really good for them. This is perfect for them,” said Bev Slimmer, church administrator and camp chaperone. Continued on page 8 L Pullout Guide begins on page 15 CASH FOR 2009 Model Clearance CLUNKERS Your vehicle may be eligible for up to $4500.00 Voucher HURRY BEFORE THE MONEY RUNS OUT!! 2008 President’s Award Winner & 2008 Council of Excellence Winner Is On NOW! Se Habla Español 1517 SOUTH DELSEA DRIVE, VINELAND NJ 856-692-1700 • www.rossihonda.com Visit Us At www.rossihonda.com INDIVIDUALS STRUGGLING WITH MEMORY IMPAIRMENT… ARE IN LOVING, HIGHLY TRAINED HANDS WITH OUR WELLSPRING MEMORY CARE PROGRAM. We offer: • A specialized, secured community with outside garden areas • Therapeutic, innovative interventions and programs designed to enhance the resident’s strengths and abilities • Our In Touch specialized staff training program developed by a nationally known dementia expert • Respite/short term stays are offered { 2 } the grapevine | AUGUST 12, 2009 JUNIPER VILLAGE ALSO OFFERS A SEPARATE ASSISTED LIVING COMMUNITY ON THE SAME CAMPUS 1640 South Black Horse Pike Williamstown, NJ 08094 www.junipercommunities.com 856.740.4444 I Faces in the News Newfield Bank Donates Scoreboard to Delsea High School History repeats itself. Some 40 years ago, Newfield National Bank sponsored Delsea Regional High School’s scoreboard. The scoreboard was originally installed in the late 1960s with John Borelli, Sr., president and Joseph Hoffman, director, of Newfield National Bank making the presentation to Steve Cesare, president of the School Board, and Boyd Sands, Superintendent of Schools. On Tuesday, July 28, 2009, John Borelli, Jr., president; Joseph Hoffman, Chairman of the Board; and Ronald Cunningham, Board of Directors of Newfield National Bank presented the new and improved scoreboard to Frank Borelli, Superintendent of Schools, along with John A. Oberg, for whom the field is named. This sign is a modern, digital, radio-controlled sign with all the latest innovations in scoreboard signs. Frank Borelli stated, “Newfield National Bank has been the sole sponsor of all the scoreboards in the wrestling, football, soccer, baseball and basketball venues.” John Borelli, Jr. commented, “Newfield Bank has always had a tradition of civic responsibility and we will continue to do so for our community.” THEN: Boyd Sands, John Borelli, Sr., Steve Cesare, and Joseph Hoffman. NOW: Piera Gravenor, Principal of Delsea Middle School; Frank Borelli, Superintendent of Schools; John Oberg, retired Football Coach/Athletic Director of Delsea Regional High; John Borelli, Jr., Joseph Hoffman, Ronald Cunningham, and Joseph Sottosanti, principal at Delsea. Crew Team Gives Back Vineland High School crew team members volunteered at the Vineland Fire Department’s Burn Foundation Golf Tournament held at White Oaks Country Club on July 20. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Christmas in July Members of the Boys & Girls Club of Vineland’s Summer Program celebrated “Christmas in July” recently and exchanged gifts with one another. Shown here are some of the members showing off their gifts in front of a Christmas tree that the young people decorated with ornaments they designed themselves as part of an arts and crafts project. For more information on the Boys & Girls Club, call 696-4190. Intensive Outpatient Program Added at SJH South Jersey Healthcare announces the addition of an intensive outpatient program to the continuum of mental health services offered to Cumberland and Salem county residents. The Adult Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) offers new services provided at SJH Bridgeton Health Center that are designed specifically for patients who are experiencing psychiatric or emotional difficulties, but do not or no longer need the level of care offered by inpatient or partial care hospitalization programs. The goal of intensive outpatient therapy is to empower each person to learn and experience new ways to cope with stress, anxiety, and depression. To request treatment services or find out more about the program, call 575-4111 or visit www.sjhealthcare.net. Pictured at the ribbon cutting, from left: Celeste Riley, Andria Balicki, Louis Magazzu, Dave Moore, Albert Kelly, Jane Jannarone, Michael Rossi III, Nelson Thompson, John Burzichelli and Chet Kaletkowski. More Faces in the News on page 10 & 29 SEND US YOUR FACES — IT’S FREE! Get your photos published in The Grapevine… birthdays, engagements, weddings, anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them the address listed on p. 4. the grapevine { 3 } I Editor’s Letter Cumberland GOP BACK TO SCHOOL Candidates Go High-Tech SPECIAL STARTS EDITOR’S NOTE: This column is the first in a series covering each party fielding candidates in the November 3 election for Cumberland County Freeholder and County Clerk. { CONTENTS } 1 Trip to the Farm City kids take a tour of Indian Trail Farm. STEPHANIE FARRELL 3, 10 Faces in the News 6 Clothesline Art Show Saturday’s Fresh and Specialty Foods Market gets the kids drawing. TODD NOON Get the kids in for their haircuts before school starts! KIDS HAIRCUTS (cannot be combined with any other offers or specials.) exp 08/31/09 ONLY 8 WOW Get your Loved One A Gift Certificate Today 14 Years & Younger $ HOURS Mon. – Wed. 9-5pm, Thurs. & Fri. 9-7pm Sat. 8:30-3pm & Sun., 9-1 pm WALK-INS WELCOME! NO APPOINTMENTS NECESSARY 5006 E. Landis Ave.Vineland (856) 691-2202 High Efficiency Heating and Cooling and Water Heating Equipment Eligible for up to $1500 in Federal Tax Credits and up to $400 in Rebates { 4 } the grapevine | AUGUST 12, 2009 Following the lead of Republican gubernatorial candidate Chris Christie, who announced his Lieutenant Governor running mate choice on Twitter.com, the Cumberland County Republican candidates are utilizing the Internet to reach existing and new voters. The local GOP’s three candidates for Freeholder, Sam Fiocchi, Rick Tonetta and Tom Sheppard, joined incumbent candidate for County Clerk, Gloria Noto, in a press conference last week to announce their new web site, CumberlandAnswers.com. The county GOP chairman, Bob Greco, said that the web site is just one of the tools the party would use to reach new and existing voters via the Internet. Social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter will also be used to keep Cumberland County residents up-to-date on the candidates’ campaign activities and on their positions on issues. The three GOP freeholder candidates are hoping to eliminate the Democrats’ seven-seat monopoly on the Freeholder board. When accessing CumberlandAnswers.com, site visitors will be directed randomly to pages set up for each of eight campaign issues. Each of these pages are headlined with the question, “Did you know?” Visitors can click through to subsequent pages to learn more about each of these issues, addressed individually by one of the candidates. The site also features a section with profiles of each candidate and other sections dedicated to news, videos, and information about donating to and volunteering for the campaign. “Politics as usual are over,” said Greco. “It is our responsibility to educate the public about the issues that effect them in Cumberland County. In order to do this most effectively we hired a non-political firm, Graphicus Communications, to run our campaign.” The Millville-based Graphicus Communications, which is designing the GOP’s print media ads, hand-outs, posters and other printed collateral material, has also designed the new web site and is advising the candidates’ in the use of social networking sites and other new media. Graphicus has not been involved with political campaigns in the past and that is part of the reason the GOP selected them, according to Greco. After 35 years of being in the minority on the Freeholder board (the Democrats have held the majority for each of those 35 years except for one year: 2002), the Republicans have good reason to try a new tactic. They also feel that they have their best chance for success in 2009 than they’ve had in years. Whether Cumberland County is ready for the party’s Internet-based election tools may have less to do with the outcome on November 3 than the help they get from Christie at the top of the ticket, but the GOP candidates believe can’t afford the status quo. And any tools to improve communication between the residents and those who wish to represent them, they say, certainly can’t hurt. —MIKE EPIFANIO, Editor & Publisher 7 Snail Mail The handwritten letter has qualities that more modern forms of communication can’t touch. DEBORAH A. EIN 12-14 HOME & GARDEN 15-26 ARTS & CULTURAL GUIDE 27 28 29 Entertainment Letters to the Editor An Historic Evening President Nixon’s resignation was felt locally. VINCE FARINACCIO 29 30 33 Vintage Vineland Community Calendar DINING: All Atwitter About Food Tweeters who are also foodies meet at a Collingswood eatery. STEPHEN WILSON 36 Recipe Corner Just in time for Jersey tomato growers—a recipe for sauce. LISA DINUNZIO 38 REAL ESTATE { STAFF } BELOW: Cumberland County Republican candidates for Freeholder Sam Fiocchi, Rick Tonetta and Tom Sheppard join incumbent County Clerk Gloria Noto and GOP party chairman Bob Greco at a press conference announcing the candidates’ new web site, www.CumberlandAnswers.com MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor LORI GOUDIE Art Director GAIL EPIFANIO Controller JACK EPIFANIO Distribution SHERRY MUNYAN Advertising Executive MARIE HALPIN-GALLO Advertising Executive PATTY ALI Graphic Designer MARYANNE BERTRAND Advertising Assistant Serving Vineland for over 100 years! The Grapevine 691-1950 State Lic. # 12089 3660 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361 PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816 EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2009. All rights reserved. International Food & Cultural Festival S 3– 500 Block Landis Ave. ALSO… Sausage and Peppers Clams Raw & Steamed North Italy Famous Clams For the Kids: Ice Cream -N- Water Ice Homemade Wine Competition* Homemade Sauce/Gravy Competition* (Is it Sauce or Gravy? You Decide!) Sunday, August 16,2009 From Noon til’ 6:00 PM on the Lodge Grounds S. East Ave. & Virano La., Vld, NJ DONATION $ 00 9 PER PERSON Crowning of Mr. & Miss Cherry Tomato Foods from Around the World (and Vineland) and Live Music Live Band North Italy Beneficial Association Sponsored by Platter: Homemade Macaroni Salad-Corn Roasted Peppers-Tomato Salad-Roll FREE OIL TANK REMOVALS! New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) is offering refunds of up to $3,000.00 to NJ homeowners for the removal of underground home heating oil tanks including the installation of new aboveground oil tanks. kM Fran the and rone a n Italia s D un Phal yn Refunds up to $3,000 Remove your non-leaking oil tank, including the cost of installation of a new above ground tank. J o era, Z o e R iv ro na Ze Refunds of $1,200 Remove your non-leaking underground oil tank. *To compete in the Homemade Wine or Sauce/Gravy Contest Vineland Mayor’s Youth Council Talent Show/Fair & Battle of the Bands Activities for Youth and Adults Hangar 84 Tickets only $10 Silent Auction Arts and crafts Open Air Bands Games for Kids throughout the day Inflatables Contact VDID/Main Street 603 East Landis Avenue 856-794-8653 WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | To qualify for this refund you must meet the following requirements: • Your underground tank must not leak when removed • You must have a taxable income of less than $250,000 per year. • Your “Net Worth” (not including the value of your primary residence or retirement funds, 401K, IRA or Keough) must be less than $500,000 • Your annual living expenses must be 51% or more than your annual taxable income. • You must pay a $250.00 application fee. MainStreetVineland.org For more details contact CALMAR ASSOCIATES LLC at (609) 476-4500 or (856) 692-5070 on how to take advantage of this program. CALMAR ASSOCIATES LLC is certified by the NJDEP, insured, and has over 25 years experience in: the grapevine { 5 } VINELAND TROLLEY VINELAND TROLLEY TANK TESTING • TANK REMOVALS • TANK ABANDONMENTS LEAKING TANK CLEAN-UPS • INSURANCE CLAIM REMEDIATIONS This ad has been paid for with funds approved for such use by the New Jersey Urban Enterprise Zone Authority. FREE – PARK & RIDE: The trolley will be running during the event. Trolley runs from Walmart to Kidston Towers. Pick up on Wood or Elmer in Festival Area. I Downtown Vineland { TODD NOON, EXEC. DIR., VDID/MAIN STREET } Clothesline Art Show The season’s final Farmers’ Market on Saturday features a kids’ art show. A ugust is here and back-to-school sales are in full swing, but we at VDID/Main Street Vineland are still hard at work planning some summer fun for you. Our Fresh and Specialty Foods Market winds up for the year this Saturday as we feature the Kids Clothesline Art Show. Participants can register up to the date of the event and can enter to win ribbons in two contests—(1) create your own artwork at the Market or bring a favorite drawing from home, and (2) show off your sidewalk drawing talent in the Chalk Art Contest. Both contests will be judged in the following age groups—3-5 years, 6-8 years, 9-11 years, and 12-14 years. The art session will begin at 9 a.m. Also, you can still cast your vote in the 18 -H o l e C o u r s e H a n d i c a p – A c c e ss i b l e Little Miss & Mister Cherry Tomato photo contest. The winner will be crowned at the International Food & Cultural Festival next Saturday, August 22, and will ride in the Holiday Parade on November 28. All the proceeds will go toward the great cause of downtown revitalization. Presented by VDID/Main Street Vineland and sponsored again by Sun National Bank, the Market runs from 8 a.m. to noon. *** The summertime festivities continue at the Third Annual International Food & Cultural Festival on August 22 (rain date is August 23), from 3 to 8 p.m., on the 500 block of Landis Avenue. Enjoy a real “virtual vacation” as food, musicians, dancers, artists, and crafters from a variety of cultures will be fea- tured. You can sample Greek, Hispanic, Italian, and Jamaican cultural traditions, and then travel back to the United States for some down home food and music. The festival will also feature the return of our popular Homemade Wine Competition and the addition of a Tomato Sauce Competition. Stop by the office at 603 E. Landis Avenue or go to the website for registration forms. Partnering with this event is the Mayor’s Youth Council, which is sponsoring its Youth Fest on Sixth Street, between Landis Avenue and Elmer Street. Watch for more information on this great event next week, as well as a sneak peek at the Rock ‘n Roll ‘n Ribs ‘n Chili Cook-Off coming up on Saturday, September 26. The fun just keeps on coming! *** Remember that for all our downtown events, support your downtown merchants and businesses. They, and we at VDID/Main Street Vineland, will greatly appreciate your support and patronage. I For more information on VDID/Main Street Vineland’s “endless summer” of events and activities, call the office at 794-8653 or visit the website—www.mainstreetvineland.org. Kids 3 to 14 years of age may enter the Chalk Art Contest and create sidewalk drawings on the spot. { 6 } the grapevine | AUGUST 12, 2009 (1) Round of Golf for a Group of 4, FREE Hot Dog or Nachos & (1) FREE Soda – Only $25.00 Hot Dogs• Chili/Cheese • Nachos • Sausage • Sodas & Soft Pretzels Indoor & Patio Seating Gift Certificates Available Wednesday N ig h t S p e c i a l 5pm- close Fund Raising Opportunities for your school or organization Senior Citizen Rates • Visa & Mastercard Accepted $5.00 until 5PM • $6.00 5PM to Close B i r th d a y P a r t y P a c k a g e s 73 Landis Ave. Upper Deerfield Twp. Located next to Rita’s Water Ice 856-453-PUTT (7888) www.landislinks.com Hours: 11 am-10pm Daily Video Games Moonbounce Dunk Tanks Slip-N-Slide Cotton Candy Pucker Powder Snow Cones Art Spinner Tables & Chairs Tents I Gleanings { DEBORAH A. EIN, MANAGING EDITOR } Snail Mail The handwritten letter has its advantages. ith troops being deployed to Afghanistan, military families are dealing with what soldiers and loved ones of past wars long endured—waiting for letters from back home or from the war zone. American soldiers sent to Iraq had almost instant contact with loved ones through e-mails, texts, or webcams. Not so in Afghanistan. The units are being sent out into remote villages to protect locals from Taliban attacks, and the villages rarely have modern communication systems. For older soldiers, previous service puts the convenience of modern communication in perspective. As recently as Operation Desert Storm in the early 1990s, there was limited phone access and no e-mail. In that conflict and all others before, soldiers relied on the handwritten letter, and mail call was a much-anticipated W time to hear back from loved ones. As reported by CNN News, “Capt. David Luber remembers waiting to talk to his wife during a nine-month tour during Operation Desert Storm. Luber would go weeks without hearing his wife’s voice. To make matters worse, Marines only received mail once their ship arrived at port. Sleepless nights and the torment of reckless seas were forgotten when he’d receive a bundle of letters, one for each consecutive day his wife wrote. One by one, Luber would put the letters in chronological order and read each one until he read the last.” My own grandmother, who lived with us from the time I was six, wrote to my cousin while he served in Vietnam. I recall trying to imagine what it was like for him in that faraway land. He was my older cousin—18 seemed ancient to a 10-year-old but looking back now, I realize he was just a child himself. I read some of the letters he wrote to my grandmother, in which he talked about the weather, his unit being held up by the rainy season and such. My own experience in letter writing at the time was with a pen pal. After second grade, my best friend moved away and we wrote each other all the way through grade school and high school. With more modern forms of communication, pen pals of the letter-writing variety are few E-mail and text messages may be too hard to find, if they survive at all, to tell the stories of today. and far between these days. A friend of my daughter moved to Connecticut about a year ago, and they communicate sparingly by e-mail or IMing. There are subtleties that we can put on paper that do not translate so well in an e-mail. When we first started e-mailing on the job about 10 years ago, a colleague of mine pointed out that a huge drawback to e-mails, especially if not proofread, is the terse tone that comes across, often unwittingly. With a letter, there’s the handwriting and sometimes a scent (love letters) that you can’t get through the phone or e-mail, making letters absolutely precious and long-lasting. It shows that the sender took the time to find paper and pen, and think before carefully writing in his or her own unique hand what could not be backspaced over. Biographers and other researchers have long used letters and journal entries to trace history. E-mail and text messages may be too hard to find, if they even survive, to tell the stories of today. In an age when even wedding invitations are emailed, is there any hope of a good oldfashioned letter carefully penned being stashed away in a box of correspondence or mementos? Luber is now a deputy program manager at the Office of Naval Research. It’s been 18 years since his Desert Storm deployment, but the comfort and fragrance of his wife’s letters linger. “I still have them all and she has all mine,” he said. I BUYING GOLD & SILVER • Gold Jewelry • Silver Jewelry • Sterling Silver Flatware • Gold Rings • Gold Bracelets • Gold Chains • Gold Class Rings • Dental Gold • Other Gold or Silver Items • U.S. Eagles • K-Rands • Pandas • Mexican-Pesos • Canadian Maple Leaf • Gold and Silver Bars • National Currency • U.S. Paper Money 1864 to 1922 • Coin Collections • Estates WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the grapevine { 7 } 1 2581 E. Chestnut Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361 (856) 794-1600 • 856-776-6404 Owned & Operated by the Avena Family for over 35 years Coin & Jewelry Co. Avena Farm Trip Continued from page 1 “It’s incredible. They actually get out into the woods, learn about the plants and the purpose they served, things I didn’t know.” Slimmer said the kids would never get this type of experience if it weren’t for the two-week day camp, now in its fourth year. This was their first trip to Indian Trail. “They are learning how to respect the animals, be gentle with the animals, how to listen.” The camp is a free outreach by the church for second to fifth graders. “We wanted to give them structured activities in the summer, a sense of God and nature.” The campers were decked out in Camp E.D.G.E. T-shirts, which stands for “Experience and Discover God Everywhere.” Mevoli led the nature walk in her Native American dress, and carefully pointed out sassafras, bushberries, and huckleberries. She explained how the Lenape tribe used different plants and trees. “Wherever they walked, they observed. They paid attention. They ate hickory nuts. They ate chestnuts. Whenever they cut something or killed something, they asked forgiveness from the creator. They knew he created it all,” said Mevoli. “There was no waste. They would use everything.” She explained how acorns were shelled and ground into flour, how the cherry bark was used to make an expectorant. Mevoli explained that she didn’t plant the trees. They had been there for 200 years. Tara Weyman, Indian Trail’s riding instructor, taught the kids about the care of horses while they petted the dapple gray mare and her three-month-old baby. The farm has three of the only 2,000 registered Mountain Pleasure horses. “We bring them in for storms and to feed them. They go out into the paddock or out to graze in the pastures for a few hours a day. If they get too much grass, they can get colic,” Weyman said. “We don’t want anything to hurt our horses. We feed them oats and hay twice a day. We feed all of our animals natural supplements. We try to keep them really healthy. They work really hard for us. We love them.” Among the horse enthusiasts were Alyssa Rodriguez, 10, who thought the horses were a pretty color, and Nyasia Mayas, 7, who had several questions for Weyman. Rebecca McDonald, 11, who liked the Mediterranean donkeys, was looking forward to the other unusual animal on the farm. “I think it’ll be hilarious to see a goat faint.” Indian Trail Bring a friend and share the fun Buy one, get one FREE! Buy One Buy One $ 29 29 99 99 FREE FREE Get One Get One Requires new line of service or qualified upgrade Requires new line of service or qualified upgrade and two-year agreement. Handset pricing varies and two-year agreement. Handset pricing varies by Sprint Authorized Rep. and may be subject to by Sprint Authorized Rep. and may be subject to add’l req. See store for details. add’l req. See store for details. Buy one LG ® Rumor 2 ™ for only ne LG Rumor for only $29.99 after $50 mail-in rebate and 9 after $50 mail-in rebate and get second one FREE after $50 get a second one FREE after $50 mail-in rebate and $29.99 in store mail-in rebate and $29.99 in store rebate. rebate. 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USF charge of up to 12.9% (varies quarterly), Administrative Charge (up to $1.99/line/mo.), Regulatory Charge ($0.20/line/mo.) state/local fees by area]. Sprint **Monthly charges exclude taxes, Sprint Surcharges [incl. USF charge of up to 12.9% (varies quarterly), Administrative Charge (up to $1.99/line/mo.), Regulatory Charge ($0.20/line/mo.) & state/local fees by area]. Sprint Surcharges are not taxes or gov’t-required charges and are subject to change. Details: Sprint.com/taxesandfees. Surcharges are not taxes or gov’t-required charges and are subject to change. Details: Sprint.com/taxesandfees. May require up to $36 activation fee/line, credit approval deposit. Up to $200 early termination fee/line applies. Phone Offer: Offer ends 9/7/09. While supplies last. Taxes and services charges excluded. No cash May require up to a $36 activation fee/line, credit approval & deposit. Up to $200 early termination fee/line applies. Phone Offer: Offer ends 9/7/09. While supplies last. Taxes and services charges excluded. No cash back. Requires activation at the time of purchase. Mail-in Rebate: Requires purchase by 9/7/09 activation by 9/21/09. Line must be active 30 consecutive days. Allow 10 to 14 weeks for rebate. Other Terms: Coverage back. Requires activation at the time of purchase. Mail-in Rebate: Requires purchase by 9/7/09 & activation by 9/21/09. Line must be active 30 consecutive days. Allow 10 to 14 weeks for rebate. Other Terms: Coverage not available everywhere. The 3G Sprint Mobile Broadband reaches over 270 million people (incl. data roaming). Nationwide Sprint Network reaches over 275 million people. Offers not available in all markets/retail not available everywhere. The 3G Sprint Mobile Broadband reaches over 270 million people (incl. data roaming). Nationwide Sprint Network reaches over 275 million people. Offers not available in all markets/retail locations or for all phones/networks. Pricing, offer terms, fees features may vary for existing customers not eligible for upgrade. Other restrictions apply. See store for details. 2009 Sprint. Sprint and the logo are locations or for all phones/networks. Pricing, offer terms, fees & features may vary for existing customers not eligible for upgrade. Other restrictions apply. See store for details. © 2009 Sprint. Sprint and the logo are trademarks of Sprint. Other marks are the property of their respective owners. trademarks of Sprint. Other marks are the property of their respective owners. breeds Myotonic goats, also known as fainting goats. “There’s a chemical in their muscles, when they get excited—it could be a bird flying over or a motorcycle driving by— when they try to move and they are stiff, they fall over. It’s very funny and only lasts for 30 seconds,” said Mevoli, who said they make for awesome pets because they can’t jump. They are too scared. “We have fun things to share. I’m educating people about the Lenape tribe. There are 10,000 registered Lenape in Salem, Cumberland and Gloucester counties. My tie is I’m really close friends with the chief, Mark ‘Quiet Hawk’ Gould, and his wife, Gail,” said Mevoli. “We teach them not only about the Lenape, but about teepees. The Lenapes didn’t live in them, of course, it was the Plains Indians.” The farm, which opened in 1997, host- { 8 } the grapevine | AUGUST 12, 2009 I Historical Vineland { VINCE FARINACCIO } An Historic Evening ABOVE: Erica Mevoli, holding staff, answers the campers’ questions while taking them on a nature trail through the woods. Dressed in Native American garb, Mevoli also discussed how the first Americans valued the trees and the land. BELOW: Campers peer through the boards to see some of the animals in the barn. All joined together in watching Richard M. Nixon resign the office of President. he patrons at the bar conversed softly, most of them sipping from a second round of drinks and eyeing the television set in the corner. In the back room, tables were still empty. A drum kit, amplifiers, a keyboard, assorted guitars and a bass sat on the stage, ready for use when the signal was given. The local band should have been halfway through its first set by now, but tonight there was a delay decreed by management. As if sensing this might be an historic occasion, the owners of this area establishment insisted there would be no music until after the televised speech. When it began, staff, patrons and musicians all joined together in watching Richard M. Nixon announce his resignation as President of the United States. When it was over, the television was muted as the band launched into Crosby, Stills and Nash’s “Long Time Gone.” For anyone sitting in that Vineland bar 35 years ago on the night of August 8, 1974, the city’s 113th birthday, Nixon’s resignation might be forever linked with the music of that supergroup. The next day, Crosby, Stills and Nash plus Neil Young visited the region to perform at the Atlantic City Race Track, just east of Mays Landing. Like the rest of the country, this area was still reeling from the events of the night before. At the track, the country’s political wounds still festered in the appearance of Nixon graffiti and the shouts of audience members to “Impeach Ford,” a reference to Nixon’s successor, Gerald Ford. As president, Nixon had polarized the country in how he handled Vietnam and the Watergate scandal, and one extreme was in evidence here on August 9 when CSNY performed Young’s “Ohio,” a blistering indictment of Nixon and the National Guard’s role in the shooting of four Kent State University students in May 1970, which the Times Journal reported “brought the audience to a peak.” Shortly after the president’s resignation, Young penned a still unreleased song, “Goodbye Dick,” which received only one performance on the tour. In it, he bids a weary nottoo-fond farewell to the departing president and his secretary, Rose Mary Woods T ed its first powwow last year and has another planned for this fall. “What it’s about is educating people, teaching them how to do Native American dancing and drumming.” Indian Trail also offers riding lessons for ages three and up as well as a vaulting team, which performed at Founders Day. Mevoli said vaulting, which is an Olympic-recognized sport, is gymnastics and ballet on the back of a horse. But even without doing any tricks, riding the horse was the favorite experience for both Rodriguez and Mayas, who loved the horses. “We just want to give people a good memory, a positive experience, getting back to the good life,” said Mevoli. On a perfect summer day, spending time at Indian Trail Farm was all that for this group of city kids. I For more information about Indian Trail Farm, call 609-870-1588 or visit www.indiantrailfarm.com. who was credited with erasing 18 minutes of apparently incriminating audiotape. But after the tour, Young wrote a third tune, “Campaigner,” which took a more forgiving look and admitted unashamedly that “even Richard Nixon has got soul.” Despite Philip Roth’s novel Our Gang and many songwriters’ reactions to the 37th president, probably no one captured the range of emotions Nixon elicited more effectively than Young, whose appearance here on that rainy 1974 night solidified the link begun the night before at the bar. For the next two weeks, the Vineland Times Journal offered news, features, letters and editorials on Nixon’s resignation that reflected the same range of response as Young’s songs. “Today I am proud to be an American,” wrote one resident, who continued, “We cleaned our house and washed out dirty linen in public.” Another reader proclaimed, “They have forced a great man to resign his position when he didn’t want to quit.” When interviewed, one individual stated that Nixon was a scapegoat, yet was relieved he had resigned. A Vineland woman knitted a Watergate afghan containing the key names and terms associated with the scandal’s televised hearings. One letter claimed “the humility that characterized President Nixon’s resignation was clearly the missing ingredient in his term of office.” Another advised not to “feel sorry for the man who has turned us all down.” And sharing the same tone as “Campaigner,” an editorial noted “it’s awesome to realize…the frailties of the man elected to lead the most powerful nation on earth.” With the passage of time, Nixon’s persona has evolved through the media into a mythic rendition of the man. Oliver Stone’s film Nixon attempted to paint him as a Charles Foster Kane in search of his own Rosebud. Peter Morgan’s Broadway play Frost/Nixon and its Ron Howard film adaptation proved less dramatic than the historic 1977 television interviews they depicted. In 1989, Young dedicated “Ohio” to the protestors in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, and recently he witnessed his own fans divide over his anti-Bush Living With War CD and tour. Thirty-five years can make a big difference. I VINTAGE VINELAND Where, Oh Where? Do you recognize this sprawling building? Over the years, the Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society has acquired many old-time images. Kate Harbold, at the Society, is busy cataloging the photos from Vineland’s rich past, but she needs the help of The Grapevine readers in identifying the people and places captured on film so long ago. If you know something about this photograph, we ask that you contact either Harbold at the Society or use the contact information on page 4 to inform us. The mission of the VHAS is to acquire, maintain, and preserve Vineland’s history. The Society was founded in 1864, just three years after the establishment of the town of Vineland. It is the second oldest historical society in New Jersey, second only to the New Jersey Historical Society. The VHAS consists of a museum, library, and archives, open to the public on Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m., same hours Tuesday through Friday for research. It is located at 108 South Seventh Street, Vineland (691-1111). WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the grapevine { 9 } I Faces in the News The Morgans are pictured at their 50th anniversary celebration 20 years ago. Happy 70th, Joe and Dorothy Morgan To our beloved parents, Joe and Dorothy Morgan, who celebrate 70 years of marriage on August 12. Your family thanks you for your devoted love and all the sacrifices you endured for our happiness. We dearly love you! Your children Joann Messick, Linda Morgan, Herb Morgan and wife Christine; your nine grandchildren, and 16 great-grandchildren. God Bless you always! ARC Thanks Schimmel Linda Schimmel, certified yoga instructor, was given a plaque for her participation as a “Friend of the ARC” sponsor of the 2009 Walkathon at Parvin State Park. The ARC of Cumberland County has been serving the developmentally disabled people of the area for more than 50 years. Pictured from left: Harry Fisher, Walkathon Coordinator; Linda Schimmel; Miribel Caban, ARC staff; and Lee Fisher. Happy 1st Birthday to our precious little boy Joshua Michael Periconi on August 10. You are the light of our lives. Love, Mommy, Daddy, Mom-Mom and Pop-Pop Haars, Grandmom and Grandpa Periconi, and Family. National Night Out Nickolas Casalinuovo is pictured enjoying National Night Out in Vineland. On Tuesday, August 4, the Vineland Police Department joined more than 10,000 communities nationwide in hosting National Night Out, a crime prevention event to promote police community partnerships, safety, and neighborhood unity. National Night Out is designated to increase crime and drug prevention awareness, generate support and participation in local anti-crime program efforts, strengthen neighborhood spirit and police community partnerships, and send the message to criminals that neighborhoods are keeping an eye on suspicious or illegal activity. The Vineland Police Department kicked off National Night Out 2009 by hosting a large community event at Pagliughi Park on Magnolia Road. The event included free food, IDent-I-Kid kits, emergency vehicle displays, K-9 dogs, gang literature, inflatables, music, give-a-ways for the kids and much more. The evening also gave members of the community an opportunity to meet and talk with local law enforcement officers and officials. { 10 } the grapevine | AUGUST 12, 2009 Get Your Kids Ready For School & Save! Official Shoe Store for Sacred Heart High School, St. Joseph High School, Bishop Schad, St. Mary’s in Millville Fully stock with the shoes you will need for your schools including $ 00 on your purchase of $30 or more! 5 OFF Exp: 9/15/09 639 Landis Avenue • Vineland Al’s Shoes 856-691-1180 With This Ad (Cannot be combined with any other offers) Ellison Campers Have a DINO-Mite Time Campers at The Ellison School recently dug their way through “The Big Dig”— one of an eight-week series offered at the Ellison Explorers Summer Camp. Campers made paper dinosaurs, a dinosaur board game, built a T-Rex, made dinosaur hats and magnets, traveled to the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, made dinosaur eggs, dug for fossils, made their own fossils, and constructed volcanoes as part of a lesson on one theory of how dinosaurs met their demise. Here, Ellison campers, Jake Ottinger and Isabel Lubin add one of the final ingredients necessary for their team’s volcano to erupt. 1 WEEK ONLY 8-12 to 8-18 50%OFF BUY 1 PERENNIAL or HANGING BASKET GET THE 2nd Of Equal or Lesser Value ALL SHRUBS & ANNUALS ROUNDUP EXTENDED CONTROL $ 99 482 Tuckahoe Rd. Buena Vista, NJ 08310 50%OFF 19 25%OFF ALL PLASTIC, CLAY & CERAMIC POTS! SEND US YOUR FACES — IT’S FREE! Get your photos published in The Grapevine… birthdays, engagements, weddings, anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them the address listed on p. 4. Holly Tone & Plant Tone FERTILIZER $ STEP 3 Insect Control Plus Fertilizer 9 99 $ 20lbs. 1 6 99 40lbs. $ 99 9 $ 4599 Treats 15 m WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | OPEN MON.-FRI. 8:00AM-6:00PM • SAT. 8:00AM-5:00PM • SUNDAY 9:00AM-3:00PM • 856-696-1644 Do You Have Dangerous Trees? Call For Your Free Evaluation Good, Clean Work At Reasonable Prices Don’t Be Fooled. Call A Certified Aborist. For All Your Tree Care. the grapevine { 11 } Pruning • Tree Removals • Storm Damage Elevations • Shrubbery Trimming • Stump Grinding Owner Operated Local Business • Fully Insured Owner Working At All Jobs! FREE ESTIMATES www.forresttreesurgeon.com 10% Off Any Tree Service Forrest Tree Surgeon • 856-694-0922 Must present coupon at time of estimate. Not valid with other offers. Exp. 9/12/09 Home Garden and POWER MEETS PORTABILITY Honda EU3000i Handi Generator NEW! Available Summer 2009 $ Backyard Composting Tip Many people may not realize that backyard composting, the natural process of decomposition and recycling of organic material into rich humus, is an easy, fun, and rewarding way to recycle organic material. Compost bins can be purchased from garden centers, hardware stores, or mail order garden catalog companies. To get started, set up your bin and add your available organic materials, leaves, grass, and table scraps. Moisten the dry parts lightly and mix whatever you have together with some old compost, composted manure, leaf mold, compost starter, or rich loam soil. Add your daily kitchen In a matter of months you will have a free mulch soil enhancer and potting soil …while helping to save valuable landfill space. scraps and garden trimmings. The contents should be moist, like a wrung-out sponge. Mix the compost every couple of weeks or each time you add new material. In a matter of months you will have a free mulch soil enhancer and potting soil to add to your flowers and garden while helping to save valuable landfill space. For more information about recycling programs in Cumberland County, call the Improvement Authority at 856-825-3700, or visit www.ccia-net.com. and DCP require all signatures be obtained by the deadline. Andreoli emphasized, “In all cases, it is the responsibility of the operator and owners of a farm to obtain and submit all necessary signatures on election and enrollment forms by the August 14, 2009 deadline.” Producers should also note that once they select ACRE for a farm, that decision irrevocably elects ACRE for the farm through crop year 2012. In that case, the ACRE contract form must be completed each year the producer intends to participate and receive benefits. For more information about the ACRE program and an online ACRE Calculator, visit www.fsa.usda.gov or contact your local Farm Service Agency (FSA) county office. Biomass Crop Assistance New Jersey USDA Farm Service Agency Acting State Executive Director, Henri Olsen, recently announced that biomass conversion facilities can begin signing up to participate in the Biomass Crop Assistance Program, which will help increase production of renewable energy. The program, authorized in the 2008 Farm Bill, provides financial assistance to producers who deliver eligible material to biomass conversion facilities and FSA will provide financial assistance to collect, harvest, store and transport eligible materials. “This program will benefit producers, the developing biomass industry, the general public and the environment as we continue working to expand production and availability of renewable energy,” said Olsen. “Owners of eligible material can receive financial assistance for delivering qualified biomass to conversion facilities that use biomass for heat, power, biobased products or advanced biofuels.” Biomass conversion facilities and material owners or producers should contact their FSA state offices or visit www.fsa.usda.gov for more information. FSA will begin accepting applications from biomass facilities interested in participating in the Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP). Once an agreement is signed between FSA and a facility and funding through the program is provided, the facilities can begin accepting materials. Producers who sell these materials can apply for matching payments under the collection, harvest, storage and transportation (CHST) component of BCAP. The matching CHST payments are paid at a rate of $1 for $1 per dry-ton equivalent received from a qualified biomass conversion facility, not to exceed $45 per dry-ton equivalent. A biomass owner is eligible to receive payments for two years. The purpose of the matching payments is to assist biomass producers with the CHST cost of delivering biomass to a qualified biomass conversion facility. 1,999† The lightest 3000-watt inverter generator we’ve ever made. $ 999 † Months EU6500is Generator 12 EU2000i Generator No Payments No Interest Option* Vineland Rental Country, Inc. 1044 W. Landis Ave. 856-692-7510 † Prices shown are manufacturer’s minimum advertised price. * The Honda Power Equipment Mastercard® card issued by Wells Fargo Financial National Bank is a dual-line credit card. Special terms apply to purchases charged with approved credit to the Honda Power Equipment line of credit. No payments are required during the special-terms period. The nointerest option means there is no interest if the purchase is paid in full within the special-terms period; otherwise interest accrues from date of purchase at the regular APR. For newly opened accounts, the regular APR for purchases is 23.90% and the default APR is 27.90%. All APRs given are as of June 1, 2009. All APRs may vary. If you use the card for cash advances, the cash advance fee is 4% of the amount of the cash advance, but not less than $10.00. Offer expires 12/31/2009. Connection of a generator to house power requires a transfer device to avoid possible injury to power company personnel. Consult a quali?ed electrician. For optimum performance and safety, we recommend you read the owner’s manual before operating your Honda Power Equipment. Not all dealers carry all products. Consult your local Yellow Pages. © 2009 American Honda Motor Co., Inc. AH928-01-89441-4 ACRE and DCP Deadlines Approaching Angela J. Andreoli, county executive director of USDA’s Farm Service Agency in Vineland reminds producers of the deadlines for enrolling in the new Average Crop Revenue Election (ACRE) program or the Direct and Counter-Cyclical Program (DCP). The deadline to enroll in ACRE or DCP for 2009 is August 14, 2009. “It is critical for producers to begin the enrollment process as soon as possible,” said Andreoli. “ACRE is an innovative alternative to the traditional farm safety net, but this new program comes with a complex signup process.” Andreoli advises producers to contact their local office right away to set up appointments well before the August 14, 2009 deadline. Late-filed applications for ACRE or DCP will not be accepted. Producers should note also that ACRE elections will not be approved until all producers, including owners, on a farm have signed both election and enrollment forms. If producers do not elect ACRE, they still have the option of enrolling in the DCP program by August 14, 2009. Both ACRE 30 YEAR TIMBERLINE Roof Shingle Upgrade { 12 } the grapevine | AUGUST 12, 2009 With new roof system. Offer good to August 31, 2009. www.scottibrothersinc.com John’s Cell: (609) 381-4289 • Tom’s Cell: (856) 498-4841 FREE ESTIMATES • FULLY INSURED LIC# 13VH00096200 Tomato and Peach Tasting • Tuesday, August 18, from 4 to 6 p.m. • Rutgers Agricultural Research and Experiment Center, 121 Northville Rd. Upper Deerfield (near Bridgeton) Cumberland County. the matching CHST payment at their FSA county office. An application must be submitted before the eligible material is sold and delivered to a qualified biomass conversion facility. After the product is delivered, a producer must provide FSA with documentation of product quantity, quality and payment rate. County offices will validate payment requests with information in the county office and information provided under the terms of MOUs with the qualified biomass conversion facilities. CHST payments will not be authorized until after an appropriate environmental analysis has been conducted. Landscaping • Lawn Cutting • Fertilizing Garden Center • Mushroom Compost Mulch • Top Soil • Fill Dirt • Stone Irrigation Repairs & Installation • Pool Sand Snow Removal • Winter Salt in Bulk For example, if a qualified biomass conversion facility pays a producer $30 per dry ton for biomass, the material owner or producer would be eligible for a matching payment of $30 per dry ton from FSA. This payment will help offset the costs of CHST. Biomass conversion facilities may become “qualified” by submitting a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to the FSA state offices. The MOU generally provides the requirements for becoming a qualified biomass conversion facility. Once a facility becomes qualified, eligible material owners or producers who deliver biomass to that facility may be eligible to receive CHST payments. Eligible material owners or producers, who market eligible material to a qualified biomass conversion facility, may apply for Direct Loans to Farmers and Producers Angela J. Andreoli, county executive director of USDA’s Farm Service Agency in Vineland, has announced that $760 million is available for approved but previously unfunded USDA direct farm ownership and operating loans throughout the country. “President Obama provided a welcome boost to rural economies around the country when he signed the Supplemental Appropriations Act, because it has critical funds that will enable local producers to access necessary capital,” said Andreoli. “USDA will deliver these loans to producers as quickly as possible to meet the capiContinued on next page Delivery Available United Lawn L.L.C. 41 S. Wade Blvd. Millville, NJ 08332 856-327-3212 • Fax: 856-293-9588 LANDSCAPE SUPPLY Your Lawn & Garden Outlet ADVERTISE IN The Grapevine and get incredible results. Get amazing results from your advertising campaign in The Grapevine. Get the benefit of our distribution to every residence in Vineland (approx. 22,250)! 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Jars 12 Pack – Wide Mouth Pt 12 Pack – Wide Pack Qt. Complete with bands and dome lids. the grapevine { 13 } Sales Ta 3.5% x 1363 S. Delsea Dr. Vineland Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm Sat. 8am-2pm *Taxes and Delivery extra 856-563-1500 Blue Granite Ware Covered Canner $ Canning Accessories & Supplies • • • • Canning Jars Blanchers Canners Funnels Presto Pressure Canners Double as water bath canners for preserving fruits, jams,jellies pickles and salsas. Constructed of extra strong, warp resistant alum. and is suitable for use on reg. and smooth-top ranges. includes cooking/canning rack & complete instruction & recipe book. 21.99 • With Rack • Holds 7 qts. • Large Model Available $ 99.95 & UP SUMMER SALE! Grown & Sold Here Purchase! 20%OFF Any Plant With This Coupon Bedding Plants – 4.5 – 8″ pots Patio Planters• Hanging Baskets exp: 8/18/09 470 N. Union Rd. East Vineland (between Oak Rd. & Landis Ave.) Mon. – Sat. 8am-6pm Sun. 9am-5pm 856-691-7881 www.cmgrowers.com Between Grant & Elmer Rd. 1969 South East Ave Vineland, NJ 08360 Call Mark for Details: 856-692-8650 Mon.-Fri. 7-5 Sat. 7-12 Sales Tax Children Enjoy Nature Program At County Library Madison Guzman, 7, from Vineland (Left) and Lexie (5) and Luke (7) Miletta from Bridgeton proudly show off the natural designs that they painted on shirts in the art in nature program at the Cumberland County Library. Earlier the children observed butterflies and learned about their development. 3.5% FREE 2009 Hardscaping Project Guide © 2009 EP Henry Make an impression before they get to the door. Your driveway should be your personalized welcome mat. EP Henry pavers are a beautiful and practical alternative to asphalt or concrete.With a variety of colors, styles and patterns at your disposal, you can add instant curb appeal – and lasting value too! 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FSA makes direct farm loans with government funds. The agency services these loans and provides direct loan customers with individual financial planning and expertise so they have a better chance for success. Producers can use Direct Farm Ownership loans to buy farmland, construct or repair buildings and other fixtures, and promote soil and water conservation. Operating Loans may be used to purchase items such as livestock, farm equipment, feed, seed, fuel, farm chemicals, insurance, and other operating expenses. Operating Loans can also be used to pay for minor improvements to buildings, costs associated with land and water development, family subsistence, and to refinance debts under certain conditions. The maximum amount for either type of loan is $300,000. Producers interested in applying for direct loans or other FSA products should visit the local FSA county offices. For more information, visit www.fsa.usda.gov. I { 14 } the grapevine | AUGUST 12, 2009 CRABTREE’S LANDSCAPING And Turf Management Beautifying the outside since 1989 Serving Vineland, Millville & Bridgeton Areas COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL OVER 2 0 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE! Total Landscape Renovations In-ground Irrigation Systems Sodding, Mulching, Hydroseeding Waterfalls & ponds 856.875.0774 2009 STATE OF THE ARTS in the Greater Cumberland County Area WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | CONNECTING YOU T O V I N E L A N D . W E E K L Y. CONTENTS ARTS VENUES . . . . . . . . . . . .16 ARTS IN ABUNDANCE . . . . . .18 SECOND FRIDAYS . . . . . . . . .20 A FULL CANVAS . . . . . . . . . . .22 SONG AND DANCE . . . . . . . .24 f you’re looking for a cultural night out, a big-priced ticket and 45-mile drive to the big city isn’t necessarily the way to go. There are dance troupes, art exhibits, singing groups, stage performances, and symphonies right here in Cumberland County, New Jersey. Millville, in the last decade, has perhaps led the way in becoming an artist’s haven as well as a beacon to draw in art enthusiasts. “Arts in Abundance” on page 18 outlines what you can expect to find in Millville’s Glasstown Arts District. For The Grapevine’s exclusive interview with Millville’s art pioneer Pat Witt, see “A Full Canvas” on page 22. From the Little Theatre to Fuel House Coffee Co. to a revitalized Landis Theatre, the town of Vineland is abuzz with an arts awakening. And the offerings are as varied as they are homespun. There’s the standard theater offerings, as well as classical music in a residential setting, storytelling at Center Court in the mall, and Second Friday art exhibit openings. Turn the page to a countywide view on the state of the arts 2009… I the grapevine { 15 } { 16 } the grapevine | AUGUST 12, 2009 that casting had just been completed and the production would now enter the standard eight weeks of preparations to ready it for an October 9 opening. { VINCE FARINACCIO } Selection of next year’s slate of plays is also underway. “That’s an important thing to do,” she said, “because you want to make sure that you’re not doing what everybody else is doing, but you’re also trying to make From the Little Theatre to Fuel sure that you can make some money to keep House Coffee Co. to a revitalized the building open. Our little niche pretty Landis Theatre, the town is abuzz much is to do family entertainment. We want with an arts awakening. families to be able to come and see shows.” By mid-October, the Frank Guaracini Jr. Fine and Performing Arts Center’s 15th seahe arts in Vineland have undergone a son will be underway as well. The PAC has revitalization process over the past housed a variety of Cumberland County year, thanks to the venues dedicated College events such as its theater program to providing theater, music and and seasonal musical performances as well dance for the grateful audiences who crave as performances of local artists. them. Despite the economy and the perva“The Guaracini Center acts as many sive lure of pop culture, the arts have been things to many people, but overall it is a thriving in this area—from Appel Farm Arts resource,” PAC Director Gregory Hambleton and Music Center to the venerable explained recently by e-mail. “Its two main Cumberland Players to the Frank Guaracini “users” have been the College’s performing Center for the Fine and Performing Arts and arts programs and the Guaracini Center’s the new center city additions like LaBella own professional performing arts programs. Gallery, Hangar 84, and the Fuel House, all Programming for the two is done a year in advance and done so that the two complement each other. Additionally, this enables the College to offer wide price ranges for events at The Center.” Kim Chapman, artistic director of the Vineland Regional Dance Company which has performed at the PAC over the past four years, finds the facility to be superior. “It’s Surrounded by artwork on the walls, art enthusiasts gather at absolutely the best the Fuel House for an artist’s reception held there recently. thing that Vineland which will soon share their location with a and Cumberland County have to offer curreconstituted Landis Theatre. rently as a theater,” she said, adding that she The longest running of Vineland’s theater doesn’t see the Guaracini Center as the organizations, the 63-year old Cumberland exclusive home of the dance company. Players offers three mainstage productions The PAC’s new season, Hambleton feels, each year, in addition to a children’s theatre “reflects a more diverse programmatic agenshow. There is also a “Kids at CP” project da” that mixes returning favorites such as that allows youth from the age of 8 to 18 to fiddler Natalie MacMaster and Junie B. Jones perform a “junior” or abbreviated version of with new productions, including an interaca popular Broadway musical. “We try and tive Beatles show. give a lot of different people an opportunity On the other side of town, Bain’s to be on the stage,” Cumberland Players Deli/The Fuel House has recently added art president Kathe Johnson said recently. “It’s to its menu. The establishment has been nice. It’s hard work, but it’s nice.” running music since its opening in the fall of The group’s current season has witnessed 2007, but this past May, it became a gallery an infusion of new blood in the ranks. “It’s as well. “This was an original idea Russell almost like a rebuilding year for us,” [Swanson, Fuel House owner] and I both Johnson said. “I see a lot of new people right had to have rotating art work,” manager now. There‘s a lot of enthusiasm and creSteven Forrest said. “We had purchased a ative people.” One of the newcomers is John really nice art-hanging system that included Weiner, who will direct the group’s fall a whole art-lighting system with it that’s offering, Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap. been up in the deli since we opened.” “John has been involved in theater for Forrest said the busy schedule prevented many years and has directed for Off-Broad the gallery from materializing earlier. “We Street Players,” Johnson said. “This is his finally said, ‘We need to do this,’ ” he said. first time directing for us.” She explained “Russell put together an art committee con- Arts Venues T we hold an art show opening, which is an artist’s reception, so we premiere the new art that’s up for the month, and with that there’s a wine and cheese tasting and we have a couple of musical acts for the night.” While the Fuel House gallery is fairly new, it shares its interest in art with several other Landis Avenue exhibits, according to Forrest. “There’s La Bella Art Gallery which has work up and rotating,” he said. “And Martini’s Shoes…has works of local artists up on the walls.” Art fans aren’t the only group accommodated by Landis Avenue’s new venues. Music fans, too, have been frequenting center city lately, spending the evening listening to acts at the Fuel House or Hangar 84 or even both in one night. “There have been quite a few times I’ve seen kids flip-flopping back and forth, depending on what band they want to see,” Forrest said. Soon a third option will be available when the Landis Theatre’s resurrection as the Landis Theatre Performing Arts Center is complete. Theater arts will share the stage with music and comedy. According to Lori DiMatteo-Fiocchi, president of the Landis Theater Properties, COPA director Joe Marcello will be producing his shows there. Last year, rumors abounded that Cumberland Players would be abandoning its Sherman Avenue digs in favor of the Landis Theatre, but both DiMatteo-Fiocchi and Johnson dispel this as pure fiction. “We’re keeping our own building, “Johnson clarified. “We like to be able to govern ourselves. Landis Theatre is not looking for a move like that from us.” “Cumberland Players may very well be using the theater, and we’re very happy to have them do so, but as of yet they have not committed to that,” DiMatteo-Fiocchi said. Johnson hasn’t ruled out the possibility of a production there, however. “They have asked us to produce a show there as they’ve asked all the other theaters,” she said. “It’s something we are considering.” There are no specifics yet on the theater’s schedule, but DiMatteo-Fiocchi did mention a children’s theater summer camp as one of the programs. She also mentioned dance could be part of the theater’s roster and that she had spoken with the Vineland Regional Dance Company. “We’ll see in the future if they want to do a show there,” she said. According to DiMatteo-Fiocchi, the facility’s reopening, now scheduled for March 2010, will be non-profit and run by a board currently being formed. It seems the imminent reopening is a welcomed event in the arts community. “I think the more traffic you bring down here, the better,” Forrest said. “It helps everybody out in the long run.” Chapman agrees. “More performances are a win-win for the community,” she said. “It’s a win for everybody.” I Here are just a few of the great events coming up in our 15th Anniversary Season…. Sunday, October 18th at 3:00 $10 for Adults, $5 for 55 & over, $5 for under 18. These Appalachian fiddlers will play southern rags, regional waltzes, and other hot fiddle tunes this afternoon. www.runotmill.com A Christmas Carol Flamenco Vivo Sunday, November 8th at 3:00 $22 for Adults, $18 for 55 & over, $12 for under 18. One of the nation’s premier flamenco and Spanish dance companies performs El Corazon del Flamenco “The Heart of Flamenco”. Featuring a synthesis of live music and dance, the program features a spectrum of Spanish culture including cante jondo, songs of a heavy heart and lighter songs, cante chico, with a unique look at the Latin influenced rhythms of the Bailes de Ida and Vuelta www.flamenco-vivo.org Monday, December 14th at 7:00 $22 for Adults, $18 for 55 & over, $12 for under 18. Recommended for ages 8 and up. Nebraska Theatre Caravan performs this full-scale production complete with Tiny Tim, Ebenezer Scrooge, and the ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future. It is the longest running national tour, 40 actors strong, plus orchestra. Laughter, pageantry, and heartfelt renditions of British carols enhance this timeless soul-transforming journey that presents the rarest of gifts… the chance for a man to change his life and find his heart. www.nebraskatheatrecaravan.com WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | The Interactive Beatles Experience Sunday, February 28th at 3:00 $22 for Adults, $18 for 55 & over, $12 for under 18. Rock to the music of the Beatles in this all-new interactive concert experience where the audience creates the playlist for the night. How? You write down your favorite Beatles song title, the reason why, and turn it in before the show. These songs then are be picked to be played at will. Featuring Billy McGuigan, the star of last year’s sold out “Rave-On,” these personal stories and meaningful tunes connect the audience and this band of exceptional musicians in a way like none other. www.yesterdayandtodayshow.com The full season brochure detailing all events will be coming out soon! Be sure that you are on our private mailing list by calling the box office – (856) 692-8499. Tickets for all events go on sale September 1st! The Box Office is open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday 10 am – 2:00 pm with late hours on Wednesday 10 am – 7:00 pm. All events are reserved seating. Complete listing of events through May 2010 at www.cccnj.edu Cumberland County College Frank Guaracini, Jr. Fine and Performing Arts Center the grapevine { 17 } Village on High Located on High Street in the heart of Millville’s Glasstown Arts District, the “Village on High” is home to 10 unique buildings (each 192 sq. ft.) with new galleries, artisan workshops, and boutiques. { MARIANNE LODS, EXEC. DIRECTOR, MAIN STREET MILLVILLE } Arts in Abundance Millville’s Glasstown Arts District, besides being an artist’s haven, is a glistening forerunner that inspires art lovers everywhere. en years have passed since the inception of a plan to revitalize the downtown of Millville by creating a zoned arts district. Artists are encouraged to live and work there, and to fill the street with galleries, studios, shops and restaurants. During that decade, there has been an amazing renovation and restoration of historic buildings, new construction, and many events to whet the appetite of first-time visitors. May I suggest an itinerary for your first visit? Plan to arrive at 11 in the morning. I urge you to visit on a Thursday, Friday or Saturday to be able to see all there is to offer. If you park your car in the first or second block of North High Street (close to Rt. 49), you will have three hours free parking on the street or you may utilize one of Krafty Eleganza Miriam K. Proctor Purses, Scarfs, Jewelry, Wreaths, Floral Baskets, Original Prints Let us personalize your gift idea’s La Bella Gallery T Art is Eternal… we customize your ideas 856-697-0649 267-257-3954 KraftyEleganza@aol.com Artist Specialist-Gallery Manager 715 East Landis Ave. High Street Millville Cottage H labellagallery@yahoo.com Perez-Madgey 856-264-3711 the parking lots behind the buildings (most have unlimited hours). Your first stop should be the Riverfront Renaissance Center for the Arts, a public center that includes three galleries and a gift shop where you can buy fine art prints, hand-crafted jewelry, glass and ceramic arts, textiles and much more. Next door is Amanda’s ladies’ shop and a few doors further you will see students at work at the Clay College creating beautiful pieces of pottery. The Glasstown Art Glass studio follows with a brilliant display of original glass art pieces in the windows. Make sure you go inside to see the artist/owner blowing and creating new pieces of glass. Rusty Heart is just next door to the Art Glass studio, and in his shop you’ll be enchanted by the assortment of accessories for the person and the home. Cross the street and visit Liz Ryan Gemstones (Dondero’s second jewelry store), and nearby you’ll have fun picking out your favorite penny candy at Incredible Bulk. At this point you may be ready for lunch and in this two-block area you can choose between sushi, California-Euro cuisine, Italian, a Tea Room, or Irish pub fare. You’ll be able to enjoy a leisurely meal or a quick bite at any of these eateries. Continue your visit by stopping at J.B. and M.E. Gallery, Artists Consortium, Isabelle’s and Ricci’s Little Shop. There is such a wide variety of original artwork and objects of art, you’re bound to find the perfect treasure to decorate your home or put Numerous art lovers enjoy an exhibit at one of the many galleries in the Glasstown Arts District. Musicians warm up a winter’s evening at Looking Glass Cafe. Angels of Light CANDLES AND GIFT SHOP We carry 100% Soy Candles! STORE HOURS: Thurs. – Sat. 12-5 Sunday 12-4 The Village on High 501 N. High St. Cottage F Millville, NJ 08332 856-293-9111 CUSTOM FURNITURE & ACCESSORIES Hours: Thurs, Sat & Sun 12-5, Fri. til 9 Your Purchase with this card! Enjoy 20% Off 609-703-2692 VAN LUDWICK 501 D HIGH ST. MILLVILLE vlud@comcast.net VILLAGE ON HIGH { 18 } the grapevine | AUGUST 12, 2009 RIVERFRONT FRAMING Affordable Framing For Everyone! Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. Ed Munin 856-293-8800 www.riverfrontframingnj.com The Villages On High Street 501 N. High Street Suite A Millville, NJ 08332 For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. aside as a gift for someone special. Notice the Levoy Theatre across the street as you finish browsing. Next year at this time should mark the opening of a series of live theater, dance and concerts that will broaden the Arts District nightlife. As you proceed to the next block, you’ll find the only bookstore in Cumberland County, Bogart’s Book Store and Cafe. You can have a beverage at the coffee bar there while checking out the new or gently used books. Most visitors get hooked and visit this shop often. If you skipped lunch earlier, you’ll find a quick repast in this block at the buffet, spicy chicken wings, pizza shop or “crazy hot dog” shop! Just a little further along you may want to pick up some fresh flowers or a silk creation at Colonial Flowers and then visit Steelman’s to pick up a souvenir of Millville and get some ideas for framing the piece of art you just bought or plan to buy on your next visit. If you want to move your car, now would be a good time. It’s not time to go home yet, and if you love browsing for bargains, you may find them at the Refrigerator Door, which is home to several dealers. New Revelation Records carries vinyl records and CD’s and Kit & Bob’s offers up some sport equipment and collectibles. One more block to go. You’ve now arrived at The Village on High, a little shopping conclave of 12 cottages filled with art, ladies accessories, craft supplies, fair trade handmade gifts, soy candles and more. Sip a beverage and enjoy a sweet at a table in the midst of one of the finest flower gardens you’ll ever see! Don’t leave before you cross the street and visit one of the oldest galleries in town, LaBottega of Art, representing 22 area artists. Right next door is the Wheaton Mansion. Although it is not always open, there are special tours offered periodically so remember to notice if a tour is being advertised. There are also several working artists’ studios throughout the six blocks you just visited and there are some on secondary streets, too. They include Green Boots Gallery on 2nd Street (open by chance or appointment) and the Fithian House on Pine Street (open Thursday to Sunday). A few of the galleries on High Street are open for special events and on Third Friday, such as Fath Gallery, Brain Church and Amethyst. Many of these galleries, shops and restaurants are open six and seven days a week, but there are several only catering to the public from Thursday through the weekend. Make sure you put the Third Friday of each month on your calendar to visit from 6 to 9 p.m. (much later at many locations). You’ll find new art exhibitions each month, live music filling the streets and many of the establishments, wine and cheese being offered up. Whatever your pleasure, the arts await you in Millville’s Glasstown Arts District. I Discov Discover is ver the Arts at e Ar Arts Appel Far Appel Farm l Far BIG performances in the heart of South Jersey art Evening Concert Series John Hammond Blues Guitarist. October 3 | 8:00PM Girlyman Stunning Vocal Harmonies. October 10 | 8:00PM John Hammond Cherish the Ladies Lively Irish Music. November 21 | 8:00PM Arts Classes and Workshops begin September 14 Register before September 1 and receive $10 off classes • Ceramics • Painting • Drawing • Sculpture • Theater • Yoga and more! 3, 5 and 10-week sessions for adults and children on weekdays and weekends! Discover Jersey Arts People’s Choice Awards Best Place to Take an Arts Class (Kids) Music of the Crooked Road: Mountain Music of Virginia Bluegrass & Old-Timey Music. April 24 | 4:00 & 8:00PM Family Matinee Series Junie B. Jones October 3 | 2:00PM Schoolhouse Rock Live Too! October 24 | 2:00PM and mor e! Visit www.appelfarm.org/concerts for the 2009-10 schedule. See the complete schedule at www.appelfarm.org These programs are made possible in part by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts/Department of State, a Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts and by funds from the National Endowment for the Arts. Additional funding sources include corporations, foundations and individual contributions by friends, Trustees and alumni of Appel Farm. 457 Shirley Road, Elmer, NJ 08318 , Elmer, www. www.appelfarm.org | (856) 358-2472 .appelfarm.org r WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Please Join Us For An Evening of Art, Entertainment, & Free Refreshments! We’re bringing the Arts back to Landis Ave! Back to School Special $ 2.00 OFF any Child’s Haircut urs. Fri. & Sat. Mon & Tu Haircut es s Friday August 14th 6 – 9 pm ART SHOW Weds. -35 Years Experience- FULL SERVICE SALON 696-9890 • 692-8659 GIFT CERTIFICATES • Walk-ins Welcome Separate Men’s Styling Room • No Appts Necessary Mon. Tues. Wed. 9-4:30pm • Precision Cutting $13 Foil Highlights $55 Perms Start @ $55 $ 1 1 00 the grapevine { 19 } COLOR & CUT Good Any Day Good Any Day PERMS 613 A East Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08360-8093 $ (856) 691-2329 expires 9/12/09 3o? $ expires 9/12/09 5o? urs. 9-7pm • Fri. 9-6pm • Sat. 8:30-3pm • Sun. 9-1pm Lincoln & Dante Shopping Center • 1760 S. Lincoln Ave. Maxine’s Dance Studio Fall Registration Now through August 31 For Ages 3 and Up FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Worldwide Convenience • Personal Attention Open Classes Available for Teens and Adults Savings Home Equity Checking VISA Credit Cards Auto Loans VISA Check Cards Personal Loans Online Banking Classes In: Ballet • Pointe • Tap • Jazz • Modern • Hip Hop { 20 } the grapevine | AUGUST 12, 2009 Plus Much More! “Serving Members for Over 70 Years” 37 West Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08360 Classes For Boys Available: “Free” For One Year All Current Students Must Re-Register 856-696-0767 Also serving members at: 28A Cornwell Dr. Bridgeton, NJ 08302 Open House August 10-14 • 9am-3pm For Information and to Register 856-453-9094 www.cumcofcu.org 691-6059 Maxine & Kimberly Chapman-Co-Directors 2388 N. East Ave. Vineland, NJ 08360 made custom jewelry and gifts. Art works on display are offered for sale. The anniversary celebration runs until 9 p.m. { MICKEY BRANDT } On the same night, Fuel House is opening its exhibit of works by painter Michele Collins of Painted River Studios in Corbin City. The artist’s reception includes music by Danielle Deckard along with cheese and veggie trays. There’s also a wine tasting. Admission is $8; with wine tasting included, it’s $15. The event runs from 7 until 9 p.m. Martini co-owner Lynn Martini helped Vineland has claimed the lead the revival of Second Fridays. Right second Friday of each month to now, the store is exhibiting her work plus have special exhibit openings that of six other artists from Vineland and and art events. Newfield, and paintings are for sale. “Customers enjoy looking at it,” Martini said. Martini Shoes is having its third everal years ago, Vineland’s monthly art show on Friday from 6 to 9 p.m. Second Friday celebrations with live music and refreshments. Martini brought many people downtown to see art and enjoy nightlife. After said scores of people always attend. “We have a lot of chairs, so people tend to stay a a hiatus, it appears Second Friday is a while,” she said. reality again on Landis Avenue because of Off the Avenue, Common Grounds several art-minded merchants. Café inside Larry’s II restaurant held its Fuel House Coffee Co., Martini Shoes, first art show two weeks ago. “We want to and LaBella Art Gallery and Gifts all disintroduce art into the café and introduce the café to Vineland,” said manager Stephen Gatier. The opening was for works by local residents Bobbi Berg and Maryann Canon. The small paintings by Berg and intaglio etchings by Cannon are on display and for sale for a month. The next show will be with the director of the Noyes Museum, Michael Cagno. Although perhaps not thought of as such, one of the oldest art galleries in the area is the Doris Tripp Room at the Vineland Public Library. It has displayed the works of scores of local artists and has hosted many memorable openings and sales. Currently displayed is the art of Vinelander Myer Glick, who works with stained glass and creates with watercolors, oils, and acrylics. A Meet the Artist reception is set for Monday, August 17, 6 to 8 p.m. Cumberland County College’s art gallery is in the Frank Guaracini Center for the Performing Arts. The building is open all day and members of the public can view works by both Carmen Perez at the year-old LaBella Art Gallery. students and faculty. An annual art competition is held at the end of each play works by local artists and have speschool year. College interim dean Jim cial openings and events on the second Piccone praised the gallery for providing an Friday of each month. Vineland claimed opportunity for these works to be displayed. the second Friday since Bridgeton has a Millville Public Library holds about similar celebration on the first one and three exhibits featuring southern New Millville on the third. Jersey artisits each year in the Gant Room. This Friday, LaBella is celebrating its The next show will be the works of local one-year anniversary with refreshments, entertainment, and a raffle. “Our purpose is artist Emily Luertzing. Libarary Director Irene Percelli said, “We were the beginning to get more people involved in the atmosof the arts district in Millville…. We take phere of the arts,” said manager Carmen credit for that. Now everybody…forgot Perez, an artist herself. LaBella opened a about us, and we’re free.” Millville location four months ago in the Art displayed at the library is also for Arts District there. Both stores sell hand- Second Fridays S sale. The Gant Room is open during regular library hours. One of the newest area art galleries is at the Cumberland County Library in Bridgeton. It opened a year ago. The Photographic Society of Vineland has a juried show there through August. Claire Lelli of Vineland won the overall prize for her photo, “Deserted Church.” In about a month, a “phenomenal exhibit” will open, according to Library Directror Patty Anderson. It’s a national traveling show entitled “Free At Last: A History of the Abolition of Slavery in America” and is presented on a 60-foot panel panorma. I • LaBella Art Gallery and Gifts 715 East Landis Ave., Vineland 856-264-3711 labellagallery@yahoo.com • Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 East Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400 www.fuelhousecoffee.com • Martini Shoes, 615 Landis Ave., Vineland, 691-2329 martinishoesinc@comcast.net • Common Grounds Café (Larry’s II), 907 N. Main Road, Vineland, 692-9001, www.larrys2.com/ • Vineland Public Library 1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 794-4244 www.vinelandlibrary.com A Second Palette of Visual Arts Magnolia Hill Studios: Magnolia Hill is a school of the arts and dance that focuses on small classes, younger children, and an integrated teaching approach. “Art is an underappreciated part of our culture,” says owner Sandy Smith, “We expose the children to different art forms and try to build in them a familiarity with the arts.” Smith says that, while she’d be thrilled if a professional artist or dancer came out of her program, she thinks it’s more important to build appreciation. “They’ll feel at home attending art galleries or ballet performances because they’ve been exposed to it before,” she says. Magnolia Hill Studios, 1425 Magnolia Road, Vineland, 981-0418 magnoliahillstudios.com and student artists. In the rear, visitors can observe potters at work. Clay College Director Jackie Sandro says registration for classes is strongly encouraged, but sometimes walk-ins can join a class if it isn’t filled. “This is for young children through adults,” she says. Cumberland County College’s Clay College 104 North High Street Millville, 765-0988 jsandro@cccnj.edu plate. Teachers can have a Carmie’s artist come to the classroom to literally brighten the students’ day and teach a valuable skill. Carmie’s Pottery Paint Works At LaTorre Hardware 1607 S. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 691-3637 www.carmiespotterypaintw orks.com CHILDREN’S BALLET WORKSHOP 1129 E. Weymouth Road • Vineland, NJ 08360 (856)697-2929 CALL NOW TO REGISTER! Classes in Ballet, Pointe, Technique, Tap, and Jazz Classes for children age 4 through adult Clay College: Part of Cumberland County College and located in the heart of the Glasstown Arts District in downtown, Clay College Ceramic Arts Studio gives both credit and non-credit students the chance to learn how to mold and fire pots. Students can take classes during the day, in the evening, and on weekends. Some make it part of their college curriculum and many go simply for personal enrichment. You can also visit the gallery, which features the work of regional, national, Carmie’s Pottery Paint Works: Carmie’s Pottery Paint Works on South Delsea Drive in Vineland gives children and adults the chance to create fine ceramic works with an easy-to-learn system. Describing her twoyear-old business, owner Carmie LaTorre says it’s a “phenomenal place. “We are a contemporary paint-your-own pottery piece studio. We’re especially good for children for their self-esteem.” She says even very young children can create beautiful ceramic pieces, good for display or giving as a gift. Artists can choose from a thousand items. “When they leave it with me it’s dull, when they get it back, it’s bright and shiny,” LaTorre says of her system of permanently sealing designs on pottery. Birthday parties at Carmie’s are unique fun: Every child helps paint a specially-designed tile or Pat Witt’s Barn Studio of Art became a nonprofit corporation in 2007 because the Witt family wanted to assure the continuation of the storied school as the 82year-old founder begins to limit her direct involvement. “The Barn has always been nonprofit,” Witt joked, “Now it’s just official.” Witt’s daughters, Nancy Witt Mulick and Carole Witt Mankin are managing directors and Kelly Alice Andrews, Mankin’s daughter, is director of education. A 20-member volunteer advisory board, all former students, participates in running the school. Now, the Barn is eligible for public and private grant funding and conducts regular fundraisers. Guest instructors have joined the Witt family in conducting classes. The founder is a major fundraising participant, of course, and plans a “100 for $100” exhibit and sale: Any size and medium Pat Witt work will be sold for $100. The Barn Studio of Art, 814 Whitaker Ave., Millville, 825 5028, www.BarnStudio.org Classes fill fast, so don’t hesitate! Liz Nicklus Mosaic Artist Gregory Criss Winfield’s Beverly Smith Colonial Flowers Jersey Tomatoes Aren’t The Only Thing Growing In Your Backyard.. What many consider New Jersey’s best Arts District, Glasstown continues to grow. And like so much else in our own backyards, we sometimes neglect what’s close at hand in favor of distant Philadelphia, Wilmington, or Cape May. Millville’s tree-lined sidewalks are home to artists’ studios and galleries, imaginative gift shops, and restaurants unequalled for their variety and kitchen virtuosity. Whether your taste tends to veal chops, pan-seared ahi tuna, handshaped sushi, authentic Italian, Chinese, or American tavern fare, you’ll find it in Glasstown—just one block away from the Maurice River. Come to your senses in Millville’s Arts District. Just 15 minutes down the road, or a click away at MyArtMyMillville.com. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the grapevine { 21 } A Main Street NJ Community • 1-800-887-4957 #$+ )*(“*& $+ & )(++$% $’ )*, / !-’+ !*(& ,#  .  *+ / ,, (-’$% (‘ ,# *,+  )*,& ‘, (! ,,  *,’ * ” ‘/ (! ,# ,$(‘% ’(.& ‘, !(* ,# *,+ -’  / ,# *’ ’, *)*$+ *(“*& { STORY & PHOTOS: MICKEY BRANDT } A New Jersey Non-Profit Corporation A Full Canvas Pat Witt has spent a lifetime imparting wit and wisdom on the beauty and essential quality of arts and nature 47 Years as South Jersey’s Premier Academy of Fine Art Art Classes for Children & Adults • Painting • Drawing • Landscape • Master Classes • And More! Classes begin Sept. 16 Register NOW! Photo by Lydia Champion The Barn Studio of Art is a non competitive environment. Each student is accepted as an individual. Creativity and originality are encouraged. Each student progresses at their own pace. Concepts are introduced only when the individual student is ready. Fundamentals based on tradition are introduced and self-discipline is encouraged, along with the development of self esteem, self confidence, and the willingness to make mistakes. For More Information or To Register for Classes BarnStudio.org • 856.825.5028 M { 22 } the grapevine | AUGUST 12, 2009 illville resident Pat Witt’s legendary accomplishments as a painter and teacher are boldly splashed across the canvas of county history. She’s also a naturalist, community servant, amateur meteorologist, grandmother, self-described rabble-rouser, and visionary. Warm-hearted and energetic, she remains hard at work on her art, even at 82 and with visual impairments. Her Barn Studio of Art has taught thousands of children and adults the beauty of art and nature since 1962. Her vision shaped the Glasstown Arts District that revolutionized her city’s downtown. Currently, she’s engaged with assuring the Barn will survive and thrive in her eventual absence. Two weeks ago, pond-side behind the Barn, with iced tea and in the company of several gentle cats, she talked passionately about…well, everything. Grapevine: This is a beautiful spot. Pat Witt: It’s magic. You know what people feel here? They feel exactly what I want them to feel: The spirituality of this—and closeness with nature. But, you know, sometimes it’s like Zen … people will want to know what Zen is… GV: They might. Witt: But, you can’t describe it. Frederick Gill, the artist, always said if you have to explain modern paintings, abstract paintings, if you have to explain art, then it isn’t art. I like that one. When people come here they have a difficult time describing it, but to me I just think it’s got a lot of energy. Psychic energy. So people come here and they feel at peace here. And I think this is why we have second, third, fourth generations [attending] here. GV: How did you start the Barn Studio? Witt: Well, Cousin Edith owned it. I used to come over and have tea with her. It was up for sale at that time and she wanted $35,000 for the whole 35 acres. I didn’t have any money at all, and I kept saying, “Cousin, I would love to have this place.” She’d say “Now, Patsy, what would you do with it?” I said, “I’d have an art school.” I said I could afford $10,000 so she sold me the barn and 2 1/2 acres. It’s funny, she said she wanted $10,000 even if the appraisal was lower and I agreed. The joke was it came up to be $15,000, so we had already shaken hands on it and her lawyer told me “That’s the kindest thing Edith Ackley Clunn ever did.” She lived up to her word. And it took me 45 years to pay off that $10,000. So, that’s how the Barn came about. I didn’t do much to it. I painted it red. GV: Is it still 2 1/2 acres? Witt: Oh no, I was forced to sell part [for a highway, Wade Boulevard Extension]. It came right through the yard. Eminent domain. I was talking to the workmen when they were building the road, asking them to not take down Mr. and Mrs. Hickory Tree. They asked, “Where are they?” and I said, “Right there,” and said “all their children are nuts, you know.” And they just looked at me. People don’t get it. GV: Did you lose Mr. and Mrs. Hickory Tree? Witt: No, they’re still there. GV: It’s still a lot of gardens and woods and it looks pretty wild. How do you maintain all this? Witt: Mother [Helen Hampton Vanaman] and I did it for years. We designed the gardens, she was an avid gardener, loved it. I used to see her out here all the time on her hands and knees planting stuff. Then, as one becomes older, it gets tougher and tougher. However, then there were other people [including Cumberland County Master Gardeners] who would come and pull weeds…. Then, two years ago, a husband of one of my students, John McClain of Port Norris, said he would like to volunteer gardening here. He’s been doing it ever since, every Thursday, right as rain, he’s here. GV: I notice you have a lot of weeds. Witt: Oh, I know. I love weeds. It took [the Master Gardeners] two years to talk me into getting a pokeberry weed out. They said, “Can’t we take this out?” I said, “No, no, the kids love to squeeze them to make ink.” You know it has the beautiful magenta color. A couple weeks ago they said, “You know, Pat, there’s a weed over on the side.” I said, “But I love it, it curves and blocks out that project over there.” He (McClain) said, “If we can pull it out, I’ll plant better grasses there.” So, they have to bargain with me, a weed for a weed. GV: Do the children enjoy the grounds? Witt: You know, the greatest thing is, I meet people everywhere that ask “Oh, do you remember me?” Most everybody I do, I have a good memory. And they’ll say, “I was there when I was 10, or 7.” And I’ll say “What do you remember the most, what was your favorite thing to do?” You know what it is? Nature walks. Every time. Pottery is second. Nature walks and clay are the top. Twodimensional, not so much. GV: When did you start the school and how does it run? Witt: When I got the barn in 1962, I started with three students [in one room]. I didn’t have any money. The easels were tripods that kept collapsing. The lessons were $2.50, you know, like egg money. I had a cigar box where people would just put their money. That’s how I started. Then, word got around and I [opened up more rooms]. Here’s a bit of magic: I always wanted to have pottery here. Did I have pottery wheels? No—they were very expensive. Do you know one night somebody called me; it was a professor from a college. He said, “Pat, can you get two men and a pickup truck and meet me by the back door of the college?” I said yes. They were going to throw out those three wheels… throw them away in the dump! So, there we got them. They’ve been rebuilt four times because it happens to be that a couple of the students are machinists and they’ll come over and load them up in their truck and restore them. One of the men said, “You mean those potters’ wheels are still here, they were here when I was a kid.” GV: What do you do with the students here? What do you teach them and what else do you do? Witt: My method of teaching I just learned one year, it was 1975. [Up until then] I didn’t know how I was teaching. I was invited to speak at the University of Michigan at their big art festival. Afterward, one man came up and said, “I see your methods are highly Socratic.” And I didn’t know what he meant. I learned it meant getting to the answer by asking the right questions. It was always my teaching method and now it had a title, right? Big deal. Sometimes the teaching here…it’s hard to explain. Once a father of [a student age 7 or 8] asked her “What does she teach you?” She said, “She doesn’t teach us anything.” She brought a little friend in one day and asked me how to get the color brown. And I said, “How do you think you get the color brown?” She turned to her friend and said, “See, she never teaches us anything.” GV: What else do you teach in addition to art? Witt: It’s nature study, it’s love for the environment, being kind to one another, using good manners, love—love is very important. Art encompasses everything. GV: Tell us a little about your personal background, where you’re from, whether you were a child prodigy. Witt: There’s no such thing as a child prodigy. In math or music, yes, but not in art because you have to go through your baby steps like scribbling on the wall with Mother’s lipstick. GV: Your art career began with scribbling on the wall with your mother’s lipstick? Witt: Right. And she didn’t punish me. She just gave me paper and said do it on the paper. Because some children have been punished for doing that and they were stifled from the beginning. They didn’t think they were being punished for destroying, but for creating. Anyway, I was blessed that I was born on a farm. It was “down below.” (What they call down below here—Menantico, south Delsea Drive). You had to create your own time. I was always playing with dolls up in the attic. My grandmother used to think there were a lot of people up there, but it was only myself, taking parts, theater, you know. Then, I started making paint from onion skins, or walnut, crushing up gravel, pokeberries. I decorated all the stalls in the barn. I used chicken feathers—you could get nice designs. And I still teach that way here. GV: Did you study formally; did you go to art school? Witt: I decided I wanted to be an artist at an early age. I was a poor student in school, I disliked school greatly. I just couldn’t get it. I failed math…. It took me five years to get through high school. My mother was embarrassed because she was a great teacher. I always got in trouble because I was doodling and drawing. You know it’s a great escape when the teacher’s up there talking. You’re way out there in space. I got sent out of the room many times. So, Mom said, “OK, I’ll put you in a school where all you do is draw.” She enrolled me in the junior classes at the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial and Textiles. Now it’s called University of the Arts. I was 12 or 14. It was Saturday School. You had to leave at dawn. [Mother] said, “I’m going to show you how to go to Philadelphia three times, then you’re going to be on your own.” So we got on the train out of Millville, crossed on the ferry, got on a trolley, then a subway. Four modes of transportation. After three times I [went alone]…. And, guess what, I got all As…. Thank God she did that. And I can selfidentify with every child who has difficulty. GV: Did you go to college? Witt: [Yes] first, I signed up for art education, then I switched over to pottery. This was a funny part of my life. Could I make a bowl center? No, they’d wobble. I couldn’t even wedge clay. Everything I did blew up in the kiln…. I’d watch these people make little ashtrays, donkeys and I’d look at Dr. [Joyce] Royer and I’d say, “I don’t understand.” She said, “You know what, you’re going to be a great teacher because you have accepted failure and you will understand failure.” I loved that. But, she said, “I have to give you a C.” GV: Did you finish college? Witt: I have 90 credits but they’re not in anything. They’re like seeds scattered to the wind. GV: What’s the most unusual or most daring art work you’ve done? Witt: I tried spray cans, you know, graffiti. I think [these fellows have] a special talent in that. Of course, it’s destroying buildings. [What I tried] had a lot of depth and I wondered what people would think. GV: What are you working on now? Witt: I’m going to tell this story because I think it’s going to be pretty important to people who have handicaps. I was told a few years ago that I had macular degeneration; [my] center vision is gone. I can’t see to read or write anymore, but I’ve been writing in my journal for a year now and I don’t even know what I wrote, I just write. Of course, I always have to remember where I left off. Now all my paintings are [from] memories. I can’t do detail anymore, and I don’t want to. I’ve had a lot of encouragement…. I call it my macular degeneration period. GV: What do you think of the changes the Arts District has brought to Millville? Witt: I saw this happening; I wanted to see it happen 35 years ago. So what I’m seeing downtown now is what I envisioned. I think when creative people go into a town they make it a better town. I nagged [commissioners]. I said, “Can’t you see it?” And now it’s happening. If every little town would do this… Now Vineland is sprawled out but if they would take sections, like little streets at a time, then it grows, you go from the center out. You don’t go from out to in, you can’t. I don’t know what that means…. Mr. [Morris] Blackburn [a teacher and mentor] would get on a roll in a lecture and I’d be [staring straight ahead] and he’d say “Patricia, do you understand what I’m saying?” I’d say yes and he’d say, “My God, you must be a genius!” And she is. I Pizzazz Dance Center Fall Registration & Open House Saturday, August 15th & Saturday, August 29th 10 am – 1 pm Ballet * Tap * Jazz * Pointe * Lyrical * Hip Hop * Irish Step * Musical Theatre * Aerobics Visit us at our new location! 7 Greenwood Avenue Newfield, NJ (856) 697-7575 WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the grapevine { 23 } Song and FRESH SPECIALT Y F O O D S M A R K E T Dance m This Week’s Feature (Opposite Vineland Post O ce) & Cohanzick Zoo Day { JANET NIEDOSIK } up residence at the Levoy Theatre in Millville sometime next year. • Rogers and Hammerstein’s musical Oklahoma is the final show of the 2009 season and will be presented November 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, and 22. For more information: www.obsponline.org. Cumberland County College has its own in- Create A Work of Art at the Market or Bring Your Favorite Drawing to the From theater productions performed on stage to storytelling in the mall to classical music in a private residence, Cumberland County has performance art galore. (No framed or 3D work, needs to be able to hang from clothesline for display) Drawing Sessions from 9 am –10:30 am ––––––––––– Plus– Sidewalk Chalk Art Contest Jersey Fresh Produce · Last Market of Season VINELAND TROLLEY VINELAND TROLLEY G WIC & Senior Coupons Accepted otta sing? Gotta dance? Or maybe you just want to hear singing or see dancing? Well, in Vineland as well as in its surrounding environs, you can probably find what you’re looking for. There are dance troupes, singing groups, theater and symphony right here. What follows is a sampling of some of the performing arts groups in the county. It is by no means an exhaustive list, but keep reading The Grapevine for news on these and other performing arts groups in Cumberland County. RIDE THE TROLLEY TO AND FROM THE MARKET FREE! Runs Landis Ave – Kidston Towers to WalMart This event is sponsored in part by VDID/Vineland Main Street. This ad has been paid for with funds approved for such use by the New Jersey Urban Enterprise Zone Authority. THEATER Cumberland Players, formerly known as The Little Theatre of Vineland, was founded in 1946 as an offshoot of Vineland Community Arts Group. According to their website— www.cumberlandplayers.com—the first production was held at the tiny Vineland Methodist Church on Sherman Avenue, which has since been enlarged and renamed The Little Theatre. The group officially changed its name to the Cumberland Players in 1977, in an effort to draw people from areas other than just Vineland. The Cumberland Players is a group made up entirely of volunteer amateur thespians offering grassroots participation for young and old alike. The group also offers a children’s theater each season. Currently in its 63rd season, Cumberland Players generally stages five shows a year. Up next is Agatha Christies’ The Mousetrap on October 9, 10, 11, 15, 16, and 17. house actors headed by Director of Theatre Deborah Bradshaw, within the Arts and Humanities Division. The department usually puts on four productions plus a summer production, Bradshaw said. The theater students, some faculty, staff and some community members perform in the Frank Guaracini, Jr. Fine and Performing Arts Center, “which is really one of the reasons I came to work full time at the college,” said the Broadway veteran. In four years, Bradshaw has established a highly successful theater program. The group just finished its summer production of the Tony award-winning Bye, Bye Birdie. Up next: • Lend Me a Tenor, a comedy nominated for eight tony awards in 1989 scheduled for November 20 at 8 p.m.; November 21 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. and November 22 at 3 p.m. • An Evening of Scenes and Monologues from Tony award-winning plays will be presented on December 9 at 7 p.m. Bradshaw said Guys and Dolls will go into production in 2010. For information or tickets, visit www.cccnj.edu or call the box office at 692-8499. Pageant Wagon Productions LLC, is in its WHEATONARTS Explore. Experience. Connect. Pageant Wagon Productions LLC Speaking and Storytelling Performance Programs Featuring Kathryn “Miss Kathy” Ross Enrichment through literature, drama, history & the arts for all ages! Serving schools, libraries, churches, elder & adult care, community groups & more! Antiques & Collectibles Show August 22 & 23, 2009 Sat., 10am to 5pm Sun., 10am to 4pm – Tale Spin Stories – Vintage Verses & Hat Stand Stories – Living History & Literature Alive Programs – Pageant Wagon Melodrama Summer Family Theatre – Home School Theatre Workshops, & More! Visit www.pwpstorytellers.com for programs available and performance calendar! Nostalgic pieces ranging from furniture, linens, glass & household collectibles, to fine jewelry, artworks & pottery. { 24 } the grapevine | AUGUST 12, 2009 Admission Includes Antique Show Plus Museum of American Glass Artist Demonstrations Folklife Center Award Winning Museum Stores Food and Refreshments Or call 856-205-9334 Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. $20.00 FAMILY RATE! Up to 2 Adults and All Children 17 & Under Cannot be combined with any other offer Every Wednesday and Sunday SPECIAL OFFER! WheatonArts is open Tuesday through Sunday, 10am to 5pm. Open Labor Day. wheatonarts.org 856.825.6800 Millville, NJ 08332 In comparison to Cumberland Players, The Off Broad Street Players is a relatively new amateur theater group in Cumberland County. Founded in 1998 by artist/director Walter Webster, The Off Broad Street Players is currently in its 12th season. “We have a core group of talented young people and encourage others from the community to join us,” Webster said. The group presents five shows a season—three musicals, a comedy and a drama. It also sponsors a summer camp for kids that ends in a performance. The 2009 season began with All Shook Up, in February followed by Moon Over Buffalo in May. The production of Thoroughly Modern Millie ended last weekend. Up next: • Ordinary People, scheduled for October 2, 3, and 4. Performances are held at Bridgeton High School. The group is expected to take fifth year of presenting literacy and character enrichment performance programs. Storytellers Ed and Kathryn Ross present programs customized for all ages and diverse groups. There are several facets to Pageant Wagon Productions LLC. “Miss Kathy” appears every Tuesday in her own show at Center Court in the Cumberland Mall at 10:30 a.m. The hour-long show is geared toward the pre-school set with the parent/caregiver. It features songs, a story, and snack parade with musical instruments. PWP’s Melodrama features the Pageant Wagon Players who, every summer, stage a melodrama. Melodrama 2009 The Villain Vaudevillians played to enthusiastic crowds recently. Watch The Grapevine for information on Melodrama 2010, Hooligans at High Tide: A Seaside Whale of a Tale. For more information: www.pwpstorytellers.com MUSIC At Cumberland County College’s Guaranci Center, The Joy of Music Series begins with the Run of the Mill String Band. An afternoon of old-time Irish and Appalachian string band music is scheduled for October 18.. For information or tickets, visit www.cccnj.edu or call the box office at 692-8499. The Singing Ambassadors, formerly known as the Vineland Community Chorus, began as a church choir in 1957. Their home base is Landis Middle School but they have also performed at Disney World, in Pittsburgh, and in Canada. They are a chorus of 35 voices from throughout the county who range in age from 19 to 82, Director John Gainfort said. They perform two major concerts a year. They will begin practice for their annual Christmas Concert on September 14, at 7:30 p.m. in Vineland Senior Center, Sixth and Elmer streets. Gainfort said no date has yet been scheduled for the concert. Read The Grapevine for upcoming information. Anyone with questions can email Gainfort at jgainfort@comcast.net. The Cumberlads, founded three years ago by retired Millville Police Officer Herb Williams and retired Millville High School teacher Ron Vinick, is a men’s acapella chorus of about 27 voices, said Director Gene Tubertini, retired music director at Millville High. “We do a variety of music—barbershop, patriotic, country, gospel, popular,” Tubertini said. “We sing at social affairs and other events.” On September 20, The Cumberlads will sing the Star Spangled Banner for the opening of the races in Millville. Anyone interested in joining The Cumberlads can come to practice Monday nights at 6:30 p.m. in Holly Heights School. For more information, call 825-0511. “The mission of Maurice River Music,” according to founder Paul M. Somers, “is to bring first-class chamber and solo music to those who want to come join us in our house. We make nothing from it. We have five concerts each year and pass the hat at the end of each one. All money taken in goes to the artists and to pay for piano tuning when needed. The first concert was back in February of 2007 … Since then we’ve had a former member of the Nash Ensemble of London, an Israeli pianist, a Grammy-winning pianist, a member of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, and members of the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra. We intend to continue that level of performance,” Somers said in a press release. … This season we bring two artists from the Bay-Atlantic Symphony as solo recitalists—concertmaster Ruotao Mao and cellist Nancy Stokking—in order to reflect the first-rate musicianship heard in this area.” The schedule of performances: • Cellist Nancy Stokking will perform music by Brahms, Schumann, and others on October 17, 7:30 p.m. • Pianist Ron Levy will perform Paul Somers’ East Haven Spirits (New Jersey premiere) and Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition on December 6 at 2:30 p.m. Stay tuned for details on the January, February, and June 2010 concerts or contact Maurice River Music, P.O. Box 133, Mauricetown, NJ 08329 (phone: 506-0580). The Bay-Atlantic Symphony was established in 1983 as the Bridgeton Symphony with Russell Meyer as its Music Director. The orchestra achieved significant growth, attracting players from throughout the Delaware Valley region and renowned soloists. Under Jed Gaylin, the orchestra’s music director since 1997, the orchestra has grown to an impressive ensemble with national recognition. The orchestra changed its name in 1998 to the Bay-Atlantic Symphony to reflect this artistic growth and the regionalization of its stature. Today, the Symphony performs in four counties. The Bay-Atlantic Symphony has been the resident symphony of the Guaracini Fine and Performing Arts Center at Cumberland County College since 1999. As part of an ongoing musical education program, the orchestra sponsors monthly lectures, annual children’s concerts, and annual master classes by renowned soloists. The symphony’s next Cumberland County performance, to be held in the Frank Guaracini, Jr. Center, Cumberland County College, is titled “Night at the Opera” and is set for November 7 at 8 p.m Also, mark your calendar for January 23, March 6 and May 1 concerts. A pre-concert conversation with the Maestro is held prior to each performance at 7 p.m. For more information call 6928499 or visit www.bayatlanticsymphony.org Visit Our New Website! www.yourrentalcity.com DANCE Founded in 1980, the Vineland Regional Dance Company (VRDC) has spent the last 30 years generating an interest in dance in southern New Jersey. A nonprofit New Jersey corporation, this seasoned and inspiring organization is a member of the South Jersey Cultural Alliance and has been an “honor” company of Regional Dance America Northeast (RDA/NE) for 30 years. A board of directors representing areas from Gloucester to Cape May counties runs the VRDC. The board promotes the art of dance in southern Jersey through the VRDC, according to Artistic Director Kim Chapman. Located at 2388 N. East Avenue, The VRDC provides professional dance training, choreography and stage performances to individuals interested in dance while creating a career opportunity for dancers of professional caliber. Its presence enhances the dance culture in the region. Company dancers, who are all area residents, perform between 20 and 25 times a year, and are afforded the opportunity to work with world-renowned master teachers and choreographers. More information on the VRDC can be found at www.vrdc.org The VRDC 2009 -2010 season includes: • 32nd Annual Nutcracker December 19 and 20 at Cumberland County College’s Guaracini Fine and Performing Arts Center. • Annual Spring Dance Concert March 27. The Arts of the Dance Center offers virtually any kind of dance from ballroom dancing to Irish dance, Hawaiian dance and belly dancing in a state-of-the-art studio at 1925 Chestnut Avenue, Vineland, said Marlene von Reuter Harwas, whom the students affectionately call Miss Vaughn. She added, “We also offer Zumba sessions six days a week.” Founded in 1961 by Harwas, Arts of the Dance is primarily a teaching studio. “All our teachers are certified,” said Harwas, who, at age 73, also continues to teach, “not as much as I did in the past, but I still love it. I’ve been teaching for 55 years.” Arts of the Dance stages a recital and review annually at Lakeside Middle School, Millville. Students range in age from three to 80-somethings. For details, call 692-9606. I Additional Discounts: • All orders booked for any future event and paid for in full* will receive ADDITIONAL 10% discount! • If you spend over $1000 you’ll get another 5% discount, or if you spend over $3500 take off another 5%! Fine Print: Maximum of 25% discount can be given on rental changes. Discounts do not apply to state taxes or damage waiver charges. This coupon is not valid with any other offer or discounts at this time. Also, discounts do not apply to: generators, comfort stations, chair cover/sashes, frozen drink machines, and 60’ or 80’ wide tents. * Payments made in full are non-refundable. 1297 West Landis Ave, Vineland, NJ 08360 856-696-1666 • yourrentalcity.com augustcoupon@rental-city.com Own Your Memories Rent Everything Else! Getting Divorced? Bonnie L. Laube, Esq. Greenblatt & Laube, PC Divorce, Separation, Custody, Child Support, Parenting Time, Alimony, Asset Distribution, Emancipation, Domestic Violence Certi?ed by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Civil Trial Attorney 856-691-0424 • email: bll@greenblattlaube.com 200 North Eighth Street • PO Box 883 • Vineland, NJ 08362 All major credit cards accepted WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | cordially invites you to enroll in the 49th season at e Arts of the Dance Centre 1925 East Chestnut Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361 856-692-9606 Registration: Wed. August 19th 2-7 PM urs. August 20th 2-7 PM Kinder Creative Klass thru Advanced Ages 3 to Adult the grapevine { 25 } ZUMBA – 6 Days a Week NOW OPEN 3.5% SALES TAX DELI SPECIALS PEPPERED HAM DIETZ & WATSON DIETZ & WATSON Dietz & Watson Meats and Cheeses $ FRUIT • PRODUCE • DELI • SANDWICHES 1362 S. Delsea Dr. Vineland • 856-362-5978 Featuring (next to T& F Camera) LARGE JERSEY TOMATOES…39¢ lb. RED & WHITE GRAPES…..$100 lb. MANGO’S….$500 Box or 80¢ea EXTRA LARGE JERSEY PEACHES..95¢lb. IDAHO POTATOES……..5 lbs/$150 JERSEY WHITE CORN…….35¢ea SUGARBABY MELONS………$299ea ROMAINE LETTUCE…..75¢a head EXTRA LARGE JERSEY CANTALOUPES $129ea CUBAN PEPPERS……………..50¢lb GREEN PEPPERS……………..50¢lb MILK • EGGS • FRUIT BASKETS LISCIO BAKERY ROLLS • BREAD SPECIALS HONEY CURED TURKEY BREAST AMERICAN CHEESE BLACK FOREST SMOKED TURKEY BREAST GOURMET LIGHT HAM $ DIETZ & WATSON DIETZ & WATSON DIETZ & WATSON 4.49 lb. 5.89 lb. 2.49 lb. 5.99 lb. 4.99 lb. $ $ $ Open 7 Days Mon-Sat 8am-7pm Sun 8am-2pm Beautiful Smiles, Made Affordable OUR SERVICES { 26 } the grapevine | AUGUST 12, 2009 MILLVILLE FAMILY DENTAL Union Lake Crossing Shopping Center 2144 N. 2nd St., Millville NEW PATIENT WELCOMING PACKAGE $ 80 (reg. $230.) Includes oral exam, full mouth series of x-rays, cleaning & polishing, oral cancer screening, periodontal (gums) evaluation. With coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Emergency Walk-Ins Welcome • Same-Day Denture Repair • • • • • • • • • • • Cleaning & X-Rays Porcelain Veneers Cosmetic Dentistry Periodontal Therapy (Gum Treatment) Full Mouth Reconstruction Implant Rehabilitation Root Canals (One Visit) Full & Partial Dentures Bleaching White Fillings Crowns & Bridges 856-825-2111 Open 7 Days a Week. Day & Evening Hours Proud Member Of The Allied Dental Practices Of NJ Personalized Dentistry SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO OUR SENIOR CITIZENS Se Habla Español E D W A R D P O L L E R , D D S • G L E N N P R A G E R , D D S • TO D D P R A G E R , D D S • D A N I E L D I C E S A R E , D M D I Entertainment SECOND FRIDAY, OUTDOOR CONCERTS, NIGHTLIFE, AND HANGAR 84 ROCK SHOWS. AUGUST 12, 13, 14, 15, AND 18 Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Wednesday: ’70s and ’80s Throwback Night (frozen drink specials) 8 p.m.midnight, Thursday.: Karaoke with DJ Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday: Blue Moon Dance Party, $3 Blue Moon drafts, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Saturday: Latin Dance Party, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Tuesday: Country Western Dance Party (beer and shot specials), 8 p.m.-midnight. House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. 7 p.m. $10. SATURDAY, AUGUST 15 Stray From the Path. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland. 6 p.m. $12-$15. (frontgatetickets.com). SATURDAY, AUGUST 15 Dan Godbey and Friends. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. 7 p.m. THURSDAY, AUGUST 13 Through the Eyes of the Dead. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland. 6 p.m. $10$12. (frontgatetickets.com). SUNDAY, AUGUST 16 Doctors of Rhythm. Bridgeton Riverfront Park, Bridgeton. 7 p.m. Free concert. 4531675. AUGUST 13, 14, AND 15 Nightlife at Villa Filomena. Villa Filomena Ristorante & Lounge, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena, 697-7107. Thurs.: Ladies Night, Fri.: Live music, Sat.: Italian Accordian. MONDAY, AUGUST 17 Doctors of Rhythm. Giampetro Park Enrico Serra Band Shell, E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 7 p.m. Free concert. TUESDAY, AUGUST 18 The Bud Cavallo Duo. Bruno Melini Park, Joe Dale Pavilion, 616 Central Ave., Minotola. Bring your own chair. 7-9 p.m. Free concert. AUGUST 13, 14, AND 15 Nightlife at Bojo’s. 222 N. High St., Second Friday FRIDAY, AUGUST 14 Martini Art Exhibit. Martini Shoes, 613A Landis Ave., Vineland. Paintings from local artists are featured including Sue Mounier, Judy Miller, Paula Pagluighi, Carole Ward, Lynn Martini (pictured) and special guest Miss Tyler Cheli, student of well-known local artist, Margaret Ricci. Refreshments and live entertainment. 6-9 p.m. Millville, 327-8011. Thurs: Ladies Nite with Charlie. Fri: Kids Don’t Bounce. Sat: Singalong. Sun: Nascar/Baseball. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19 The Silvertones. Michael Debbi Park, Cedar Ave., Richland. Entertaining Big Band audiences since 1992. 7 p.m. rain or shine. Seating available or bring a lawn chair. Free concert. FRIDAY, AUGUST 14 Tom Moran/Bosco & Peck. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. 5 p.m./ 7 p.m. Art Show Opening/Michele Collins featuring music by Danielle Deckard. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. Wine and cheese reception for new art exhibit. $8/$15. La Bella First Anniversary. La Bella Art Gallery, 715 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 264-3711. Music and refreshments. Art and jewelry for sale. Also, Victorian and vintage jewelry and purses. Open until 9 a.m. FRIDAY, AUGUST 14 Liam and Me. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland. 6 p.m. $10-$12. (frontgatetickets.com). THROUGH AUGUST 31 Myer Glick Artwork. Vineland Public Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 794-4244. Original paintings in acrylic and watercolors displayed in the Doris Tripp Exhibit Room. Hand-crafted stained glass work is exhibited in the display cases on the first floor of the library. This exhibit focuses on local resident and Holocaust survivor Myer Glick’s zest for life and the beauty he finds in the world. A reception to meet the artist takes place on Monday, August 17, 6-8 p.m. and refreshments will be served. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12 Bob Ferris Orchestra. Michael Debbi Park, Cedar Ave., Richland. Swinging standards from the big band era. 7 p.m. rain or shine. Seating available or bring a lawn chair. Free. WEDNESDAYS IN AUGUST Nightlife at Ramada. Harry’s Lounge at Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 696-3800. Wednesday: Ladies Night, 1/2 price appetizers all night and live entertainment. Happy Hour MondaySaturday, 4-6 p.m. $1 off all drinks. AUGUST 14 AND 15 Nightlife at Old Oar House. Old Oar House Brewery, 123 N. High St., Millville, 293-1200. Fri.: The Founders, 9 p.m. Sat.: TBA, 9 p.m., WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | SATURDAY, AUGUST 15 FreshStartPromotions Presents. Fuel Affordable Symphonies Bay-Atlantic Symphony ticket prices will become more affordable thanks to a $40,000 PNC Arts Alive grant awarded to the Symphony. Because of this grant, which will be used to subsidize the cost of concert tickets, subscription concert tickets will be at the flat rate of $25 regardless of venue, seat location, or when the ticket is purchased. It will also be used to keep tickets affordable for the Symphony’s Swinging with the Symphony event at the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa on September 24—a tribute to the “King of Swing” Benny Goodman with The Dave Bennett Sextet as guest artists and pianist Jeffrey Biegel performing Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue. Tickets for that event will be $65, $50, and $35. “We are extremely proud and grateful for this grant, which will help to make our concerts more accessible to people in these tough economic times,” said Bay-Atlantic Symphony Executive Director Paul Herron. “Anything that enables us to bring great music to more people helps us in our mission.” This grant is part of $1 million in grants given out this year by the PNC Foundation through its PNC Arts Alive program. This program is a fiveyear, $5 million investment designed to support visual and performing arts organizations. Its aim is to increase engagement in the arts and make the arts more accessible to diverse audiences in the Greater Philadelphia and Southern Jersey region. “The PNC Foundation has a long history of providing grants to non-profit organizations that strengthen and enrich the lives of our neighbors,” said Bill Mills, regional president of PNC for Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey. “We understand the valuable return that investing in the arts can deliver. Today more than ever, the businesses we attract, the jobs we create and the visitors who extend their stay are drawn by what the Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey region has to offer.” For more information on the Bay-Atlantic Symphony, call (856) 451-1169 or visit the Symphony’s website at www.bayatlanticsymphony.org. the grapevine { 27 } Varicose • Veins • Featured on ? and LETTERS to the Editor Russian Festival Thank-you Luncheon In gratitude to some of the Holy Trinity parish’s friends and neighbors for their help with the first Russian Festival, an indoor luncheon featuring only Russian cuisine will be held at 1 p.m. on Sunday, August 30, at the hall of the Holy Trinity Russian Orthodox Church at 2211 W. Landis Ave. in Vineland. We had an overwhelming response at the Russian Festival on July 19 and sincerely thank the community for their support. To our great regret, many guests were forced to wait in the hot sun for hours only to learn that the Russian dishes had run out. We deeply apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused. In light of the shortfall, the organizers are extending invitations to this three-course all-Russian-fare luncheon to everyone who missed out at the festival. Unfortunately, seating is limited and reservations are required. Tickets are $15 and must be purchased in advance; none will be sold at the door. Tickets may be purchased by contacting deacon Serge Ohotin via e-mail sohotin@yahoo.com or call 558-0610. —Serge Ohotin, Vineland Reach Out To The Most Qualified Specialist Minimally Invasive Insurance covered Please Watch for Our Free Vein Screening in the Fall 30 min. Office Treatment Charles L. Dietzek, D.O., FACOS Raymond S. Wojtalik, M.D., FACS Voorhees • Sewell • Vineland 856.309.VEIN (8346) SAFE Combats Teen Pregnancy On Tuesday, July 14, I observed and took part in an excellent program. It was organized by the “SAFE” Program. SAFE stands for “Sexual Accountability for Everyone.” This is Cumberland County Teen Pregnancy Preventative Initiative. It was held at the Regal Theater at the Cumberland Mall. The staff of SAFE played music the teenagers enjoyed. They also threw candy into the stands to make it a fun day. There was an announcer who spoke to the audience for about 20 minutes. Then SAFE shared a short film, which included girls about 15 years old, talking about how hard it is raising a child. This program was very effective. I would like to take this time to commend this organization. As I left the theater, I listened to the comments of the children attending. They were very positive. Thank you, Regal Theater, for letting this happen. The children were given a bag with candy and a shirt with “SAFE” on it on the way out. Many smiled because the second part of the program was to see the Harry Potter movie for free. —Stephen I. Plevins, Vineland Specializing in spider and varicose vein treatment 2950 College Dr., Suite 2B, Vineland • www.VeinVascular.com { 28 } the grapevine | AUGUST 12, 2009 Lab Puppies four males one female all black Current Vaccinations & Vet Checked Family Raised Parents on site Don’t just dream it… now you can travel the world! Featuring 5 Cruises & 25 Vacations or Use Us For Single Vacation Bookings! Call Now & Ask About Our Lifetime Package! www.TvTravelPackage.com/HA8467 856-696-9491 Getaway Lifetime Vacations, LLC (856) 979-8467 • Hilberto Andujar Free Summer Concerts Another year of open-air “geriatric” bandstand is upon us in the various parks, namely Giampietro Park in Vineland, Joe Dale Pavilion in Minotola and [Michael] Debbi Park in Richland. Every year, I urge young and old to attend and listen and dance to the sounds of the Big Band era. Even if you don’t care to dance, it’s a night when you can come out and sit under the stars and listen to good music and associate with friends who you may not have seen over the long wintry months. So I will be expecting you to join the crowd and get in on the fun. Come and join me in doing the “Line Dance” or the “Medicare Shuffle.” —John Quinesso, Vineland Don’t Play Politics with Health Care Physicians are reminded in the Hippocratic Oath that they take at the end of medical school “to first do no harm.” In other words, better to stand back to think about what to do, then to jump in with a treatment plan that may hurt, not help the patient. Congress should follow this wise rule. I do not see my government doing what is best for the nation and its citizens; I see a body of politicians jumping all over themselves to rush through a serious change in our lives in order to be able to declare their work to “reform” healthcare and win an election down the road. Most “goodies” concocted in Congress come with all sorts of unintended consequences; thousands of pages of laws, not read, not discussed openly, and not given the time to be thoroughly reviewed by Congress and its constituents is obscene. Are we still a democracy (power to the people) or are we a dictatorship (power to government without the people)? Let’s not forget in this discussion that our government has had nearly 50 years to run and follow two healthcare programs that they established: Medicare and Medicaid. How are they doing? Medicaid was a government program set up to help people who were too poor to buy health- care or under-skilled to work at companies that offered healthcare as a benefit. Over the years, fewer and fewer people have been helped in this program because the Federal government stopped funding it, leaving it to the states to fund it, whose own budget problems led to reductions in funding year after year. When the money to fund Medicaid shrank, bureaucrats decreased payments to doctors. As a result, doctors dropped out of the Medicaid program. Like any other business, doctors could not continue in a program that cost more money to offer than they could recoup from the government. And what most people don’t realize is that healthcare costs to patients with insurance and patients able to pay for their doctor’s bill by themselves went up for many years due to the poor payments of Medicaid; in other words, those that could, paid to subsidize the Medicaid patients. At some point nothing could be done by a physician to continue to see Medicaid patients and the physician simply had to get out of the system. This scenario will repeat itself with universal health care. President Obama has claimed a “savings” from hospitals and physicians; the squeeze to ring out “savings” from hospitals and doctors will lead to fewer hospital services and fewer doctors. Look to Medicaid and Medicare for the facts. Medicare was established by President Lyndon B. Johnson in March 1965. A provision to cover doctors’ visits added $450 million dollars more to the Medicare expense. According to the AARP, “in 45 years, that annual $450 million portion of Medicare has grown to nearly $200 billion dollars.” Billion. This despite every administration’s (since 1965) attempts to hold down costs and eliminate waste. This is not a Republican or Democrat assertion—it is a fact that Medicare costs continue to consume more and more of our taxes. Before our government creates another and larger health program in the United States, shouldn’t we hold them accountable for the way that they have run Medicare? And Medicaid? Therefore, what I am suggesting very strongly is that people stop wishing and hoping for a new “goodie” from the government without studying the realities: What exactly are we getting in this program? What will it cost now and in the future, and who will fund it? If we don’t have time to quiz our representatives and they don’t think we have a right to know the facts before they sign it into law, then we have another sobering problem—the end of a democratic government. —Judy Feinstein, Vineland I Faces in the News Free Dance Lessons For Boys Kimberly Chapman; Artistic CoDirector/Co- Owner Maxine’s Studio of Dance is making boys realize that dance can improve their sports. From football, to basketball, baseball, soccer, wrestling, track and field, and swimming, boys from around the area are taking notice that dance can help their performance in sports. “The class is for boys only, ages 4 to 12, and meets on Tuesday or Thursday from 4 p.m.–5 p.m.,” said Chapman. “We focus on stretching, strengthening, coordination, isolations and agility. Things that will improve their sports.” The free class is offered to afford boys the opportunity to understand and appreciate the art of dance while improving their agility, flexibility, coordination, memorization and athleticism. Those interested in signing your child up for this class should call 856-691-6059 or stop by for the “open house” August 10–14 from 9 a.m.–3 p.m. at 2388 N. East Ave. Vineland. Haley to Compete in Ireland The family of Haley Richards extends a warm thank you to all those who came out to support us at our fundraiser at Fuelhouse Coffee on Landis Avenue on July 25. Thank you to all the musicians who brought their instruments and shared their music. It was a great success and a fun night for all! Haley, a seven-year-old fiddler/violinist, has qualified to travel to Tullamore, Ireland to compete in the All Ireland Fleadh on August 22. Special thanks go out to Bains Deli/Fuelhouse Coffee— especially Russ and all the guys working on July 25—for their hard work making all the sandwiches and keeping the music board running smoothly. For more information about Haley, Towheads (the traditional Celtic music group comprised of Haley and her brothers, Dylan and Newt), or Haley’s trip to Ireland, visit www.towheads.org. Hoag Awards Scholarship Martin Hoag, owner of Hoag-Parrish Financial Management, has awarded his annual $1,000 Scholarship to local Vineland High School graduate, Juan C. Hernandez of Vineland for 2009. Hernandez graduated from Vineland High School Summa Cum Laude, placing 38th out of 647 graduates. Hernandez plans to enroll in Lafayette University in the PreMed Program. This is the 16th year that Hoag-Parrish Financial Management has sponsored a scholarship to a deserving Vineland High School graduate. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Vineland’s 148th Birthday Celebrated The anniversary of the city’s founding by Charles K. Landis in 1861 was celebrated on Saturday, Aug. 8 with an open house at the Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society (VHAS). The event featured appearances and speeches by elected officials, by VHAS president Frank Amari, Jr. (pictured, above right) and a lecture by The Grapevine’s history columnist Vince Farinaccio. Highlights of the day included a kids program and a delicious birthday cake, cut by Mayor Bob Romano (pictured above with VHAS board members, Amari, and city councilwoman Mayra Arroyo). the grapevine { 29 } Feel The Difference With Fabrizio Chiropractic Get Relief From HEADACHES NUMBNESS NECK PAIN LOWER BACK PAIN I COMMUNITY CALENDAR HAPPENINGS WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12 Planning Board Meeting. Council Chambers, City Hall, Seventh and Wood sts. 7:30 p.m. fruits and vegetables and various crafters and other exhibitors will be on hand. Trolley will shuttle between Kidston Towers and Walmart, providing free transportation for anyone going to the Market. 794-8653. SATURDAY, AUGUST 15 Nature Scavenger Hunt. Parvin State Park, 701 Almond Rd, Pittsgrove. 1:30 p.m. 358-8616. SATURDAY, AUGUST 15 SATURDAY, AUGUST 15 Fresh and Specialty Foods Market/Clothesline Art Show. 700 block of Landis Ave. 8 a.m.-noon. p.m. The final market of the season—vendors will sell fresh AUGUST 15 AND 16 9th Annual Seafood Festival. Bellview Winery, Atlantic St., Landisville. Held in conjunction with 4th Annual American Car Show, 11 am.m-5 p.m. All 27 Bellview wines will be poured for sampling and offered by the glass or bottle to complement the seafood and Movie Night. Bridgeton City Park Amphitheater. Movies are PG rated. Bring your favorite lawn chair or blanket and watch the movie on a huge movie screen. Movie starts at dusk. A PUBLIC MEETING has been Come In For A FREE CONSULTATION & Learn How You Could Win A FREE IPOD SHUFFLE! Dr. Theresa A. Fabrizio DC 856.692.0077 1790 N. Main Road, Vineland, NJ FAX: 856.692.4008 scheduled to discuss the Vineland Municipal Utility’s progress. It will be Thursday, August 27, at 7 p.m., at Vineland City Hall (640 E. Wood Street, Council Chambers, 2nd Floor). Utility representatives will discuss the utility’s accomplishments over the last year and also their future strategies. Items of discussion include customer service initiatives, electric utility infrastructure improvements, and water utility infrastructure improvements. There will be a power point presentation along with a question and answer period. This public meeting will be available for live viewing on our local network (Channel 9). years the Vineland PAL has served over 10,000 children from the surrounding area. The Vineland PAL continues to operate with fundraisers and donations from the Vineland business community. A CLASSIC CAR BENEFIT/CRUISE revs up on Saturday, August 15 at the Delsea Drive-in. The event will feature four movies for the evening, including the film classic Smokey and the Bandit and three current features. The event is open to all classic cars, from muscle cars, street rods, classics, rat rods and specialty cars. The cruise begins at 5 p.m. and WVLT 92.1 disc-jockey Pepper Paul will play cruisin’ oldies music before the feature presentations start at dusk. next to the auditorium. Spaces for vendors and families are $15, on a firstcome-first served basis. Space size will equal two parking spaces. Electricity, tables and trash collection are not provided. All unsold items must be removed from the premises at the end of the sale. Space reservations can be made by calling 794-6800 ext. 2539. Start Fresh Today! Credit Card Debt • Medical Bills Utility Bills • Surcharges And Even Some Income Taxes Stop Wage Executions Reduce Car Payments Free Office Visit-Start Fresh Financially! Want to wipe out your debt? WIPE OUT: SACRED HEART HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF ’69 will hold its 40th class reunion on September 26. The reunion will take place at Uncle Ricky’s, 470 Wheat Road in Vineland. The party will begin at 6 p.m The cost is $25 and includes a pig roast, draft beer, and a donation to the Alumni Association. Cash Bar. RSVP by September 16 to rick@wheatroad golf.com or 207-6923. KEEP FIT AND COOL at the YMCA of Vineland. The Y boasts a large, safe indoor pool, plus new Family Fitness and free weight areas, all in air-conditioned comfort. There are special savings available throughout this month: Facility member fee bank draft—adult and family facility members can get 25 to 50 percent off the joining fee. Those paying annual facility member fee in full (excluding youth and teen) – can pay no joining fee and get a thirteenth month for no additional charge These savings can range as high as nearly $150. For additional information on the “Beat the Heat” program offered through August 31., call the YMCA at 691-0030. SCHOOL SUPPLIES for the new STOP SHERIFF SALE THE VINELAND POLICE ATHLETIC League (PAL) will be celebrating its 15th Year anniversary on Saturday, August 15. The event will take place at 627 E Elmer Street. The 600 block of Elmer Street will be closed down from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Vineland PAL will be having opening ceremonies at 11 a.m., during this time the Vineland PAL will be honoring several of volunteers and sponsors. Activities include a live amateur boxing show in the street from 1 to 4 p.m., water rides and bounces for the children, a water dunking machine, food venders, music and a laser show at Hanger 84. The honorable Mayor Romano will have an exhibition boxing fight with Mayor Shannon from Millville. The Vineland PAL is a non-profit organization that provides numerous activities for the youth of our community thought out the year. For the past 15 BANKRUPTCY IS YOUR LEGAL BAILOUT! { 30 } the grapevine | AUGUST 12, 2009 Listen to Seymour Wasserstrum Esq. Live on the Radio Every Thursday Night From 8-9 pm on 92.1 FM Helping people wipe out their bills – since 1973 205 Landis Ave., Vineland www.wipeoutyourbillstoday.com $100 OFF w/this ad – CR We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for Bankruptcy Code. Seymour Wasserstrum, Esq. Partial proceeds from food sales, at the concession stand, will be donated to the Dare to Dream Foundation. The Delsea Drive-in car cruise and movie is hosted by radio personalities Larry Lazereff and Ben Notaro, host and co-host respectively of “Cruisin’ with the Editor,” a weekly car talk show on local radio station WVLT 92.1 FM. It is also hosted in cooperation with the Delsea Drive-in. Delsea Drive-in information may be obtained from their website; www.delseadrive-in.com. All regular drive-in fees and rules apply. Further information may be obtained by calling Larry at 297-5012 . WASSERSTRUM Esq. -Bankruptcy Attorney- SEYMOUR 856-696-8300 VHS MARCHING CLAN will host a Giant Yard Sale at Vineland High School South (2880 E. Chestnut Avenue) on Saturday, August 22, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. (Rain date is Sunday, August 23.) The sale will be held in the parking lot, school year are being collected by South Jersey Healthcare’s Family Success Center of Vineland to help families in our community. School supplies will be distributed to students ages preschool through high school. Items needed include: backpacks, notebooks, pencils, pencil cases, crayons, highlighters and calculators. Donations will be accepted through August 13 at the following drop-off locations: • Family Success Center, 1038 E. Chestnut Avenue – Suite 130, Vineland (Vineland Health Center) • IMPACT Program, Montrose Avenue & the Boulevard, Vineland • SJH Regional Medical Center, 1505 West Sherman Avenue, Vineland (Human Resources Office) • SJH Bridgeton Health Center, 333 Irving Avenue, Bridgeton (Human Resources Office) For more information, call 5077840. other available food choices. American Car Show Saturday (rain date, Sunday). Car show, parking, and all festival activities, including a souvenir Bellview wine glass, are included in the $5 admission fee. Music performed by the The Blue Method. Bring lawn chairs or blankets. Festival held rain or shine. www.BellviewWinery.com, or 697-7172 daily from 11 a.m-5 p.m. Festival special cake topped with fresh peaches and whipped topping $5 ($3 for kids 10 and under). Proceeds will go toward upgrading and maintaining the camp buildings. Call 466-0288. SUNDAY, AUGUST 23 Pink Carpet Gala. St. Anthony’s Hall, Wheat Road. The event will benefit the South Jersey Healthcare Foundation, Susan G. Komen race for the Cure. Central South New Jersey affiliate and Fedup-4u. Dancing, African-American food, Italian dishes, a live band playing ‘80s and new music, award ceremony, special guest speakers, Gospel singers, poetry and a dedication to the late Michael Jackson (come join in on the thriller dance) Call James Cooper at 364-8103 for tickets. Sponsorship packages are available starting at $50. P.S.—Wear some pink. SUNDAY, AUGUST 23 Newfield Day/Old Fashion Peach Social. Newfield Public Library will hold its annual Old Fashion Peach Social in The Grove along with all the other Newfield Day festivities. Top off your chicken barbeque with peach pie, cobbler, or ice cream and topped with fresh Jersey peaches. Two servings sizes ($5 or $3); take-outs available. 697-0415. SUNDAY, AUGUST 16 Fire Apparatus Show and Muster. Wheaton Arts and Cultural Center, 1501 Glasstown Rd. (Rt. 55, Exit 26), Millville, More than 80 antique fire trucks, a firefighter competition, firefighting demonstrations, and more. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission to show only. To visit WheatonArts: $10 adults, $9 senior adults, $7 students. Children 5 and under are admitted free. TUESDAY, AUGUST 25 City Council Meeting. Council Chambers, City Hall, Seventh and Wood sts. 7:30 p.m. GOLF, SPORTS, ETC. CHURCH NEWS Wordshop 2009 will be held Saturday, August 22, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Carl Arthur Recreation Center, Third and Plum streets. Four women will speak. Registration fee is $20 (includes kit, Continental breakfast, and lunch). Call 691-1349. A farewell Mass and get-together will be held for Rev. Patsy Amabile, pastor of Sacred Heart Church, on Friday, August 21, beginning 7 p.m at the church. A dinner will be held at Merighi’s Savoy Inn, following Mass. Tickets for the dinner are $30 per person and are available by calling the Rectory at 691-0420. Coffee farewells are also planned in the church hall on Sunday, August 23. Father Amabile has been assigned to a parish in New York City. Friday, August 21 – Youth Ministry Concert, Jeff Deyo, Contemporary Christian singer will perform his latest album, Unveil at 7 p.m. at Bridgeton Assembly of God, 424 Indian Avenue. Tickets $10 at door or purchase at Cornerstone Christian BookStore on Seventh Street in Vineland. Summer Art and Learning Camp at New Hope Presbyterian Church (65 Hitchner Avenue, Bridgeton). Wednesday afternoons (August 12, 19, 26) for ages 7 to 12, from 1 to 5 p.m. Arts, crafts, reading, dance, music lessons, science exploration, outdoor recreation. No cost. Come one afternoon or come all summer. Call 451-7644. Children are invited to participate in a Young Readers (ages 4-12) Summer Reading Club. It is held at Trinity Episcopal Church, 8th and Wood Streets, Vineland on Mondays, 4-6 p.m. It features: Reading enrichment, music lessons, healthy snacks—all free! To enroll, phone 691-7243. SUNDAY, AUGUST 16 Weekly Dance. North Italy Club Hall, East Ave. and Virano Ln. County chapter of the Single Parents Society holds the dances for people age 50 and up, married or single. Live band performs music for waltz, rhumba, swing, foxtrot, line dances, and more. 7:30-10:30 p.m. $7 members, $9 nonmembers 697-1814. EVERY SATURDAY Canoe & Kayak Trip. Parvin State Park, 701 Almond Rd, Pittsgrove. On Parvin Lake and Muddy Run. Meet at 10 a.m. at Fire Ring (between CS 13 and 15). Bring your own boat or rent one from Al & Sam’s. 358-8616. SUNDAY, AUGUST 16 Block Party/Pizza Eating Contest. Dominick’s Pizza, Lincoln and Dante Shopping Plaza (1768 S, Lincoln). Benefits Alex’s Lemonade Stand and American Diabetes Association. All proceeds will go to these two charities. 11 a.m-4 p.m. 691-5511. AUGUST 10-13, AND 17-20 Learn-to-Row Camp. Harris Industrial Park Boathouse (home of the Vineland HS Crew Team), 328 S. 2nd Street, Millville. For first-time rowers (grades 6 to 11 for the fall 2009 school year). Rowing on the Maurice River. 5-7 p.m. each day. Cost is $150 per session, $50 deposit to hold a spot. 498-1057 or 293-1848. MONDAY, AUGUST 17 NAMI Monthly Meeting. Chestnut Assembly of God, 2554 E. Chestnut Ave. County Chapter of National Alliance on Mental Illness meets. 7-9 p.m. 691-9234. FRIDAY, AUGUST 21 Dick Baum Memorial Golf Tournament. Running Deer Golf Club, 1111 Parvin Mill Road, Pittsgrove. Cumberland County Habitat For Humanity hosts. 11 a.m. registration; noon lunch; 1 p.m. shotgun; 5 p.m. dinner. $100 golfer donation (includes greens fee, golf cart, lunch, dinner). Call 563-0292. TUESDAY, AUGUST 18 Family Fun Night. Purple Penguin Ice Cream, 1008 Harding Hwy., Newfield. Benefits Newfield Fire Co.. Family fun, good food. Bring a chair/blanket. 6:30 p.m. 697-4731. SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 13 2nd Annual Run For Life. Wheat Road Golf, 2142 E. Wheat Rd. 5K this year in memory of Ronald K Brownlee Jr, who lost his battle with leukemia last June. All proceeds benefit The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. 9 a.m. 5 K Run or 1 Mile Walk $20 if reg by Sept. 5, $25 day of race. www.therunforlife5k.com. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19 Secrets to Permanent Weight Loss. The CyberSpot, 610 E. Landis Ave. 7-8 p.m. Workshop participants will learn about nondrug solutions. Free but limited to first 20 callers. 691-1313. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19 Osteoporosis Prevention. Cumberland County Extension Education Center, 291 Morton Ave., Rosenhayn. A Rutgers Cooperative Extension family and community health sciences program. Free, but registration required. 451-2800. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 Ellison’s 15th Annual Golf Tournament. Buena Vista Country Club, Rt. 40, Buena. This year’s golf outing is part of The Ellison School’s 50th Anniversary celebration. Registration begins at 11:30 a.m., followed by a buffet luncheon. Tournament at 1 p.m. Putting and hole-in-one contests offering more than $6,500 in prizes. Entry fee of $150 includes greens fees, carts, tips, luncheon and dinner. Advertisement and sponsorship opportunities are available. 691-1734. the grapevine { 31 } SATURDAY, AUGUST 22 New Jersey Peach Festival. Malaga Camp Meeting, 4400 N. Delsea Dr., Newfield. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Highlights include the Lil Miss and Mr. Peach Contest, live entertainment, games, and some “peachy” baked goods and treats. Admission is free, signature Peach The Grapevine’s Crossword Puzzle ACROSS 1. Married woman 4. Converged 7. Point one point S of due E 10. Table condiment 12. Trade 14. Indian frock 15. Bombast 16. Blighia tree (var.) 17. Pre-college school 18. Give clear expression to 20. ____ Tomei, actress 22. Tall hardwood tree 23. Actress Ryan 24. Not true 26. Organic compounds 29. Hill (Celtic) 30. Apprehension 35. They ___ 36. 1st state abbr. (var.) 37. Chicken ___ King 38. “Me & Bobby McGee” singer 44. Horny jaws of a bird 45. Beheaded queen Antoinette 46. Goatlike Eurasian antelope 48. Wrath 49. Container cover 50. Also-rans 53. So. Spanish port city 56. Brood of pheasant 57. Coal tar product 59. Retained 61. Sagu_____: treelike cacti 62. Challenged 63. Clods 64. Pinna 65. Cotter or straight 66. Tell on DOWN 1. Mutual savings bank 2. Abnormal breathing 3. E. European people 4. Nutmeg covering spice 5. Large northern deer 6. Spill over 7. Auricles 8. La ____ Tar Pits in L.A. 9. A way to take in liquids 11. Mercaptan 12. One who fires 13. Sewed together 14. Water tap Solution to last week’s puzzle 19. Vogue publisher Conde 21. ____l: of the kidneys 24. Nummulite 25. Space for public entertainments 27. Chinese dynasty 502-557 28. Genus of the Soleidae 29. ___ Mahal 31. Tokyo 32. High spirits 33. Not in good health 34. Seize suddenly 39. Bearded plants 40. Beget 41. Shouted derisively 42. No man is one 43. A hammered fastener 47. N.W. state 50. Old Italian money 51. Aroma 52. Detergent 53. Demeanor 54. Sports paraphernalia 55. ____ Romeo, car 56. No (Scottish) 58. ___ Lanka 60. Fall back time only at South Jersey’s Premier Car Wash Just $850 YES! Voted #1 “Best of Best” 2009 + Tax Can get my car clean INSIDE & OUT??? SEAFOOD HOUSE 1554 S. Delsea Drive, Vineland • 856-692-2800 NEPTUNE’S DAILY SPECIALS MONDAY SPECIAL PRIME RIB THURSDAY SPECIAL THURSDAY SPECIALS S CHIPINO For 2 $9.99 TUESDAY SPECIAL SUMMER BARBEQUE $12.99 S (Regularly $35.95) Live Lobster, Mussels, Clams,SATURDAY Snow Crabs & Fish Shrimp, Scallops, SPECIAL Fillet. Served on Linguine S SNOW CRAB $14.99 SUNDAY SPECIAL S FRIDAY SPECIAL SCALLOPS & SHRIMP BY M FRIDAY SPECIAL $19.99 { 32 } the grapevine | AUGUST 12, 2009 EVER Guaranteed! Windows included with this ad. Best Wash 1/2 Rack of Bar-B-Q Ribs & Chicken BreastPlus Fried Shrimp & Fried Oysters w/Pepperhash, Served w/Fried Potato Wedges WEDNESDAY SPECIALS 2 DINNERS For Plus 1 Appetizer & 1 Dessert To Share $12.99 Scallops & Shrimp over Clams & Linguine $20.00 SATURDAY SPECIAL NEW ENGLAND STEAM POT Choice of Appetizer: Fried Calamari- Mozzarella Sticks-Buffalo Wings-Stuffed Potato Skins w/Bacon & Cheese $21.99 Snow Crab, Shrimp, Scallops, Clams, Mussels & Corn on the Cob Choice of Dinner Entree: Clams & Linguine, Chicken Parmesan with Penne, Chopped Sirloin Steak-Broiled Pork Chop, Beer Battered Fish & Chips Served w/Salad w/Bread & Butter SUNDAY SPECIALS HALF PRICE APPETIZER 10% Senior Citizen Discount From Individual Entree Only 2611 S. Main Rd. Vineland, NJ 08360 (Between Grant & Sherman) GV Choice of Dessert: Jello, Rice Pudding, Vanilla or Chocolate pudding CHILDREN UNDER 12 EAT FOR FREE (Accompanied by a paying adult) I Culinary Adventures { STEPHEN WILSON | PHOTO: JILL McCLENNEN } All Atwitter About Food Tweet Up at the Tortilla Press brings foodies together. everal weeks ago, I got word that there would be a “Tweet Up” at the Tortilla Press in Collingswood for the network of southern Jersey tweeters to which I belong. This group is nothing formal, but just a handful of folks that have one thing in common… a shared love of good, local foods. For those of you who are not familiar with Twitter, it is a social networking site on the Internet that allows members to write anything they want in 140 characters or less. Who reads these updates, you may ask? Anyone who subscribes to your account can read what you have written. This allows people to follow others with common interests and maybe something interesting to say. At the bakery, I tweet updates about what’s going on in the kitchen, what we’re eating, S and anything else I find interesting about food and drink in southern New Jersey. I found out about this “Tweet, Meet, Greet, and Eat” at the Tortilla Press through my network of foodies, and I was thrilled to see that it was planned for a Monday evening (one of the few evenings I generally have free). I’d never been to the Tortilla Press but had heard much about it through traditional press, Twitter, and word of mouth. Since Collingswood has a wonderful reputation for having good restaurants, it was a perfect excuse to check it out. On the evening of the event, Jill and I arrived early so that we could talk to Chef Mark Smith, also the proprietor of the restaurant. The restaurant was positioned on a corner lot, and large windows opened right into the dining room from the sidewalk. The dining room was consequently filled with fresh air and light, which shone on the weathered, wood floor… my kind of place. Chef Mark greeted us, and we exchanged pleasantries. He made Jill and I some killer margaritas with lime juice that was clearly fresh-squeezed. Pretty soon, more people arrived and we found a place to sit at one of the tables set for our group. It was great to meet some of the people that I’d developed a “virtual” relationship with, and so we immediately hit it off as good food began to arrive at our table. The first appetizers to arrive were little chicken taquitos (moist chicken tightly wrapped in a tortilla and deep fried), as well as homemade tortilla chips with delicious freshly made tomato salsa and the Tortilla Press’ famous guacamole. The guacamole was fantastic—creamy, wellseasoned and bright green. It’s been a long time since I’ve had a good guacamole, and eating this spread brought back memories. A dishwasher, Poli, from a former job in San Francisco, made it for me from scratch on special occasions. Yum. After a discussion about Twitter and how we all use it in our lives and businesses, it was time for dinner to start. Chef Mark had created a menu just for the occasion for the ridiculously low price of $15 each. Continued on next page QUESO OR GUACAMOLE QUESO OR GUACAMOLE with this ad FREE SIDE OF Since 1957 Strawberry Ice Cream Pies $6.95 Custard HOALWAYS FREERE CKSALSA! MEW CHIPS AND ER WITH 856-825-3525 FREE**Side with purchase of HOME WRECKER** Union Lake Crossing 2188 N. 2nd Street. MLV 9 Non-Fat Sugar Free Flavors Daily 25 Hand Dip Flavors Flavor Burst • Banana Splits Sundaes • Milkshakes • Volcanoes Hotdog & Soda $1.98 • Small Cones $2.20 Low Carb Soft Serve • Water Ice Come Sit Under Our Gazebo Credit & Debit Card Purchases Now Accepted Open 7 Days • Noon-10pm • 692-2748 1231 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | the grapevine { 33 } Mon. to Fri.6am-2pm Sat.-Sun.7am-1pm Dungeness Crabs Every Wednesday Comes with pasta red or white, salad, garlic bread $ 4940 Landis Ave• Vineland, NJ 08360 1999 . (856) 691-8051 Continued from previous page For the first course, I went with the “sliced Jersey tomato salad with red onion and grilled queso cheese drizzled with cilantro vinaigrette.” It was as good as it sounds; the tomatoes were sweet and cool, which contrasted against the warm queso blanco. Although I don’t like cilantro if it’s overdone, I found the vinaigrette to be refreshing. The second course was a “grilled chicken breast with Jersey peach salsa.” It was served with a creamy chipotle sweet potato casserole, which was the hit of the evening. The sweet potatoes were tender, sweet and vibrantly orange and the chipotle pepper added a spicy kick. Jill got a cheese-stuffed poblano pepper, breaded, fried, and served with rice and beans. I was proud to tell my table of locavores that the pepper was from Vineland’s Flaim Farm. Finally, we got coffee and dessert. Hot java and a Jersey blueberry and peach cobbler with crumb topping, served with vanilla ice cream; it hit the spot after a long evening of eating and tweeting. I Stephen Wilson along with his wife Jill McClennen owns The Sweet Life Bakery. You may contact him via e-mail at thesweetlifebakery@verizon.net. EATING OUT From fine dining to lunch spots to bakeries, the area has choices to satisfy any appetite. Call for hours. Amato’s Restaurant, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 692-5756. Veal, chicken, seafood, and pasta specialties for dinner. Open for lunch, too. Closed Sundays. Andrea Trattoria, 1833 Harding Hwy., Newfield, 697-8400. Chef/owner Andrea Covino serves up Italian specialties in an atmosphere of fine dining. Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave, Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food served tapas style, specialty martinis, catering, private parties. Extensive wine list. Live music Friday nights. Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-0909. This breakfast and lunch spot offers a menu of sandwiches named for colleges near and far. Bain’s Deli, 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. Come in for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Daily specials include coffee of the day. Barbera’s Chocolates on Occasion, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 690-9998. Homemade chocolates and candies, cus- tom gift baskets. Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees, desserts, drink specials. Take-out, too. Happy Hour buffet Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. MLB games on flat-screen TVs. Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy., Vineland, 697-5500. Steaks, veal, chicken dishes. Meet friends at the bar. Open daily for lunch and dinner. Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 205-0012. Featuring the “Gutbuster” a 21-oz. burger, pizza, salads, wings, subs, dinners. Bojo’s Ale House, 222 N. High St., Millville, 327-8011. All food is homemade, including the potato chips. Casa Dori II, Brewster Rd. and Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 794-1888. Authentic Italian, lunch and dinner; catering available. Crust N Krumbs Bakery, Main and Magnolia rds., 690-1200. Cakes, pies, cookies, breads, and doughnuts. Custom wedding cakes, too. Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call for lunch and dinner specials. Soft ice cream and cakes year-round. Mon.-Sat 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 696-1900. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Takeout, too. Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. Open 24 hours. Kids eat free Tues. & Sat. Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave., Vineland, 691-5511. Family time-honored recipes, fresh ingredients. Donkey’s Place, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland, 690-1777. One-of-a-kind cheesesteaks made on large, fresh poppyseed rolls. Dreamz Cafe, 2184 Union Lake Crossing, Millville, 765-5029. Panini, sandwiches, salads, soups. Also, gelato, Italian coffee, desserts, smoothies, and frappuccino. Esposito’s Maplewood III, 200 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks, seafood and pasta dishes at this Italian restaurant. Eric’s, 98 S. West Ave., Vineland, 205-9800. Greek and American cuisine. Pizza, too. Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. & Tuckahoe Rd., Vineland, 691-6080. Italian cuisine and dinner buffets to savor. Family-owned. Fresh Restaurant, 1405 Mays Landing Rd., Millville, 327-3435. Jumbo lump crabcakes, Black Angus burgers. Wed. is pasta night. Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli, 527 S. Brewster Rd., 697-3509. Name says it all. Daily specials, catering. Closed Sunday. The OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Top Banana DIV. OF ZUKERMAN FOODS Wholesale Outlet Wheat Road & Delsea Drive, Vineland • 641-0815 HOURS: Mon. – Thurs. 9-6:30; Friday 9-6; Sat. 9-6; Sun. 11-5 1853 Vine Rd. Vineland 691-4848 Fax: 856-691-2294 Specials For August 12-15 EBT marcaccimeats@verizon.net Sale 8/12/09 to 8/16/09 Major Credit Cards Accepted NOW ACCEPTING E.B.T. CARDS!!! EGGS & MILK LOW PRICE ALWAYS! Ready to pick up. Easy shop by Phone or Fax 641-0813 TOMATOES Cauliflower Watermelon JUMBO HEAD $3.99 49¢ $1.99 each Lb. each JERSEY FRESH JUMBO SNO WHITE SEEDLESS COKE { 34 } the grapevine | AUGUST 12, 2009 SPRITE, DR. PEPPER, FANTA, SEAGRAMS, ZERO 2 Lt. 99¢ ROSENBERGER’S ONIONS $1.49 3 Lb. Bag FRESH LEAN FRESH BEEF CHICKEN PICNICS CUBES AVERAGE (3-3.5 lb) WHOLE AVERAGE (8-10 lb) GROUND FREE FIELD FRESH WRAPPED ICEBERG LETTUCE 2 FOR $1 .99 ¢ lb. .99 2 ¢ $ 69 lb. 2 lb. FARM FRESH GRADE A MILK WHOLE – 2% – 1% EGGS Extra Large $ FULL GALLON 2.89 $ 1.29 Doz. BEEF BREAKFAST BONE IN SHORT SAUSAGE LINKS PORK LOIN RIBS $ 99 $ 79 WHOLE lb. Come in and check out our great selections and prices on all your Bar B Q Meats! 1 $ 49 lb. 1 lb. SHOP SMART • SAVE SMART • EAT SMART General Custard’s Last Stand, 2578 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 696-2992. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner served Tues.-Sat. Gina’s Ristorante, 110 N. High St., Millville, 825-4241. Italian cuisine, lunch and dinner, BYOB, nothing over $20. Giorgio’s Restaurant 363 E. Wheat Rd., Buena, 697-2900. Serving lunch and dinner daily. Italian cuisine, pizza. Giovanni’s Italian-American Deli. 1102 N. East Ave., Vineland, 692-0459. Pizza, Italian subs, all your lunch favorites. The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf Course, 4049 Italia Rd., Vineland, 691-5558. Restaurant and lounge open to the public for lunch Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Jake’s. 611 Taylor Rd., Franklinville, 694-5700. Italian-American, served lakeside. Lunch, dinner, happy hour, Sunday brunch. Joe’s Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-8860. Barbecue and Kosher chickens, homemade sides, catering for all occasions. Kawa Thai & Sushi, 2196 N. Second St. (Rt.47), Millville, 825-9939. Thai and Japanese cuisine. BYOB. Landicini’s Family Restaurant & Pizzeria Landis and Lincoln aves., Vineland, 691-3099. Italian cuisine, gourmet pizza salads. Open for lunch and dinner. Larry’s II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-9001. Three meals daily. Sunday breakfast buffet, early-bird dinners. Library V Restaurant, 206 Rt. 54, Buena, 697-9696. Renowned for prime rib, steaks, seafood, salad bar. Closed Mon. and Tues. La Locanda Pizzeria & Ristorante, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 794-3332. Pasta, veal, chicken. Lunch and dinner. Closed Sun. Lucia’s Ristorante, 785 W. Sherman Ave., Vineland, 692-0300. Italian fine dining and regional cooking. Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 563-0030. ItalianAmerican cuisine, seafood and veal. Open daily for lunch and dinner, Sunday breakfast buffet. Manny & Vic’s, 1687 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 696-3100. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Manny’s Pizza, 426 N. High St., Millville, 327-5081. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Martino’s Trattoria & Pizzeria, 2614 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 692-4448. Brick oven pizza, risotto, polenta. Three meals daily. Merighi’s Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. Banquet/wedding facility as well as intimate restaurant. Nicky G. Fridays 9 p.m.–midnight. Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s Head rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet lunches and dinners in a casual setting. Moe’s Southwest Grill, 2188 N. 2nd St., Millville, 825-3525. Tex-Mex, burritos, catering. MVP Bar, 408 Wheat Road, Vineland, 697-9825. Full bar menu, live entertainment, drink specials. Neptune Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge, 1554 South Delsea Drive, Vineland, 6922800. Live lobsters, seafood, prime rib, steak, cocktails and wine. Next Oar, 127 N. High St., Millville, 2931360. Weekly menu, made-to-order dishes. Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek cuisine—lamb dishes and salads. Paperwaiter Restaurant & Pub, 1111 Village Dr., Millville, 825-4000. A special place for all your special occasions. Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland, 694-0500. Breakfast, lunch, dinner specials; convenient drive-thru, minimeal specials. Pete’s Pizza, 20 W. Park Ave., Vineland, 205-9998. Pizza (including whole wheat), subs, wings. Open daily 11 a.m-10 p.m. The Rail, 1252 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-1440. Bar and restaurant with daily drink specials and lunch specials. Richland House, 1303 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-5700. Eclectic dinners and casual lunch fare. Closed Mondays. Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville, 3278878. Authentic Vietnamese—noodle soups, curry, hotpot, Buddhist vegetarian. Serene Custard, NW Blvd. and Garden Rd., Vineland, 692-1104. Pulled pork, hot dogs, homemade ice cream, party cakes. South Vineland Tavern, 2350 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-7888. Breakfast, lunch, dinner daily. Seafood and prime rib. Speedway Cafe at Ramada Vineland, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 692-8600. Open 6 a.m.-11 p.m. daily for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Steakhouse at Centerton Country Club, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3325. Lunch and dinner. Steaks, reserve wines, upscale casual. Stewart’s Root Beer, 585 Delsea Dr., Vineland, 696-8062. Burgers, hot dogs, fries, floats and shakes. Continued on next page Experience The Difference CASINO & RESTAURANT WORKERS RESTAURANT • LOUNGE • BAKERY ! NOW OPEN ATTENTION Finally, Shoes You Can Work ALL Day In! Slip Resistant & Water Resistant Enter to Win WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | A FREE Pair of SAS Shoes (enter inside store) Drawing 9/22/09! Sunday Breakfast Buffet 8am-2pm • Starting July 26th Serving Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Take Out Available 613 A East Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08360-8093 (856) 691-2329 Monday-Friday 3-6pm Reduced Drinks Appetizers Join Us For Happy Hour Try Our Fabulous Cakes And Treats From Our $ 3513 Delsea Drive • Vineland • 856-765-5977 • Fax 856-825-0707 Major Credit Cards Accepted • Gift Certificates Available Hours: 10 am – 2 am Mon.-Fri. • 8 am-2 pm Sat. & Sun. Bakery Of SAS Shoes Expiration: 9/5/09 15 Pair OFF Any the grapevine { 35 } Continued from previous page Sweet Life Bakery, 601 East Landis Ave., Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood bakery. Homemade pastries, cakes, coffee. Tony Sopranos, 107 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 405-0200. Pizza, Mexican Southwest fare, Atkins-friendly salads. Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs, chicken, fish, steaks. Always clams, eat in or take out service. Villa Filomena, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena Vista, 697-7107. Dinner combos, grilled meats, fish. Lunch and dinner daily. Wheat Road Cold Cuts, 302 Wheat Rd., Vineland, 697-0320. Deli and catering. Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-8899. Dinners, grilled sandwiches, wings in eight flavors. Willmott’s Pizza. 12 S. Seventh St., Vineland, 696-1525. Hand-tossed pizzas, stromboli, breakfast pizza. Offering Take-out or eat in service. Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville, 327-0909. Continental cuisine and spirits served in a casually upscale setting. Ye Olde Centerton Inn, 1136 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3201. American classics served in a building right out of a Rockwell painting. I Recipe Corner { LISA ANN DiNUNZIO } Recipe Swap Fresh Jersey tomatoes star in this recipe for homemade sauce. reetings! As an Italian, I love homemade tomato sauce. Actually, in my house we call it “spaghetti or pasta sauce,” but I have also heard it called “gravy.” I have heard many people say that only ItalianAmericans call it gravy, whereas people living in Italy call it sauce. I know it has a lot to do with what we remember from childhood, and where we were born or raised, but however you title it, one thing is for sure—there’s nothing like homemade “sauce” or “gravy” to go over your favorite pasta. So enjoy this recipe…and Mangia! This story and recipe were submitted by Louisa Lugo, who writes “I read about the request for recipes using up produce from home gardens. This is a recipe I make every summer. I actually make it several times a week to jar and give to family and friends, G and all they have to do is come home from a long day at work, boil their favorite pasta and warm up the sauce for a quick meal made with fresh tomatoes right from my garden.” Homemade Tomato Sauce ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil 1 onion, chopped 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped 10 -12 fresh Italian plum tomatoes, diced 3 tbs. water 1 tsp. sugar Pinch of crushed red pepper flakes Salt and ground pepper, to taste A few leaves of fresh basil, chopped water. Add sugar, crushed pepper flakes, and season well with salt and pepper. Add the basil and cook for 30 minutes. Press tomatoes through a food mill to remove seeds or puree in a food processor. Serve over favorite cooked, drained pasta. As always, Bon Appetit. I Lisa Ann is the author of Seasoned With Love, Treasured Recipes and Lisa Ann’s Seasoned With Love II. Send recipes for publication to lapd1991@aol.com or to The Grapevine, 3660 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08361. Heat olive oil in a medium saucepan. Add onion and cook over medium heat till translucent. Stir in garlic, tomatoes and Fresh Picked Corn Daily! Order Your Plum Tomatoes For Canning! Vineland’s Mexican Night – $1 TACOS $5 Margaritas $2 Coronas Unlimited Pasta Night – $10.95 { 36 } the grapevine | AUGUST 12, 2009 Bring In Your Gently Used Bag Full of Bags & Receive WE RECYCLE BAGS! 2 lbs of FREE PICKLES! With This Coupon (cannot be combined with any other offers) Exp: 8/18/09 MONDAY NIGHT neighborhood bakery, where everything is made from scratch and quality counts. 3460 Oak Rd, Vineland • 691-2497 (Between Lincoln & Brewster) • 8AM to 6PM TUESDAY NIGHT Italian Seafood Buffet – $13.95 SHRIMPFEST – Starting at 3 pm Starting at $9.95 8 am – 1 pm WEDNESDAY NIGHT THURSDAY NIGHT a 6th street between Landis and Elmer in Downtown Vineland 856-692-5353 www.thesweetlifebakery.com SUNDAY BREAKFAST BUFFET $ 00 Adults: $8.95 Children 10 & Under $5.95 2 OFF 856-563-0030 west40autodetailing.vpweb.com (Bluebell Rd & Rt. 40 Vineland) Try our award-winning Chocolate Chip Cookies the best in South Jersey, according to the most recent SJ Magazine annual readers’ poll Auto Detailing & Headlight Restora on WEST 40 (856) 305-2884 947 North Delsea Dr. Vineland, NJ 08360 Newly Renovated & Open All Summer The Best Sushi Bar in Cumberland County Beer Garden Let BJ’s Cook for You Tonight! To Place an order Call (856)825-8123 Now serving soft serve and water ice BYOB Best of the Best 2009 RIBS BJ Roasers Ribs are barbequed in our own Zesty Sauce Served Fri. & Sat. only after 4 while supplies last! FULL RACK (BBQ on side)..$17.99 HALF RACK (BBQ on ribs)..$9.99 RIB PLATTER (BBQ on ribs)..$10.99 Rib Platter Only Served with 2 side items OF THE Daily Specials Breakfast & Lunch Mon.-Sat. 8-3 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Come Check Out Our Popular Under $15 Menu Including: Dinner Thurs. – Sat. 5-8 Stuffed Peppers-Pork Ribs-Stuffed Shells Rosemary Chicken-Pub Steak AFTER 5:00 BAR SPECIALS Chinese & Japanese Cuisine BEST BEST RIBS BEST OF THE BEST 2009 WINGS BEST OF THE BEST WINGS Offering a New Dinner Menu for 2009 Always Fresh, Never Over-priced 12 Pak..$7.99 25 Pak..$13.99 50 Pak..$22.99 100 Pak..$38.99 Hot Sauce and Blue Cheese served on the side MONDAY-THURSDAY 10% OFF ANY REGULAR PURCHASE (minimum purchase $15) w/this coupon-Not Valid w/other offer-GVN-Expires 8/30/09 The Looking Glass Cafe is Millville Arts Districts’ Original and Longest Running Casual Dining Establishment Catering On- and Off-Premises Available for Your Special Event 231 N. High Street (corner of High & Mulberry Sts) Millville, NJ 08332 16 N. High St. Millville NJ 08332 856-327-1666 Sunday $1.00 Slider $5.00 Martini menu Monday $1.00 Hot Dog $5.00 Dog Fish Head 60 minute IPA 20 oz Tuesday $1.00 Taco’s $5.00 Margarita’s Wednesday $1.00 Sloppy Joe’s $5.00 Long Island Iced Tea Thursday $1.00 Pizza $5.00 Import/Micro 20 oz. Friday & Saturdays Live Entertainment 856-293-1200 123 North High St. Millville, NJ Coming Soon Hibachi Japanese Steak House • Catering • Banquet Facilities/Wedding Reception • Eat In/Take Out & Delivery We deliver min. $25-$30 Hours: Open 7 Days A Week M-Th: 11am-10pm Fri & Sat: 11am-11pm Sunday: 12 noon-10pm (856) 765-1818 Fax: (856) 765-0588 WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | 101 E Main St. Millville, NJ 08332 Gypsy Smokehouse Tues.- Sun. 11am-7pm Closed Monday Served with celery & Blue cheese BBQ, Honey Mustard, Mild (Spicy) Medium (Hot), Hot (Very Hot), Insane (Need we explain) Beef Brisket, Pulled Pork, Pulled Chicken, Smoked Sausage Served S.O.S. (Sauce On Side) All Platters include sandwich, cornbread & 2 sides BBQ Extended Hours on Fridays & Weekends All Summer Long! 19 E. Oak Street Millville, NJ Phone: 856-327-1000 Fax: 856-327-1009 WINGS 10/15/20/25 Pieces Seasoned & Smoked until they are fall off the bone tender! Served Wet (Sauced), Dry (No Sauce) and S.O.S. All Platters include sandwich, cornbread & 2 sides Half Rack or Full Rack RIBS the grapevine { 37 } ! ”      Open ’Til 9:00 Every Friday MyArtMyMillville.com REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS The following transactions of $1,000 or more were filed with Cumberland County in the month of June 2009 (transactions may have occurred in an earlier month). Names listed may, in some cases, be those of buyers’ or sellers’ representatives. MAURICE RIVER TWP 4099 Route 47., Patricia L Harris to Amber Moore on 6/16/09 for $179,000 Route 47, James A Anderson to Victor Colon, Jr. on 6/29/09 for $32,000 5064 Route 49, Stormi Hoffman (Adm.) to Stormi Hoffman on 6/30/09 for $356,547 BRIDGETON 370 Bank St., Countrywide Home Loans Inc. to BSL Real Estate LLC on 6/16/09 for $20,000 52 York St., Frankie Cruz to Josue Aparicio on 6/17/09 for $111,000 56 S East Ave., Vincent J Parenti, Sr. to Tranquilino Soto on 6/22/09 for $73,500 14 Timber Rd., William R Kinney to Luzmila McHale on 6/23/09 for $105,000 217 S Pine St., City of Bridgeton to Lawrence F Brown on 6/30/09 for $5,000 to C&D General Contracting LLC on 6/25/09 for $45,000 FAIRFIELD TWP 26 Blew Valley Ln., Alfred F Gentile, Jr. to Robert C Thompson on 6/18/09 for $195,000 MILLVILLE 903 D St., Gwendlyn K Fagotti to Marilyn Barratt on 6/16/09 for $82,500 471 Rhonda Drive., Elizabeth Marie Heichel (Exec.) to Joseph M Clark on 6/16/09 for $155,000 1202 Mulberry St., Karen G Balicki to Tai-Yon Anderson on 6/17/09 for $162,900 2318 Mistletoe Ln., Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. (by Atty.) to Keith Wildin on 6/17/09 for $169,000 212 S 5th St., Nationstar Mortgage LLC (by Atty.) to Mahmoud Zayyad on 6/19/09 for $39,375 519 Sharp St., Gustave Vastardis (Adm.) to Richard R Bailey on 6/22/09 for $25,000 2 Emily Dr., Ann M Helle to Bernard Jones, Jr. on 6/22/09 for $235,000 201 N 11th St., Frederick A Jacob (Exec.) to Ralph L Whilden on 6/26/09 for $148,900 GREENWICH TWP 873 Ye Greate St., Dale A Lodge to Susan D Cummins on 6/18/09 for $195,000 HOPEWELL TWP 29 Lakeside Dr., Tracy DeBiaso (Exec.) to Alice M Youse on 6/18/09 for $132,500 28 Hopewell Rd., Jeffrey A White (Exec.) to Jacob W Roser on 6/19/09 for $125,000 COMMERCIAL TWP 1990 Strawberry Ave., Bernadine Reed (Ind. Exec.) to James Chando on 6/24/09 for $225,000 7210 Ackley Rd., Norman H Lore to Linette Langowski on 6/29/09 for $60,000 129 Sandalwood Rd., Household Finance Corp. III to Robert H Watson on 6/29/09 for $85,000 LAWRENCE TWP Lexington Ave., Clyde H Lynch to Edwin F Kozuba, Jr. on 6/17/09 for $6,000 205 Factory Rd., Daniel M Miller to Michael S Hickman on 6/18/09 for $40,000 DOWNE TWP 175 Bayview Rd., Downe Meadows LLC With rates at historic lows, now is a great time to buy a new home or consider refinancing your existing mortgage. For unparalleled service, great rates and a variety of financing options, call Blaise R. Menzoni. FHA • VA • Conventional LET THE NUMBERS DO THE TALKING WE ARE #1! Maturo Realty sold more real estate in the 1st Half of 2009 than any other Cumberland County real estate office* * Stats gathered from SJSRMLS Sold Units from 1-1-09 thru 6-30-09. Thomas F. Maturo, Broker. Time is Running Out!!! … for the $8,000 CREDIT for Qualified First-Time Home Buyers. To qualify, you must purchase and settle a home before November 30, 2009. Call Maturo Realty, Inc. 856-696-2255 for more details and let one of our experienced, professional agents find a home for you today… { 38 } the grapevine | AUGUST 12, 2009 Blaise Menzoni LOAN OFFICER Gateway Funding DMS, LP Office 856.692.9494 Fax 856.691.3687 Cell 856.297 .7087 …BEFORE TIME RUNS OUT… 1 17 E. Landis Ave • Suite C • Vineland, NJ 08360 1 Licensed by NJ department of Banking and Insurance 856-696-CALL (2255) www. Opening Doors to Home Ownership 506 Brian Ave., Daniel W Malone, Sr. to James Cathey, III on 6/29/09 for $160,000 4 Osprey Dr., Kristen B Schmidt (Adm.) to Stephen Young on 6/29/09 for $250,000 UPPER DEERFIELD 71 Cornwell Dr., Kenneth L Clark to Township of Upper Deerfield on 6/26/09 for $222,500 VINELAND 2877 Bryant St., Tribeca Lending Corp. to Waca Investments LLC on 6/16/09 for $155,000 2296 S Lincoln Ave., Charlie Lusinski to Jacob E Fransko on 6/16/09 for $165,000 564 Mayfair St., Louis G Rubino (Exec.) to Emeterio Bermudez, Jr. on 6/16/09 for $165,000 1252 Livia Ln., Landmark Development No. 4 LLC to Jeremias J Bermudez on 6/16/09 for $243,315 2440 Valhalla Rd., Ahmed Shahzad to Gurdev S Dhaliwal on 6/16/09 for $435,000 111 Highland Ave., Lohmann Animal Health International Inc. to Nutri-Mack LP on 6/16/09 for $1,300,000 1038 New Pear St., William J Gruman to Steffeny Grillo on 6/17/09 for $159,000 790 Becker Dr., Linda L Schaefer to Judith Viera on 6/17/09 for $165,000 1217 Livia Ln., Landmark Development No. 4 LLC to Luis G Rodriguez on 6/17/09 for $204,500 3071 E Chestnut Ave., Kejzman Realty LLC to O’Rourke Equities LLC on 6/17/09 for $210,000 22 W Almond St., Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. (Trust, by Atty.) to Milagros Oquendo on 6/19/09 for $114,000 1681 N Valley Rd., John L Caselli, Sr. to Big Oak Investments LLC on 6/19/09 for $120,000 2291 Delmar Ave., Beazer Homes Corp. to Stephanie R Waters on 6/22/09 for $251,900 2498 Simonelli Rd., Tradition Homes at Vineland LLC to NVR Inc. (DBA) on 6/23/09 for $77,500 220 Doren Terr., Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. (Trust, by Atty.) to Damian Salas on 6/24/09 for $100,000 1035 Cambridge Pl., Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. (Trust, by Atty.) to Leon Houser on 6/24/09 for $116,000 1191 N East Ave., Gilbert W Reinheimer, Jr. to Jonathan Perez on 6/25/09 for $167,000 3049 Cedarbrook Ct., Timothy D Hullihen to Raymond Torres on 6/25/09 for $188,000 1674 W Walnut Rd., Sec. of Housing & Urban Development (by Atty.) to Nikolay Krivosheyev on 6/26/09 for $115,000 735 S Main Rd., James Schermerhorn (Exec.) to Falasca Holding LLC on 6/26/09 for $148,000 Panther/Dante &C., Beverly Smaniotto to Michael Sikking on 6/26/09 for $179,559 732 E Almond St., Pantaleone Mercurio to Jose L Mercado on 6/29/09 for $97,000 1964 E Oak Rd., Ivan Perez to Darya C Feldman on 6/29/09 for $135,000 1970 Sunset Ave., Entrustcama FBO to Lisa Clement on 6/29/09 for $136,000 1964 E Oak Rd., Carmela Trzeciak to Danielle Madden on 6/29/09 for $144,000 1764 Tomahawk St., NVR Inc. (DBA) to David L Decasien on 6/29/09 for $211,405 3155 Swan Dr., Robert M Evans to Benjamin Denman on 6/29/09 for $249,000 1301 W Forest Grove Rd., BDGS Inc. to 1301 Forest Grove LLC on 6/29/09 for $1,473,094 2792 E Landis Ave., Redcrest Fields LLC to Jamie M Volpe on 6/30/09 for $272,000 Perfect Starter Homes! PERFECT RANCHER What a beauty! This perfect rancher consists of 3 large Bedrooms, 1.5 Baths, wood floors in bedrooms and living room, completely remodeled bathroom, large dining room, tiled eat in kitchen, 2 car attached garage, finished basement family room with a fireplace and lets not forget the large fenced in back yard. CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIVATETOUR!!! Vineland LIKE BRAND NEW This 3 Bedroom rancher is like brand new. Large eat-in Kitchen, 2 full Baths, Basement nice and high with Family room, sits on almost 2 Acres. Home seems small but is very deceiving. Vineland OPEN FLOOR PLAN This 3 Bedroom Home has an open floor plan, huge walk-in attic substitute for crawl space, large master bath, Washer and Dryer on first floor, porch in the front perfect for enterainment. Vineland 4 LARGE BEDROOMS WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | This is one spectacular home. 4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths. Wood floors in Dining Room, tile floors in eat-in Kitchen, and Hallway. Laundry on first floor. Above ground pool is less than one year old. Concrete pad, covered with large awning off the Kitchen patio door, excellent for entertaining. 9′ garage doors. Call Listing Agent for more details! Vineland Call Me Today (609) 501-2340 CARMEN MINGUELA Realtor / Associate Bilingual Circle of Excellence, 2003 thru 2008 the grapevine { 39 } Graham Realty • 1101 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08360 Business (856) 606-0696 ext 107 Fax: (856) 691-3020 CMINGUELA@AOL.COM Clifford Graham broker of record CALL VISIT PLAY 1234 All Summer Long At Our New West Landis Avenue Branch Now, those living or working on both sides of Vineland can enjoy the full banking services that have made our 175 S. Main Road headquarters Cumberland County’s fastest growing bank. Call 691-1234 to learn more. Or better yet, visit 1234 W. Landis during our Endless Summer Fridays 2. While you’re at our new branch, meet our professional staff and enter to win $1234 in the Capital moneycard grand prize drawing.† NEW BRANCH NOW OPEN At 1234 West Landis Avenue Next to the Wal-Mart Supercenter 2.02% APY* NOW Checking Account No minimum balance or monthly fees. Free logo checks. Unlimited check writing. No fee ATM/Debit card. Lobby Hours Both Locations: Monday – Wednesday: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM Thursday & Friday: 8:30 AM – 6:00 PM Saturday: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM Drive-Thru Hours Both Locations: Monday – Thursday: 8:00 AM – 6:00 PM Friday: 8:00 AM – 7:00 PM Saturday: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM Or Anytime at CapitalBankNJ.com Plus! Spin The Endless Summer Fridays 2 Wheel of Prizes and Win! Opening any new account at either Capital branch during our Endless Summer Fridays 2 gets you a spin of the wheel for the chance to win a beach towel, hibachi, cooler bag, or camp chair. Se Habla Español All rates are guaranteed through December 31, 2009. Offer may be withdrawn at any time without previous notice. Fees may reduce earnings. *Annual Percentage Yield (APY). Interest rate may vary. Limitations may apply. †You need not open an account to play or win, nor do you need to be present at the time of the drawing to win. Drawing date: Friday, September 4, 2009. All federal, state and local tax liabilities and gratuities are winner’s responsibility. Our Focus Is You. 175 S. Main Road & 1234 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland, NJ • 856.690.1234 Member FDIC

Posted on August 4th, 2009 by by Mike

August 5, 2009

INSIDE OFF TO COLLEGE • HOME & GARDEN • IDOLS IN A.C. • PEACH CRUMBLE VOLUME 2 | ISSUE 26 | AUGUST 5, 2009 CONNECTING YOU { VINCE FARINACCIO } T O V I N E L A N D . W E E K L Y. Visit us online www.grapevinenewspaper.com This Saturday, the town marks 148 years since Landis drove the first stake. hen Vineland founder Charles K. Landis drove the stake at the center of town on August 8, 1861, he brought his city into existence with a mythic grandeur the Ancient Greeks would envy. Yet, that iconic moment was the easiest part of creating his utopia. The most daunting of his work lay ahead. Vineland was unlike other places, its identity already forged by the time the hammer’s downward swing at the spot now known as the Boulevard and Landis Avenue plunged the stake into the ground and laid claim to a vision. When the dust settled, it was time to create just the right conditions to nurture this dream. According to Landis’ account, the remainder of August and the months of September and October were spent on several crucial projects that filled this short frame of time with considerable work. The first was the completion of the mile-and-ahalf stretch of Landis Avenue to what was then known as Horse Bridge Road, today’s Main Road. Landis saw this as vital in drawing prospective settlers and even delayed promoting Vineland while work was being done. The only problem posed by the project was the surveyor’s attitude, blatantly displayed in his “sarcastic questions and remarks” and “unfeigned astonishment.” Landis anticipated such reactions and writes that “I might expect a good deal of this for some time to come, and I hoped that as he [the surveyor] saw people buying land and improving it after a while this would wear off.” In order to secure ownership of all the land that would become Vineland as well as the township named after him, Continued on page 10 W Best Big Sister Local woman earns state’s Big Sister Award. The New Jersey Big Brothers Big Sisters Foundation recently presented their 2009 Big Brother and Big Sister of the Year Awards. The Big Sister Award was presented to Jill Estell from the Cumberland and Salem Counties Big Brother Big Sister Agency. Estell and her Little Sister Amanda have been matched since September 2006. Estell’s unwavering commitment to spend time with Amanda every week is one of the reasons she received the award. Amanda credits Jill with helping her stay focused in school. “If I ever have a problem, I go to her and she helps me,” Amanda says. “Jill is the coolest person, she’s funny and I love hanging out with her. Everything we do is fun.” Learn more by visiting the organization’s web site at www.bbbsnj.org. Frank Amari, Jr., President of the Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society, will welcome guests on Saturday for Vineland’s 148th Birthday Party/Open House. CALL VISIT PLAY NEW BRANCH NOW OPEN            All Summer Long At Our New West Landis Avenue Branch 1234 2.02% APY* NOW Checking Account No minimum balance or monthly fees. Free logo checks. Unlimited check writing. No fee ATM/Debit card. Now, those living or working on both sides of Vineland can enjoy the full banking services that have made our 175 S. Main Road headquarters Cumberland County’s fastest growing bank. Call 691-1234 to learn more. Or better yet, visit 1234 W. Landis during our Endless Summer Fridays 2. While you’re at our new branch, meet our professional staff and enter to win $1234 in the Capital moneycard grand prize drawing.† All rates are guaranteed through December 31, 2009. Offer may be withdrawn at any time without previous notice. Fees may reduce earnings. *Annual Percentage Yield (APY). Interest rate may vary. Limitations may apply. †You need not open an account to play or win, nor do you need to be present at the time of the drawing to win. Drawing date: Friday, September 4, 2009. All federal, state and local tax liabilities and gratuities are winner’s responsibility. Plus! Spin The Endless Summer Fridays 2 Wheel of Prizes and Win! Opening any new account at either Capital branch during our Endless Summer Fridays 2 gets you a spin of the wheel for the chance to win a beach towel, hibachi, cooler bag, or camp chair. Our Focus Is You. 175 S. Main Road & 1234 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland, NJ • 856.690.1234 Member FDIC Landscaping • Lawn Cutting • Fertilizing Garden Center • Mushroom Compost Mulch • Top Soil • Fill Dirt • Stone Irrigation Repairs & Installation • Pool Sand Snow Removal • Winter Salt in Bulk NOW OPEN 3.5% SALES TAX FRUIT • PRODUCE • DELI • SANDWICHES 1362 S. Delsea Dr. Vineland • 856-362-5978 Delivery Available { 2 } the grapevine | AUGUST 5, 2009 PEPPERED HAM HONEY CURED TURKEY BREAST AMERICAN CHEESE DIETZ & WATSON DIETZ & WATSON DIETZ & WATSON DELI SPECIALS DIETZ & WATSON Dietz & Watson Meats and Cheeses $ Featuring (next to T& F Camera) LARGE JERSEY TOMATOES…50¢ lb. RED & WHITE GRAPES…..$100 lb. MANGO’S….$500 Box or 80¢ea EXTRA FANCY JERSEY PEACHES..95¢lb. IDAHO POTATOES……..5 lbs/$150 CUCUMBERS…………..3 for 69¢ SEEDLESS WATERMELON.$399ea ROMAINE LETTUCE…..75¢a head RED BELL PEPPERS……..2 lbs/ $200 BLUEBERRIES……..2 Pints for $300 CUBAN PEPPERS……………..79¢lb MILK • EGGS • FRUIT BASKETS LISCIO BAKERY ROLLS • BREAD SPECIALS 4.49 lb. 5.89 lb. 2.59 lb. 5.99 lb. $ $ United Lawn L.L.C. 41 S. Wade Blvd. Millville, NJ 08332 856-327-3212 • Fax: 856-293-9588 BLACK FOREST SMOKED TURKEY BREAST $ Open 7 Days Mon-Sat 8am-7pm Sun 8am-2pm ACK OOL! B CH OS T ds Only! 6 Ki 6 For Dentistry For Children NJ Specialty License #2255 Dr. Michael B. Rulnick D.M.D., P.C. “We’re all about the kids!” 6 State-Of-The-Art Sterilization Dr. Rulnick is a Diplomate of the Ameri can Board of Pediatric Den tistry. This distinction is achieved by only a small number of specialists na tionwide! WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Enjoy Our Friendly Staff Kid-friendly Waiting Area • Full Dental Services For Children & Special Patients • Outpatient Hospital or Surgical Services Available • Certified by the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry • Staff of both the Regional Medical Center & The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Michael B. Rulnick, D.M.D. Pediatric Dentistry 6 Dr. Rulnick has over 25 years of experience practicing pediatric dentistry. Dr. Rulnick is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine. He completed his residency in pediatric dentistry at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. He has lectured in the United States and Europe on the subject of pediatric dentistry. Dr. Rulnick was the first pediatric dentist to bring modern dental care to the operating room at Newcomb Hospital for patients requiring care while under general anesthesia. Gift Certificate Courtesy Consultation And X-Ray Evaluation ($100 Value) Please Present This At Appointment (New Patients Only) Referred By:__________________________________ (Referring Patient Will Receive A $5 Credit Towards Their Bill) the grapevine { 3 } 1450 E. Chestnut Avenue, Bldg. 6 Ste. C • Vineland, New Jersey 08361 PHONE: 856-696-5400 FAX: 856-696-5867 WWW.4KIDS-ONLY.COM • DENTISTRYFORCHILDREN@VERIZON.NET I Editor’s Letter NJ’s New No. 2 Garden State voters to choose first Lt. Governor on Nov. 3 { CONTENTS } 1 Happy Birthday, Vineland It’s time to celebrate—and plan for the big one just two years away. VINCE FARINACCIO 2, 5 6 7 Faces in the News Crossword Less Than Perfect Perfection is a tough row to hoe when it comes to growing fruits and vegetables. DEBORAH A. EIN High Efficiency Heating and Cooling and Water Heating Equipment Eligible for up to $1500 in Federal Tax Credits and up to $400 in Rebates Serving Vineland for over 100 years! 691-1950 State Lic. # 12089 SPECIAL STARTS BACK TO SCHOOL Get the kids in for their haircuts before school starts! { 4 } the grapevine | AUGUST 5, 2009 KIDS HAIRCUTS (cannot be combined with any other offers or specials.) exp 08/31/09 ONLY 8 WOW Get your Loved One A Gift Certificate Today 14 Years & Younger $ Senator Loretta Weinberg of Bergen County. Independent gubernatorial candidate Chris Daggett announced that his running mate will be Kean University history professor and Ocean City native Frank J. Esposito. Why have we changed our state constitution to create this new position in the executive branch of our state government? You may recall that we (New Jersey voters) approved a ballot question in November of 2005 after two elected New Jersey governors in a row left office mid-term, subjecting our state to controversial power shifts twice in four years. To rectify the situation, our representatives in Trenton voted to create the office of Lieutenant Governor. Like our nation’s vice president, this secondin-command office-holder would assume the position of governor if a future state chief executive leaves office before his or her term ends. At the time voters approved the referendum (required to ratify amendments to the state constitution), New Jersey was one of only eight states in the union without a lieutenant governor. Up until now, the State Senate president has assumed the role when a governor has left office during an unexpired term. When Christie Whitman resigned to become President Bush’s first head of the Environmental Protection Agency in early 2001, then-State Senate President Donald DiFrancesco served most of the remainder of her four-year term. Dick Codey became acting governor on November 15, 2004 when Governor James McGreevey’s resignation became effective. Since no provision in our constitution required the Senate President to abdicate his or her legislative post, the result was two acting governors in a four-year span filling both roles (Governor and Senate President), thereby eliminating the prudent separation of powers between the executive and legislative branches of New Jersey government. So we’ve established the fact that not having a Lieutenant Governor has proven problematic in our immediate past. And that certainly justifies the creation of the new position. But our state’s financial situation doesn’t allow for any bureaucratic waste, either. So whoever is elected as New Jersey’s first Lieutenant Governor had better have something very important to do while they’re sitting on the sidelines — a heartbeat away from the Governor’s mansion, Drumthwacket. Realizing this, our state legislators gave the Lt. Guv some specific job duties when they created the position. In January of 2006, the state constitution was amended as follows: “The Governor shall appoint the Lieutenant Governor to serve as the head of a principal department or other executive or administrative agency of State government, or delegate to the Lieutenant Governor duties of the office of Governor, or both. The Governor shall not appoint the Lieutenant Governor to serve as Attorney General. The Lieutenant Governor shall in addition perform such other duties as may be provided by law.” So the winning gubernatorial candidate is now required to place the lieutenant governor in a cabinet-level position. And let’s hope it’s a vital one. After all, the new post solves the problem of succession if future governors step down early. But the last thing we need is another politician in Trenton with a fat salary and an ambiguous job title. In a few short months, New Jersey no longer will be one of the only states in the union without a Lieutenant Governor. The gubernatorial election on November 3 will be historic; marking the first time we’ll choose a Governor with a running mate. The candidates have selected their Lieutenant Governor choices already. Republican candidate Chris Christie was the first to announce his choice for a running mate when he announced last week that Monmouth County Sheriff Kim Guadagno will be his second in command. Governor Jon Corzine followed shortly on Christie’s heals in declaring that his Lieutenant Governor choice on the Democratic ticket is veteran state 8 10 12 14 Letters to the Editor Vintage Vineland Entertainment Birthday Warmup Founder’s Day will be celebrated at the Fresh and Specialty Foods Market on Saturday. TODD NOON 18-21 HOME & GARDEN 22 DINING: What’s for Dinner? An invitation to sup with friends inspires a potluck. STEPHEN WILSON 25 Recipe Corner Peach Crumble is the ideal way to celebrate the peak of the peach season. LISA DINUNZIO 26-27 BACK TO SCHOOL 28 30 Community Calendar REAL ESTATE { STAFF } MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor LORI GOUDIE Art Director GAIL EPIFANIO Controller JACK EPIFANIO Distribution SHERRY MUNYAN Advertising Executive MARIE HALPIN-GALLO Advertising Executive PATTY ALI Graphic Designer MARYANNE BERTRAND Advertising Assistant The Grapevine 3660 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361 PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816 EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com HOURS Mon. – Wed. 9-5pm, Thurs. & Fri. 9-7pm Sat. 8:30-3pm & Sun., 9-1 pm WALK-INS WELCOME! NO APPOINTMENTS NECESSARY 5006 E. Landis Ave.Vineland (856) 691-2202 MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2009. All rights reserved. I Faces in the News Aug. 8, 2009 9am-11:30am RAIN OR SHINE Bazile Named Director of CCC’s University Center Dr. Stanley A. Bazile has been named Director of the Shirlee and Bernard Brown University Center at Cumberland County College. Bazile has experience in both student and academic affairs. He received his B.A. and M.S.W. from Stony Brook University, and Ph.D. in Educational Leadership from Pennsylvania State University. Prior to his appointment here, Bazile served as program director for the S-Plan Mentoring Program at Penn State. Cumberland County College’s 17,423-square-foot university center houses advanced degree programs offered by University Partners: Fairleigh Dickinson University, Franklin University, Georgian Court University, Montclair State University, Rowan University and Wilmington University. Bazile will represent Cumberland County College to the University Center partners in the development of courses and programs that respond to college and regional needs. The University Partnership concept has been thriving at the college for the past several years, with hundreds of students taking bachelor’s and master’s degree courses offered by the University Partners on CCC’s campus. Cumberland is one of only two of New Jersey’s 19 community colleges to open an on-campus university center. 1853 Vine Rd. Vineland 691-4848 Fax: 856-691-2294 marcaccimeats@verizon.net Specials For Aug 1- Aug 8 EBT “I Like That Hat” The Boys & Girls Club of Vineland recently held a Crazy Hat Day as part of its Summer Program being held at the Success Building in Vineland. More than 35 youth are enjoying various arts and crafts, recreation, field trips and themed weeks at the program and were asked to bring in a crazy hat on a particular day in July. The program participants are shown here with several junior counselors that were hired over the summer through a grant from the State of New Jersey’s Department of Children & Families. For more information on the Boys & Girls Club, call 696-4190 or 896-0244. CHICKEN HAMS T-BONE AVERAGE THIGHS (20-25 LB) STEAK $ 49 ¢ $ 99 BONELESS FRESH FRESH CUT WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | 1 lb. .99 lb. lb. 5 lb. More Faces on pages 28 SEND US YOUR FACES — IT’S FREE! Get your photos published in The Grapevine… birthdays, engagements, weddings, anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them the address listed on p. 4. BAR B Q CHUCK PORK ROAST SPARE OUR OWN RIBS $ 49 $199 $599 $ 89 1 Come in and check out our great selections and prices on all your Bar B Q Meats! 3lb. box 2 HOT OR HATFIELD SWEET HOT ITALIAN DOGS SAUSAGE lb. the grapevine { 5 } lb. The Grapevine’s Crossword Puzzle 18 -H o l e C o u r s e H a n d i c a p – A c c e ss i b l e ACROSS 1. Former CIA 4. Seated 7. Cycles per minute 10. 2 or more draft animals 12. Baby carriage 14. Go quickly 15. Snow house 17. Swiss river 18. Metal containers 19. Interference 22. Glides on ice 23. Inner layer of the skin 24. Object of worship 25. Feel ill 26. Manuscript (abbr.) 27. A tall vase 28. Macaws 30. A wooden pin 31. Female swan 32. Atomic #64 33. 13th Hebrew letter 34. Launched Apollo 37. A pleasant odor 40.Surface sheen 42. Home entertainment controller 46. Building plot 47. Movie “____ and the King” 48. Gulf of, in the Aegean 49. One of the Mannings 50. Phonograph record 51. Sodium chloride 52. British air aces 53. Sweet or savory baked pastry 54. Lock opener DOWN 1. About organ of hearing 2. Edible lily bulbs 3. Gazelle hound 4. Practice fights 5. Biblical name for Syria 6. Container weight deduction 7. Fairy tale prince 8. About a conifer 9. Military food hall 11. Atom with a valence of 1 Solution to last week’s puzzle 13. Anthropologist Margaret 16. A cushioned foot stool 18. Tubocurarine 20. Anguilliformes 21. Point midway between S and E 27. Relays recent information 28. Drink taken before a meal 29. Take out 32. ____ly: knotted tree 33. Folder paper 35. Lithuanian basketballer Jasaitis 36. Parka 38. Of I 39. P__ox: contradictory statement 40.Topographic point 41. Cornmeal mush 42. Exploiter 43. Clip 44. Oversees U.S. standards 45. Z____: spicy { 6 } the grapevine | AUGUST 5, 2009 (1) Round of Golf for a Group of 4, FREE Hot Dog or Nachos & (1) FREE Soda – Only $25.00 Hot Dogs• Chili/Cheese • Nachos • Sausage • Sodas & Soft Pretzels Indoor & Patio Seating Gift Certificates Available Wednesday N ig h t S p e c i a l 5pm- close Fund Raising Opportunities for your school or organization Senior Citizen Rates • Visa & Mastercard Accepted $5.00 until 5PM • $6.00 5PM to Close B i r th d a y P a r t y P a c k a g e s 73 Landis Ave. Upper Deerfield Twp. Located next to Rita’s Water Ice YOUR HAIR NEEDS A SPA DAY TOO! Put The Shine & Moisture Back Into Your Hair W i t h B o t a n i c a l H a i r & S c a l p T h e r a p y SM A potent sensory experience and intense repair for hair. It begins with a scalp, neck and shoulder massage—with up to 12 aroma-therapeutic essential oils—to increase scalp circulation while targeting pressure points that release tension. Then hair is treated with one of two intense repair formulas: Moisture Immersion, for up to 71% softer, smoother strands; or Strength Infusion, for up to 71% more resistance to combing breakage. At every step, aroma-therapy elevates, soothes and recharges. Call and schedule your Hair Spa Today! 856-453-PUTT (7888) www.landislinks.com Hours: 11 am-10pm Daily Video Games Back to School Savings Purchase a Liter of Shampoo & Conditioner & Get A Styling Product for 1/2 PRICE! With This Ad – Exp: 8/31/09 (Cannot be combined with any other offers) I Gleanings { DEBORAH A. EIN, MANAGING EDITOR } Less Than Perfect If a few blemishes on fruits and vegetables means fewer pesticides, it’s a tradeoff worth its weight in bushels. I n the Home & Garden section a couple of weeks ago, a Rutgers Extension county agent suggested that homeowners abandon their desire for the perfect or near-perfect lawn in order to lessen adverse impacts on the environment. It’s a tradeoff I am perfectly willing to make. In fact, I am the proud owner of possibly the ugliest lawn on our block. When we moved in a few years ago, my husband lamented the fact that we didn’t have a working sprinkler system. We never had before, either, but I guess it was on his list of what he wanted in a “new” house. We talked about tearing up the lawn, putting in a sprinkler system, and replacing the zoysia with sod…but there just seemed like so many better ways to spend thousands, which we didn’t have anyway. The “perfect lawn” topic reminds me of a debate I always had with my brother over the use of pesticides to grow produce, particularly apples. Thankfully, things have changed somewhat, but it is human nature when you go to the supermarket or a farm market to buy the bestlooking fruit in the pile. Our argument centered on the fact that consumers would not buy a scabby apple or one that was otherwise less than perfect. If the farmer could not produce the perfect apple or tomato or zucchini, the buyer would move on. And let’s face it, pesticides are needed to combat blemished produce. As farmers, my dad and brother deal with that reality every day. I would like to think that things have changed— with increased emphasis on the environment and the advent of organic farming and the marketing of such varieties as the Ugli tomato—but I know better. It will take a true reconnection to farms and the land before we and our kids learn that lesson. A great way to educate kids on this front is to have them help plant and tend a home garden. Being surrounded by farming, I have seen how much waste there is of “perfectly” good produce. You’d think being right there on a farm that we would have the cream of the crop. Not so. That would be like a builder living in a perfectly maintained mansion. When my mother planned to can tomatoes, my father brought in the bushels of “seconds.” Another example: Unmarketable cantaloupes were often our dessert this time of year. And my favorite example: On a sweltering summer day when we were all out in the field helping, my dad would haul a watermelon out of the cold storage. Was it a marketable melon? Never! Maybe it had been dropped and was partially split open, or perhaps a deer had taken a nibble out of one side. Dad would cut it open right there in the field and we would eat the icy cold watermelon smiles. I don’t think I have ever had a sweeter “smile.” So this fact is deeply ingrained in me: A few spots on an apple or a slightly overripe peach does not render the fruit less than perfect. When it comes time to put up my sauce this year, I will seek out the second-grade tomatoes at a farm stand. This week’s recipe (p. 25), Peach Crumble, offers a way to use imperfect peaches, or those that get too ripe before you get around to eating them. Preserving jams is another way to “waste not, want not.” In this week’s Home & Garden section, we list area farm markets where you can find a bounty of locally grown Jersey produce. Just don’t demand perfection. If you want fewer pesticides and a safer environment, you can cast that vote with your produce purchases. Kids, try not to be picky eaters, and parents, look for the ugliest tomatoes you can find. If they’re Jersey tomatoes, you know it will not affect the taste one iota. I FREE Business Checking & FREE Online Business Banking Dial 1-800-690-3440 for more information or see us online at www.newfieldbank.com to sign-up for Online Business Banking. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Real-time Online! the grapevine { 7 } Member FDIC I Letters to the Editor a meal, it’s like going to a transportation museum free and the food is your option. It should be noted that almost all local cruises are free and that makes for an inexpensive outing for everyone. Enjoy one of Summer’s many activities by making plans to visit a classic car cruise. It’s a fun way to bring back memories. —Ben Notaro, Vineland Summer Fun with Old Cars I’ve been an automobile aficionado for many years. My passion for cars really became ignited in 1963 with the introduction of the new Corvette Sting Ray. Cars have played a part in most all of our lives from the one that dad drove mom to the hospital when you were born to the ride that you had on your first date. Memorable times and that special, faithful automobile that had a role in the significance of these times. So, what is a great source of bringing back some memories of the past then to attend a local car cruise. Cruising has changed since the heyday of riding Landis Avenue and showing off your special car. It now has cruisers congregating at local establishments and hanging out for a few hours to talk about “the good old days” and, of course, cars. Enjoying old cars is not just a participant hobby, as one observes the Landis Avenue cruise each June. It’s a time to take the family and go to a “living” automotive museum. It really is a participant and spectator hobby. Most car cruises are held at or near restaurants or food locations. If you know of a location for a cruise and want to enjoy Photo: South Jersey Cruisers Association Car Club’s recent cruise at Bennigan’s Restaurant in Vineland with over 120 cars and many spectators and family out to enjoy. The Sign Tells All west40autodetailing.vpweb.com (Bluebell Rd & Rt. 40 Vineland) Auto Detailing & Headlight Restora on WEST 40 (856) 305-2884 Advertise in { 8 } the grapevine | AUGUST 5, 2009 The Grapevine and get incredible results. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. I have been involved with protecting one of our most precious natural resources for over 20 years in Salem and Cumberland County. You probably remember your childhood when you took a dip in a local lake or enjoyed boating and fishing in that lake. Today it is hard to find a lake you can do these things. In Salem County most of our lakes are polluted. The U.S. Government requires each State to perform what they call the Needs Survey. [Editor’s Note: A Needs From New Jersey NRCS report from New Jersey’s Performance Results System (PRS) Report most recent Needs Survey appears at left.] The survey County A/F # Total Needs identifies the major ATLANTIC 34004001022 $719,372 source of pollution in BERGEN 34001005021 $360,701 Salem County coming BURLINGTON 34007206022 $12,153,176 from excessive sediment CAMDEN 34006001021 $16,132,101 and agriculture runoff CAPE MAY 34004013026 $158,855 containing fecal coliform. CUMBERLAND 34005018021 $1,368,451 My county is rated ESSEX $306 GLOUCESTER 34006039022 $1,123,899 No.1 while Cumberland HUDSON $0 County’s rating is 7th as HUNTERDON 34002501021 $1,605,468 needing the most monies MERCER 34001007021 $1,602,256 to address the sources MIDDLESEX 34002065021 $1,051,387 and find ways to prevent MONMOUTH 34002001021 $1,789,147 this type of pollution. MORRIS 34001032021 $33,733 State agencies say it is OCEAN 341″31500021 $1,720,420 difficult to address these PASSAIC 34001055021 $33,810 issues without regulating SALEM 34005310021 $80,528,603 the way farmers operate 34002097021 $714,916 SOMERSET their business. One local SUSSEX 34009507022 $923,489 agent in the local Soil UNION $0 Conservation Agency WARREN 34008105021 $6,821,066 told me and my wife he TOTAL $128,841,155 wants all the lakes to fill in—which in time, they will, if we do nothing—and that is exactly what we are doing. I believe this is why the State wants all the dams to be condemned and removed. If we don’t have lakes, we do not have to worry about maintaining them and we would not have to regulate farming. One bad farm can harm all farmers by creating the need for unnecessary enforceable laws. We do not need any more laws; what we need is good common sense and agencies that care and do not play politics. We live under one law, no one should be exempt. Remember: “KEEP NEW JERSEY GREEN – NOT OUR WATERS!” —Emerson Eisele, Upper Pittsgrove Twp. Culinary Adventures I want you to know how much I look forward to Stephen Wilson’s food column each week. It is obvious he takes the subject quite seriously and knows what he’s talking about when he describes ingredients and how they come together. Steve’s reviews are right up there with ones you read from folks who write reviews for a living. Stephen’s comments about the Cape May Salts served at the Dune in Margate are dead on. A good friend and I are so hooked on them that on a recent trip down to The Merion Inn in Cape May with our wives for dinner, we stopped at the Lobster House’s Schooner Bar to get the Salts which I knew were not on The Merion’s menu. Extra horseradish and the drizzle of vinegar Steve mentioned are mandatory. Oyster lovers have favorites like Barron Point, Belon, Blue Point, Malpeque, Kumamoto and others, but there is something about the clean, firm texture and wonderfully salty finish of the Cape May Salt that, for me, trumps all the other, more expensive and exotic varieties. Your foodie readers may be interested in three outstanding BYOB’s we’ve visited recently in Philadelphia. Modo Mia at 161 W. Girard Ave. offers an inexpensive, three-course Menu Turista for $33. (A La Carte also available). Some of the best, authentic Italian food to be found anywhere. Little Fish at 600 Catherine St. offers unbelievably fresh and exotic presentations of seafood like Halibut, gnocchi, fava bean chanterelle mushroom truffle. Probably the smallest and most intimate restaurant anywhere. August at 1247 S. 13th St. offers an extremely intimate, quite setting with superlative presentations of pasta and seafood. Thanks for dedicating a portion of The Grapevine to the serious presentation of real food. Bon Appetit! —Bob Giordano, Vineland For Every Woman’s Imaging Needs, We’re Here For You When your physician orders an ultrasound or DEXA scan, South Jersey Healthcare has five area locations to serve you. And now each location features digital mammography for a faster and more accurate diagnosis. But that’s not all we offer. With overlapping services, no matter what type of imaging your doctor requests—CT, MRI, fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, interventional radiology, or just a general x-ray—our state-of-the-art technology and the region’s largest and most experienced radiology group will accurately report the results to your doctor in a timely manner. So when you need a digital mammogram, DEXA scan, or any other radiology services, look to South Jersey Healthcare. We’re here for you. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Call our appointment line: 1-866-SJH-APPT www.SJHealthcare.net the grapevine { 9 } SJH Regional Medical Center • SJH Elmer Hospital • SJH Bridgeton Imaging SJH Millville Imaging • SJH Hammonton Imaging Anniversary Continued from page 1 Landis needed to buy the individually owned property within the territory he had already purchased from Richard Wood. Prior to this, there was no interest in these properties except for their wood, and Landis now found these owners “anx- VINELAND’S 148TH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION Open House at the Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society: Saturday, August 8, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. • 11 a.m.: Doors open • Noontime: Singing of national anthem outside around flagpole by Vinelander Ashley Birmingham and prayer by Rev. Ellen Rutherford of Vineland’s First Church, Trinity Episcopal Church • 12:20 p.m.: Politicians speaking • 1 p.m.: Cake cutting • 1:30 p.m.: Lecture by Vince Farinaccio • 2 p.m.: Kids’ program Kids’ activities will include an essay contest, about 200 words, for ages 8 & up—”My Life in Vineland,” and a picture contest, ages 7 & younger—”My Life in Vineland.” Deadline is August 15. The winning entries will be printed in a future issue of The Grapevine. ious to sell.” He hired a man who came highly recommended and who “was acquainted with property holders in South Jersey” and began inquiring after purchasing these “exceptions.” The town founder soon increased his holdings, buying from such people as Fislerville (now Clayton) resident John M. Moore who provided 800 acres and became Landis’s New York agent in the process. A third venture, the creation of a monthly publication called Vineland Rural that would help market the town, was also organized in the three months after the stake had been driven. Landis’s fourth endeavor would prove to be a catch-22. The attempt to establish a post office in an unpopulated town was turned down because, quite logically, there were no residents to receive or send mail. Landis, however, felt that the post office would help draw settlers if it was already there waiting for them. He paid a visit to Washington, D.C. to speak with the Second Assistant Postmaster, who turned down the founder’s pleas on economic grounds. A meeting with President John Tyler’s son, Robert, whom Landis had met previously in Philadelphia, led to another confrontation with the Second Assistant Postmaster, who still considered the proposal absurd. Robert Tyler’s intervention indicated that he was considerably familiar with Landis’ accomplishments. The president’s son identified Landis’ founding of Hammonton as “an Countdown to 150 Preparations are already underway for the Vineland Sesquicentennial celebration in 2011. Mayor Robert Romano has appointed a Blue Ribbon Committee (BRC) headed by Dr. Frank DeMaio to begin coordinating the events that will soon fill the city’s 150th year. The group has met twice so far in order to gather information and initiate the process of contacting various organizations that will help bring the festivities to life. “Right now, it’s in its infancy as far as getting ideas out,” committee member Joe Profetto said of this phase of the BRC’s work. “We’re trying to gather people and put together the various events that would take place. “We’re looking forward to many of the organizations, churches and groups to come forward to assist.” While specifics have yet to be worked out, fireworks and an historical costume ball seem to be on the short list of events that may fill more than just the weeks surrounding August 8, 2011. Much of the summer of 1961 was spent celebrating the city’s Centennial. That celebration was largely coordinated by an outside group specializing in such occasions. “I don’t think we need to bring in an outside person to do this,” Profetto said of the Sesquicentennial. “We’ve got enough talented people in the city.” An upcoming press conference, which may be held as early as this week, is expected to reveal more details of Vineland’s 150th Birthday Celebration. VINTAGE VINELAND Vineland Male Chorus Only the chorus leader, holding the baton, has been identified. Do you know any of the other men? Over the years, the Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society has acquired many old-time images. Kate Harbold, at the Society, is busy cataloging the photos from Vineland’s rich past, but she needs the help of The Grapevine readers in identifying the people and places captured on film so long ago. If you know something about this portrait, we ask that you contact either Harbold at the Society or use the contact information on page 4 to inform us. HERE’S WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THIS PHOTO: This photo of the Vineland Male Chorus was taken around the 1950s, and was led by William Trevarthen, who is the man sitting in the front holding the baton. But the names of all the other men in the picture are not known. The mission of the VHAS is to acquire, maintain, and preserve Vineland’s history. The Society was founded in 1864, just three years after the establishment of the town of Vineland. It is the second oldest historical society in New Jersey, second only to the New Jersey Historical Society. The VHAS consists of a museum, library, and archives, open to the public on Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m., same hours Tuesday through Friday for research. It is located at 108 South Seventh Street, Vineland (691-1111). { 10 } the grapevine | AUGUST 5, 2009 Cartridge World goes out of its way to help businesses by delivering the ink and toner cartridges you need to your o ce, for less. Why visit a superstore just to pay more? Over 1,700 locations worldwide Magnolia Court Shopping Center Vineland, NJ 08360 856-692-0372 1370 S. Main Rd. Main Road Magnolia Rd Mail Room Organics Market ©2008 Cartridge World. All rights reserved. The Global Ink and Toner Experts www.cartridgeworldusa.com/Store305 enterprise I should have counted among the impossibilities had I not known of it” and of his new town as “a much greater affair.” Tyler’s defense successfully earned Vineland its first post office, but not without a few stipulations. Landis would serve as the postmaster and also pay a $20 annual fee. It was not until October that Landis finally settled in Vineland permanently. He took up residence at Andrew Sharp’s house at Main Road and Park Avenue. Occupying a room in the northeast corner of the dwelling, Landis filled the rooms across from it with “my maps, and business table, and the draughting board of the surveyor.” It was also in October that the first ads for the town were placed in the New York Herald, the Public Ledger and the Boston Journal. Landis writes that letters soon began arriving and that he replied to each one he received, including a copy of the Rural as well. The initial advertising drew someone Landis refers to only as “a little Englishman,” but A. G. Warner’s Vineland and Vinelanders, identifies this gentleman as J.G. Colson who arrived from New York County residents. Vineland’s first house, built in 1862, is on the grounds. • Vineland Historical Society: 108 S. Seventh St., Vineland. Open Tues. & Sat. 1-4 p.m. 856-691-1111. www.vinelandhistory.org. 2. WARREN LUMMIS GENEALOGICAL AND HISTORICAL LIBRARY. Holds more than 900 genological files, a deed index starting in 1800, and maps and surveys as far back as 1700. Local newspaper collections begin in 1795. The N.J. and U.S. Census are available from the early 1800s. The staff will do limited research. • Lummis Library, 981 Ye Greate St., Greenwich. Open Wed. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Fri., Sat. Sun. 1-4 p.m. 856-455-8580. www.cchistsoc.org/museums-hours.html. Searches begin at $5 plus photocopy fees. 3. EAST POINT LIGHTHOUSE. Erected in and spent a day examining Landis’ maps and discussing the area. By his second day in town, Colson bought some property, making him the first person to purchase land in the Vineland area from Landis. Warner writes that this transaction consisted of 10 acres between Oak and Wheat Roads west of the Boulevard. According to Landis, the sale occurred just as Richard Wood “had become quite impatient to see something done…” Since any deeds needed to be signed by Wood at the time, a trip to Millville was necessary, and Landis writes of Wood’s astonishment: “…to think that a man would come down from New York and purchase a piece of this land for cash.” Accompanying Landis and Colson back to Vineland, Wood took Andrew Sharp aside and discussed the first sale. Later the town founder learned that Wood had “charged [Sharp] to help and facilitate Mr. Landis in every possible way; for…he must be a great man.” In the first three months of Vineland’s existence, Landis managed to expand the main roadway, add a post office, establish a publication, buy up additional land, promote his new town and sell his first property here. Imagine what he might have accomplished if he had been living in this area the entire time. I 1849, the East Point Lighthouse is the second oldest standing lighthouse in the state. The lantern room offers a nice view of the surrounding marsh. This a favorite spot not only for history enthusiasts, but also for bird watchers, photographers and artists. • East Point: Heislerville. Open for tours by appointment, Contact the Maurice River Historical Society for more information at Maurice River Historical Society PO Box 141 Heislerville, NJ 08324 or e-mail them at: eastpointlighthousenj@yahoo.com. 4. SPRINGTOWN. Located in Greenwich Township, Springtown developed after 1786 when Quakers were legally allowed to sell land to free blacks. It is one of the oldest African-American settlements in the country. For many fugitive slaves, Springtown was a temporary Underground Railway destination before they moved on; for others it ABOVE: This life-size, 1870s-era portrait of Vineland founder Charles K. Landis hangs in the main parlor room at the Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society building at Seventh and Elmer streets. LEFT: A map of the Vineland Tract from 1865 shows the one-square-mile town of Vineland and the land surrounding it, with the names of landowners marked on their property locations. Five Points of Interest for the History Buff { MICKEY BRANDT } If you value history, you’ll find a wealth of it in many local places. Here are a few offerings, which can be part of the history buff’s “stay-cation.” 1. VINELAND HISTORICAL AND ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY. Second in age only to the N.J. Historical Society, it holds a vast collection of books, newspapers, ephemera, maps, artifacts, and paintings relating to Vineland and its founder, Charles K. Landis. There are exhibits featuring area glass and the Civil War and detailed genealogies of Cumberland became the end of their running. Before and during the Civil War, Springtown was a center for abolitionist activity. The Bethel AME Church there was built in 1783; it can be viewed but is not open to the public. • For more information, call 856-451-2700. 5. HISTORIC MAURICETOWN. You can go antiquing in the several shops and view the 200-year-old captains’ houses along the tree-lined streets. The Caesar Hoskins Cabin is the oldest structure in the county. The original cabin portion of the house was constructed by unknown builders, possibly the Swedes, sometime prior to the year 1714. The cabin is a rare specimen with its interior in original condition. • Mauricetown Historical Society. Cabin open by appointment. 856-785-0457 www.co.cumberland.nj.us/content/163/235 /851/1067.aspx WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Do You Have Dangerous Trees? Call For Your Free Evaluation Good, Clean Work At Reasonable Prices Don’t Be Fooled. Call A Certified Aborist. For All Your Tree Care. the grapevine { 11 } Pruning • Tree Removals • Storm Damage Elevations • Shrubbery Trimming • Stump Grinding Owner Operated Local Business • Fully Insured Owner Working At All Jobs! FREE ESTIMATES www.forresttreesurgeon.com 10% Off Any Tree Service Forrest Tree Surgeon • 856-694-0922 Must present coupon at time of estimate. Not valid with other offers. Exp. 8/31/09 I Entertainment IDOL CHATTER, OUTDOOR CONCERTS, NIGHTLIFE, AND HANGAR 84 ROCK SHOWS. Millville, 327-8011. Thurs: Ladies Nite with Charlie. Fri: Mainstreets. Sat: Singalong with Charlie. Sun: Nascar/Baseball. FRIDAY, AUGUST 7 Cumberlads. Cumberland Mall. Men’s a capella chorus under the direction of Gene Tubertini. 7 p.m. FRIDAY, AUGUST 7 Tom Moran/Cardigans and Hollowbodies. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. Acoustic music. 5 p.m./Jazz, 7 p.m. FRIDAY, AUGUST 7 The Walk Of Fame, Alert The Media, Beyond Daylight, Colour Like Clover, This Minus You. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. 6 p.m. $10. Favorite Idols in Atlantic City FRIDAY, AUGUST 7 American Idols Live! Tour 2009. Boardwalk Hall, 2301 Boardwalk, Atlantic City. The top 10 contestants from American Idol season 8 make a stop here. 7 p.m. $40.50-$69.50. www.ticketmaster.com AUGUST 7 AND 8 Nightlife at Old Oar House. Old Oar House Brewery, 123 N. High St., Millville, 2931200. Fri.: TBA, 9 p.m. Sat.: TBA, 9 p.m., SATURDAY, AUGUST 8 Book Signing. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. Local author Ann Boyle signs her book, Turn of the Sentry. 9 a.m.3 p.m. WEDNESDAYS IN AUGUST Nightlife at Ramada. Harry’s Lounge at Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 696-3800. Wednesday: Ladies Night, 1/2 price appetizers all night and live entertainment. Happy Hour MondaySaturday, 4-6 p.m. $1 off all drinks. Moon Dance Party, $3 Blue Moon drafts, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Saturday: Latin Dance Party, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Tuesday: Country Western Dance Party (beer and shot specials), 8 p.m.-midnight. SATURDAY, AUGUST 8 JerseyShows.com Presents. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. 6 p.m. $10. AUGUST 6, 7, AND 8 Nightlife at Villa Filomena. Villa Filomena Ristorante & Lounge, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena, 697-7107. Thurs.: Ladies Night, Fri.: Live music, Sat.: Italian Accordian. AUGUST 5, 6, 7, 8, AND 11 Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Wednesday: ’70s and ’80s Throwback Night (frozen drink specials) 8 p.m.midnight, Thursday.: Karaoke with DJ Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday: Blue SATURDAY, AUGUST 8 Danielle Deckard. Bogart’s Books, 210 N. High St., Millville, 327-3714. 7 p.m. ADVERTISE IN The Grapevine and get incredible results. Get amazing results from your advertising campaign in The Grapevine. Get the benefit of our distribution to every residence in Vineland (approx. 22,250)! Ride the wave of excitement as The Grapevine’s debut has excited our town’s citizens. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. SUNDAY, AUGUST 9 Bud Cavallo Duo. Bridgeton Riverfront Park, Bridgeton. 7 p.m. Free concert. 4531675. AUGUST 6, 7, AND 8 Nightlife at Bojo’s. 222 N. High St., THROUGH AUGUST 31 Myer Glick Artwork. Vineland Public Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 794-4244. Included in the exhibit are original paintings in acrylic and watercolors displayed in the Doris Tripp Exhibit Room. Hand-crafted stained glass work is exhibited in the display cases on the first floor of the library. This exhibit focuses on local resident Myer Glick’s zest for life and the beauty he finds in the world. A reception to meet the artist takes place on Monday, August 17, from 6-8 p.m. and refreshments will be served. Glick developed his love of art as a child in Warsaw, Poland. Upon arriving in the United States in 1949, Glick lived in Philadelphia and attended the Fleischer Memorial Art School where he worked with watercolors, oils and acrylics. Glick began working in stained glass art in the 1980s. He has exhibited at Cumberland County College, winning awards at the local and state level. Glick is a Holocaust survivor from the Warsaw Ghetto and the notorious Auschwitz-Birdenau concentration camps. He and his wife, Nella, are recipients of the prestigious Miles Lerman Holocaust Education Award and were presented with honorary associate degrees from Cumberland County College. { 12 } the grapevine | AUGUST 5, 2009 MONDAY, AUGUST 10 Corky Gale’s Combo. Giampetro Park Enrico Serra Band Shell, E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 7 p.m. Free concert. THURSDAY, AUGUST 13 Through the Eyes of the Dead. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland. 6 p.m. $10$12. (frontgatetickets.com). THROUGH AUGUST 10 Tara Jacoby Art Exhibit. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. Her work ranges from ink drawings, watercolor paintings, digital media and oil paintings. FRIDAY, AUGUST 14 Art Show Opening/Artists Reception. Fuel House Coffee Co., 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. Wine and cheese reception for new art exhibit. TUESDAY, AUGUST 11 Shai Hulud. Hangar 84, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland. 6 p.m. $12-$15. (frontgatetickets.com). FRIDAY, AUGUST 14 Second Friday Art Exhibit. Martini Shoes, 613A Landis Ave., Vineland. Paintings from local artists are featured including Sue Mounier, Judy Miller, Paula Pagluighi, Carole Ward, Lynn Martini and special guest Miss Tyler Cheli, student of well-known local artist, Margaret Ricci. Refreshments and live entertainment. 6-9 p.m. Happy Birthday Vineland FRESH WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12 Bob Ferris Orchestra. Michael Debbi Park, Cedar Ave., Richland. Swinging standards from the big band era. 7 p.m. rain or shine. Seating available or bring a lawn chair. Free. FO ODS MARKET – (Opposite Vineland Post O ce) & SPECIALT Y AT THE CASINOS HEADLINERS, COMEDY ACTS, AND MORE This Week’s Feature Vineland’s 148th Birthday Party Tickets: 1-800-736-1420; www.ticketmaster.com unless otherwise noted. HEADLINERS THURSDAY, AUGUST 6 Erykah Badu. Showboat House of Blues. 8 p.m., $55, $50, $45. 9 p.m. (except during headliner engagements) 1-800-298-4200. Comedy Stop at the Trop. Three comics nightly. Sun.-Thurs., 9 p.m., $23; Fri., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $23; Sat., 9 and 11:15 p.m., $28. Order tickets by phone at the Comedy Stop Box Office: 1-877-FUNNY-AC or 609-348-0920. comedystop.com. Fame. Tropicana. Monday and Thursday 8 p.m., Tuesday and Wednesday 3:30 and 8 p.m., Sunday 7 p.m. Yesterday: A Tribute to the Beatles. Tropicana. Liverpool Club Theater in North Tower. Wed.–Sun., 8:30 p.m., $25. And it’s All FREE! FRIDAY, AUGUST 7 Crosby, Stills & Nash. Borgata. 8 p.m. $86, $76. 1-800-298-4200. Get the Led Out. Hilton. 9 p.m. $25. Cyndi Lauper and Rosie o’Donnell. Showboat House of Blues. 9 p.m., $50.50, $45.50, $40.50, $35.50. SATURDAY, AUGUST 8 Mike Jones vs. Larry Mosley. Bally’s. Unbeaten welterweight Mike Jones, of North Philadelphia, and veteran Larry Mosley, of Los Angeles, square off. 7:30 p.m., $75, $50. The Celebration Continues at the AUGUST 7 AND 8 Marc Anthony. Trump Taj Mahal. 9 p.m. $108 and $88. Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | SATURDAY, AUGUST 8 Van Morrison Performing Astral Weeks LIVE. Caesars. 8 p.m. $325, $275, $150. Dave Koz and Brian Culbertson with Peabo Bryson. Hilton. 8 p.m. $45. Gov’t Mule. Showboat House of Blues. 8 p.m., $35, $25. Sugar Ray. Tropicana. 9 p.m. $25-$45. The Belmonts. Trump Marina. 8 p.m. $30. THROUGH AUGUST 9 A Bronx Tale. Harrah’s. Tues.-Thurs. 8 p.m., Fri.-Sun. 9 pm. $65, $55, $40. – THROUGH SEPTEMBER 5 Hypno-Sterical. Trump Marina. Thurs, and Fri. 9 p.m., Sat. 10 p.m. $22.50. Jersey Fresh Produce THROUGH SEPTEMBER 6 Carnival of Wonders. Trump Plaza. 8 p.m. Tues., Wed., Thurs., Sat.; 9 p.m. Fri.; 3 and 7 p.m. Sun. $25. Market Runs through August 15 WIC & Senior Coupons Accepted THROUGH SEPTEMBER 6 Cirque Dreams Pandemonia. Taj Mahal. 8 p.m. Wed., Thurs;, 9 p.m. Fri.; 3:30 and 8 p.m. Sat. and Sun. $35 and $25. For more info call 856-794-8653 or go to MainStreetVineland.org VINELAND TROLLEY VINELAND TROLLEY the grapevine { 13 } COMEDY & MORE Comedy Club at Borgata. Borgata Music Box: three comedians daily, RIDE THE TROLLEY TO AND FROM THE MARKET FREE! Runs Landis Ave – Kidston Towers to WalMart This event is sponsored in part by VDID/Vineland Main Street. This ad has been paid for with funds approved for such use by the New Jersey Urban Enterprise Zone Authority. Start Fresh Today! DR. JOHN MAINIERO Credit Card Debt • Medical Bills Utility Bills • Surcharges And Even Some Income Taxes Stop Wage Executions Reduce Car Payments Free Office Visit-Start Fresh Financially! Want to wipe out your debt? WIPE OUT: I Downtown Vineland { TODD NOON, EXEC. DIR., VDID/MAIN STREET } Affordable CHIROPRACTIC CARE WE ACCEPT ALL HEALTH INSURANCES NO INSURANCE NEEDED! NO REFERRAL NEEDED! WALK-INS WELCOME. STOP SHERIFF SALE Birthday Warm-Up It’s not quite the big one, but we’re celebrating Vineland’s birthday this weekend. BANKRUPTCY IS YOUR LEGAL BAILOUT! Listen to Seymour Wasserstrum Esq. Live on the Radio Every Thursday Night From 8-9 pm on 92.1 FM Helping people wipe out their bills – since 1973 205 Landis Ave., Vineland www.wipeoutyourbillstoday.com $100 OFF w/this ad – CR We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for Bankruptcy Code. W Seymour Wasserstrum, Esq. AND WELLNESS CENTER SEYMOUR WASSERSTRUM Esq. -Bankruptcy Attorney- 691-5900 1420 S. Lincoln Ave. • Vineland, NJ 08360 www.doctormainiero.com 856-696-8300 { 14 } the grapevine | AUGUST 5, 2009 hat do you do when Vineland’s birthday falls on the same day as the Fresh and Specialty Foods Market? You celebrate, of course! And that’s exactly what we’re going to do this Saturday—celebrate Vineland’s 148th birthday. Like many parties, it gets bigger as you keep planning, and we got help from some friends—the Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society and the Friends of Historic Vineland. So after the Market is over at noon, the fun and celebrating will keep right on going throughout the afternoon at the Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society building. The festivities start in the morning at the Market. Re-enactors from the Friends of Historic Vineland will be on hand to portray legendary figures in our city’s history. There will be historical displays, Miss Kathy and Mr. Ed will entertain with games and a prize chest, and we’ll have a large birthday cake to top off the first part of the celebration. Over at the Vineland Historical Society, at 108 S. Seventh Street, an open house will take place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be tours of the building, another birthday cake, programs for the kids, and lots more. The big 150th birthday celebration is two years off and plans are already underway for that, but this will be a great warm-up. *** The following Saturday, August 15, will be the last week of the Market. It will feature the Kids Clothesline Art Show, and it’s not too late to register. Participants can enter to win fun prizes in two contests—(1) create their own artwork at the Market or bring a favorite drawing from home, and (2) show off their sidewalk drawing talent in the Chalk Art Contest. Both contests will be judged in the following age groups—3-5 years, 6-8 years, 9-11 years, and 12-14 years. The art session will begin at 9 a.m. *** Each week of the Market, you can cast your vote in the Little Miss & Mister Cherry Tomato photo contest. The winner will be crowned at the International Food & Cultural Festival on Saturday, August 22, and will ride in the Holiday Parade on November 28. All the proceeds will go toward the great cause of downtown revitalization. Presented by VDID/Main Street Vineland and sponsored again by Sun National Bank, the Market runs from 8 a.m. to noon. We’ll have a large birthday cake to top off the first part of the celebration. *** Enjoy a real “virtual vacation” at the International Food & Cultural Festival on August 22, from 3 to 8 p.m., on the 500 block of Landis Avenue. Food, musicians, dancers, artists, and crafters from a variety of cultures will be featured, along with the return of our popular Homemade Wine Competition and the addition of a Tomato Sauce Competition. Partnering with this event is the Mayor’s Youth Council, which is sponsoring its Youth Fest on Sixth Street, between Landis Avenue and Elmer Street. More about this exciting event will be in future columns. *** For all the downtown events, support the downtown merchants and businesses. If you can stop into any of them during the events, please do so. If you do not have an opportunity during that time, make a point of coming back later. The businesses, and we at VDID/Main Street Vineland, will greatly appreciate your support and patronage. For more information on VDID/Main Street Vineland’s “endless summer” of events and activities, call the office at 7948653 or visit www.mainstreetvineland.org. Bring a friend and share the fun Buy one, get one FREE! Buy One Buy One $ 29 29 99 99 FREE FREE Get One Get One San Juan Festival Vineland’s longest running social services program, Casa PRAC, held its annual San Juan Festival Saturday, August 1, at the North Italy Hall. “It celebrates the diversity of youth in Cumberland County,” said Luz Petty, member of Casa PRAC . Petty has been with the organization for three years and said this year has been the best turnout for the event that she has seen. The Festival was headlined by a visit from Gov. Jon S. Corzine. A Dominican dance group kicked off the daylong festivities. Mayor Robert Romano volunteered to sit in the dunk tank. Master Eric King, head instructor and owner of Arts in Motion Karate, led his group of students in a martial arts presentation. “We came out to display the fellowship with the Spanish community,” King said. “A good majority of our students are Hispanic and it’s important we give back to the community.” Along with the many shows throughout the day, there were also Spanish foods such as pastilles, pinchos, and pastilillos. “It’s nice to be out here because this is part of my heritage,” said Mariluz West, whose daughter participated with Arts in Motion Karate. Sonny Lugo of WMIZ 1270 volunteered his time to be the emcee and DJ. “We love doing this for the Spanish community. Having it done here at the North Italy unites the whole community,” Lugo explained. To add to the festivities, Bridgetonbased Wheels of Thunder held a car show. Fred and Rita Polhamus brought their 1931 Model A right-hand drive to be judged. Although the festival celebrates Spanish heritage, it was more about bringing the community together. Young explained it best: “If we don’t show our appreciation for one another’s cultures, we lose respect for each other.” —Brian Bertonazzi Requires new line of service or qualified upgrade Requires new line of service or qualified upgrade and two-year agreement. Handset pricing varies and two-year agreement. Handset pricing varies by Sprint Authorized Rep. and may be subject to by Sprint Authorized Rep. and may be subject to add’l req. See store for details. add’l req. See store for details. Buy one LG ® Rumor 2 ™ for only ne LG Rumor for only $29.99 after $50 mail-in rebate and 9 after $50 mail-in rebate and get second one FREE after $50 get a second one FREE after $50 mail-in rebate and $29.99 in store mail-in rebate and $29.99 in store rebate. rebate. 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We Have Chef Wear! the grapevine { 17 } $ Lamar Upham Lamar Uph ham Ott Uph Ott Upham ham 5 o any purchase of $25 or more any purchase of $25 or more O er Expires 10/15/09 er Expires 10/15/09 Home Garden and All Annuals, Patio Planters & Hanging Baskets History of Jersey Fresh Source: Rutgers Cooperative Extension In the days when New Jersey’s agricultural and allied industries such as canning dominated the state, New Jerseyans’ diet bore out of this bounty. While trucks of tomatoes and other vegetables bound for Campbell’s Soup in Camden or Heinz in Salem or crossed the borders to fresh markets in New York or Philadelphia, New Jerseyans ate what was seasonal and local. As New Jersey’s rural landscape became more and more suburban, residents’ shopping venues changed to large supermarkets. As food markets increased in size, the distribution/availability equation of wholesale food purchasing changed and local produce growers were often shunned for year-round suppliers of fresh food. The simultaneous pressure on New Jersey’s farmers to relinquish their land for lucrative real estate transactions, changed the face of the Garden State so that the once dominant rural landscape became a hidden treasure, out of sight and out of mind of New Jersey’s increasing population. In 1984, the State of New Jersey took a major step to recreate an awareness of fresh produce from New Jersey’s farms. The New Jersey Department of Agriculture developed the Jersey Fresh program, under then secretary of agriculture, Art Brown, recently retired county agricultural agent and professor, Rutgers NJAES. The early Jersey Fresh program featured professionally developed point-of-purchase materials and radio and billboard advertising. To increase grocery store use of New Jersey produce, the department established contact with the retail sector and food chains to become involved in the program. Billed as one of the first programs of its kind, Jersey Fresh gave a star performance in its first year, making considerable gains in consumer awareness and trade usage. According to Brown, the Jersey Fresh success story spread quickly. As the program grew in prominence, other States began to adapt the Jersey Fresh model to their own situations. The second season of the Jersey Fresh program expanded the scope by adding a Jersey Fresh TOMATO AND PEACH TASTING • Tuesday, August 18, from 4 to 6 p.m. • Rutgers Agricultural Research and Experiment Center, 121 Northville Rd. Upper Deerfield (near Bridgeton) Cumberland County. Summer Sale Mandevillas on Sale Plus w/Coupon take additional $4.00 OFF $5.00 OFF exp. 08/11/09 Reg. Price Quality Grading program where growers agreed to be licensed and to follow department packing guidelines. This further enhanced buyer confidence and increased retail use. The foundation for the Quality Grading program is based on research and recommendations from Rutgers NJAES. Twenty-five years later, the Jersey Fresh program is still going strong, and its popularity is further fueled by the nationwide increased interest in local foods (perhaps the program was ahead of its time). New Jersey boasts a strong support movement to the Jersey Fresh program: Garden State growers, restaurants and supermarkets, statewide media publications, non-profit advocate organizations such as Slow Food and Northeast Organic Farmers Association of NJ, Rutgers NJAES research and outreach programs, local municipalities hosting community farm markets and an enthusiastic public. Growers Of Quality Plants For All Your Gardening Needs Farm Markets in the Region Source: Rutgers Cooperative Extension A Taste Of The Garden State 298 Columbia Hwy., Bridgeton Directions: Near the town of Shiloh and Rt. 49; Call for specific directions Phone: (856) 453-5749 Open: Monday – Saturday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Available: Unique store that features non-perishable food items from NJ businesses; Specialty is Garden State gift baskets—great for sending family and friends. Adamucci Farms, Inc. 152 Trench Rd., Bridgeton Phone: (856) 451-4069 Open: July 15 – Sept. 15, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Roadside Market: Peaches, Nectarines Bachinsky Farms 905 Tuckahoe Rd., Milmay Phone: (856) 696-4695 Hanging Baskets • Bedding Plants • Garden Decorations • Flowering Shrubs • Soils • Mulches, and much more! 470 N. Union Rd. East Vineland (between Oak Rd. & Landis Ave.) Mon. – Sat. 8am-6pm Sun. 9am-5pm Wide Selection Of Old Time Favorites & The Newest Varieties 20% off Any Plant Purchase Grown & Sold Here 856-691-7881 www.cmgrowers.com Cannot be combined with any other coupon. (Before Taxes) Must present coupon. of $25.00 or more. exp. 08/11/09 { 18 } the grapevine | AUGUST 5, 2009 CRABTREE’S LANDSCAPING And Turf Management Beautifying the outside since 1989 Serving Vineland, Millville & Bridgeton Areas COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL OVER 2 0 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE! Total Landscape Renovations In-ground Irrigation Systems Sodding, Mulching, Hydroseeding Waterfalls & ponds 856.875.0774 Open: Mar – Jun Roadside Market: Tomatoes; peppers; lettuce; cabbage; collard; herbs; onions; cucumbers Also Available: Pickles; impatiens; greenhouse; bedding plants Bellview Winery 150 Atlantic Street, Landisville Directions: On web site Phone: (856) 697-7172, Fax: (856) 697-7183 Web site: www.bellviewwinery.com Open: Year round, Wed. – Sun., 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Roadside Market: NJ wine and wine related items Bertuzzi’s Market & Greenhouse 831 Tuckahoe Rd. (Rt 557), Milmay Directions: From Vineland, take Landis Avenue east to Rt. 557 S (Tuckahoe Road). Phone: (856) 691-6779 Open: Daily, Apr. 1 – Thanksgiving, 8 a.m. – 8 p.m Roadside Market: Tomatoes; corn; melons; strawberries; all other fruits & vegetables Also Available: Bedding plants; hanging baskets; planters; nursery stock; cut flowers; dried flowers; fall mums; bakery on premises; WIC and Senior FMNP checks accepted Badaracco Farms, Inc 954 Union Rd., Vineland Directions: From Landis Avenue, turn right to head south on Union Rd. (Rt. 671), 1 mi. Phone: (856) 691-5531 Open: July – Sept., 8 a.m.- 6 p.m., Oct. – Dec., 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Roadside Market: Peaches, pears, apples, pumpkins, sweet potatoes, vegetables, greens Apple Varieties: Golden Delicious, McIntosh, Red Delicious, Stayman/Winesap. Brassie’s Farm Market 1427 S Lincoln Ave., Vineland Directions: Between Rt 40 & Rt 55 Phone: (856) 692-8707 Open: March – October 31, Monday – Saturday 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Roadside Market: Dandelion, broccoli raab, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, sweet corn, peaches, strawberries, blueberries, apples, all types of lettuce, parsley, basil, summer squash, pickles, cucumbers, many other fruits & vegetables Also Available: Eggs Camps Big Oak Farm Market Delsea Dr. (Rt 47), Port Elizabeth Phone: (856) 825-7367 Open: June – Oct., 9 a.m-6 p.m Roadside Market: Fruits, Vegetables, Corn, Sweet/White Potato, Melons, Pumpkins Cat-Tail Farm in the City 27 E. Commerce Street, Bridgeton Directions: Rt. 77 to Commerce St., west 1.5 blocks or Rt. 49 to Laurel St., north 1 block to Commerce St., west 1/2 block Open: June – September, Saturdays, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Roadside Market: A wide selection of organically-grown vegetables including green beans, beets, tomatoes, hot & sweet peppers, some herbs, hard-shell gourds, lavender, blackberries Also Available: WIC and Senior FMNP checks accepted. Casazza Farm Market 559 Tuckahoe Rd. (Rt. 557), Vineland Directions: 1/4 mi. N of Landis Ave. (Rt. 540) on Tuckahoe Road (Rt. 557) Continued on page 20 LANDSCAPE SUPPLY Your Lawn & Garden Outlet We Have Everything You Need To Beautify Your Backyard! EVERY THURSDAY IN AUGUST SOUTH JERSEY 50%OFF WHILE SUPPLIES LAST WAS NOW 2 CF. . . . . . . 3.99 $2.00 ALL BAG PRODUCTS SUMMER CLEAN UP Receive 25% Off Your Entire purchase! 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Henry Products • Riverock – Various Sizes PICK • Driveway Stone & DEL UP IVERY • Screened Top Soil • Mulch – Various Varieties REFILL YOUR PROPANE HERE! Bring Life To Your Landscape! G AROPPO STONE & GARDEN CENTER IN BUSINESS OVER 35 YEARS! 20 lb BBQ Tank $1500 the grapevine { 19 } 10% OFF Your EP HENRY PURCHASE! One coupon per customer. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. Exp. 8/31/09 Homeowners Special! 1200 Harding Highway (Rt. 40), Newfield • www.garoppos.com • (856) 697-4444 Farm Markets Continued from page 19 Phone: (856) 692-7708 Open: July & August, Daily, 9:30 a.m .- 6 p.m. Roadside Market: Corn, tomatoes, eggplant, bell peppers, Cuban peppers, cantaloupes, watermelons, pickles, zucchini, peaches Also Available: WIC and Senior FMNP checks accepted Century Farms 709 Ye Greate St., Greenwich Directions: From Rt. 49 at Shiloh, 4 mi. South on Rt. 620, Right onto Rt. 623, Farm is .2 mi. Phone: (856) 455-5408 Open: Daily, Sept. 15 – Oct. 31, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Roadside Market: Pumpkins Also Available: Fall ornamentals Cruzandale Farms Harvest Quarters 434 Rt. 540, Bridgeton Phone: (856) 455-8737 Open: 7 a.m.-dusk Roadside Market: Pumpkins, gourds, mums, corn stalks, straw Also Available: Already-made gourd basket centerpieces Donato Brothers 337 Weymouth Rd., Landisville Directions: Landisville between Rt. 40 & Rt. 54 Phone: (856) 697-0404 Open: July – Dec., Monday – Friday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m, Saturday 9 AM – 1 PM Roadside Market: Apples Apple Varieties: Empire, Fuji, Gala, Ginger Gold, Golden Delicious, Jonathan, McIntosh, Mutsu, Paula Red, Red Delicious, Stayman/Winesap D’Ott’s Farm Market 3308 E. Landis Ave, Vineland Directions: From Rt. 47 and Rt. 55 East on Landis Phone: (856) 691-5565 Open: May – Nov, Monday – Friday 9 a.m.-6 p.m, Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Roadside Market: All Fresh Fruit & Vegetables, Fresh Jersey Cantaloupes, Greens, Corn; Melons & Tomatoes are our specialty Also Available: Jams, Jellies, Extra Large Assortment of Flowers, Planters, Bedding Plants, Hanging Baskets, Pouches & Much More. Du Bose Farm 28 Ayars Lane, Bridgeton Phone: (856) 455-5811 Open: July – Dec., Monday – Saturday Roadside Market: Vegetables, Herbs, Fruits NOFA Certified Organic Four Seasons Farm Market 601 Fordville Rd., Bridgeton Phone: (856) 451-8341 Open: June – January, Mon. – Fri. 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m-6 p.m.; Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Roadside Market: Vegetables; onions; tomatoes; peppers; collard greens; peas; beans Also Available: WIC and Senior FMNP checks accepted Horse Hay Acres 329 Old Mill Rd., Greenwich Directions: 1 2 mi. W of Ye Greate St. on Old Mill Rd., First farm on Right; W of Gum Tree Corner Rd. Intersection Phone: (856) 455-3640 Open: Daily Available: Timothy Hay, Orchard Grass Hay Ingraldi Farms Cedarville Rd. & Rieck Ave., Millville Directions: On Cedarville Rd. across from Rieck Ave., close to Millville Airport Phone: (856) 451-1019 or (609) 381-4221 Open: April- October 31, 7 days a week Roadside Market: Tomatoes, cucumbers, corn, eggplant, peppers, strawberries, blueberries, melons, asparagus, and more Pick Your Own: Strawberries Also Available: Pickles Jericho Gardens – MR Dickinson & Son 1256 Roadstown Rd., Bridgeton Phone: (856) 451-3978 Open: May – October, Mon. – Sun. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Roadside Market: Vegetables; herbs; tomatoes; peppers (hot & sweet); green beans; lima beans; pumpkins; lettuce Also Available: WIC and Senior FMNP checks accepted Joe’s Produce Market 481 East Elmer Rd., Vineland Directions: On Elmer Rd. off Delsea Dr. or Main Rd.; on corner of East & Elmer Rds. Phone: (856) 794-8210 Open: March – Oct. & Dec. 1 – Christmas, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Roadside Market: Spring: Easter crosses; summer: fresh Jersey produce; corn; tomatoes; peppers; melons; eggplants; zucchini; pickles; fall: pumpkins; gourds; cornstalks; mums; hay stacks; Also Available: Christmas grave blankes, crosses; logs Lake View Farms – Nardelli Bros. Inc. 54 N Main St., Cedarville Directions: Route 553 South Phone: (856) 447-4020, Fax: (856) 447-3990 Open: April – November, Monday – Saturday 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Roadside Market: All fruits & vegetables Levari’s Petals & Produce 5012 Landis Ave., Vineland Phone: (856) 696-9811 Open: Year Round Roadside Market: Fruits; vegetables Also Available: WIC and Senior FMNP checks accepted Lillian’s Market 3834 Rt. 47, Port Elizabeth Directions: Rt. 55 S to Rt. 47, 2.5 mi. on the right side Phone: (856) 293-0099, Fax: (856) 785-8135 Open: May – November (until Christmas with greens), Daily, 8 am – dark Roadside Market: Asparagus thru zucchini, all home-grown fruits, vegetables Also Available: Honey, dressings, relish, preserves, bedding plants, cut flowers, potted flowers, Christmas – wreaths, blankets, sprays, greens, WIC and Senior FMNP checks accepted Marlboro Farm Market & Garden Center 601 Route 49, Bridgeton Directions: 3 mi. W of Shiloh Phone: (856) 451-3138 Open: Year round, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Roadside Market: Tree-ripened peaches; apples; pumpkins; sweet corn; strawberries; blueberries; full line of produce Pick Your Own: Pumpkins Also Available: Jersey Fresh Cooks cookbook; bedding plants; seasonal flowers; shrubs; trees; apple cider; pumpkin hay rides in fall; WIC and Senior FMNP checks accepted Meadow View Farms Transport 92 Causeway Rd., Bridgeton Directions: Stow Creek Twp. Phone: (856) 455-1882 Open: Call for hours & produce availability Mollinelli’s Tuckahoe Rd.. (Rt. 557), Milmay Phone: (856) 691-9224 Directions: From Vineland, take Landis Avenue east to Rt. 557 S (Tuckahoe Road). Roadside Market: Tomatoes; corn; melons; other fruits & vegetables Muzzarelli’s Farm Market 3460 Oak Road, Vineland Directions: From Rt. 40, W to Oak Rd. approx. 5 mi. on left; From Delsea Drive (Rt. 47), E on Oak Rd. approx 5 mi. on right Phone: (856) 691-2497 Open: June 15- October 31, Daily 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Roadside Market: Herbs, lettuces, cabbage, tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, beets, leeks, potatoes, yams, sweet potatoes, onion, garlic, cucumbers, squash, winter squash, peaches, plums, nectarines, and many more Also Available: Pickles Nantuxent Farms 439 Baptist Rd., Newport Phone: (856) 447-3917 Open: June – Nov., 6/7 a.m.-Sunset Roadside Market: Sweet Corn, Vegetables, Melons, Okra, Pumpkins, Lima Beans Also Available: Gourds Home Delivery, Retail & Wholesale Petrini’s Farm Market Rt. 40, Newfield Directions: Rt. 40 Between Rt. 555 & Blue Bell Rd. Phone: (856) 697-4539 Open: Summer: Daily 8 AM – 8 PM, Winter: Monday – Saturday 9 AM – 6 PM Roadside Market: Jersey Fresh Fruits & Vegetables Also Available: Pies, Other Baked Goods (baked on premises), Annuals, Perennials, Fresh Cut Flowers, Fruit Baskets, Gift Baskets, Jellies, Jams, Pasta, Pasta Sauces Pontano Farms 3937 S. Lincoln Ave., Vineland. Open: April 4 to October 31 Daily 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m-4 p.m. Raehaven Farms 109 Bacon’s Neck Rd. (Rt. 642), Greenwich Directions: 2 mi. W of Historical Greenwich Open: Daily, Memorial Day – Hallloween, Sunrise – Sunset Roadside Market: Vegetables, Small Fruits, Berries (strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries), Melons, Tomatoes, Hot Peppers (many varieties) Rottkamp Farms Inc. 780 Shiloh Pike, Bridgeton Directions: 4 mi. west of Bridgeton Phone: (856) 451-2359 Roadside Market: Fruits & vegetables Also Available: WIC and Senior FMNP checks accepted Santaniello Farms Oak & Lincoln Ave., Vineland Directions: Call for directions Phone: (856) 691-3769 Open: Year round Roadside Market: Greens; melons; specializing in many produce varieties Sparacio’s Farm Market 670 Landis Avenue, Bridgeton Directions: From Rt. 55 take exit 32B (56 West) for 3.5 mi. From Morton Ave. go West on Landis Ave. (Rt 56) for .5 mi, From Rt. 77 go East on 56 (Landis Ave.) 3 mi Phone: (856) 451-4142 Open: May-Oct Roadside Market: Strawberries, peas, and a variety of fruits and vegetables $ 00 ONLY 7 { 20 } the grapevine | AUGUST 5, 2009 Tuesday Evenings – 7:45 pm Everyone Welcomed Exercise in a new FUN WAY! at 2205 Delsea Dr. Franklinville, NJ (856) 694-2141 for more information! Current Vaccinations & Vet checked Family Raised Parents on site Everyone Needs a Marley! Pick Your Own: Strawberries Also Available: Chocolate covered berries, strawberry shortcake, smoothies, milkshakes, icecream. Sunny Slope Farms of NJ 400 Greenwich Rd., Bridgeton Directions:South at Rt. 49 & West Ave. intersection, take 2nd right off West Ave. onto Rt. 607 (Greenwich Rd.), located 3/4 mi on left Phone: (856) 451-0022 Open: Mid July – December, Daily, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Roadside Market: Apples, peaches (white, yellow), nectarines (white, yellow) Apple Varieties: Empire, Fuji, Gala, Ginger Gold, Golden Delicious, Jonagold, Mutsu, Red Delicious, Stayman/Winesap Also Available: Apple cider, WIC and Senior FMNP checks accepted Walker’s Farm Market 105 Porchtown Rd., Pittsgrove Directions: Between Elner and Malaga. Right off of Rt 40 near Rt 55. Farm sign on Rt 40 at Porchtown Road traffic light. Phone: (856) 358-1318, Fax: (856) 358-6127 Web site: www.walkersfarmmarket.com Open: Daily, Apr. 1 – Oct., Monday – Saturday 9 a.m. – 6 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Roadside Market: Asparagus, Strawberries, Squash, Radishes, Squash, Ranapo Tomatoes, Sweet Corn, Peaches, Blueberries, Watermelons, Cantalopes, Pumpkins, Apples Also Available: Bedding plants (flowers and vegetables) and hanging baskets Weaver’s Farm Market 762 Garden Rd., Pittsgrove Directions: 1 2 mi. W of Rt. 55 (Exit 35) on Garden Rd. just W of Vineland Industrial Park & Brotmanville Phone: (856) 692-9481 Open: Apr. – Oct., Monday – Saturday 8:30 a.m.- 6:30 p.m Roadside Market: Hydroponically-grown Greenhouse Vegetables, In-season Garden Produce. Specializing in Early Tomatoes, Strawberries, Seedless Watermelon Also Available: Mulch Products Hydroponically-grown Greenhouse Willow Brook Farm 135 Seeley Rd, Bridgeton Directions: 1 mi. S of Deerfield Phone: (856) 451-7014 Open: 8 months Roadside Market: Pumpkins Also Available: Nursery Products Woodbridge Farm 100 Back Rd., Newport Phone: (856) 447-4724 Open: May & June, Sunrise to Sunset Roadside Market: Strawberries Varicose • Veins • Featured on ? and WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Reach Out To The Most Qualified Specialist Minimally Invasive Insurance covered Please Watch for Our Free Vein Screening in the Fall 30 min. Office Treatment Charles L. Dietzek, D.O., FACOS Raymond S. Wojtalik, M.D., FACS Voorhees • Sewell • Vineland 856.309.VEIN (8346) Specializing in spider and varicose vein treatment 2950 College Dr., Suite 2B, Vineland • www.VeinVascular.com 30 YEAR TIMBERLINE Roof Shingle Upgrade With new roof system. Offer good to August 31, 2009. Do You Think You Can’t Afford A Vacation? You can with us! Don’t just dream it… now you can travel the world Featuring 5 Cruises & 25 Vacations or Use Us For Single Vacation Bookings! the grapevine { 21 } www.scottibrothersinc.com John’s Cell: (609) 381-4289 • Tom’s Cell: (856) 498-4841 Call Now & Ask About Our Lifetime Package! www.TvTravelPackage.com/HA8467 FREE ESTIMATES • FULLY INSURED LIC# 13VH00096200 Getaway Lifetime Vacations, LLC • Hilberto Andujar • (856) 979-8467 I Culinary Adventures { STEPHEN WILSON | PHOTO: JILL McCLENNEN } What’s for Dinner? Sharing a meal with friends is a chance to show off special dishes and cooking talents. s much as I enjoy cooking, sometimes it can be more of a chore than a joy. Last Monday afternoon, I was knee deep in office work, and thoughts of dinner started trickling into my head. I was in no mood to cook anything, but obviously had to prepare something. At that moment, Jill came into my office and said that our friend Jen had called and invited us to dinner. What a relief! Jill had offered to bring something, so she grabbed some eggplant Parmesan from the freezer. I had pre-made it for future dinners and hopefully would have found it even if Jen hadn’t called. Jill also picked up a few peaches, leftover carrot cake scraps, some “sticky bun goo” (a mixture of brown sugar, butter and spices that we use for our sticky buns at the bakery) and a bottle of her homemade strawberry liquor. We packed up the car and took off for Jen and Ryan’s. A We had two stops to make on the way. The first was at Wawa to pick up a pint of vanilla ice cream, and the second was at the liquor store on Main and Wheat, H & K. I had never been to that liquor store before, and I was pleased with the selection of wines that they had on hand. We picked up a bottle of Asti, a sweet sparkling wine, as well as a bottle of New Jersey Red from a winery in Hammonton. When we arrived at Jen’s house, the oven was on and the eggplant Parm went in to heat up. Jill then put a smear of the sticky bun goo in the bottom of a baking dish, placed the halved peaches on top of this butter/sugar mixture, and placed that pan in the oven next to the eggplant Parmesan. Jen had prepared what I consider an all-American meal of meatloaf, mashed potatoes, sweet corn and cucumber salad. Fresh roasted peppers, most likely picked from the farm field behind their house, sat in a bowl on the table. Because we were running a little late, mostly everything was done so we talked and played with baby Addison before we ate. Addison had recently begun to eat solid foods, so Ryan decided to feed her before the grown-ups ate. I forgot how messy babies are when they eat! She gobbled up her carrot puree and soggy cereal with great pleasure. With each spoonful that went into her mouth, half of it ended up Experience The Difference QUESO OR GUACAMOLE QUESO OR GUACAMOLE with this ad FREE SIDE OF RESTAURANT • LOUNGE • BAKERY ! NOW OPEN HOALWAYS FREERE CKSALSA! MEW CHIPS AND ER WITH 856-825-3525 FREE**Side with purchase of HOME WRECKER** Union Lake Crossing 2188 N. 2nd Street. MLV Sunday Breakfast Buffet 8am-2pm • Starting July 26th Serving Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner { 22 } the grapevine | AUGUST 5, 2009 Take Out Available INTRODUCING NEW Gluten Free Pizza & Pasta Wheat Free • Gluten Free • No WBRO • All Natural We use only the finest all-natural ingredients to bring high quality, wheat-free/gluten-free pizza, pasta and pierogi to your table. It is with confidence that we can say “Our wheat-free and gluten-free foods are just as good as the ‘real’ thing.” Monday-Friday 3-6pm Reduced Drinks Appetizers Join Us For Happy Hour Try Our Fabulous Cakes And Treats From Our 310 Wheat Road, Vineland PH: FAX: 3513 Delsea Drive • Vineland • 856-765-5977 • Fax 856-825-0707 Major Credit Cards Accepted • Gift Certificates Available Hours: 10 am – 2 am Mon.-Fri. • 8 am-2 pm Sat. & Sun. Bakery 856-697-3400 856-697-1757 RETAIL STORE OPEN Mon. – Fri. 7am – 5:30pm Sat. 9am – 3pm www.contespasta.com contespasta@comcast.net on her face, where Papa Ryan gently scooped it back in. It was so much fun watching the whole interaction. His facial contortions as he worked the spoon into her mouth were hilarious, and her pleasure in eating new foods was ridiculously cute. How exciting it must be for her— every meal offers the opportunity to try new and potentially wonderful tastes and flavors! Before long, Jen popped the cork on a little half-bottle of wine from Napa that her sister had gotten her several years back, then poured us each a glass. The meatloaf smelled good; I couldn’t remember the last time I had had it, and it tasted as good as it smelled. Large chunks of onion studded the juicy meat, and combined with the mashed potatoes, the meal provided a healthy nostalgic kick. The buttered and salted corn was sweet, flavorful and crunchy. After finishing dinner and digesting for a little while, Jill prepared drinks and dessert. Our wine glasses were rinsed and a few ounces of Jill’s strawberry liquor was poured into each. On top of the liquor, she poured the Asti and the bubbling explosion mixed the two liquids together into a sweet, bubbly, strawberry after-dinner drink. We toasted to good food and good friends. Ever the pastry chef, Jill chose to plate the desserts individually. Pieces of the spicy carrot cake went first onto our respective plates, and then the slices of soft brown-sugar roasted peaches went on top. A scoop of cold, creamy vanilla ice cream went next to the peaches, and then finally a drizzle of the syrup that was created from the roasted peaches. Needless to say, the completed dessert was excellent, as Jill has always had a knack for teasing wonderful complicated flavors out of the most simple of ingredients. Sadly, the night ended too early, as seems to be happening more as we get older and our friends begin to have children. It was fun eating with Jen and Ryan, and it was a riot watching Addison eat…. I hope it’s the first meal of many with us during her long, happy life! I EATING OUT From fine dining to lunch spots to bakeries, the area has choices to satisfy any appetite. Call for hours. Amato’s Restaurant, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 692-5756. Veal, chicken, seafood, and pasta specialties for dinner. Open for lunch, too. Closed Sundays. Andrea Trattoria, 1833 Harding Hwy., Newfield, 697-8400. Chef/owner Andrea Covino serves up Italian specialties in an atmosphere of fine dining. Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave, Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food served tapas style, specialty martinis, catering, private parties. Extensive wine list. Live music Friday nights. Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-0909. This breakfast and lunch spot offers a menu of sandwiches named for colleges near and far. Bain’s Deli, 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 563-1400. Come in for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Daily specials include coffee of the day. Barbera’s Chocolates on Occasion, 782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 690-9998. Homemade chocolates and candies, custom gift baskets. Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees, desserts, drink specials. Take-out, too. Happy Hour buffet Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. MLB games on flat-screen TVs. Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy., Vineland, 697-5500. Steaks, veal, chicken dishes. Meet friends at the bar. Open daily for lunch and dinner. Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 205-0012. Featuring the “Gutbuster” a 21-oz. burger, pizza, salads, wings, subs, dinners. Bojo’s Ale House, 222 N. High St., Millville, 327-8011. All food is homemade, including the potato chips. Casa Dori II, Brewster Rd. and Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 794-1888. Authentic Italian, lunch and dinner; catering available. Crust N Krumbs Bakery, Main and Magnolia rds., 690-1200. Cakes, pies, cookies, breads, and doughnuts. Custom wedding cakes, too. Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call for lunch and dinner specials. Soft ice cream and cakes year-round. Mon.-Sat 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Stephen Wilson along with his wife Jill McClennen owns The Sweet Life Bakery. You may contact him via e-mail at thesweetlifebakery@verizon.net. Continued on next page Whet Vineland’s Appetite. Get your restaurant noticed by advertising on these dining pages in Vineland’s neighborhood bakery, where everything is made from scratch and quality counts. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | The Grapevine. Every residence in Vineland receives a 6th street between Landis and Elmer in Downtown Vineland The Grapevine… There’s no better way to draw customers into your establishment! Call today for advertising information: 856-692-5353 www.thesweetlifebakery.com the grapevine { 23 } 856-457-7815 Try our award-winning Chocolate Chip Cookies the best in South Jersey, according to the most recent SJ Magazine annual readers’ poll DINING LISTINGS Continued from previous page Giovanni’s Italian-American Deli. 1102 N. East Ave., Vineland, 692-0459. Pizza, Italian subs, all your lunch favorites. The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf Course, 4049 Italia Rd., Vineland, 691-5558. Restaurant and lounge open to the public for lunch Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Jake’s. 611 Taylor Rd., Franklinville, 694-5700. Italian-American, served lakeside. Lunch, dinner, happy hour, Sunday brunch. Joe’s Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-8860. Barbecue and Kosher chickens, homemade sides, catering for all occasions. Kawa Thai & Sushi, 2196 N. Second St. (Rt.47), Millville, 825-9939. Thai and Japanese cuisine. BYOB. Landicini’s Family Restaurant & Pizzeria Landis and Lincoln aves., Vineland, 691-3099. Italian cuisine, gourmet pizza salads. Open for lunch and dinner. Larry’s II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-9001. Three meals daily. Sunday breakfast buffet, early-bird dinners. Library V Restaurant, 206 Rt. 54, Buena, 697-9696. Renowned for prime rib, steaks, seafood, salad bar. Closed Mon. and Tues. La Locanda Pizzeria & Ristorante, 1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 794-3332. Pasta, veal, chicken. Lunch and dinner. Closed Sun. Lucia’s Ristorante, 785 W. Sherman Ave., Vineland, 692-0300. Italian fine dining and regional cooking. Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 563-0030. ItalianAmerican cuisine, seafood and veal. Open daily for lunch and dinner, Sunday breakfast buffet. Manny & Vic’s, 1687 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 696-3100. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Manny’s Pizza, 426 N. High St., Millville, 327-5081. Daily pizza specials, delivery. Martino’s Trattoria & Pizzeria, 2614 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 692-4448. Brick oven pizza, risotto, polenta. Three meals daily. Merighi’s Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. Banquet/wedding facility as well as intimate restaurant. Nicky G. Fridays 9 p.m.–midnight. Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s Head rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet lunches and dinners in a casual setting. Moe’s Southwest Grill, 2188 N. 2nd St., Millville, 825-3525. Tex-Mex, burritos, catering. MVP Bar, 408 Wheat Road, Vineland, 697-9825. Full bar menu, live entertainment, drink specials. Neptune Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge, 1554 South Delsea Drive, Vineland, 692-2800. American cuisine, array of cocktails. Next Oar, 127 N. High St., Millville, 2931360. Weekly menu, made-to-order dishes. Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek cuisine—lamb dishes and salads. Paperwaiter Restaurant & Pub, 1111 Village Dr., Millville, 825-4000. A special place for all your special occasions. Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland, 694-0500. Breakfast, lunch, dinner specials; convenient drive-thru, minimeal specials. Pete’s Pizza, 20 W. Park Ave., Vineland, 205-9998. Pizza (including whole wheat), subs, wings. Open daily 11 a.m-10 p.m. The Rail, 1252 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-1440. Bar and restaurant with daily drink specials and lunch specials. Richland House, 1303 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-5700. Eclectic dinners and casual lunch fare. Closed Mondays. Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville, 3278878. Authentic Vietnamese—noodle soups, curry, hotpot, Buddhist vegetarian. Serene Custard, NW Blvd. and Garden Rd., Vineland, 692-1104. Pulled pork, hot dogs, homemade ice cream, party cakes. South Vineland Tavern, 2350 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 692-7888. Breakfast, lunch, dinner daily. Seafood and prime rib. Speedway Cafe at Ramada Vineland, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 692-8600. Open 6 a.m.-11 p.m. daily for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Steakhouse at Centerton Country Club, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3325. Lunch and dinner. Steaks, reserve wines, upscale casual. Stewart’s Root Beer, 585 Delsea Dr., Vineland, 696-8062. Burgers, hot dogs, fries, floats and shakes. Sweet Life Bakery, 601 East Landis Ave., Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood bakery. Homemade pastries, cakes, coffee. Tony Sopranos, 107 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 405-0200. Pizza, Mexican Southwest fare, Atkins-friendly salads. Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs, chicken, fish, steaks. Always clams, eat in or take out service. Villa Filomena, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena Vista, 697-7107. Dinner combos, grilled meats, fish. Lunch and dinner daily. Wheat Road Cold Cuts, 302 Wheat Rd., Vineland, 697-0320. Deli and catering. Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-8899. Dinners, grilled sandwiches, wings in eight flavors. Willmott’s Pizza. 12 S. Seventh St., Vineland, 696-1525. Hand-tossed pizzas, stromboli, breakfast pizza. Offering Takeout or eat in service. Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville, 3270909. Continental cuisine and spirits served in a casually upscale setting. Ye Olde Centerton Inn, 1136 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3201. American classics served in a building right out of a Rockwell painting. Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Vineland, 696-1900. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Takeout, too. Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. Open 24 hours. Kids eat free Tues. & Sat. Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave., Vineland, 691-5511. Family time-honored recipes, fresh ingredients. Donkey’s Place, 20 S. Sixth St., Vineland, 690-1777. One-of-a-kind cheesesteaks made on large, fresh poppyseed rolls. Dreamz Cafe, 2184 Union Lake Crossing, Millville, 765-5029. Panini, sandwiches, salads, soups. Also, gelato, Italian coffee, desserts, smoothies, and frappuccino. Esposito’s Maplewood III, 200 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks, seafood and pasta dishes at this Italian restaurant. Eric’s, 98 S. West Ave., Vineland, 205-9800. Greek and American cuisine. Pizza, too. Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. & Tuckahoe Rd., Vineland, 691-6080. Italian cuisine and dinner buffets to savor. Family-owned. Fresh Restaurant, 1405 Mays Landing Rd., Millville, 327-3435. Jumbo lump crabcakes, Black Angus burgers. Wed. is pasta night. Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli, 527 S. Brewster Rd., 697-3509. Name says it all. Daily specials, catering. Closed Sunday. General Custard’s Last Stand, 2578 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 696-2992. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner served Tues.-Sat. Gina’s Ristorante, 110 N. High St., Millville, 825-4241. Italian cuisine, lunch and dinner, BYOB, nothing over $20. Giorgio’s Restaurant 363 E. Wheat Rd., Buena, 697-2900. Serving lunch and dinner daily. Italian cuisine, pizza. DADS SEAFOOD { 24 } the grapevine | AUGUST 5, 2009 Advertise in The Grapevine and get incredible results. For a free and no-obligation advertising consultation, call 856-457-7815 or e-mail: sales@grapevinenewspaper.com today. Come Peek at our CRABS FRESH DAILY Scallops * Shrimp * Clams All Types of Fresh & Frozen Fish Fresh Homemade Red Sauce and Fried Platters Dad’s Stuffed Shrimp, Stuffed Mushrooms & Stuffed Flounder No Fillers! Try Our Bacon Wrapped Scallops Wedding Invitations Delicious! NO Holiday Greeting Cards Baby Products and Much More… Comes with pasta red or white, salad, garlic bread 1568 N Delsea Dr. Vineland (Across from Wheat Road) (856) 4940 Landis Ave• Vineland, NJ 08360 692-0083 www.HereComes (856) 691-8051 ~ We Deliver Quality Product ~ At A Discount ON Dungeness Crabs Every Wednesday $ 19 99 . OPEN 7 DAYS Mon – Sun 11 am – 6 pm eBride.cceasy.com I Recipe Corner { LISA ANN DiNUNZIO } Restaurant Profile Recipe Swap It’s the peak of peach season, so it’s time to whip up some crumble. reetings! One of my husband’s favorite pies is made with fresh Jersey peaches. Each summer he looks forward to me baking a few, one for us and one to bring to our Saturday family dinner at my parents. Peaches are naturally sweet, and if ripe, they are usually very juicy. I think the perfect way to enjoy a peach is to wash one off and sink your teeth into it, juice running down the chin and all! Just have a napkin nearby and enjoy one of summer’s favorite local fruits. This story and recipe were submitted by Kristy Tyler, who writes “I make and bring this peach crumble every August to our annual family get-together. I often double or triple the recipe because it goes so quickly.” Fresh Restaurant Chef/owner Frederic Belfus has owned and operated Fresh Restaurant, Deli & Catering a little less than five years, but he is no stranger to the food industry. He worked for some 30 years for other people, including 10 years in casinos, as well as at Renault Winery in pan sauteed,” are a signature item on the dinner menu. Belfus also serves about seven other weekly specials, including chicken, pork, beef, and a salmon or tilapia dish. Italian options include chicken and sausage cacciatore, grilled prosciutto-wrapped shrimp, G Peach Crumble 3 cups fresh peaches, diced bite size 3/4 cup granulated sugar 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 1 tablespoon butter, cut into small pieces Crumble Mixture 1/4 cup melted butter 1/3 cup brown sugar 2/3 cup all-purpose flour 1/8 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon baking soda 2/3 cup quick cooking oats brown sugar. Sift together the flour, salt, and baking soda, mix with oats. Combine the flour oat mixture with the brown sugar and melted butter mixture. Spread over peaches. Bake for 40 minutes. Serve warm, with ice cream or whipped topping. As always, Bon Appetit. I Lisa Ann is the author of Seasoned With Love, Treasured Recipes and Lisa Ann’s Seasoned With Love II. Send recipes for publication to lapd1991@aol.com or to The Grapevine, 3660 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08361. Preheat oven to 375°. Arrange diced peaches in a buttered 8-inch square baking dish. Sprinkle with 3/4 cup sugar and cinnamon, dot with the 1 tablespoon of cut up butter. Then combine melted butter with Egg Harbor City and Rams Head Inn in Galloway Township. He describes his Millville restaurant as “a step above a diner, and a little below gourmet.” For breakfast, Belfus specializes in five-egg omelets. He will make them stuffed with whatever the diner chooses. Baguette French toast is also available, and on weekends, you can order cream chipped beef and sausage gravy. A star on the lunch menu is the house roasted turkey, served with roasted peppers, provolone, asparagus, and pesto herb mayonnaise on semolina bread. Salads, Black Angus burgers, steak sandwiches, and hoagies are also available. Crabcakes, “all lump, no filler, and and flounder Parmesan. Pasta is among the specials every night, but Wednesday night is Pasta Night. That’s when diners may choose from eight different pastas with any of 12 sauces. A family-style salad and bread are brought to each table at dinner. The service fits right in with the homey atmosphere of the eatery. Catering is another service provided by Belfus. He says he’ll cater everything from a pig roast to a sit-down wedding reception, onsite or off. “We’re only limited by our imagination,” he says. Fresh Restaurant, Deli & Catering is located at 1405 Mays Landing Rd., Millville, 327-3435. WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | It’s It’s easy to get distracted by today’s o distracted y today’s r headlines… Frank Parrish & Martin Hoag Getting Divorced? Bonnie L. Laube, Esq. 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You g www w w.hoag-par rish.com. r the grapevine { 25 } Hoag-Parrish Hoag-Parrish Financial Ma Mangement Fi F nancial M ngement Securities offered through Royal Alliance Associates Inc., a registered broker-dealer. Member urities Royal Inc., , broker-dealer. FINRA/SIPC. Advisory Services FINRA/SIPC. Advisory Ser vices offered through Hoag-Parrish Financial Management, a registered NRA/SIPC Hoag-Parrish P Management, 856-691-0424 • email: bll@greenblattlaube.com 200 North Eighth Street • PO Box 883 • Vineland, NJ 08362 All major credit cards accepted I Back to School labus each semester. However, just because it’s written on paper doesn’t mean that you’re actually going to use it enough to get your money’s worth. Every student learns differently and every professor teaches differently. If you can, talk to other students who have taken a course to see if you will actually need the textbooks, and then decide if you should purchase them. Avoid purchasing your textbooks from the campus bookstore. Prices there tend to be on the high side, and when book buy-back time rolls around during exam week, the return on what you originally paid doesn’t always lead to a pretty penny. If you can, purchase your books online and sell them back online too; you’ll find this to be a win-win situation in the end. 4. Campus Involvement Builds Friendships Your social life is a huge part of the college experience. Getting involved on campus in clubs, organizations, Bible studies, or athletics will help you meet new people and develop lasting friendships. Enjoy yourself and the friends you spend your time with. College is about the people you meet, the experiences you go through, and the memories you make. Ten Things Every College Student Should Know Source: www.collegeview.com 1. No Major? No Problem! Most college students will change their major at least once. You can use your freshman year as a time to explore, taking classes in subjects you never thought about studying before to help you hone in on what you want to do with your life. Look at college as an opportunity to expand knowledge and build upon interests. 2. Your Advisor is an Important Resource Your school will provide you with a catalog of courses offered, the prerequisites and requirements needed for each class and major, and requirements you must satisfy in order to graduate. For help with scheduling or course selection, see your advisor. 3. The Truth about Textbooks There are two simple rules to follow when it comes to textbooks: • Don’t buy your textbooks too early. • Save money by buying and selling online (or, buy used books at your campus bookstore). Many schools claim that you are required to buy all of the textbooks assigned on the syl- 5. Balance Work and Play to Reduce Stress Balancing an academic schedule, extracurriculars, athletics, perhaps a job, and on top of all that a social life can be extremely demanding. All work and no play is a sure-fire recipe for unhappiness and will catch up to you in the long run. Learn to balance school work by taking the number of classes you feel comfortable taking on. Don’t over-involve yourself in activities, and if you have to work a part-time job, only work a few flexible hours per week. Keep in mind that you still need to save time in your schedule for rest, relaxation, and socializing. 6. Your Professors are Not the Enemy Talk to your professors: introduce yourself, ask questions, visit during office hours, and make sure they know your name. Be sincere in showing your efforts in the classroom. Your professors will begin to see that you are trying and your efforts will pay off. As a result, they will be more willing to go out of their way to help you, and you may even be able to use them as references later on. 7. Studying Abroad Brings Classroom to Life For students studying abroad, living, breathing, eating, and feeling a new culture is definitely an educational experience. Studying abroad allows you to fully immerse yourself in a foreign language, to observe a new culture firsthand, and to experience new music, art, theater, food, and nightlife. Studying in the actual environment brings the classroom to life. 8. Every Campus Has Safety Hazards Check with your local police to learn about the areas on and off campus that you should avoid. Learning the areas where the most crime takes place and what types of crime are most common in your college town can help to keep you safe. For an added safety measure, store emergency phone numbers in your cell phone and post them beside the phone in your dorm as well. Also, always be sure to carry identification on you. 9. Internships Increase Your Hiring Power Do you have an internship? Well, plan on getting one if you don’t already have one. Job recruiters love practical experience, so plan on getting some before you graduate and you should be in great shape for your first job. Internships will not only provide you with practical, real-world experience, but you may even be one step ahead of the game and land a job offer from the company you intern for before you even graduate. 10. Avoiding Debt is Simple A simple monthly budget will prevent you from overspending and will make paying the bills much easier. Allow yourself a weekly allowance for entertainment purposes and stick to it. Only use a credit card for emergencies, don’t ever use it for entertainment. Sticking to your budget and remembering that little things add up fast will help to keep you debt-free. Get Your Kids Ready For School & Save! Official Shoe Store for Sacred Heart High School, St. Joseph High School, Bishop Schad, St. Mary’s in Millville Fully stock with the shoes you will need for your schools including Serving Vineland and neighboring communities since 1982 2008 International Martial Arts Association Instructor of the Year 856-405-0008 Lincoln Plaza • 3722 E. Landis Avenue Suite G • Vineland, NJ 08361 www.vinelandmartialarts.com $ 00 on your purchase of $30 or more! 5 OFF Exp: 9/15/09 Get Ahead! 639 Landis Avenue • Vineland Al’s Shoes 856-691-1180 BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIAL August 18, 2009 – October 24, 2009 With This Ad (Cannot be combined with any other offers) $ { 26 } the grapevine | AUGUST 5, 2009 includes FREE uniform Don’t wait until school starts – get a Head Start on earning better grades and achieving more by preparing your mind and body for a great school year! Parents: To see how Tang Soo Do can help your child get better grades and achieve more in School click on the ‘Better Grades’ tab on our website at www.vinelandmartialarts.com (Youth and Adult Tang Soo Do Programs only – Little Tigers is excluded) Space is Limited – Call Today 856-405-0008 We are currently accepting new students in our Little Tigers (4-6 year olds) and Tai Chi Programs. 99.00 ONLY OFF-TO-COLLEGE CHECKLIST Make sure you have everything you need for your first year at college. Each person’s needs are different, so tailor this list to suit your requirements. Kitchen Needs ____Plastic bowl and cup ____Coffee cup ____Fork, knife, spoon ____Can/bottle opener ____Chip clips Room Needs/Storage ____Bedside lamp ____Alarm clock/clock radio ____Wastepaper basket ____Milk crates or other sturdy storage cubes (a collapsible crate also comes in handy for carrying laundry or other things) ____Stacking baskets ____Under-the-bed storage trays ____Lots of hangers ____Desk lamp ____Fan ____Drying rack ____Adhesive hooks, tacky adhesive, mounting tape ____Bulletin board and push pins ____Dry erase wall calendar/board ____Toolkit Electronics ____Computer and printer ____Phone cord/Ethernet cord for computer ____Headphones ____Surge protector ____Extension cords ____3-2 prong adapters ____Phone (Check with roommate(s) to avoid duplication.) It should be cordless, with multiple message boxes in the answering machine, unless you’re using voicemail. ____Portable CD or cassette player (great to use at the gym) Linens/Laundry Supplies ____Sheets and pillowcases (2 sets. Check with school for size needed— some college twin beds are extra long.) ____Towels (3 each of bath, hand, and face) ____Pillows (2) ____Headrest pillow ____Mattress pad (Check with school for size needed—some college twin beds are extra long.) ____Blankets (2) ____Comforter and duvet cover (makes laundering easier) ____Clothes hangers (wire takes up less space, plastic are easier on your clothes) ____Laundry bag/basket ____Laundry marking pen ____Laundry stain remover ____Roll(s) of quarters ____Quarter dispenser ____Lint brush ____Sewing kit Toiletries/Misc ____Pepto-Bismol® ____modium® ____Aspirin or ibuprofen ____Vitamin C ____Neosporin® ____Band-Aid® bandages ____Cough drops ____Shower tote ____Shampoo/conditioner ____Hair-styling products ____Bath and face soap ____Travel-soap containers ____Toothpaste/toothbrush ____Dental floss ____Comb/brush ____Tweezers ____Nail clippers ____Hair dryer ____Razor/shaving cream ____Lotion and/or facial moisturizer ____Q-tips® Office/Desk Supplies ____CD-ROMs/Memory Sticks ____Phone/address book ____Assignment book ____Heavy-duty stapler and staples ____Printer paper ____Pens and pencils ____Pencil holder and sharpener ____Notebooks ____Pocket folders ____Labels of various sizes ____3 x 5 cards ____Post-it® notes ____Paper clips ____Rubber bands ____Scissors ____Highlighter pens (multiple colors) ____Ruler ____Stackable desk trays (at least 4) ____Hanging files or folders ____Dictionary and thesaurus ____Stamps/envelopes These Can Be Purchased Upon Arrival ____Paper towels ____Trash bags ____Lightbulbs ____All-purpose cleaner ____Ziploc® bags ____Kitchen storage containers ____Laundry detergent (tablets are easiest to manage) ____Fabric softener (sheets are easiest to manage) ____Dish soap ____Wet wipes ____Tissues Clothing Guidelines ____21 pairs of underwear ____21 pairs of socks (more if you play sports) ____7 pairs of pants/jeans ____14 shirts/blouses ____2 sets of sweats ____Pajamas ____Slippers and/or flip-flops ____2 sweaters (if appropriate) ____Light/heavy jackets ____Gloves/scarf/hat (if appropriate) ____1 pair of boots ____2 pairs of sneakers or comfortable/walking shoes ____1 pair of dress shoes ____1 set of business attire ____1 set of semi-formal attire (optional) Shared Items (Check with roommate(s) to avoid duplication.) ____Audio equipment ____TV and VCR/DVD player ____Coffee maker/hot pot ____Microwave/toaster oven ____Small refrigerator ____Area rug ____Camera ____Posters/art Source: www.collegeboard.com CASINO RESTAURANT CASINO & RESTAURANT WORKERS FINALLY, Shoes You Can ALL DAY IN! SLIP RESISTANT SLIP RESISTANT & WATER RESISTANT WATER RESISTANT Any Pair Of SAS Shoes ATTENTION! WORK $ 15 OFF WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Expiration: 9/5/09 Enter to Win A FREE Pair of SAS Shoes (enter inside store) DRAWING 9/22/09! Slip Resistant Water Resistant 613 A East Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08360-8093 the grapevine { 27 } (856) 691-2329 I Faces in the News East Vineland 9-10 All-Stars Win Championship COMMUNITY CALENDAR HAPPENINGS THURSDAY, AUGUST 6 Cataract Coffee Talk. SurgiCenter, 251 South Lincoln Ave. Learn more about cataract surgery. 9 a.m. Register with Stacey, Nurse Manager at 691-8188 ext. 272. SATURDAY, AUGUST 8 Fresh and Specialty Foods Market/Vineland’s Birthday. 700 block of Landis Ave. 8 a.m.-noon. p.m. each Saturday through August 15. Vendors will sell fresh fruits and vegetables and various crafters and other exhibitors will be on hand. Trolley will shuttle between Kidston Towers and Walmart, providing free transportation for anyone going to the Market. 794-8653. East Vineland 9-10 Little League All-Stars won the District 3 Championship. The undefeated team triumphed over South Vineland with a score of 9-1. Team members include Anthony DeRuchie, Matthew DiGiorgio, Anthony Gaunt, Nick Grotti, Spencer Infranco, Michael Irvine, Buddy Kennedy III, Michael Miles, Jeff Valdiseri Jr., Jake Walters. Team members not pictured are Sam Desimine and John Alongi. Coaches: Brian Stringari, Buddy Kennedy, Carmen DiGiorgio. Manager: Jeff Valdiseri. THURSDAY, AUGUST 6 Photographic Society Meeting. Newfield Senior Center, Catawba Ave. and Church St, Newfield. New members welcome. 7:30 p.m. 794-2528. SATURDAY, AUGUST 8 Downtown Car Show. Glasstown Arts DIRTY CAR? Vineland High School Marching Clan along with Sparkle Kleen will host a car wash fundraiser on Saturday, August 8, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sparkle Kleen is located at 2611 South Main Road, and the business will donate $2 for each vehicle. For more information, call 764-6800 ext. 2539. A BLOCK PARTY/PIZZA EATING CONTEST is set for Sunday, August 16, from 11 a.m to 4 p.m., at Dominick’s Pizza, Lincoln and Dante Shopping Plaza (1768 S, Lincoln). The pizza eating contest will consist of an adult race, and a kid race (ages 9-14). There will also be a car show, sidewalk sale, live music, and a silent auction, all to benefit Alex’s Lemonade Stand and the American Diabetes Association. All proceeds will go to these two charities. Call 691-5511 for details. extensive knowledge of the Bay and is just as comfortable plotting a course off shore as he is netting fish on deck. The boat will leave from NJ State Marina Dock #5 in Fortescue, 4:30 p.m. with a cost of $65 per person. Space is limited to the first 54 persons to register. You can register on the Scouts website at www.snjscouting.org or by calling 327-1700, ext. 25. The cruise will benefit the Southern New Jersey Council, BSA, which serves 10,000 youth and 3,500 volunteers in the five counties of Cape May, Cumberland, Salem, Gloucester and Camden. A MONTE CARLO NIGHT will be hosted by The Cumberland Cape Atlantic YMCA/ YMCA of Vineland, The annual President’s Gala will be held at Merighi’s Savoy Inn on Friday, September 25. Festivities will begin at 7 p.m. The community is invited to this fun-filled event, featuring food, prizes, and “betting bucks.” Tickets will be $100 each. Sponsorships are currently being sought. To volunteer, make a donation, or request an invitation, call Lisa Scheetz at the YMCA at 691-0030, ext. 118. Pirate Day with Miss Kathy Pirate Day at Cumberland Mall’s TaleSpin Stories was held recently with a crew full of pirate stories and adventures. Miss Kathy, right, assisted by Pageant Wagon Players portraying pirates, Jon-Mark Grussenmeyer, left, and David Lord lead youngsters through the rigors of “A Pirate’s Life,” complete with battles and swabbing the deck. Join Miss Kathy every Tuesday in Cumberland Mall’s Center Court from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. for a creative adventure in storytelling, songs and play-a-long fun. { 28 } the grapevine | AUGUST 5, 2009 A MODEL SEARCH is being held by South Jersey Healthcare (SJH) on Saturday, September 12, at 10:30 a.m. at Lakeside Middle School in Millville. The SJH Foundation is looking for male and female participants from 17 to 65 years of age, from the trim to the fullfigured. Finalists will appear in the SJH Foundation Annual Fashion Show sponsored by Century Savings Bank on October 28 at the Centerton Country Club. Last year’s show featured fashions by regional clothiers such as TAHARI, Caché, Juvante Formal Wear, Madrigal, Brooks Brothers, Zinman Furs, Shimmer, and Rienzi Bridal Salon. Tickets to participate are $25 and must be purchased by August 28 (calli 6916551). Proceeds benefit the SJH Foundation. A SUNSET CRUISE of the Delaware Bay will be hosted by The Boy Scouts of America, Southern New Jersey Council on Saturday, September 26. The group will cruise the Delaware Bay, approaching five lighthouses along the way, as participants enjoy refreshments and music. Capt. Mike has OSTEOPOROSIS PREVENTION will be addressed in a Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Cumberland County family and community health sciences program on Wednesday, August 19, from 1 to 3 p.m. It will be held at the Cumberland County Extension Education Center, located at 291 Morton Avenue in Rosenhayn. The class will include discussion of risk factors for osteoporosis, foods rich in calcium, weight–bearing exercises for bone health, bone density testing, calcium supplements, medications used for treating osteoporosis, and home safety methods for preventing falls. The program is free, but registration is requested prior to the class. Phone the Family and Community Health Sciences program at 451-2800. More Faces on pages 4 SEND US YOUR FACES — IT’S FREE! Get your photos published in The Grapevine… birthdays, engagements, weddings, anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them the address listed on p. 4. CHURCH NEWS Vacation Bible School “Camp Edge” will be held August 10-14, from 6 to 8:15 p.m. for children 2-years-old to fifth grade, at Newfield United Methodist Church, Columbia and Elmo avenues in Newfield. 697-5999. Faith Tabernacle Holy Church, 1665 North Avenue in Port Norris, invitesall to “Followers Of God”/Youth Platform Service Sunday on August 9, at 3:30 p.m. Summer Art and Learning Camp at New Hope Presbyterian Church (65 Hitchner Avenue, Bridgeton). Wednesday afternoons (August 12, 19, 26) for ages 7 to 12, from 1 to 5 p.m. Arts, crafts, reading, dance, music lessons, science exploration, outdoor recreation. No cost. Come one afternoon or come all summer. Call 451-7644. Children are invited to participate in a Young Readers (ages 4-12) Summer Reading Club. It is held at Trinity Episcopal Church, 8th and Wood Streets, Vineland on Mondays, 4-6 p.m. It features: Reading enrichment, music lessons, healthy snacks—all free! To enroll, phone 691-7243. block of Landis Ave. 8 a.m.-noon. p.m. each Saturday through August 15. Vendors will sell fresh fruits and vegetables and various crafters and other exhibitors will be on hand. Trolley will shuttle between Kidston Towers and Walmart, providing free transportation for anyone going to the Market. 794-8653. include the Lil Miss and Mr. Peach Contest, live entertainment, games, and some “peachy” baked goods and treats. Admission is free, signature Peach Festival special cake topped with fresh peaches and whipped topping $5 ($3 for kids 10 and under). Proceeds will go toward upgrading and maintaining the camp buildings. Call 466-0288. SATURDAY, AUGUST 15 Movie Night. Bridgeton City Park Amphitheater. Movies are PG rated. Bring your favorite lawn chair or blanket and watch the movie on a huge movie screen. Dusk. SUNDAY, AUGUST 23 Newfield Day/Old Fashion Peach Social. Newfield Public Library will hold its annual Old Fashion Peach Social in The Grove along with all the other Newfield Day festivities. Top off your chicken barbeque with peach pie, cobbler, or ice cream and topped with fresh Jersey peaches. Two servings sizes ($5 or $3); take-outs available. 697-0415. AUGUST 15 AND 16 9th Annual Seafood Festival. Bellview Winery, Atlantic St., Landisville. Held in conjunction with 4th Annual American Car Show, 11 am.m-5 p.m. All 27 Bellview wines will be poured for sampling and offered by the glass or bottle to complement the seafood and other available food choices. American Car Show Saturday (rain date, Sunday). Car show, parking, and all festival activities, including a souvenir Bellview wine glass, are included in the $5 admission fee. Music performed by the The Blue Method. Bring lawn chairs or blankets. Festival held rain or shine. www.BellviewWinery.com, or 697-7172 daily from 11 a.m-5 p.m. GOLF, SPORTS, ETC. AUGUST 10-13, AND 17-20 Learn-to-Row Camp. Harris Industrial Park Boathouse (home of the Vineland HS Crew Team), 328 S. 2nd Street, Millville. For first-time rowers (grades 6 to 11 for the fall 2009 school year). Rowing on the Maurice River. 5-7 p.m. each day. Cost is $150 per session, $50 deposit to hold a spot. 498-1057 or 293-1848. MONDAY, AUGUST 17 NAMI Monthly Meeting. Chestnut Assembly of God, 2554 E. Chestnut Ave. County Chapter of National Alliance on Mental Illness meets. 7-9 p.m. 691-9234. District, High St. from Main to Broad, Millville. Cars made before 1981 are eligible to participate, as well as special-interest and modern collectibles of any age. Trophy presentation 2:45 p.m. Judges will award over 50 trophies, including two Best of Show. Rain date August 15. For car registration, call 825-3047. For event information, call 825-2600. FRIDAY, AUGUST 21 Dick Baum Memorial Golf Tournament. Running Deer Golf Club, 1111 Parvin Mill Road, Pittsgrove. Cumberland County Habitat For Humanity hosts. 11 a.m. registration; noon lunch; 1 p.m. shotgun; 5 p.m. dinner. $100 golfer donation (includes greens fee, golf cart, lunch, dinner). Call 563-0292. TUESDAY, AUGUST 18 Family Fun Night. Purple Penguin Ice Cream, 1008 Harding Hwy., Newfield. Benefits Newfield Fire Co.. Family fun, good food. Bring a chair/blanket. 6:30 p.m. 697-4731. SATURDAY, AUGUST 8 Wild Edible Plant Walk. Parvin State Park, 701 Almond Rd, Pittsgrove. 1:30 p.m. 358-8616. SATURDAY, AUGUST 22 New Jersey Peach Festival. Malaga Camp Meeting, 4400 N. Delsea Dr., Newfield. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Highlights WEEKLY THROUGH OCTOBER 6 Senior Golf Association Events. Various courses throughout southern New Jersey. Annual membership $20. July 28 (Westwood). Aug. 4 (White Oaks), Aug. 11 (Patriots Glen), Aug. 18 (off), Aug. 28 (TBA). Call to join or for additional information, 691-4098. SUNDAY, AUGUST 9 Weekly Dance. North Italy Club Hall, East Ave. and Virano Ln. County chapter of the Single Parents Society holds the dances for people age 50 and up, married or single. Live band performs music for waltz, rhumba, swing, foxtrot, line dances, and more. 7:30-10:30 p.m. $7 members, $9 non-members 697-1814. only at South Jersey’s Premier Car Wash WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | Just $850 YES! Voted #1 “Best of Best” 2008 + Tax Can get my car clean INSIDE & OUT??? THE ELLISON SCHOOL’S 15TH ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENT This year’s golf outing, part of The Ellison School’s 50th Anniversary celebration, will be held on Wednesday, September 30. The event, chaired by Dan Falasca, Jr., will be held at Buena Vista Country Club. Registration begins at 11:30 a.m., followed by a buffet luncheon. Tournament play begins at 1 p.m. sharp and will feature both putting and hole-in-one contests offering more than $6,500 in prizes. Entry fee of $150 includes greens fees, carts, tips, luncheon and dinner. Advertisement and sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information, call 691-1734. SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 13 2nd Annual Run For Life. Wheat Road Golf, 2142 E. Wheat Rd. 5K this year in memory of Ronald K Brownlee Jr, who lost his battle with leukemia last June. All proceeds benefit The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. 9 a.m. 5 K Run or 1 Mile Walk $20 if reg by Sept. 5, $25 day of race. www.therunforlife5k.com. TUESDAY, AUGUST 11 City Council Meeting. Council Chambers, City Hall, Seventh and Wood sts. 7:30 p.m. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 Old Timers Baseball Reunion. Semper Marine Hall, W. Landis Ave. (opposite 84 Lumber). All former players, family members, and fans are invited to come out and mingle with old teammates and to honor newly elected members to the Hall of Fame. 5 p.m., dinner at 6 p.m. $20 payable at the door. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12 Planning Board Meeting. Council Chambers, City Hall, Seventh and Wood sts. 7:30 p.m. EVER Guaranteed! Windows included with this ad. Best Wash the grapevine { 29 } SATURDAY, AUGUST 15 Fresh and Specialty Foods Market/Clothesline Art Show. 700 2611 S. Main Rd. Vineland, NJ 08360 (Between Grant & Sherman) GV I Real Estate Exit Uptown Celebrates 5 Years Area realtors meet with Congressman LoBiondo to discuss issues affecting sourthern New Jersey. O n July 18, Exit Uptown Realty owners Jane Jannarone and Stephanie Verderose celebrated their five-year anniversary along with a couple hundred guests who came out for the event. The Vineland Fire Department had Sparky the fire dog and one of its trucks on display for all the children. There was a funnel cake cart, ice cream truck, popcorn machine and a hot dog stand and moon bounce on site. But the show topper was the dunk tank. Vineland Mayor Robert Romano and Cumberland County Sheriff Robert Austino volunteered to get dunked in the Dunk Tank for a good cause. All proceeds from the tank were donated to Cumberland County Habitat for Humanity. In less than one hour, Exit Uptown Realty raised more than $250. Freeholder Director Lou Magazzu, along with Freeholder Rev. James Dunkins and Freeholder Nelson Thompson were on hand to help celebrate and present Exit Uptown Realty owners with a proclamation from the Cumberland County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Fun was had by all! THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING and Urban Development In photo, from left: Stephanie A. Verderose, Broker/Owner, Jane Jannarone Broker/Owner, Freeholder Louis Magazzu. Back row: Freeholder Nelson Thompson and Freeholder Rev. James Dunkins. (HUD) will be at Vineland Public Library (1058 E. Landis Avenue), on Monday, August 24 from 1 to 4 p.m. HUD representatives from will answer questions about refinancing, the stimulus, fair housing and subsidies, mortgages and other housing questions. This free event takes place in the library’s Community Event Room located on the first floor. For more information, call 794-4244. Beautiful Smiles, Made Affordable OUR SERVICES { 30 } the grapevine | AUGUST 5, 2009 MILLVILLE FAMILY DENTAL Union Lake Crossing Shopping Center 2144 N. 2nd St., Millville NEW PATIENT WELCOMING PACKAGE $ 80 (reg. $230.) Includes oral exam, full mouth series of x-rays, cleaning & polishing, oral cancer screening, periodontal (gums) evaluation. With coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Emergency Walk-Ins Welcome • Same-Day Denture Repair • • • • • • • • • • • Cleaning & X-Rays Porcelain Veneers Cosmetic Dentistry Periodontal Therapy (Gum Treatment) Full Mouth Reconstruction Implant Rehabilitation Root Canals (One Visit) Full & Partial Dentures Bleaching White Fillings Crowns & Bridges 856-825-2111 Open 7 Days a Week. Day & Evening Hours Proud Member Of The Allied Dental Practices Of NJ Personalized Dentistry SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO OUR SENIOR CITIZENS Se Habla Español E D W A R D P O L L E R , D D S • G L E N N P R A G E R , D D S • TO D D P R A G E R , D D S • D A N I E L D I C E S A R E , D M D O Family Moves Into Habitat Home Cumberland County Habitat for Humanity (CCHFH) officially handed over the keys to the Groover-Ramirez family last weekend. This is the 16th family that has achieved the dream of homeownership with the help of CCHFH. The year-long project was kicked off last summer with volunteers from St. Anthony’s Catholic Church of White River Junction, VT. Since then volunteers from Port Elizabeth UMC, Shiloh Seventh Day Baptist Church, Progresso Foods, Ogren Construction, Homestead Plumbing, A.R. Sauro Water, Campagna Plumbing, Vineland Fire Department, Bokma Landscaping, Lowes, Home Depot and so many more have come out to help complete the home. “We will be forever grateful to everyone who gave so much,” remarked Michelle Ramirez, homeowner. Rev. Carol Ann Bass of Port Elizabeth United Methodist Church was on site to bless the home and Alvina Baum, Board Secretary, dedicated the home and officially passed the keys to the new owners on Saturday. The Garden Patch Quilters Guild was also on site to present handmade quilts to all five children and the parents as a first housewarming gift for a very special home. In addition to being the first handicapped accessible home for the local affliate, it is also the first home to be co-mortgaged with Capital Bank of New Jersey. Traditionally, CCHFH puts up the capital to build homes and then the partner families enter into a zero percent interest mortgage agreement to repay the loan. With this home Capital Bank donated $15,000 to the project and will be repaid under the same 20year, zero-interest terms as Habitat. CCHFH employs the generosity of volunteers and local business to donate time, money, materials, or funding and work in partnership with selected families. Anyone interested in getting involved is encouraged to contact the office at 563-0292 or visit www.habitatcumberlandnj.org. Offers you all you would expect in apartment living and more, “a place to call home” 5 Large Floor Plans One & Two Bedroom Apartments and Three Bedroom Townhomes Features: • Washer & dryer in all apartments • Individual heat & central air • Spacious rooms & generous closets • Wall-to-wall carpeting • Pool & playground (856) 696-1929 1301 S. Lincoln Ave. Vineland, NJ www.oakvalleyapartments.com LET THE NUMBERS DO THE TALKING WE ARE #1! Maturo Realty sold more real estate in the 1st Half of 2009 than any other Cumberland County real estate office* * Stats gathered from SJSRMLS Sold Units from 1-1-09 thru 6-30-09. Thomas F. Maturo, Broker. 856-696-CALL (2255) www NEW!!! Grapevine Business Directory ads! Black & white only. Optional – One photo per ad permitted at no extra charge. Only $27 per week! Tuesday Evenings – 7:45 pm WWW.GRAPEVINENEWSPAPER.COM | $ 00 ONLY 7 Everyone Welcomed Exercise in a new CORNERSTONE HARDSCAPE & CONSTRUCTION, LLC • Landscaping • Driveways • Sidewalks • Concrete • Pavers • Walls • Porches • Fencing FUN WAY! at 2205 Delsea Dr. Franklinville, NJ (856) 694-2141 for more information! 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Exp. 8/28/09 Back to School Special Full Braces $2,995 (856) 451-8041 (Across from Walmart) Main Road • Vineland (856) 691-0290 (Next to Acme & Blockbuster) TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS www.quality-dental.com Bridgeton